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kansas Umi’s succulent sushi page 4 www.kstatecollegian.com Tomorrow:

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state

wednesday, august 24, 2011

Friday:

High: 94 F Low: 70 F

03

Flamenco time Check out the photos of Tuesday’s dance performance on page 3.

05

vol. 117 | no. 3

To the point The Editorial board takes a look at the new athletic ticket system.

06

A word from coach Head Coach Bill Snyder talks about the upcoming football season at media day.

CARD ME

Athletic department transitions to new card passes for events Caroline Sweeney managing editor

New system still allows students ability to share tickets with others Monday was the first day that students were able to pick up their athletic tickets. But this year, a single card has replaced the packet of tickets. Last year, the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics worked closely with the Student Governing Association to formulate a different way of providing tickets to the student body. Scott Garrett, assistant athletic director for ticketing and fan strategies, said “One of the reasons we changed the format was because webmail was down prior to home games,” which made accessing tickets hard. Garrett said that the cards provide an ease of use. “(The cards) will get students into the games faster.” Along with the ease of use for students, the cards enable the athletic department and ticketing services to track points accumulated for each student over the season. This becomes crucial when creating the line-up for big men’s basketball games. Students still have the ability to share their tickets. “The name on the card does not have to match the name on the Wildcat ID,” Garrett said. “The ID just has to be active.” While going through the process last year, SGA and the athletic department researched other universities who have tried a similar process. East Carolina University and the University of Kansas have used the card format over the old style ticket format. The difference in those programs to the current program at K-State is those universities linked student ID and athletic tickets together. Garrett said that K-State still

Lauren Gocken | Collegian

Annie Cutler, junior in public relations, searches for an athletic pass in the Cottonwood Room on Aug. 23. Lines were out the door as students waited to get their athletics passes. wanted students to have the ability to share tickets and that is why the athletic tickets were not put on the student ID. Although the process of changing from one format to another has appeared seamless, picking up the cards has not been as easy. Adam Prough is the assistant director of fan strategies said that the first time for any new system will not be perfect.

“Students should have their Wildcat IDs and know what tickets they purchased,” Prough said. “That will help move the line along.” Even though the lines are moving slowly, Prough said there have not been any major problems. While waiting in line, Brooke Lechtenberg, a senior in nutrition and kinesiology said she is going to keep her card with her Wildcat ID. When asked about the wait,

Lechtenberg said, “I think it is fine. Mail would have been nice.” Garrett said they thought about mail but, “understanding where each student was at,” would be difficult. “We wanted to have some sense of control,” Garrett said. Since Monday, over half of the cards ordered have been picked up. The cards are available today for pickup in the Cottonwood Room on

the second floor of the K-State Student Union. “There are two lines,” Prough said. There will be an ICat line along with a GA combo and football only line. Prough said they hope to move back down to the main floor of the Union on Thursday. Cards will also be available for pickup next week in the Union.

New domestic violence Professors affected by decreased policy adopted on campus state funds, no raises for third year Caroline Sweeney managing editor On Aug. 19, Attorney General Derek Schmidt released a model domestic violence policy along with a training manual. The Governor’s Advisory Council on Domestic Violence Training designed the policy for law enforcement agencies around the state. In 2010, the state Legislature required law enforcement agencies to adopt domestic violence policies as part of an effort to strengthen the state law. The Domestic Violence Designation law went into effect in July 1. According to the Kansas Bar Association website, ksbar.org, domestic violence, “may be physical, sexual or emotional: slapping, punching shoving ... other verbal abuse or any pattern of behavior that causes emotional harm.” The definition continues saying, “nothing excuses violence ... people and laws exist that will help you take action to prevent ‘the next time’ from happening.” The Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence, KCSDV, is a network of member programs. The KCSDV works with local law enforcement to coordinate community response. Audra Fullerton, the communications coordinator for the coalition said, “(KCSDV) is in total support of the effort” made by the attorney general’s office. Fullerton said that the changes would help to create a “seamless and safe response to domestic violence. I think the effect will be positive.”

The model policy is available on the attorney general’s website, www.ksag. org. The policy is in place “to establish guidelines for response to domestic violence calls ... “ Deputy Chief of Staff Jeff Wagaman reiterated that fact. Attorney General Schmidt created the model policy, “to put out a template for local law enforcement.” “The law enforcement agencies are expected to implement this policy alone, but the attorney general’s office is there to provide assistance if requested,” Wagaman said. Along with the model policy, there is also a training bulletin available. KCSDV worked with the attorney generals office to create the 41-page bulletin that can be adopted by local law enforcement. The K-State Police Department is adopting the model policy. Capt. Don Stubbings said the police department “has adopted the attorney general’s model policy which specifically outlines the laws and our obligation to adhere to the standards outlined in the policy.” In 2010 the campus police made three arrests relating to domestic violence. Since the campus police are adapting the model policy as is, students should know that the model policy states, “the primary focus shall be on safety of the victim, officers and others in proximity of the crime.” “We are pleased with the new domestic violence laws that now expand our ability to enhance the safety of our K-State community,” Stubbings said.

Sarah Rajewski senior staff writer Editor’s note: This is part three of a three-part series on the rising cost of tuition and its effect on students. This story was produced as a class assignment for the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communications. K-State professors might receive substantial grants or earn teaching awards that set them apart. And yet, these achievements still won’t earn them raises. This situation, which Provost April Mason described, is becoming all too common at K-State as the state decreases funding for Kansas universities. Even if faculty members have a great year, K-State cannot afford to pay them more. “We give them no raise. We give them no merit evaluation because we can’t,” Mason said. “There’s no money to give it to them. You do that for too many years, their salaries are not competitive.” Though students must foot the bill of tuition increases, faculty and staff members are also affected by the state’s decreased funding. A large portion of this year’s tuition increase will fund a 15 percent increase in employee health insurance costs. Health insurance is mandated by the state, meaning it is not the same thing as a salary increase, Mason clarified. This school year, employees

will probably not receive raises for the third year in a row, a situation Mason said makes them consider leaving the university. Classified employees, who are in a staff category whose salary is determined by the state, have had costof-living raises in the past few years, Mason said, but any unclassified employees — which is the category where faculty and administration fall — have not.

“We give [faculty members] no raise. We give them no merit evaluation because we can’t. There’s no money to give it to them.” April Mason Provost “If faculty are not getting compensated for what they’re doing, they might start looking to go someplace else, and as bad as it is nationwide, there are places that are trying to hire people,” Mason said. “You can do more in an initial hire than you can with annual increases, and so faculty are looking around.” As decreased state funding continues to affect faculty, staff and students, K-State plans to increase tuition each year in the future. But the increases will be modest, said Bruce Shubert, associate vice president for administration and finance.

Instead of 20 percent increases as in some previous years, tuition will be about 3 or 4 percent more each year to maintain the education K-State provides, he said. “If you start shortchanging the learning experience of students, pretty soon graduates are not prepared and you lose reputation,” Shubert said. “You affect not only the current graduates but all of our graduates that are out there with the K-State credential so we think that everything that we’ve done has been necessary. In terms of the future, all we can say at K-State is that it’s our intention to just do reasonable, modest required tuition increases.” For students like Rylee Bacon, though, any increase can have an effect. Bacon, a junior in apparel and textiles, pays in-state tuition, and both she and her parents have taken out loans to finance her education. She guessed she will have about $30,000 in student loans to pay once she graduates and that her parents will have about the same amount. However, for now, Bacon works and tries to save. K-State knows that students like Bacon are working hard to make due, and yet university officials realize that professors cannot live forever without a raise. The situation creates a difficult balance, said Student Body President Nate Spriggs.

TUITION | pg. 7


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wednesday, august 24, 2011

kansas state collegian

Logan’s Run | By Erin Logan

collegian kansas

state

The Kansas State Collegian, a student newspaper at Kansas State University, is published by Student Publications, Inc. It is published weekdays during the school year and on Wednesdays during the summer. Periodical postage is paid at Manhattan, KS. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Kedzie 103, Manhattan, KS 66506-7167. First copy free, additional copies 25 cents. [USPS 291 020] Š Kansas State Collegian, 2011 All weather information courtesy of the National Weather Service. For up-to-date forecasts, visit nws.noaa.gov.

CONTACT US DISPLAY ADS...................................................785-532-6560 adsales@spub.ksu.edu CLASSIFIED ADS.............................................785-532-6555 classifieds@spub.ksu.edu NEWSROOM....................................................785-532-6556 news@spub.ksu.edu DELIVERY.............................................................................785-532-6555

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Collegian welcomes your letters to the editor. They can be submitted by e-mail to letters@spub.ksu.edu, or in person to Kedzie 116. Include your full name, year in school and major. Letters should be limited to 350 words. All submitted letters may be edited for length and clarity.

CORRECTIONS If you see something that should be corrected or clarified, please call our editor-in-chief, Tim Schrag, at 785-532-6556, or e-mail him at news@spub.ksu.edu.

EDITORIAL BOARD Tim Schrag editor-in-chief Caroline Sweeney managing editor Abby Belden managing copy editor Skye LeSage design editor

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Karen Ingram coverage editor Monty Thompson sports editor Mark Kern assistant sports editor Kelsey Castanon edge and features editor

Laura Thacker opinion editor Lauren Gocken photo editor Holly Grannis social media editor Sarah Chalupa ad manager Steve Wolgast adviser

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wednesday, august 24, 2011

page 3

kansas state collegian

LADIES IN RED Flamenco dancers perform in K-State Student Union basement

Chelsey Lueth | Collegian

Above: Tamara Carson and Cindy Bleck enjoy the final moment of a song during their performance Tuesday at Salsarita’s in the K-State Student Union. The dancers and guitarist took turns throughout the performance to showcase all of their talents. Left: Skirts blustering, feet stamping, “Olay” shouting — the women of the flamenco dance team dance in unison while the guitarist plays behind them. Chelsey Lueth | Collegian

Jonathan Knight | Collegian

Above: Mary Ann Hope performs in the K-State Student Union dance floor space in Salsarita’s Tuesday afternoon. Hope was part of a flamenco dance group from Kansas City. Right: Three flamenco dancers listen carefully to their guitarist, Jerrod Stephenson, during a performance set up by the UPC.

Jonathan Knight | Collegian

K-State Football?

Do You Need To Get Around Town? Call The ATA Bus Today!

Call 45 3 537-6

General Public Transportation for the Manhattan-Riley County Area

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Thurs-Sat: 11pm-3am for a Safe Ride 1 person must show K-State I.D. Let us get you home safe&sound! This project funded in part by the KDOT Public Transit Program

ATTENTION SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS: WE ARE HIRING! CivicPlus, an industry leader in eGov solutions with clients across the U. S. and the world, is looking for exceptional part-time and full-time software developers who are willing to work in a highly innovative and collaborative environment. We are located in Manhattan and are one of the fastest growing companies in the area.

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Chosen applicants will be working with a team of talented people in a fun, informal and progressive workplace to deliver cool functionality focused on helping millions of citizens engage and interact with their local and county governments all across the country and the world. We’re a small business with the spirit of a startup. No dress code or time cards here. We are looking for applicants with strong object-oriented development abilities that are great problem solvers and involved team members. Our software environment is ASP.NET (C#) MVC utilizing agile methodologies to continuously deliver high quality functionality. Experience with these technologies and methodologies is preferred but not required.

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WE WANT YOU! Come pick up a collegian, meet our editors and learn about how to get on staff.

If that sounds like a great time and you enjoy being challenged to learn and innovate, contact us at jobs@civicplus.com or check us out at www.civicplus.com


edge

wednesday, august 24, 2011

kansas state collegian

page 4

WORTH THE WAIT Restaurant presents zen-like atmosphere, various types of rolls Umi ★★★★✩

Restaurant review by Kelsey Castanon

After months of the delayed opening of Umi Japanese Steakhouse, the restaurant finally opened in June. And after my experience with its sushi, I can safely say it was worth the wait. The restaurant impresses even when first setting foot in the door. Aside from the “so-so” location, on 900 Hayes Dr. near Walmart, the spacious and zen-like atmosphere gives off a relaxing vibe. There are separate seating locations within the restaurant, including the main dining area, sushi bar and hibachi room. The spatial organization takes away from the cluttered feeling many restaurants have. When I sat down to eat, my expectations of the food were not great. That might be because I absolutely love sushi. I could eat it for every meal, every day of the week. That said, my expectations for sushi are high. And though I’m not as much of an expert on hibachi, Umi did a great job of impressing me in both areas. Over my two trips, I decided to try as many different rolls as possible. Umi makes that easy, as pictures for each ‘special roll’ are included in the menu. The selection was wide, with over 30 special rolls and more than 20 regular sushi rolls. I was pleased to see the pictures of the special rolls were

Lauren Gocken | Collegian

identical in their presentation on paper as they were in front of me. The Red Dragon Roll, with shrimp tempura and spicy tuna, was one of the tastiest sushi rolls I’ve had. The Wild Cat Roll — which I felt was necessary to at least try - was the best assortment of yellowtail, red snapper and crab. The Crazy Roll was also a huge hit at the table, with shrimp tempura,

salmon and cream cheese. It is difficult for me to determine the freshness of the fish; however, it does seem like Umi is the freshest type of sushi Kansas will get. None of the rolls taste fishy. And though each special roll ranged from $8 to $18, there are great deals on the simpler rolls, which range from $4 to $7. The price points during dinner hours make Umi a good

celebratory dining option, rather than a regular occurrence. When giving the hibachi portion of the restaurant a try, I really wanted to see how the entrees compared to Green Tea Sushi, which was always a bit dry to me. The chicken hibachi at Umi, though, was great. The portions were sized well and the vegetables were delicious. My only complaint

is the price point — it costs to share. If you want to share a plate of hibachi, it costs around $6 on top of the original price to do so. Other than that, I was really impressed with the chicken - not to mention the soup, salad and tasty fried rice. But, for a great deal on sushi, one of the best steals in Manhattan, in my opinion, is Umi’s lunch special. From 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., guests can get any two regular rolls for less than $7. Even better, any three regular rolls for less than $10. I took advantage and got the spicy tuna roll and the Dynamite, both of which were delicious. The price on hibachi is also cut by half during the lunch hours and is also served with the regular soup, salad and fried rice. It makes for a great and filling lunch. It’s definitely not one to miss out on. The food is great, yes, but what also impressed me was the hospitality and friendliness of the servers. During both of my experiences, the servers were attentive and even cracked jokes with us at the table. It made the dining experience that much more enjoyable. When the manager came over to check up on us, I had nothing but nice things to say. This is definitely a restaurant to scope out and try — at least once. It’s the best sushi and hibachi experience you’ll get in Manhattan. Kelsey Castanon is a senior in journalism and mass communications. Please send comments to edge@spub.ksu.edu.

HOROSCOPES Libra Sept. 24 - Oct. 23 After a nice, long day of classes, nothing compares to doing absolutely nothing on the Internet. You can consider deleting your Facebook all you want, but face the facts –it will never happen. Scorpio Oct. 24 - Nov. 22 You may find yourself in desperate need of a dictionary. Unfortunately, your future will consist of a lot of confusion unless you do so.

Sagittarius Nov. 23 - Dec. 21 Remember, if you smelt it, you dealt it. Never forget those words of wisdom.

Capricorn Dec. 22 - Jan. 20 Be courteous to a freshman today, for he or she may be wandering aimlessly on accident. You never know if they have candy in their pockets, which could make helping them extremely worth it. Lauren Gocken | Collegian

Nuberri offers quality food, lacks hip element Nuberri ★★★✩✩ Restaurant review by Jena Sauber

As summer’s scorching heat sticks around a little longer, Manhattan residents have a new place to go to cool down. Located on Anderson Avenue across from campus, Nuberri frozen yogurt shop offers an array of self-serve frozen yogurt flavors, toppings and sauces. Location The frozen yogurt shop is located at 1317 Anderson Ave. in the same building as Mr. Goodcents Subs & Pasta. The Nuberri section is immediately to the right after entering, while Mr. Goodcents is located further into the store. The seating is shared for both. The location is both a bonus and a drawback. Situated very close to campus, it is an easy walk or bike ride away. However, if you are going to drive there, finding a parking spot might be difficult as parking is limited. Additionally, the lack of outdoor seating and crowded parking lot may prevent people from enjoying their yogurt comfortably outside. Product Nuberri currently features seven flavors of frozen yogurt, including cookies and cream, peanut butter and rocky road. The number of flavors is slightly limited, but they are quality flavors. Each of the frozen yogurts is also labeled with the calorie content and other nutritional information. Customers have a choice of approximately 40 toppings including trail mix, gummy bears and almonds. They also have an array of flavored sauces including kiwi, lemon zest and white chocolate. Weight and Pay After the frozen yogurt and

dry toppings, customers can weigh their cup to see the current cost of their dessert. This handy feature can help people avoid sticker shock at the register if they pile on too many toppings. The price per ounce is 41 cents, the same as Orange Leaf ’s price per ounce. However, at the register, the cashier can only weigh and check out one dish at a time. This can create an awkward situation for people wanting to pay together - a definite downside. Overall, however, the pre-weight station helps make this aspect a plus for the store.

Pisces Feb. 20 - March 20 You might want to consider changing your typical email format this year. Although smiley faces and exclamation marks are often welcomed in text messages with middle schoolers, teachers seem to have a different opinion.

Aries March 21 - April 20 This first week of school has you wishing you were sleeping instead of attending classes. Withhold skipping them, young grasshopper, at least until tomorrow.

Taurus April 21 - May 21 The name “Marcus” will have some significance for you today. Keep an ear out for the name and follow him relentlessly. This will make or break your future.

Atmosphere While the combination of Mr. Goodcents Subs & Pasta and Nuberri frozen yogurt is good if you want dinner and dessert, it does lessen the atmosphere of Nuberri. The entire restaurant smelled like garlic when I visited, making the frozen yogurt seem less appetizing. The Nuberri section of the restaurant is brightly colored and clean, but the darker, more sophisticated atmosphere of Mr. Goodcent’s is too strong of a contrast. Overall, the store lacks a consistent “hip and trendy” element, and presents instead a slightly confusing, inconsistent atmosphere. Customer Service I was immediately greeted by a Nuberri employee upon entering. She asked if I’d been there before and offered sample cups for some pre-purchase taste testing. Upon check out, both employees were courteous, prompt and friendly. Bonus Frequent patrons do have the option to get rewards with Nuberri’s “berri frequent guest card.” It features perks such as 10 percent off on your third visit and a free cup (up to $5 in value) on your twelfth visit. The cards are free and can be picked up at

Aquarius Jan. 20 - Feb. 19 When deciding on what food to cook for lunch or what meal to eat at the Derby Dining Center, please keep in mind there are people sitting near you in class who don’t appreciate the smell of beans.

Gemini May 22 - June 20 Don’t let Discovery Channel’s Shark Week inspire your actions these first few weeks. If you are looking for some fresh meat, I hear Hy-Vee has some great sales today.

Cancer June 21 -July 22 Sometimes hugging random strangers is the only way to cheer you up after a bad day. Today proves to be one of those times for you. Just let it happen. Lauren Gocken | Collegian

the register. Orange Leaf versus Nuberri When compared to its acrosstown competitor, Orange Leaf, both shops come up winners in different categories. Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt features a wider range of frozen yogurt (16 flavors), but Nuberri’s variety and quality of sauces stands out. While Nuberri offers different deals on their punch card, Orange Leaf offers a membership program that gives customers 10 perccent off each purchase

with no limit. The atmosphere of Orange Leaf is exceptional, while Nuberri’s is less “hip and trendy” and more “garlic-infused coffee shop.” Nuberri is closer to campus, but only stays open until 10 p.m. Orange Leaf offers the ability to buy multiple bowls in one transaction and is open until 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 10:30 p.m. every other day. Jena Sauber is a sophomore in prejournalism and mass communications. Send comments to edge@spub.ksu.edu.

Leo July 23 - Aug. 22 The older you get, the more you realize that peoples’ idiocracy often reflects in their driving. If someone shows up at your house with dents in their bumper, run the other way.

Virgo Aug. 23 - Sept. 22 This is a good semester to start with a clean slate. If your past tries to sneak up on you from behind, I’d suggest headbutting. It’s the only way. -Compiled by Kelsey Castonon


wednesday, august 24, 2011

TO THE POINT

Late night capture

Card system has pros, cons To the point is an editorial selected and debated by the editorial board and written after a majority opinion is formed. This is the Collegian’s official opinon. When any new type of plan surfaces, it always seems to spark debate between those affected by the change. This year, the athletic department was faced with a challenge and difficult decision and chose to change the system of how athletic tickets are used. There are both advantages and disadvantages to this new method. In years past, students across K-State faced both struggles and successes with their student tickets. The

Tommy Theis | Collegian

Josh Klarmann a sophomore in secondary education and mathmatics, calls “out” a participant in capture the flag late tuesday night. One of the flag bases was located on the north side of Anderson Hall. The game was put on by Chi Alpha Campus Ministries and will be playing again next Tuesday at 9:30 p.m. Meet in the quad if interested.

Salina campus goes tray-less Natalie Blair K-State Salina Public and Alumni Relations K-State Salina’s cafeteria is no longer serving up trays. The new trayless dining program is expected to minimize waste, conserve natural resources, and promote environmental stewardship. “Studies have shown that trayless dining programs reduce food waste by 25 to 30

percent per person,” said Levi Esses, assistant director of student life. “Reducing that waste saves on food expense which keeps meal plan costs lower for our students.” The trayless dining program also helps conserve natural resources such as the water and the energy it takes to heat the one-third to one-half gallon of water used per tray, reduces the amount of chemicals introduced into the water table.

“The trayless dining initiative also allows the foodservice workforce to maximize their time on other tasks,” Esses said. One of those tasks is preparing for the Lunch Buffet Special. While the public is welcome to eat at the cafeteria for any meal, the all-youcan-eat lunch buffet is offered at a reduced cost of $4.75 on Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

ARREST REPORTS SUNDAY

Jesus Ignacio Salazar Cordero, of the 800 block of Moro Street, was booked for two counts of failure to appear. Bond was set at $500.50.

Bryce Samuel Russell, of the 2100 block of Browning Avenue, was booked for probation violation. Bond was set at $1,500. -compiled by Sarah Rajewski

athletic department would send out seasonal tickets, students would print them off and bring them to the games. If they couldn’t attend a game, they simply sold it. This year, things are a little different. Now, people are being asked to carry a card with their name on it in order to get into the games. A clear disadvantage is the loss of communication and commerce between students regarding tickets. No longer can individuals personally sell their ticket to whomever they please. Instead, that individual is faced with a question: “Do I trust this buyer enough to lend them my athletic ticket card?” Lending your card to just anyone doesn’t ensure

you will get it back, which diminishes all incentive to sell it in the first place. As with disadvantages, there are also advantages to the recent change. No longer will students have to scurry to print off their tickets before the games. K-State webmail will no longer be the reason for missed games during the football and basketball seasons. They will also no longer have to worry about printing off the wrong tickets. In short, this card will provide worry-free convenience at the cost of student-to-student commerce. Whether you see the good or bad in the change can be determined by the individual.

TUITION | Students involved in determining increase amounts “We’re facing the challenge of learning how to live in a culture where public institutions have to rely on private money essentially and student money to operate,” said Spriggs, junior in agricultural economics. Though tuition will continue to go up, the process K-State uses to determine the amount of increase is what makes it different from other state universities and Big 12 schools, Spriggs said. Students are involved in the

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entire process through the Tuition Strategies Committee, which formed in the fall of 2005. The committee has multiple students with voting rights who can craft the tuition proposal from the start, Spriggs said. Last school year, the committee listened to preliminary talks of almost 6 percent tuition increases, and students negotiated the proposal down to the final rate of 3.96, the lowest increase in the state, Spriggs said. In

contrast, Spriggs said other schools, like the University of Kansas, allowed students to look over the finalized proposal with only days to make changes, which gave them little time to make any substantial alterations. “I think that there’s a lot of systems out there, but I think that we have something special and unique here at Kansas State that speaks to our culture of putting students first,” Spriggs said.


sports

page 6

wednesday, august 24, 2011

kansas state collegian

BIG 12 MEDIA DAYS Coach Bill Snyder answers questions about the upcoming season Sean Frye Staff Writer One of the most tumultuous and eventful summers for college football is over, and the Big 12 is gearing up for another season. This year will feature a lot of changes to the format of the season, with the most notable change being the introduction of a round-robin schedule that pits the Wildcats against all nine Big 12 teams. The changes and excitement surrounding the 2011 football season were discussed on July 25 and 26 in Dallas, Tex. at the Big 12 football media days. Following the departure of the Nebraska Cornhuskers and the Colorado Buffaloes from the Big 12 to the Big Ten and Pac-12 respectively, the Big 12 is now a 10member conference. With that change in effect, the Big 12 decided to eliminate the North and South divisions within the conference and have every team play each other in a nine-game conference schedule. There will also be no Big 12 title game. The winner of the conference will be decided solely in the regular season. “I think the league will be as strong or stronger nationally each and every year, and the competition every week you better bring it,” Missouri Tigers head coach Gary Pinkel said. “You better bring everything you’ve got every week. That’s a challenge that you have, because this is a really, really good conference.” Pinkel’s argument carries a lot of weight, as the Big 12 has four teams ranked in the AP Top 25 poll, including the No. 1 ranked Oklahoma Sooners, who visit Manhattan for a game against the Wildcats

on Oct. 29. The new round-robin format also gives the Wildcats a chance to play the Texas Longhorns every year. The Wildcats are undefeated in their last three meetings with the Longhorns, including a 39-14 rout last year against a team that had played in a national title the year prior. “I hope we continue to have good fortune,” Snyder said. “But I assure you that we don’t have anybody’s number, Texas or anybody else for that matter. And it’s game by game, year by year, and I don’t think that will change at all.” Another big rule change is the result of one of the biggest controversies the K-State football program has experienced in recent memory. After last December’s “Salute-gate,” where K-State wide receiver Adrian Hilburn was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct after giving a salute to the crowd that forced the Wildcats to try a gametying 2-point conversion from 17 yards out, the Big 12 officials have

“I think we have the capacity, perhaps, to become a deeper football team,” Bill Snyder Head Football Coach decided to change how the rules on excessive celebration will be interpreted. Walt Anderson, the Big 12 Coordinator of Football Officials directly addressed the Pinstripe Bowl saluting incident during his press conference.

courtesy photo

“This was the play that really generally generated the spark for the rules committee to say the pendulum has swung and we need to bring it back to the middle,” Anderson said. “What the rules committee has done is not so much how the rules are written but how it is interpreted. You have acts like a salute, holding the ball up, holding a finger up, making a fist that are clearly spontaneous by the player. The rules committee wants to get celebration into the game. Now if I get into the end zone and stick my finger in (my opponent’s) face, that’s a flag.” In addition to the format, scheduling and rule changes being experienced by the Big 12, the landscape of media coverage and transparency is drastically changing as well with the addition of

the new Longhorn Network, an ESPN network dedicated solely to the coverage of the University of Texas. The network is projected to help bring exposure and money to a conference that has been pushed to the brink of expiration with the departures of Nebraska and Colorado, in addition to the potential departure of Texas A&M in the coming years. “I can tell by the work that we’ve put in during the first six months, it’s not going to be an easy partnership,” Texas head coach Mack Brown said. “Because they’re paying us $300 million for access, and we gotta figure out how much access we can give them and not hurt our chance to have an edge to win the game.” K-State fired their own shot into the realm of media exposure this

summer with the announcement than an online-exclusive network called K-State HDTV that will broadcast various events around campus, including exclusive coverage of the football team’s season opener against Eastern Kentucky. While the Big 12 is rapidly changing, the Wildcats are simply looking to stay the course and put a competitive football team on the field come this fall. “I think we have the capacity, perhaps, to become a deeper football team,” Snyder said. “By that I mean just more young guys that can create a quality two deep for us. We’re not there yet by any stretch of the imagination. So there’s still some questions to be answered to do that. But I believe we could be deeper than what we have been.”

Kansas native signs with Royals

Heisman Trophy watch

Monty Thompson Sports Editor

Mark Kern Sports Editor

Kansas native, Bubba Starling, found himself in a situation this summer that few high school graduates are ever presented with. As a successful athlete at Gardner City in football, basketball, and baseball, Starling was rated as one of the top athletes in the upcoming drafts. After being presented over the summer with the decision to either play quarterback for the University of Nebraska or outfielder for the Kansas City Royals, Starling was forced to pick between one of his two passions. On one hand, Starling was faced with competing against a skilled sophomore, Taylor Martinez, for the starting spot at quarterback for the Cornhuskers. On the other, he would need to spend time with the Royals minor league team in Arizona in order to earn a spot on the 25-man roster. For either sport, Starling holds a love for the game and ties with each team. However, love can only do so much, and when one of those choices promised to give a $7.5 million signing bonus over three years, the scales started to tilt. Needless to say, he made an unsurprising choice and will now be playing for Kansas City. It would have taken at least three years for Starling to have a chance to make money with football, while risking injuries that could have possibly lowered his value. Besides, football is still an option if things don’t go as planned for Starling at Kansas City. This season, Royals general manager Dayton Moore has made it a priority to bring up players who are having success in the Royals farm system. With

1.

Andrew Luck - Luck shocked everybody when he decided to come back to Stanford for his senior year. Almost all of the experts pegged him the number one pick in the draft and consider him one of the most ready prospects in a few year. If Luck stays healthy and the Stanford Cardinal has the season they are expected to, it will be hard to see any other player winning the trophy.

2.

LaMichael James - If there is a player that could derail Luck’s chances to win the Heisman, James could be the guy. If James can help get Oregon through the first game against LSU, these two teams could be on a collision course for a November 12th showdown in Palo Alto. The winner of that game could be on their way to a National

courtesy photo

five rookie pitchers and four infielders brought up this season, Kansas City is continuing to work on building a young, competitive team. The Royals have also shown commitment to keeping their current contributors by the recent contract extension with right fielder, Jeff Francoeur. After a successful season both at the plate and on the field, Francoeur earned a two-year extension worth $13.5 million. As the number five overall draft pick for the Royals, and

with the way things have been going for Kansas City, Starling’s chances of playing in the big leagues will likely become a reality. With Starling expected to play in the outfield, he will be competing in Arizona during the offseason for a chance to join one of the best defensive outfields in Major League Baseball. Kansas City looks to continue adding more young players to their roster, and if all goes well, expect to see Starling at some point next year in the Royals starting lineup.

Y A D E GAM

o t t u o t u o Post a sh ra e f f o r o s d your frien ons for a ti a l u t a r g n o c ew n r u o n i y a birthd . n o i t c e s T SHOUT-OU Shout-

free with outs are yo Limit of ur Student ID. Stop by 20 words. Kedzie 1 03.

Title game and a Hesiman Trophy. No matter what, expect James to once again put up some serious numbers.

3.

Landry Jones – Anytime you are the starting quarterback on the preseason number one team, there are going to be some big expectations. Jones has his top two receivers back in Ryan Broyles and Kenny Stills, so the opportunity is there to put up Heisman-worthy numbers. Jones will get tested very early in a huge non-conference match-up in Tallahassee, Fla. against a very talented Florida State team that will tell how serious of run Jones is going to put up.

4.

Trent Richardson- Now that Mark Ingram has taken his game to the NFL, it is now Richardson’s time to be the man for the Alabama offense. Last year, in limited time he rushed for 700 yards

and averaged an outstanding 6.3 yards per carry. Expect for his carries to double this year, and a 1500-yard season is definitely in question.

5. Kellen Moore- Moore has been the leader of one of the countries most explosive offenses the past two seasons. This year will be a little more of a challenge because he lost his top two weapons in Titus Young and Austin Pettis. He does have Tyler Shoemaker coming back and a great running back in Doug Martin. With the offense that Boise State runs and with how accurate Moore is, he will still put up big numbers. He, like most of the other guys on the list has that one marquee game to show his talents as Boise State faces Georgia in a big non-conference game. Other considerations are Justin Blackmon, Matt Barkley, Robert Griffin and Greg Reid.

Two minute drill Monty Thompson Sports Editor Mark Kern Assistant Sports Editor

Basketball: Legendary women’s basketball coach Pat Summitt of Tennessee has been diagnosed with early onset dementia. For months, Summitt had acted strange even in her eyes and she knew something was wrong. After going to the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn., she received her diagnosis. Summitt said that this will not affect her running the Volunteers program and she will be ready for the season.

Football: Giants handled the Bears 41-13 on Monday, but may have suffered a bigger loss than the Bears. Top cornerback Terrell Thomas tore his ACL and is out for the year. This is another injury as the Giants have already lost Osi Umenyiora to injury and this is another bad loss to that side of the ball.

Golf: J.B. Holmes was forced to withdraw from The Barclays on Monday in preparation for upcoming brain surgery. Holmes is scheduled to have surgery on Sept. 1 at John

Hopkins University Hospital. The surgery is considered a low risk surgery and Holmes hopes to be back playing golf in around three to four months.

Baseball: On September 24 Major League Baseball will be celebrating the playing of its 200,000 game. Since the first game on April 22, 1876 between Boston and Philadelphia the game has grown into what we know as the “Great American Pastime”. At this time it has yet to be determined which game on the Sep. 24 will mark the official game.

k-state sports blog For info that doesn’t make the sports page.

Perfect Gift Idea!

Now you can buy the photos you see in the Collegian. photos.kstatecollegian.com

kstatecollegian.com/blogs


wednesday, august 24, 2011

page 7

kansas state collegian

Advertise in the Kansas State Collegian’s

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classifieds

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785-532-6555

Rent-Apt. Unfurnished

Rent-Apt. Unfurnished Rent-Condos & Townhouses Rent-Houses & Duplexes

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO bathrooms, two balconies. Close to campus. Dishwasher, central air, laundry facilities. No pets. 785-5390866.

TWO-BEDROOM, two bathroom, luxury apartment. Half a block to KSU. Washer/ dryer, dishwasher, microwave, balcony. No pets. Available now. 785-537-7050.

THREE-BEDROOM, ONE and one-half bathrooms. Close to campus, 913 Bluemont. Dishwasher, central air, laundry facilities. No pets. 785-539-0866.

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Bulletin Board

Announcements LEARN TO FLY! KState Flying Club has three airplanes and lowest rates. Call 785-5626909 or visit www.ksu.edu/ksfc.

SHOUT-OUT BAND GUYS with no shirts, not a good “Symbol!”

MANHATTAN CITY Ordinance 4814 assures every person equal opportunity in housing without distinction on account of race, sex, familial status, military status, disability, religion, age, color, national origin or ancestry. Violations should be reported to the Director of Human Resources at City Hall, 785-5872440. BRAND NEW carpet and fresh clean paint. Two-bedroom apartment just west of campus and still close to Aggieville. Only $635/ mo and the rest of August is free so move in now. Emerald Property Management, 785-587-9000.

LIZ, SAW you walking toward resident halls, didn’t know you were coming to KState. Facebook me. Taylor NOW RENTING! Threebedroom, one and onehalf bath apartments near campus. Dishwasher, stove, and refrigerator in units. Water & trash paid. Housing/Real Estate 1214 Vattier, one block from Campus. www.amctiao@webs.com

Rent-Apt. Furnished MANHATTAN CITY Ordinance 4814 assures every person equal opportunity in housing without distinction on account of race, sex, familial status, military status, disability, religion, age, color, national origin or ancestry. Violations should be reported to the Director of Human Resources at City Hall, 785-5872440.

Rent-Apt. Unfurnished THREE-BEDROOM, ONE and half bathroom, on site laundry, near campus, 1019 Fremont. No pets. 785-5371746, or 785-539-1545.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Business Opportunities

THE COLLEGIAN cannot verify the financial potential of advertisements in the Employment/ Opportunities classifications. Readers are advised to approach any such business opportunity with reasonable caution. The Collegian urges our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson, Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 785-2320454.

SHOWCASE DIAMOND Jewelers and Sj2. We are looking for a full and part-time salesperson. The person should be fun and outgoing. Males and Females should apply. Contact Courtney 785539-4422. Or submit resume at 501 3rd place Suite C.

LOVE EXERCISE? Fort Riley is filling internship positions in the fitness department for the fall and spring semester. 785-239-3146. MILL CREEK Valley Jr. High in Paxico has an opening for a boys basketball coach. Please contact Cleion Morton, Principal, cmorton@usd329.com or call (785)636-5353 if interested. Applications are available at www.usd329.com. Mill Creek Valley USD #329 is an equal opportunity employer.

THE COLLEGIAN cannot verify the financial potential of advertisements in the Employment/ Opportunities classifications. Readers are advised to approach any such business opportunity with reasonable caution. The Collegian urges our readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 501 SE Jefferson, Topeka, KS 66607-1190. 785-2320454.

TWOTHREE-BEDROOM house, newly remodeled, available immediately,1320 N. 8th $1100/ month, 785-447- GTM SPORTSWEAR is 0404. looking for male and female models! Participate in seasonal photo shoots for our sportswear catalogs TWO-BEDROOM and earn $12/ hr. No HALF block east of modeling experience recampus. Fenced yard, quired. Must be 16- 25 central air, washer/ years old. Sports experidryer. 785-539-3672. ence preferred. Open Casting Call August 30th from 6pm- 8pm at 520 McCall Rd. Can’t make it at this time? Rent-Apt. Unfurnished Roommate Wanted Contact Kylie at 785537-8822 ext. 1628 or ALL YOURS! One-bed- FEMALE LOOKING for kylie.pedigo@igtm.com room apartment just roommate in two-bed- to set up an appointwest of campus. Only room near Aggieville ment. $475/ mo and the rest campus, LANDSCAPE $395 per HOWE of August is free so month. 760-954-0356. INC is currently seeking move in now. Emerald laborers for several of Property Management, FEMALE ROOMMATE our divisions. This is for 785-587-9000. wanted. Close to veteri- full-time and part-time nary school & stadium. help, with flexible schedules for students, preferNEWER, LARGE, two Shared utilities. $350/ ably 4 hour blocks of or three-bedroom apart- month. Call or text 785time. Applicants must ments. Washer/ dryer in 214-3254. be 18 years of age, each unit. Ample park- FEMALE ROOMMATE have a valid drivers liing. Available now, wanted. Deluxe twocense and pass a pre$820/ $960. 785-341- bedroom suite, private employment drug test. 4024. bathroom, off-street Starting wages are parking. Great location $8.50/ hr. Apply three by campus. Furnished, ways, in person Monliving room, dining Rent-Houses & Duplexes room, deluxe kitchen day- Friday at 12780 Madison Rd in Riley; and laundry room. 1810 call 785-776-1697 to obTodd Rd. $315/ month BE THE first to live on tain an application; or the brand new carpet- plus utilities. 847-651- email us at 8303. ing and see the fresh askhowe@howelandnew paint. Four-bedscape.com. You may ROOMMATES also visit our website, room, two bath. Great TWO wanted. $300/ month, floor plan. Only $1100/ www.howelandscape.mo and the rest of Au- utilities paid. Call 785- com. 537-4947. gust is free so move in LAW FIRM, with emphanow. Emerald Property sis in Bankruptcy, deManagement, 785-587sires to employ an up9000. perclass student majoring in Finance/ AccountCLOSE TO everything, ing, for a part-time posiAggieville, campus, Service Directory tion demanding a comshopping and eating. mitment of at least 20 Four-bedroom, two hrs/ wk and each sumbath. Room for all your mer break. Willing to acstuff and your roommates. Only $1200/ mo Pet/Livestock Services commodate academic schedules- this position and the rest of August is secondary to appliis free so move in now. BOARDING cant’s academic proEmerald Property Man- STALL agement, 785-587-9000. $425.00 per month. gram at KSU. AnticiSeven miles outside of pated that the applicant THREE, FOUR-BED- Manhattan. Indoor rid- selected will work fullCall 785- time this summer and ROOM, three bath- ing arena. hold the position until room. Central air, dish- 341-1781. graduation from KSU. washer, washer/ dryer, Interested applicants, garage. 785-539-5800. please forward your resume to: Nicole, 431A TWO-BEDROOM HALF Houston Street, Manhatblock east of campus. tan, Kansas 66502. Fenced yard, central Employment/Careers air, washer/ dryer. 785BARTENDING! $300 a 539-3672. day potential. No experience necessary. Training provided. Call 800Help Wanted Sale-Mobile Homes 965-6520 extension 144.

SMALL MEDICAL office. Office Assistant provides administrative, secretarial & clerical support to Office Manager. Maintain office by answering phones, filing, billing, basic cleaning, & other office related work. Requires computer & data entry skills as well as interpersonal skills. Performs other tasks as identified by Office Manager. Call to pick up an application 785-539-3268. Job closes August 31.

CHILD CARE needed one day a week. Pays $10 per hour. Prior experience a must. Must be reliable. If interested please call Malena at 785-342-0503.

LITTLE APPLE Toyota Honda is looking for part-time help in our reconditioning department. Please apply at 2828 Amherst Ave. Ask for Dell or Tony.

MONDO CONDO fourbedroom 2600 sq. ft. $1400- $1500/ month. Includes lawn care, trash, snow removal and all appliances. August, year lease. No pets. Call 785-3130751, for details.

n ia 555 Need a subleaser g 6 e -

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537-9064 WOODWAY APARTMENTS. Two, three, and four-bedrooms AVAILABLE NOW! Located across from KSU sporting events, spacious living room, small pet OK, on-site laundry. 2420 Greenbriar Dr. 785-537-7007, www.firstmanagamentinc.com.

Advertise

785-532-6555

STOP THROWING your money away on rent! Invest in YOURSELF while in college: Affordable manufactured homes, Clayton Homes 785-537-8111.

CHIPOTLE. WORK at a place where you ACTUALLY want to eat the food. Now hiring for all shifts. Apply in person at 606 N. Manhattan Ave.

OZ WINERY: Hiring PT tasting bar attendant. Must be personable, friendly and able to work weekends. Apply in person at 417 A Lincoln, Wamego, KS.

Open Market

Items for Sale

SEARCHING FOR parttime nanny to take care of kids on Wednes- ASKO DRYER. Good 785-537day’s, and Thursday’s condition. this fall. For more infor- 4465. mation call 785-341STUDENTPAYOUTS.- 2453. COM. paid survey takTHE OFFICE of educaers needed in Manhattional innovation and tan. 100% free to join. evaluation is accepting Click on surveys. applications for an unTransportation dergraduate research TECHNICAL SUP- assistant. Team player PORT position avail- needed for 15- 20 able for K-State under- hours/ week in threeBicycles graduate student with a four hour time blocks wide variety of skills. from 8- 5. For further inSuccessful applicants formation visit http:- FOR SALE: Schwinn must have excellent //www.oeie.k-state.edu 10 speed 26-inch bike. communication, collabo- or contact our office at 785-537-4465. ration, and problem 785-532-5930. solving skills. Experience working with and troubleshooting PCs, Macs, and common software desired. Any previous technical support or helpdesk experience is a plus, but not required. Training is pro1015 N. Thi www.PTCkansas.com vided on the job in a collaborative environment with other students and staff. Duties include supporting a diverse group of users across the state in K-State Research and Extension offices and the College of Ag via phone and in person; backing up, rebuilding and configuring new and old computers; and occasional technical documentation. Other duties such as leading training sessions and evaluating new products are also available. Applicants must be available 1215 hrs/ week between 8- 5 when school is in session, as well as up to full-time during break times. SUMMER AVAILABILITY IS A MUST! Applications are available at the Department of Communications/ IET office in 211 Um- Answer to the last berger Hall (785-532- Sudoku. 6270) and will be accepted through August 31, 2011. Please attach a resume with the application.

Pregnancy Testing Center 539-3338

“Real Options, Real Help, Real Hope” Free pregnancy testing Totally confidential service Same day results Call for appointment

Across from campus in Anderson Village

Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Deadlines

Classified ads must be placed by noon the day before you want your ad to run. Classified display ads must be placed by 4 p.m. two working days prior to the date you want your ad to run.

CALL 785-532-6555 E-mail classifieds@spub.ksu.edu

Classified Rates 1 DAY 20 words or less $14.00 each word over 20 20¢ per word 2 DAYS 20 words or less $16.20 each word over 20 25¢ per word 3 DAYS 20 words or less $19.00 each word over 20 30¢ per word 4 DAYS 20 words or less $21.15 each word over 20 35¢ per word 5 DAYS 20 words or less $23.55 each word over 20 40¢ per word (consecutive day rate)

To Place An Ad Go to Kedzie 103 (across from the K-State Student Union.) Office hours are Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

How To Pay All classifieds must be paid in advance unless you have an account with Student Publications Inc. Cash, check, MasterCard or Visa are accepted. There is a $25 service charge on all returned checks. We reserve the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad.

Corrections If you find an error in your ad, please call us. We accept responsibility only for the first wrong insertion.

Cancellations If you sell your item before your ad has expired, we will refund you for the remaining days. You must call us before noon the day before the ad is to be published.


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wednesday, august 24, 2011

kansas state collegian

Pedaling away

Lisle Alderton | Collegian

The first run of the bike tour took cyclist through Mid-Campus Drive and briefly cut off traffic on Tuesday afternoon. The cyclist eventually returned to their starting location at Bosco Student Plaza.

Have something to say? We want to hear it. Send in a Letter to the Editor to make your voice heard.

$3.99 Cheeseburger & Fries Lunch Special 11am -2pm Every Weekday 2317 Tuttle Creek Blvd • (785) 776-9588

Where can you Shout Out in for ice cream and not be in Call Hall? The K-State Collegian Classifieds Log on to kstatecollegian.com or kstatemedia.com Stop by Kedzie 103

LA FIESTA

Traditional Mexican Restaurant

Price Margarita Mondays Price Beer Wednesdays 2301 Tuttle Creek BLvd 785.587.5258

20 word limit Free with student ID


Kansas State Collegian Print Edition 8.24.11