Confluence 2020 Final Year Exhibition Catalogue

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THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & BUILT ENVIRONMENT

CONFLUENCE

2020 MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE + LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE + URBAN DESIGN



CONFLUENCE


Catalogue design by Enzo Ferraro Editing by Urs Bette, Tanya Court, David Cooke and Enzo Ferraro The University of Adelaide, School of Architecture & Built Environment,

Printed by Finsbury Green, Adelaide Cover project by Quang Thang Tran

[08] 8313 5836 www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au

Thank you to the sponsors of the 2020 Final Year exhibition

PLATINUM SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS

AILA - designwell - Jeffries - JPE - LANDSKAP - waterPRO - WAX


The school expresses its gratitude to those who gave their time to advise, discuss and critique the work throughout the semester: ARCHITECTURE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Anthony Balsamo Damon Bolton Helen Barrie Mark Branson Fran Bonato Sally Craven Daniel Brookes Kate Delaporte Dave Brown Peter Bird Margit Bruenner Gini Lee John Byleveld Warwick Keates Juliana Croffi Calixto Lyndon Slavin Quihui Wang Victor Calixto Josh Zeunert Geoff Cobham Tim Conybeare URBAN DESIGN Sally Craven Jared Wilson Maddog Delaney Emma Baker Enzo Ferraro Nigel Fox Adele Langusch David Harvey Scott McLuskey Drew Joyce Sivam Krish Tameka Lawlor Ben Van Loggem Caitlin Murphy Le Nguyen Madeline Nolan Andrew Lymn-Penning Michaal Queale Rasoul Rafat Cameron Raynes Nick Roach Simon Schrapel Meherzad Shroff Maggie Tonkin Dino Vrynios Carolyn Wigg Sam Wright


ARCHITECTURE 46

50 54 60 64 70 74 78 82

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90 96 100 104 108

STUDIO URS BETTE - BUSINESS UNUSUAL

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STUDIO DAIVD KROLL - HORIZONTAL + VERTICAL LIVING

Hartley Town Quang Thang Tran Duc Huy Tran Hanyu Zhang Kristopher Bryn Abenoja Kiyana Khalili Nur Izrin Mohd Zahidi Zheng Yi

158

Sneha Abraham Marc Davis James Gillett Mohammad Jawad Rezaie Junnan Ji Jingxin Xu

STUDIO ESTHER CHEW - FESTIVAL HUB Ping Xiu Gan Angus Johnson Haobo Liu Kevin Ung Yumeng Zhao

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STUDIO ANTHONY COUPE - THE TRUE COLOUR OF THE SEA

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Deng Shichao Sally Rowett Mitchell Lobb Shaun Norton Jack Korcz Claudine Rivers

122 126 130 134 138

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146 150

STUDIO JAMES CURRY - TOURIST FACILITY MYPONGA Bianca Caterine Kruass Mitchell Heynen

162 166 172 178 182

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STUDIO SAM RIDGWAY - RESURRECTING THE KINGS HEAD

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Tyler Schmidtke Gabriella Marciano Nadia Jamal

196 200

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STUDIO PETER SCRIVER - FABRIC, CULTURE, ARCHITECTURE: RE-HUMANISING REDUNDANT BUILDINGS AS ARCHITECTURES OF COMMUNITY

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Daniel Grilli Georgie Warren Caitlin Roy Olyvia Solomon Eleanor Hughes Fiorina Donato

212 216 222 228 234

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STUDIO AMIT SRIVASTAVA - LUNAR HABITAT

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Dushyant Kathuria Daikun Li Tian Wang Rakkesh Mohan Ma Zheming Stavros Grafyadel

248 252 256 260 266


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 274

STUDIO FIELDWORK: DESIGNED LANDSCAPES AT WAITE CAMPUS - TANYA COURT

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Jiaming Ma Azhrudin Coulthard Stephanie Pope Niveta Chawla

282 288 292

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300 306 310 314

STUDIO KI: KANGAROO ISLAND ART MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN - JO RUSSELL-CLARKE Eden Leah Bonython Samantha Godakumbura Luke Kluske Dengxiao Xia

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STUDIO TIDAL ZONES: DESIGN FOR NOVEL, EMERGING, ECOLOGIES -SCOTT HAWKEN

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Yu Lin Stephanie Clutterbuck Leo Bassano Kaihang Zhou

328 332 336

URBAN DESIGN 342

346 350 354

STUDIO DAVID COOKE - RE-THINKING THE URBAN VILLAGE Rachel Stuppos Reb Rowe Siddhesh Bhaindarkar

CLASS OF 2020 360 365 368

Architecture Landscape Architecture Urban Design


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FOREWORD - PROF. ALAN PETERS HEAD OF SCHOOL SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & BUILT ENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE

This catalogue is the capstone of SABE’s architecture, landscape architecture and urban design teaching programs. It is the result of our students’ dedication, tenacity, and most of all, their ability. It is also the result of a now much improved educational program, and the skill our staff, both permanent and sessional, brought in using that program to generate the very best in students. The results, I think, speak for themselves. The students should be congratulated on the quality of their work. Urs Bette (on the architecture side), Tanya Court (on the landscape architecture side) and David Cooke (on the urban design side), coordinated the final year studios and deserve a very special thanks. Urs also curated what will be another very fine exhibition. Enzo Ferraro designed and produced the beautiful catalogue. The final year design studio is organised around various studio leaders. What this means is that a number of our staff offer 7


individual studios that align with their own interests, and then each fifth-year student picks which leader he or she wants to work with. In Architecture eight different studios dealt with a wide range of questions, responding to; personal experiences in the corona crisis, ways of colonising on the moon, vertical inner city living, resurrecting the King’s Head pub, the Colour of the Sea, adaptive reuse of culturally significant buildings, designing a new Hub for the Adelaide Festival and tourist facilities for Myponga, South Australia. In Landscape Architecture, students worked with studio leaders on three diverse topics: ‘Studio Tidal’ considered sea level rise scenarios for the vulnerable Port Adelaide district, ‘Studio Design Fieldwork’ considered the landscape future of Adelaide University’s Waite Campus, and ‘Studio KI’ developed designs for a new Art Gallery in Kingscote, Kangaroo Island, South Australia. The Urban Design Studio dealt with re-thinking the urban village for key parts of metropolitan Adelaide. A number of firms have supported this effort financially, and they are listed in the early pages of this catalogue. It is definitely worth saying that the study of architecture, 8


landscape and urban design is not a solo activity. Family, friends and peers are part of the essential support network. If 2018 was all about getting SABE’s strategic direction right, and 2019 was about our integration into the Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences (ECMS) work, 2020 has been the year of Covid-19. The year started normally enough with big plans to increase our studio offerings abroad, but by March we began the very swift move online. The rest of the semester remained online as did our winter semester. However, most of the final-year studio was taught face-to-face, though much of the rest of teaching across the various programs retained a strong remote element. The “pivot” was difficult for both students and staff. Until 2020, and across the world, there were few examples of successful online studio teaching in architecture and related disciplines. Thus, the level of innovation needed to create a supportive and engaging teaching environment was large, and the pressure to do it fast was enormous. We experimented quite a bit in those early weeks—and students were very forgiving of our failures—but within a few weeks 9


we had a pedagogical system that was working. It turns out that although staff and students strongly prefer face-to-face, there are lessons to be learnt from 2020’s remote teaching that definitely should not be lost. Moreover, it looks certain that, in future, many classes will have both face-to-face and remote students learning and working together. The work that students have produced across all programs and in both semesters has been especially good this year; and although the teaching workload of our staff has increased dramatically, it has also been a bumper research year for the school. Now that the end of 2020 is approaching, and I have begun reflecting on what the year was about, it strikes me that Covid-19 forced even more focus and dedication than usual in both students and staff. Congratulation to our graduating students. And a thank you to staff, the supporting firms, families and friends. Without you this would not exist.

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CONFLUENCE


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STUDIO URS BETTE - BUSINESS UNUSUAL

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STUDIO ESTER CHEW - FESTIVAL HUBS

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STUDIO JAMES CURRY - TOURIST FACILITY IN MYPONGA

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STUDIO ANTHONY COUPE - THE TRUE COLOUR OF THE SEA

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STUDIO DAVID KROLL - HORIZONTAL + VERTICAL LIVING

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STUDIO SAM RIDGWAY - RESURRECTING THE KINGS HEAD

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STUDIO PETER SCRIVER - FABRIC, CULTURE, ARCHITECTURE: RE-HUMANISING REDUNDANT BUILDINGS AS ARCHITECTURES OF COMMUNITY

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STUDIO AMIT SRIVASTAVA - LUNAR HABITAT

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ARCHITECTURE MASTERS OF ARCHITECTURE Final Project is a self-led design studio, in which students are asked to develop an architectural proposition in response to a specific site, program or research question. The project develops along the students own lines of interest and inquiry. Accordingly they are given the opportunity to choose a studio leader from a pool of available staff members and their respective fields of interest. The studio leader’s role is to coach and assist the students in their design research. 45


1

STUDIO URS BETTE

“AS A CONSEQUENCE OF BECOMING MORE MOBILE AND FLEXIBLE, WE MAY HAVE GRADUALLY LOST INVOLVEMENT WITH THE PLACES WHERE WE ACTUALLY ARE. WE ARE HERE AND THERE AT THE SAME TIME. AND DESPITE TRAVELLING LONG DISTANCE AND THE APPARENT PROGRESS IN NETWORKING TECHNOLOGIES, MANY PEOPLE COMPLAIN OF LONELINESS AND ALIENATION, AND ARE LONGING FOR COMMITMENT AND SOLIDARITY. MANY PROJECTS IN THIS STUDIO DEAL WITH THIS IN SOME WAY OR ANOTHER. ”

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BUSINESS UNUSUAL STUDENTS 50 54 60 64 70 74 78 82

Hartley Town Quang Thang Tran Duc Huy Tran Hanyu Zhang Kristopher Bryn Abenoja Kiyana Khalili Nur Izrin Mohd Zahidi Zheng Yi 47


As a point of departure, the students were asked to use their own experiences in the corona crisis to reflect on the city and the ways we live today. The aim was not to design covid-save buildings – the city is not a hospital – but to rethink particular aspect of our urban environment from a personal perspective. Each student developed a project of high complexity based on their personal curiosity and line of inquiry. 199 Gouger street, a location that has been left dormant for over 10 years has been given to materialise their thoughts. The current global condition was used as a catalyst to reflect on our role as architects to envision possible futures, and how personal projections might help to create the environments that enable them. Ultimately - in practice and teaching - we are all searching for ideas, and what counts are those types of environments that foster the emergence of ideas. In this studio we are interested in the experiment as a mode of inquiry and the ways in which it can contribute to the formation of intentional work. The rational aspects of architecture - purpose, meaning, structure, etc. - are not abandoned, but introduced as a second step in the formation of a holistic product. The aim is to develop a process in which an artistic context of discovery, offering unprecedented form, can be productively linked with a consensusbased approach of justification, and in doing so facilitate the poetic aspects of architecture within environments that are dominated by expectations of quantifiable performance.

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Many architects and engineers follow a very traditional concept of innovation. They are enthusiastic about sophisticated constructions and new materials that have numbers of growth or performance attached to them. Other forms of innovation, ones that may be aesthetically or socially driven, are often overlooked simply because they are so hard to measure. It is much easier to argue for an upwards pointing graph, than it is to validate the effects of spatial qualities, even though they can be experienced and felt. The approach follows the idea that everything is achievable through technical means. It is rooted in modern age thinking and resulted in increased production and consumption, as well as an acceleration of everybody’s life. As a consequence of becoming more mobile and flexible, we may have gradually lost involvement with the places where we actually are. We are here and there at the same time. And despite travelling long distance and the apparent progress in networking technologies, many people complain of loneliness and alienation, and are longing for commitment and solidarity. Many projects in this studio deal with this in some way or another. Part of the problem might lie in the sterile character of modern cities that are designed around functional performance, standards and codes, rather than their experiential qualities or questions of identification. Designing a sense of personality is interesting because it supports the idea of an active


relationship between a building and its users. I think of it as a contribution to sustainability by creating environments with which we can develop a relationship and thus care about. The discourse on sustainability is too often reduced to its functional parameters. Yet, a building that feels right might be sustainable because it is loved – in the way it smells, looks and behaves – and thus be taken care of and given an extended lifespan, effectively reducing the use of embodied energy over time. The idea of constant growth has created the predicament we find ourselves in. Instead of optimizing and accelerating an already mobile society through digitally augmented, so called, ‘smart cities’, architects and planners should promote a sense of stay and idleness by creating places that are physically and experientially satisfactory, that users can identify with. These places must be diverse in ways that potentially can’t be described through building codes. Their design might have to incorporate the author as much as the location, in order to evoke a sense of authenticity and character. The buildings themselves are actors in a living city. Like people, these groups of actors are interesting when they are both familiar and diverse, when they are paradoxical and reassuring, when there is always something left to explore. The invigorated city needs students and subsequently architects that disassociate themselves from ingrained stereotypes and assumed modes of best practice. Enthusiasm

and utopian dreams support the intellectual freedom that enables creativity. To advance our discipline we need to step outside existing certainties and create ‘a difference that makes the difference’ (Gregory Bateson). This involves risk. I like students to be inventors of space, responding to the multiplicity of human needs - including art and poetry - and draw up the world they want to live in. Subjecting unprecedented solutions to continuous evolutionary adaptation enables students to understand ‘design’ as an evaluation practice in itself. They learn to self-evaluate their work, adapt it to changing circumstances, define their goals and become resilient in the pursuit of their goals. These are all relevant graduate attributes for working in the creative industries, enabling students to successfully respond to real-life scenarios. This has been a particularly strenuous year. I commend all students for their tenacity and persistence in this semester, and wish them every possible success in their unfolding careers! DR URS BETTE Course Coordinator and Studio Leader

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GENESIS ‘UROBOROS‘


HARTLEY TOWN

3H9R+JV investigated the potential of an inductive, rhizomatic process-based Architecture to create selfvalidifying systems that can exist without systems of external rationalisation. I initiated the investigation by actively denying the subjugation of Architectural Space to the human form and moved towards finding spatiality as an incident result of Object-Object interactions. In doing so, I was able to craft an architecture that operates across a varied scalar regime and does not rely on the ‘Subject’ to imbed meaning in the Architecture. This process simply, began with moving through stages of surface-form-space-scale, whilst maintaining genealogical coherence through each step – thus I aimed to operate within one clear genesis that imbedded the project with its own internal logic. This moved from the initial context-seed into series of disjunctive-object-fields that test surface/spatial relationships en masse (see ‘Speed-Dating’ and ‘Ouroboros’). The ‘end’ result being the manifestation of a heterogenous, inter-objectual mass that allowed for both external and internally consistent form-space relationships, allowing exterior to define the interior and vice-versa. As a result, this created aesthetic/spatial interobjectual relationships that continually withdraw from the passer-by, in both its proposed formal product and the representation via embedding the projects philosophy into its graphic abstractions. Thus, plans and elevations became abstracted site design interventions and in end generated the surrounding landscape, the imagery and linwork are presented alongside their source-code and the sections condense multiple orthographic cuts into singular fields of information the both redact and reveal others

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

3WH9R+JV

CONTEXT

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07_1 07_2 07_3 07_4 08_5

> > > > >

input previous iteration randomly reorganise using gh iterate search for spatial relationships merge chosen objects

GENESIS 07_Speed dating

‘SPEED DATING‘

07_1 > input previous iteration 07_2 > randomly reorganise using gh 07_3 > iterate 07_4 > search for spatial relationships 08_5 > merge chosen objects

09

08_orobouros 08_6 > find left over objects 08_7 > filter useful objects >look for potential ramps or stairs >does this object provide complexity? >does it provide flat surfaces? 08_8 > allocate to object

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07_Speed dating 07_1 07_2 07_3 07_4 08_5

> > > > >

input previous iteration randomly reorganise using gh iterate search for spatial relationships merge chosen objects

Speed dataing manifested in a successful result that was enabled by its own process derived logic. This stage on reflection allowed me to cirumvent my own aesthetic machinations for the project and coincidentally enabled the generation of a distilled formal result of what was attempted in earlier iterations. This distillation still did not solve the interiority of the object in the same way the it gave an exterior - and the lesson learnt in previous iterations of thoughtless floor plating meant a new method needed to be introduced.

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The genesis of the next process step came from the tv show Hannibal, of all places, within a particularly graphic scene depicting forced auto-cannibalism. This, bringing up memories of the snake eating a snake - ie. the Orobouros. This seemingly simple solution allowed for the manifestation of something i was grappling with ovr previous weeks. The interiority of the object, and how in Harmanns terminology ‘the interior of the object is more interesting than the exterior’. Similarly, i am able to draw connection between this step and Manuel DeLandas writings on relationships of interiority and exteriority (even though he said this was not to be read in terms of spatiality).


“THE INTENT AND DIRECTIVE OF THIS MESSINESS INITIALLY IS PUSH THE CONTEXT OF THE SITE TO THE LIMIT, AS WELL AS TO ACT AS A VESSEL FOR CRITICAL REFLECTION AND DISSECTION OF SITE CONDITIONS.”

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FORM DEVELOPMENT DIGITISE MODEL

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MAKE NEW MAP

EXTRACT NEW INFORMATION

OUTCOME 1 - PHYSICAL MODEL


QUANG THANG TRAN

A large number of heat waves have hit Adelaide over last 15 years, indicating the escalating issues of climate change. Temperatures can increase up to 46 C, and it its wake causing more deaths than any other natural hazard in Australia. These hot spells and severe weather patterns are set to occur more often, bringing even hotter temperatures and lasting for longer periods of time. The situation is being aggravated by sealed surfaces in our city centres, concrete and bitumen storing the heat and creating so called heat islands in our cities. The proposed project intends to mitigate this effect through the introduction of a ‘cool island’ – a passive urban air conditioning system that affects the micro-climate through a combination of greywater treatment and a heat pump. Besides the cooling devise the project also host the Goyder Institute, a research body that investigates proactive responses to climate change in water resource management. The form is characterised by large panels that are aligned with the prevailing wind directions, while at the same time they provide shade like a tree canopy. Similar to cooling system found in computers, the surfaces (or radiator fins) are interspersed by water pipes. These are connected to a plant-based filtration system and an underground heat sink. Cool Island is a circular system. Urban wastewater is treated in multiple stages before it goes through Earth Tubes installed 8 meter underground. Their aim is to cool the water down using the earth mass before feeding it back into the building. Cool Island is a green machine, a public urban park, providing an enhanced microclimate while showcasing methods of sustainable water usage. It is also home to the Goyder Institute, a place for research on climate change and a prototype of urban climate control.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

COOL ISLAND

GENESIS PAPER-PLAY

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COOLING PANELS

EVAPORATIVE COOLING SYSTEM

WEATHER STATION ECOLOGY LABORATORY OFFICE RESEARCH ROOMS CLASSROOMS AUDITORIUM LIBRARY RESEARCH ROOMS WATER LABORATORY

WALKING BRIDGE IRRIGATION COOLING CLIMATE DEVICES

RELAXATION SPACE WETLAND

PRE-TREATMENT MACHINE FOOD CHAIN REACTOR DRUM FILTER BLOWERS UV DISINFECTION

WETLAND

EARTH TUBES

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A

A

GROUND PLAN


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LVL 2 FLOOR PLAN 60


DUC HUY TRAN

The language of music is common to all generations and nations, it is understood by the heart. Memorable events of the pandemic have been people performing from their windows, balconies and rooftops, as well as streaming concerts online. Music-making brings people together, and as such shows where we stand as a society. The project’s intention is to fill a gap in Adelaide’s infrastructure, by providing a centre for music that caters for a variety of users and audiences. It’s main auditorium and smaller practice and recording studio could be a shared home for orchestral ensembles like the ASO, be used by the Adelaide Festival as well as the wider performing arts community. The building shelters a multi-purpose open air stage that would draw in the public from all directions in a surround-seating configuration. It could host a mix of outdoor festivals, cultural and musical activities that would invigorate the western side of the CBD. It would be a place for continuous use, open to all, with all the acoustic and technical wizardry, a great place for Adelaidean music lovers, from Liszt to Lizzo, but also attractive for tourists who are following the festival calendar. The form was derived from local building typologies, acknowledging their character and context. It was reversed and lifted up to create a performative surplus, a public plaza, while also acting as an urban beacon that highlights Adelaide’s aspirations as a UNESCO city of music. The concert hall, accommodating up to 2000 seats, is tailored for extraordinary harmonious quality, flexible to accommodate creative performance across a variety of music genres. It is surrounded by intimate spaces, music lounges and studios that can be reconfigured to different needs, while also providing views towards the city and vice versa. The amphitheatre plaza, ramps, stairs, elevators, and escalators form a flexible circulation network emphasises the public and accessible nature of the project. Small portions of the building are conceived as wind instruments themselves, allowing it to produce sounds itself and thus giving it an idiosyncratic character. It will be a beehive of welcome and accessible musical activities both day and night - a place where music of all kinds is made, learned, experienced, and shared.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

HARMONISER

GENESIS MUSIC IN LOCKDOWN

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PROGRAM

GENESIS CONTEXTUAL ELEVATION ANALYSIS AND OVERLAY CONCEPTUAL GENERATIVE PERSPECTIVE

MAIN HALL THEATRE

MAIN HALL LOUNGE AND STUDIOS

SMALL HALL

SITE TOPAGAPHY FESTIVAL SCENARIO


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GENERAL PUBLIC

LIFT / FIRE EXIT

PEDESTRIAN VEHICLE

FLOWER PAVILION

CREMATION CHURCH/ CEREMONY HALL CEREMONY HALL (SMALL) EXHIBTIION CAFE

CONSULTATION OFFICE

STORAGE (RECOMPOSE MATERIAL) SOIL COLLECTION BODY STORAGE VEHICLE RECEPTION

CIRCULATION LEGEND CLIENTS THE DEAD THE DEAD (AFTER CREMATION)

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GENERAL PUBLIC/ CLIENTS

NURSERY

STAFF/ CLIENTS

FLOWER SHOP

GENERAL PUBLIC

FLOWER PAVILION


HANYU ZHANG

‘Samsara’ in a Buddhist expression for the cycle of death and rebirth. It gives name to a contemporary cemetery that aims to strengthen the connection between the living, the dead and nature. The idea of Samsara is to bring the past to the present by flipping traditional codes of commemoration upside down. Instead of people bringing flowers to a tombstone, it is the cemetery that provides flowers which the visitors can take home to remember their loved ones. Flowers replace the traditional tombstone and become a present from the dead to the living. The often barren fields of tombstones are replaced by an urban park, a field of flowers where people can relax and enjoy visiting their loved ones. Natural organic composting processes turn a body into soil within one month. The soil can then be donated to conservation parks, where it supports to maintain the natural wilderness in perpetuity. Each body generates 0.7 cubic metre of nutrition-rich soil that helps plants to regenerate. A small amount of the soil can be preserved on site to nourish one or multiple plants in the local nursery. Once the plants blossom, they will be moved to the flower pavilion. Here they either remain or be shipped, including a container of soil, to loved ones. Samsara has 137 cremation vessels, 100 cold storage chambers, 2 ceremony halls, flower pavilions, flower shop, nursery, consultation space, exhibition, and office space. When people visit the funeral of their loved one, they will walk down to the underground cremation chamber following the descending ramp of the flower pavilion. The dramatic natural lighting and the layered inner wall texture enhance the underground spatial feeling—giving people the sense of taking part in the transformative process.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

SAMSARA

TRADITION TRADITION

CONCEPT TYPICAL

Tombstone as the symbol the death Tombstone as the of symbol of the death

Flower as the gift thefrom living toliving the dead Flower as from the gift the to the dead

FLOWER: GIFT TO THE DEAD

TRADITION

SAMSARA

TRADITION

SAMSARA

The dead is decaying underground The dead is decaying underground

DEAD DECAY BELOW GROUND

Tombstone as the symbol of the death Tombstone as the symbol of the death

Flowers as the symbol of the death Flowers as the symbol of the death

Flower as the gift from the living to the dead Flower as the gift from the living to the dead

Flowers as the gift from the dead to the living FLOWERS: A GIFT LIVING Flowers as the gift fromTO theTHE dead to the living

SAMSARA

Tombstone vault extruding upward upward Tombstone vault extruding

The dead is decaying underground The dead is decaying underground

DEAD ABOVEground GROUND TheCREATE dead is GROWTH growing above as flowers The dead is growing above ground as flowers

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PROGRAM DIAGRAM

THE CYCLE BEGINS

FOREST

THE LAYING IN

OPTION A SOIL IS DONATED TO SITE

BODY LAID TO REST WITH WOOD CHIPS ALFAFLA AND STRAW

THE VESSEL MICROBES BREAK DOWN THE BODY PRODUCING NUTRIENT DENSE SOIL IN 30 DAYS

FAMILY/FRIEND OPTION B SOIL DELIVERED TO HOME

ON SITE THE SOIL EACH BODY CREATES 1 CUBIC YARD OF SOIL (0.7M3)

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SOIL SERVES NURSERY BLOSSOMING PLANTS MOVED TO FLOWER PAVILLION


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GROUND PLAN

2.

Mid Review 2020

Final Project Master 1

Urs Bette Studio

3.

1.

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Wall

The roamer allready knows the destination but in order to get to the destination the roamer has to look with intentions and look for walls.

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1

Mode of Movement

What is learnt through the investigations?

Look for walls?

Theres always a starting point to when we roam and a destination. The desires and intentions to reach the destination is determined by the mode of movement you use to reach that destination.

Adelaide city is copacted with corresponding walls that create space. The walls are a way to guide you to your destination. Your mode of movement will determine what type of wall you will find. In order to reach your destination you will need to look for walls as it is your guide to your destination.

Theres a desire for one to roam. In this drawings it shows the change of direction of individuals and stoping points. The pace of the roamer is determined by the destination and how valuable that destination is.

Mid Review 2020

Walls

Theres a desire for one to roam. In this drawings it shows the change of direction of individuals and stoping points. The pace of the roamer is determined by the destination and how valuable that destination is.

Drawing recordings of Roaming Intents

GENESIS ROAMING AND THE WALL

WALLS

DESTINATION

Investigations of how a homeless man roams around the city and how they identify spots for a place of rest or home. The Homeless community has permanent spots that are normaly formed by walls which are normally hidden from the public.

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Concept of Spot and Walls juxtiposed to create some sort of roaming qualities

MODE OF MOVEMENT

Concept of looking for walls

WALL

The drawing above shows investiagtions of many characteristics of walls that forms a unique space in the Adelaide City

STARTING POINT

The strategy is to use walls as the ground for the spots/destinations. Walkable walls that guide the roamer to reaching its destination

Destination

KRISTOPHER BRYN ABENOJA

Starting point

Spaces for the vulnerable - The original back wall of the site became the inspiration for this design. Walls are valuable components because they have capacity to influence people by blocking, interrupting or redirecting their paths. The purpose of the project is to support vulnerable communities – in particular homeless individuals – by providing a space that they are drawn to, can identify with, and where opportunities for upskilling and empowerment are offered, leading to a life in better circumstances. From investigations it was found that homeless people roam the city with specific intentions, to find a ‘spot’ that they return to regularly; and that there are speDrawing recordings of Roaming Intents cific characteristics of walls that may lead them into a space where they may choose to build a temporary ‘home’. The design began with deconstructing the existing walls and recrafting them in a way to encourage roaming. The intention of the design is unique to other ‘shelters’ for homeless people, as it not only aims to provide structural support but also aims to help them regain control over their lives. The walls have been designed to facilitate further building and the attachment of additional structures. Drawing on skills of improvisation, the homeless can become the ‘architects’ of their space, allowing them to modify the structure, thus giving them greater independence, identification and ownership over the place. A second motive is to deconstruct the idea of a traditional church and expand it beyond the boundaries of its walls, by focusing on accessibility and outreach towards vulnerable communities. The building consists of two levels that have different functions – the base level is constructed of walls that breaches the upper level. The lower level provides a roaming space and support for the homeless, and the upper level will be utilized for spiritual/educational functions that include an auditorium or study spaces. Walls from the ground floor breach into the upper level with the intention to provide the same experience of ‘roaming’ above as below - and emphasize the concept of ‘accessibility’ whilst also being able to provide unique functions.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

ROAMING FIELDS


y

The roamer looks for walls where it guides you to the spot. To find the wall you must not use the ground but use the wall itself.

Drawing and Models representing the Roamer The roamer doesnt look for the spots but allready knows the spot. The roamer looks for walls where it guides you to the spot. To find the wall you must not use the ground but use the wall itself.

Urs Bette Studiohow roaming can be provided Identifying Final Project Master 1

GENESIS

on site.

Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio

Concept of Spot and Walls juxtiposed to

Final Project Master 1

create some sort of roaming qualities

Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1

+

+

Mid Review 2020

Drawing and Models representing the Roamer Theres a pattern to how the roamer roams to identify and reach spot. This pattern is carved in the feet of the roamer so that it becomes a familiar space. Patterns becomes a way of memorising a route to reach the destination.

Ide T: INT a of CO us to E in N a s RRU g w C EP pe PT alls IN c T ifi c s G, to B OF po or R LO to RO r s EDIRCKIN AM pa ce EC G a ING TIN pa G. th, Le ad ing

walls

CO NC EP

he ground for the lls that guide the n

SITE MAPPING INPUTS

Creating a starting point and placing walls

Urs Bette Studio

Urs Bette Studiohow roaming can be Identifying

to generate spots and roaming qualities Final Project Master 1

Final Project Master 1

on site.

Mid Review 2020

Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio

Concept of Spot and Walls juxtiposed to

Final Project Master 1

create some sort of roaming qualities

Mid Review 2020

Drawin Roame

The roam The roam the wall yo

Drawing and Models representing the Roamer The roamer doesnt look for the spots but allready knows the spot. The roamer looks for walls where it guides you to the spot. To find the wall you must not use the ground but use the wall itself.

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1

Concept of looking for walls

The drawing above shows investiagtions of many characteristics of walls that forms a unique space in the Adelaide City

Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio

The strategy is to use walls as the ground for the spots/destinations. Walkable walls that guide the roamer to reaching its destination

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1

Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

=

Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Drawing and Models representing the Roamer Theres a pattern to how the roamer roams to identify and reach spot. This pattern is carved in the feet of the roamer so that it becomes a familiar space. Patterns becomes a way of memorising a route to reach the destination.

Creating a starting point and placing Urs Bette Studio to generate spots and roaming qualiti Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Walls Destination

The drawing above shows investiagtions of many characteristics of walls that forms a unique space in the Adelaide City

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio

SUPERIMPOSITION

Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

Urs Bette Studio Final Project Master 1 Mid Review 2020

SECTION


Project By: Kristopher Bryn Abenoja

. Urs Bette Studio . 2020

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ces - enhancing : social connection - connectivity - livability

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KIYANA KHALILI

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LIFE IN BETWEEN Can Architectural Design Solve Social Problems? Social space is an invisible set of relationships that translates into physical space. Both design (physical space) and social dynamics influence each other. The interaction between them comes as a two-way process, where design can shape our social life and vice versa. Bill Hillier says that “space and society cannot be separated, as space is not one thing and society another, because everything that people do happens in space.” Hegel argues that our identity is not created in a vacuum, but in relation to one another. As such, we cannot consider a person’s identity without considering her relation to others, since those others are instrumental in forming her identity. And George H Mead claims that “selves can only exist in definite relationships to other selves.” These arguments highlight the importance of communication and social life to human development and wellbeing. COVID-19 let us realise the importance of social relationships, while also revealing the isolation that is structurally embedded in many housing developments. The amount of time spent at home has reiterated the importance of spatial and experiential qualities in urban dwellings. The aim of this project is to create a housing environment that is more liveable due to invigorated community relationships. To achieve this, the project investigates the potential of the unexpected and accidental in architecture, informing both the design process as well as the users daily experiences. The secret of the unknown is intended to create excitement and curiosity amongst the users. The building blocks are spaced- and carved out to provide a series of different in-between spaces. These can be used for communication and movement, while also allowing for unprogrammed events. On the ground plane these are connected by an undulating topography, while on the upper levels the building blocks are linked by communal areas. These can be accessed by lift or through intertwining stairs that encourage the user to explore the built structure. The voids in-between are equally important as the buildings themselves, creating unexpected vistas and surprising public spaces that reveal themselves over time.

GENESIS

reference drawing

reference drawing

reference drawing

reference drawing

1. movement 2. connectivity

1. movement 2. unexpected 3. isolation vs accessablity 4. spaces 5.pause vs play 6.solitude

3. unexpected

1. connectivity 2. unexpected 3. mass and void 4. spaces

7.communication

generated drawing

generated drawing generated drawing

generated drawing

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Visual permeability and unexpected views to enhance curiosity and exploration

Enabling movement and activity in between spaces

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“THE QUALITY OF A SPACE AS A HOUSE BECOMES MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER BEFORE. AS HEGEL ARGUES, OUR IDENTITY IS NOT CREATED IN A VACUUM, RATHER OUR IDENTITY IS CREATED IN RELATION TO ANOTHER.” In between communal spaces - enhancing : social connection - connectivity - livability - light quality

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CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

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NUR IZRIN MOHD ZAHIDI

The pandemic has claimed thousands of lives over the last six months. Humans were put into quarantine and communication has shifted from physical to virtual space. Based on individual personal experiences this has affected people mentally in different ways. Inspiration for this project was drawn from the site’s history as well as the book ‘Metamorphosis’ by Franz Kafka. The book describes the physical transformation of a man into a bug, and his reflections on the consequences. Themes of depression, isolation and transformation have set the trajectory for this project. It investigates how architecture can function as a device that transforms and supports the user in times of crisis. LUCI (Lucid Universal Calibration Institute) is an institute that facilitates the ‘5 Stages of Grieve’; Denial, Anger, Depression, Bargain and Acceptance. The idea was been developed as a response to the current situation, often filled with sadness, depression and grieve. Phase One, Denial, starts with an Opium den in which people are encouraged to forget, hallucinate and dream. In Phase Two, Anger, their physical abilities and anxiety level are tested and stretched. In Phase Three, Depression, people are let alone with your thoughts while being observed for 3-6 months. Next, Phase Four is Bargaining. This phase allows them to speculate about the future. In the Final Phase, Acceptance, three choices are offered; first, workshop, acquiring new skills. Second, Soothing Recreation, relaxation with steam and liquid. Third, Cryogenic Chamber, delaying any response to the world as is, by freezing the body and being revived in 20-50 years’ time in hope of a better future. The system aims to restore humanity in times of crisis and help in coping with the new normal.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LUCI (LUCID UNIVERSAL CALIBRATION INSTITUTE)

GENESIS

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Phase One

Public PHASES OPIUM DEN

01 Phase One

Connector

Phase ONE One PHASE

02

Public ISOLATION ZONE

Private

Connector

03 Connector Hotel HOTEL

04

Hotel

Private

05

Semi-Private SOOTHING RECREATION SALT POOL SAUNA Observatory

Hotel Observatory

OBSERVATORY WORKSHOP

Semi-Private

CYROGENIC CHAMBER

Observatory OPIUM FARM

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A cyrogenic chamber is provided for those who feels there is no end to their inner pain. Provided with freezing the body,


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OBSERVATION DECK/ CAMPING / OPEN CINEMA LEVEL 6

ACTIVITY CENTER LEVEL 5

WATER BAR ORGANIC RESTAURANT

LEVEL 5

CAFE LEVEL 5

LEVEL 4

COOKING WORKSHOP + FOOD PRODUCING LEVEL 3

LIBRARY LEVEL 5

BOOKSTORE LEVEL 4

FARMING WORKSHOP LEVEL 2

STAFF DORM STAFF OFFICE

LEVEL 1-3

LEVEL 2

PHARMACY + "EMERGENCY" THERAPEUTIC ROOM LEVEL 1 GF

RENTED LOUNGE LEVEL 3-4

RENTED OFFICE LEVEL 1-2

MEDITATION ROOM LEVEL 1 GF

STAND-UP COMEDY CLUB LEVEL -1

LOBBY + RECEPTION LEVEL 1 GF

82


ZHENG YI

After the pandemic outbreak, I noticed that the quarantine and isolation caused many negative effects on people’s mental health. A report shows that the current suicide rate is six times higher than the fatalities caused by the coronavirus. Compared to the attention that the pandemic has raised global, the severity of mental illness is being significantly underrated. Migrant groups, in particular overseas students, tend to be at a higher risk for developing depression or other mental illnesses due to missing social and family support. The psychological assistance programs in Adelaide and South Australia, offering either online counselling or admission into a clinic, are insufficient under the current circumstances. The proposed project intends to address this gap, by offering an early intervention program for people who may have a tendency towards mental illness but are not symptomatic yet. Mental illnesses such as depression and anxiety disorder are easy to cure in the early stages. The intention is to lower the threshold for people seeking advice, by offering them a point of contact that sits within everyday live. Upfront the center functions as a mixture of community garden, co-working space and urban retreat, while in the background, a gardener for example will also be qualified to give counselling advise, or refer visitors to other colleagues or different means of care. The center pursues a low threshold policy, essentially it is open to everyone, while at the same time offered specialist help for people needing advice. Positioning it within the busiest part of the city is a reminder that mental well-being should be part of everyday live, and that instead of ignoring problems until we need to see doctor, the practice of mindfulness can restore our emotional balance.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

URBAN RETREAT - MENTAL HEALTH CENTER

GENESIS IMMIGRATION MAPPING

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SECTION 3

84


85


2

STUDIO ESTHER CHEW

“WORKING IN COLLABORATION WITH PATCH THEATRE, THE STUDIO BEGINS WITH A EXPERIMENTAL INSTALLATION CENTRED ON THE PLAY OF LIGHT AND SHADOW. NAMED THE SPARK PROJECT, WE CREATED A “BOX” TO ENGAGE WITH A GROUP OF 4-8 YEAR OLDS’ IN A SENSE OF MAGIC, PLAY AND WONDER..”

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FESTIVAL HUB STUDENTS 90 96 100 104 108

Ping Xiu Gan Angus Johnson Haobo Liu Kevin Ung Yumeng Zhao 87


This year, the Adelaide Festival developed an EOI to appoint a designer or architect to design a new Festival Hub space that can be used for the next three Festivals (2021-23). The brief for the Festival Hub calls for a “playful, theatrical, beautiful, surprising place; a place that is a pleasure to be inside, a place where people don’t want to leave!” A successful festival hub balances atmospheric and spatial qualities with compliance and cost-effective structures, re-usable materials, clever branding and intuitive wayfinding. The aim is to extend the invitation to participate, to give agency, and to provide a space that enables audiences to create new unforgettable memories, time and time again. Festivals are a part of the ‘experience economy’.

Working in collaboration with Patch Theatre, the studio begins with an experimental installation centred on the play of light and shadow. Named the SPARK project, we created a “box” to engage with a group of 4-8 year olds’ in a sense of magic, play and wonder. This project encourages us as designers to identify with the participants, to think about how we extend our invitation, what the surprising factors are, and how we can give people—in this instance, children—a sense of agency in whatever outcome the box may or may not have. Working in parallel with the SPARK project, the studio also explored different types of festivals, locally or internationally. We studied the audience profiles and the social and cultural aspects of each festival. We learn from industry colleagues

“THE AIM IS TO EXTEND THE INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE, TO GIVE AGENCY, AND TO PROVIDE A SPACE THAT ENABLES AUDIENCES TO CREATE NEW UNFORGETTABLE MEMORIES, TIME AND TIME AGAIN.” 88


through lectures and performances, and teased out ideas on invitation and participation. We discussed festival programming, modular structures, lighting and branding, food and beverage, fences, toilets and importantly waste management. The success of this studio is largely attributed to many industry colleagues who have generously shared their experience and knowledge throughout. A selection of the festival hubs are demonstrated here. Each is unique in its response to the chosen festival. ESTHER CHEW Studio Leader

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90


PING XIU GAN

“Our living room” is a meeting place, a hub for the annual OzAsia festival in Adelaide. Located at Victoria Square, the heart of the city will be transformed into a place for celebration and gathering, pumping life through the square and into the streets of the city. Constructed with a bamboo scaffolding system, its flexible conditions, lightness, and its kit-of-parts assembly defines the clarity and simplicity of the project. By utilizing the theatrical experience and concept from “shadow play” as a tool that drives both its architecture and program, the project challenges the conventional approaches towards festival materials and designs. By locating it on Victoria Square presents, it presents opportunity to strengthen the cultural ties of Oz Asia festival to Adelaide’s Chinatown. Inspired by the bamboo scaffoldings utilized in Hong Kong’s construction industry, “our living room” is a constructed from a framework of lightweight bamboo structure. The objective is to promote bamboo as a sustainable material through this festival. The façade and the structural system provide an ephemeral character of layering colours and shadows. In addition, the mesh fabric layer covers the external skin, acting as a beacon of light at night. A large part the hub is elevated to create a private and semi-public areas. A street food night market is located at ground level, creating an informal food culture plaza that interacts between the private and public programs inside “our living room.” “Our living room” is a festival hub that is adaptable across the span of three years. A kit-of-parts structure was designed for quick assembly and subsequent disassembly, transport, and making a possible change of part or repair. From simple modular components, neutral spaces were designed inside the hub to allow flexibility of programs during OzAsia festival.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

“OUR LIVING ROOM”

GENESIS SHADOW PLAY

91


on ground level, allowing permeability and dividing main envelopes

gateway

e into 4x4m grids

Establish existing vegetation to create a gateway

ntanyangga

he six squares BD, South Australia, ght's plan. Light come the commercial 1863. However, it has anyangga s the city central's for people pumping eofsixthe squares city. D, South Australia, t's OzAsia plan. Light or festival is me the St.), commercial Moonta where the 63. However, it has concentrated. he city central's r people pumping the city.

Elevating ‘our living room’ to create a void on ground level, allowing permeability and dividing main envelopes

Layering program and extruding function spaces on the west as heavy traffic flows from the tram stop

B

Creating bamboo structure for ‘our living room’

PANORAMIC SITE VIEW

B

Legend Gridding, dividing colume into 4x4m Cyclist grids

Flinders Street

Vehicular movement such as buses, tram and cars dominates a large part of the Victoria Sq.'s characteristic. However, the site can also be accessed via a series pedestrian network. Vehicular movement such as buses, tram and cars dominates a large part of the Victoria Sq.'s characteristic. However, the site can also be accessed via a series pedestrian network.

Flinders Street Amphitheatre seatings for stage performances Lanterns will be display after the moon lantern parade Amphitheatre seatings for stage performances Spill out area on the northern part of Vic Sq. accomodated by pallet Lanterns will be display seatings after the moon lantern parade A stage to accomodate contemporary music Spill out area on the performances northern part of Vic Sq. accomodated byhousing pallet Stage back of seatings

MOVEMENT + MOBILITY 02

Located at the heart of the city's grid plan, the site is surrounded by a number of heritage buildings. The site itself also includes a number of highly important historic elements. Located at the heart of the city's grid plan, the site is 16 surrounded by a number of heritage buildings. The site itself also includes a number 19 of highly important historic elements.

04 05

03

x x x x x x x x

Tram entrance

Victoria Square

x x x x

x x x x x xx x x x x x x x x x x x xx x x x x x x

x x x x

Victoria Square

Wakefield Street

Wakefield Street

06

A stage to accomodate contemporary music Vic Sq. road (between performances Grote St. and Wakefield St.) will beofclosed-off Stage back housing to create more of an enclosed site

07

10 17 20

The tram will serve as a Vicmain Sq. journey road (between entrance to Grote St. and the site itselfWakefield St.) will be closed-off to Lost create more offirst an aid, & found, enclosed site quench bench information, marquee The tram will serve as a Waste management area main journey entrance to the site itself

08 18

21 13 22

15

09 12

14 01

15

16

EXISTING CHARACTER 17

20

18 21 22

19 01

Establish existing vegetation Establish existing vegetation EXISTING CHARACTER to create a gateway to create a gateway Creating bamboo structureCreating for bamboo structure for Pallet seatings Lost & found, firstare aid, ‘our living room’ ‘our living room’ scattered around open information, quenchthe bench

There is a mixture of native and foreign tree species found on site

There is a mixture of native and foreign tree species found on site

area to provide seating marquee for the shadow facade Waste management area performances

Tram Line Heritage Buildings

Legend 01 Magistrate's Court

02 Cyclist General Post (GPO) 03 Pedestrian Former Treasury

04 Tram Pilgrim LineUniting 05 Heritage Multicultural SA Buildings Office 01 Magistrate's Court 06 Beacon House 02 General Post (GPO) 07 Captain Charles 03 Former Treasury Sturt 04 Pilgrim Uniting 08 John McDouall 05 Multicultural SA Stuart Office 09 Reserve Bank of Aus 06 Beacon House 10 Facade of Former 07 Captain Charles SA Harbors Board Sturt 11 Metropolitan Hotel 08 John McDouall 12 Torrens Building Stuart

Our living room

Street Elevating ‘our living room’ Elevating to ‘ourAngas living room’ to create a void on ground level, create a void on ground level, Adding and subtracting allowing permeability and allowing permeability and structures dividing main envelopes dividing main envelopes The 'Heart' of City of Adelaide, SA MASTERPLAN

Angas Street

Creating ‘o

09 Reserve Bank of Aus 14 Charles Cameron 10 Facade of Former Kingston Monument SA Harbors Board 15 St Francis Xavier's 11 Metropolitan Hotel Catholic Cathedral 12 Torrens Building 16 Fennescey House 13 Statue of Queen Vic. Offices 1417 Charles DistrictCameron Court Kingston Monument 18 John Dowie's Three 15 StRivers FrancisFountain Xavier's Catholic Cathedral 19 Convent of Mercy 16 Fennescey House 20 Jeffcott Chambers Offices

21 Supreme Court 17 District Court 22 Local & District Court

18 John Dowie's Three Elevating ‘our living room’ to Foreign Trees Rivers Fountain Nativeon Trees 19 a Convent of Mercy create void ground level, Localised Wind 20 Jeffcott Chambers allowing permeability and 21 Supreme Court dividing main envelopes 22 Local & District Court Foreign Trees Native Trees Localised Wind

Pallet seatings are scattered around the open area to provide seating Our living room for the shadow facade performances

Layering p function ビ s b heavy traffi

Pedestrian

Establish existing vegetation to create a gateway ESTABLISH EX. VEGETATION TO CREATE A GATEWAY 13 Statue of Queen Vic.

Gridding, dividing colume Gridding, into dividing Layering colume program into and extruding Layering program and extruding 07 08 06 09 4x4m grids 4x4mfunction grids spaces on the west function as spaces on the west as GRIDDING, DIVIDING COLUMNS LAYERING PROGRAM AND the EXTRUDING 10 + MOBILITY MOVEMENT heavy traffic flows from the heavy tram traffic flows from tram 12 INTO 4X4 GRID FUNCTION SPACES stop stop 13 031404 05 02 Tram entrance

Adding and subtracting structures

PANORAMIC SITE VIEW

FORM GENERATION

OzAsia festival is onta St.), where the oncentrated.

spaces on the west as heavy traffic flows from the tram stop

G G

GROUND FLOO 1: 200

Addin

GROUND FLOOR 1: 200

GREEN SPACE + VEGETATION Tram line access to city centre (North Terrace) and pedestrian crossing links to Chinatown (Moonta St. )

GREEN SPACE + VEGETATION

Adding and subtracting structures

SITE CONNECTIONS

Tram line access to city centre (North Terrace) and pedestrian crossing links to Chinatown (Moonta St. )

WEST ELEVATION 1: 200

The 'Heart' of City of Adelaide, SA SITE CONNECTIONS

MASTERPLAN

WEST ELEVATION 1: 200

コートルーム coat room

コートルーム coat room

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box office

lantern gateway

B

lantern gateway 4x4m grids function spaces on the west as B B Gridding, dividing colume into Layering program heavy and extruding traffic flows from the tram ヌードルファクト リー grids 4x4m function spaces on the west as stop noodle factory コート heavy traffic flows from the tram ルーム ショップ ショップ ショップ coat shops shops shops stop room

B

プライベートスペース private space

投影 projecti

street food

“CONSTRUCTED WITH A BAMBOO SCAFFOLDING SYSTEM, ITS FLEXIBLE CONDITIONS, LIGHTNESS, AND ITS KIT-OF-PARTS ASSEMBLY DEFINES THE CLARITY AND SIMPLICITY OF THE PROJECT.” B

B

B

ヌードルファクトリー noodle factory

プライベートスペース private space

ショップ ショップ shops shops ワークショ ップ

ショップ shops

workshops

g room’ to ound level, bility and OR PLAN velopes

Elevating ‘our living room’ to create a void on ground level, Elevating ‘our livingallowing room’ topermeability and Adding and subtracting create a void on ground level,main envelopes structures dividing ELEVATE OURpermeability LIVING ROOM” TO Adding and subtracting allowing and ADDDING AND SUBTRACTING CREATE PERMEABILITY structures dividing main envelopes STRUCTURES

Creating bamboo structure for ‘our living room’ CREATE BAMBOO STRUCTURE FOR ‘‘OUR LIVING ROOM”

A

vegetation eway

トイレ toilets

P1 Adding and subtracting structures

P1

R PLAN

P2 A

ビンエリア bins area

ワークショップ existing vegetation Establish workshops to create a gateway Establish existing vegetation Creating bamboo structure for to create 織り工房 a gateway ‘our living room’ weaving Creating bamboo structure for workshops ‘our living room’

Layering program and extruding function spaces on the west as トイレ toilets from the tram heavy traffic flows stop

A

olume into s

織り工房 weaving workshops

A

ビンエリア bins area

B

コート ルーム coat room

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1: 200

P2

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1: 200

SECOND FLOOR 1: 200

SECOND FLOOR P 1: 200

NORTH ELEVATION 1: 200

ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION 1: 200

ネット座席 net seatings 織り展 weaving exhibition

うける box office

うける box office

織り展 weaving exhibition

宴会場 ネット座席 banquet rooms net seatings

宴会場 banquet rooms

バー bar

バー bar

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94


95


96


ANGUS JOHNSON

The Australian Digital Art Gallery (A.D.A.G) is the new hub for all things digital art. Located in the heart of Adelaide’s future digital innovation precinct, Lot 14. The structure stands 65 meters tall making it visible from different vantage points throughout the city. The concept for a digital art gallery originated with the SPARK project, a collaboration with the Patch Theatre Company to create a “box” that would be introduced into the classroom of 4-8 year old children. The aim of the box was to evoke play without dictating rules, allowing the young individuals to be imaginative and make their own rules. The resulting SPARK project was a sound sensitive light display named AtoMic. The construction of AtoMic saw many challenges, as well as a consistent process of learning. Two key parts to this process were the construction of the body, which consisted of various parts found within Adelaide and the process of programming an arduino to control the light display through a microphone. Upon its completion the project was tested on a young Patch Theatre audience with observed positive and animated interactions. AtoMic not only acted as an audio visual stimulus, but proposed a few questions from the audience eager to understand “How does it work?” This introduction to digital programming through art and vice versa became a key theme of the project moving forward. Through testing, the A.D.A.G. project developed from a box that bridged the void between the National Aboriginal Art and Cultural Gallery and the Entrepreneur and Innovation Centre, to a beacon that not only complemented its surroundings but also would attain and inspire public interest. The shell of the building was informed by the form of the SPARK project, however the internal structure and movement through the building was controlled by programming (parametric modeling.) From the structure came the exploration of materiality and an investigation which eventually led to the decision of using 3D printed carbon fibre.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

ADAG

SITE

97


3D PRINT PROCESS PHASE 1

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

PHASE 4

PHASE 5

PHASE 6

98


a tactile project a telescoping globe was considered, to make the presence of the display seem bigger. The idea of the balls responding to sound was decided, with each globe lighting up in succession as sound was increased.

AXO: Carbon Fibre Pavilion

S2

MASTER PLAN: Site Area 1:1000

Music, or instruments could be introduced to the toy with the added sound function. A concept of detaching the balls was one to consider, however this would dramatically increase the cost of the project. Compromises had to be considered in the creation of the toy within the small time frame.

PLAN KEY

CIRCULATION

People Flow

EXHIBITION SPACE

Exhibition Space

EXHIBITION SPACE

PROJECTION SPACE PROJECTION SPACE

EXHIBITION SPACE

Projection space

PROJECTION SPACE

The following plan view shows the movement through the structure. The structure is designed so that the occupant may flow down and around various art installments.

These diagrams were the extent of the planning. The build process was much like the play process with the balloon.

The structure links together via four bridges.

2

4

BRID GE 3

E IDG

BR

E IDG

BR

BRIDGE 1

BRID GE 1

The Build

Twelve Spheres were purchased with the ability to light up different colours. To hold these sphere, a dodecahedron was built out of MDF.

BRIDGE 4 BRIDGE 2

BRIDGE 3

EXHIBITION SPACE EXHIBITION SPACE

EXHIBITION SPACE

S1

S1

A

EXHIBITION SPACE

EXHIBITION SPACE EXHIBITION SPACE

A

S2

The faces of the dodecahedron were connected together in the form of a net. A concept that would be later considered in the ADAG project.

N

FLOOR PLAN: Bridge Plan 1:200

Programing was a key part to learning the process of building a light display that would respond to sound. A basic Arduino would act as the computer for this project.

PLAN

A mock-up of the basic arduino LED set up was tested early, with a lack of interest without the artistic element.

The globes were hacked into and placed into the arduino circuit.

The final outcome was successful, following question such as “How does it work?” The artistic element of AtoMic created interest in the technology behind the project. From this first Act came the concept of a Digital Art Gallery.

SECTION S1: South North 1:200

99


100


HAOBO LIU

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

GAME ON 2020

The Game On Festival is a 5-day new game pre-release festival which is held annually, where players from around the world gather in different country every year from November 16th to 20th. The Game On Festival aim to bring unprecedented experience to game lovers. A global touring festival, gamers can experience the latest and hottest video games as a pre-release, watch team competitions, game exhibitions and meet friends with the same interest. During the 5 days, the festival hub will be open 24 hours, and engaged in round the clock gaming with participants from around the world. The 2020 Game On festival is held at the Torrens Parade Ground, Adelaide. It will feature the first trial experience of CyberPunk 2077. The festival hub, constructed from shipping containers aim to provide a safe and fun environment for game lovers of different ages with immersive gaming experience. The main festival activities include interactive exhibitions, game arenas, eSports competition, high impact collective experiences and other fun activities. To meet typical gamers’ requirement and personality, the Game On festival hub in Adelaide offers car parking area next to the festival hub that also doubles up as a drive-in cinema for the E-sport competition. This drive-in cinema offers a chance for the audience to watch E-sport in their own car without going into the festival. Waste management area locates on the top left of the festival hub to allow easy collection. Trees, plants and lawns are brought into the 1342 festival hub to help reduce the temperature in November. An open ground at the central area is used for the audience to watch E-sport on the main screen of the festival hub. The ventilation system is applied inE-Gaming the gaming a In Australia In Theroom World to provideE-Gaming comfortable thermal condition ease festival which is held annually in more than 30 67% 7590.5 M At the end of the festival, thePopulation shipping containers are Population h. 23% 3965.9M Onlinetouring Population venue packed up, and shipped to the next in anotherAge 1-17 deo games before anyone else, watch team 65% Awarness will then be adapted$1586.1M to suit typologyAge 18-64 ith the same hobbies. country. During the 5The days,atmosphere the festival an try out the latest games and play online of game that iswith released. Age 65-94 12% $905.6M Revenues

On 2020

d experience to game lovers. In this festival, st desired video game of the year before it be ring you the first trial experience of CyberPunk 2077.

held at Torrens Parade Ground from November 16th fun environment for game lovers of different ages al activities include interactive exhibitions, game e experiences and other fun activities.

cling, the main material used for the Game On l festival, the shipping containers used in Game On pped to other countries.

Increase connection between parents/children Help develop Australian E-Gaming industry More opportunities/support to local gamers

Target Audience

Game Lover

GAMER

Family

FAMILY

GENESIS TARGET MARKET

Couple

Tourist

COUPLE

TOURIST

Influencer

INFLUENCER

101


minutes to walk from site. Buildings within red circle means it is about 350 meters far from site and takes 5 minutes to walk from site.

Axo

Concept Diagram

SITE AXONOMETRIC

s it is about 170 meters far from site and takes 2.5 within red circle means it is about 350 meters far alk from site.

Traffic Movement

Pedestrian Movement

Lawn

Tree Canopy

The Site

Maximize

Concept Diagram

Shipping Container

Type Of Container Total number of container: 53 The Site

Maximize Site Potential

Central Open Ground

Shipping Container Structure

Modify The Height

Flexible Festival Circulation

Central Main Screen

Type Of Container

Floornumber Plan of 1:200 CONTAINERS X 53 53 Total container: Ground Level

Add Green Elements

Type 1

Type 2

Remove all side and use as load support structure

Remove one larger interna

CONTAINER MODULES

N

1st Level

3

12

1

13

6

5

11

2 4

T1 1 Type

T3Type 2

CANOPY

T4Type 3

DOUBLE VOLUME Remove one side to allow

Remove all side and use as load support structure

7larger

BILLBOARD Replace container side with

internal space

billboard screen

T5Type 5

T6 4 Type

ACRYLLIC MOD side with Replace container

PLANTER BED

Cut part of shipping container to be used as tree bed

arcrylic sheet

15

Section Deta

“DURING THE 5 DAYS, THE FESTIVAL HUB WILL 10

16

Legend BE OPEN 24 HOURS, AND ENGAGED IN ROUND THE CLOCK GAMING WITH PARTICIPANTS 1 Waste Management Area FROM AROUND THE WORLD. ” 2 Arcade Game Room 9

8

12

13

14

S2

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

S1

11

15

2nd Level

Toliet Festival Installation Storage Ticket Office Bar Food Area Seating Area Boundary Gaming Room Load Support Structure Exhibition Room Exhibition Room E-Sport Room Gaming Room Food Bar

3rd Level 23

19

18

16

17

20

Section West 17

102

24


103


104


KEVIN UNG

The Garden Illumination Festival is located at the Adelaide Botanical Parks. It will allow people to encounter plants and the Australian native environment in a contemporary way through the use of light illumination and projection. It aims to celebrate the bloom of botanical. The festival will run through the first week of the spring equinox between the 1st of September to the 21st commemorating the start of blossoming of flowers and plants. The oasis will be transformed with a variety of events from day to night ranging from garden workshops, flower sculpting, kids garden spaces to light performances and 3d illumination/ projections that activates & illuminates the botanical environment within Adelaide. The festival is constructed from a series of shipping containers ranging from 3 various sizes of 10ft, 20ft and 40ft containers that are interchangeable throughout the course of 3 weeks, where new events occur to attract a wide range of audiences. The containers open the festival with the form beginning on the ground, progressively stacking, changing and shifting the illumination and projection highlighting the nature of Botanic, streaming around the festival form creating new immersive experiences. The immersive experience will support the development of Adelaide as a sustainable and liveable city alongside the initiative of ‘Green Adelaide’. The festival will allow the opportunities for increased tourism and connection to the heart of Adelaide’s green city with link and correspondence towards the Adelaide Botanic Gardens and the Adelaide Zoo.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

GARDEN ILLUMINATION

GENESIS BOX PLAY

1

2

3

105


3

Week 1:

SEPT. 1

September 1st - 7th

1. GREENHOUSE 2. PLANT GARDENS 3. BAR 4. DIGITAL PROJECTION ROOM 6 5. WASTE 6. CONTAINER STORAGE 7. CRANE 7 8. FOOD5 STALLS 9. GREEN ROOM 10. PERFORMANCE SPACE 11. TOILETS 12. PROJECTION FLOOR 13. CORPORATE HUB 4 16 14. ROOF GARDEN BAR 15. FOOD STALLS-ROOF DECK 16. KIDS THEATRE 17. GREEN ROOM LVL 1 14 18. STORAGE 3 19. BRIDGE 20. 3D PROJECTION ROOM

SEPT. 8

SEPT. 15

1 green house

Week/ site 1: plan ground

September Scale: 1st - 7th 1:500 ground site plan 2 plant /gardens

bar WEEK 1 - SITE GROUND 34PLAN digital propjection room

SEPT. 1- 7 1

6

1

7

Scale:

1:500

5 waste 6 container storage 7 crane 8 food stalls 1 9 ghreen room 10 performance space 11 toilets 12 projection floor

5

8

8

10 4

11

17 12

10

13. corporate hub 14 roof garden bar 15 food stallsroof deck 16 kids theatre 17 green room lvl 1 12 18 storage

1

19. Bridgee 11 21 3d projection room

1

10

3 18

1 green house 2 plant gardens 3 bar 4 digital propjection room 5 waste 1 6 container storage 7 crane 8 food stalls 9 ghreen room 10 performance space 11 toilets 12 projection floor

1 13

WEEK 2 - LVL 1 PLAN

1 green hous 2 plant garde 3 bar 4 digital prop 5 waste 6 container s 7 crane 8 food stalls 9 ghreen roo 10 performan 11 toilets 12 projection

SEPT. 8 - 14

16

16 17

10

Week 2:

14

September 8th - 14th

Level 1 plan

13

Scale:

19. Bridgee

13. corporate hub 14 roof garden bar 15 food stallsroof deck 17 16 kids theatre 17 green room lvl 1 18 storage

13. corporate 14 roof garde 21 3d projection room 15 food stalls

Week 3:

18 storage

14

1:500

18

18

13

Week 3:

Week 2:

September 8th - 14th

10.4m

5.2m

2.6m

0m

106

16 kids theat

September 17 green15th roo

10

Level Week 1 plan 2:

September Scale: 8th - 14th1:500 Level 1 plan

1

Scale:

1:500

Septe


19

15

19

WEEK 3 - LVL 1 PLAN

SEPT. 15 - 21

18

14

13

16

17

19

20

19

15

19

18

14

A

A

13

Scale:

h - 21st

1:200

Scale:

ember 15th - 21st

1:200

SECTION B

107


108


YUMENG ZHAO

The project is an urban commercial greenhouse that operates through rainwater harvesting, hydroponic and aquaponic vertical farming. For two weeks in January and July, it hosts a food festival to celebrate the harvest of crops and fish. The site and concept of the festival addresses urban festivals’ common drawbacks of engaging local communities and implementing long-term plans for the awareness they raise. The site is chosen to be at Bowden Heritage Precinct, outside of Adelaide’s festival heart, close to locals’ daily commute and easily accessible via public transport. The heritage-listed Brompton Gasworks represent Bowden and surrounding suburbs’ industrial background. As industrial sites are stereotypically related to pollution and lack of appeal, the project aims at cleansing the site with water through rainwater harvesting. To rejuvenate the site further, the rainwater is then recirculated in hydroponic and aquaponic farming, transforming the site into an urban farm that fuels the community through food. Hence the hub becomes a permanent commercial greenhouse outside of the festival. Hydroponic farming is a soilless technique that grows crops using only water with nutrient solution. It is highly efficient with large harvest quantities and requires about only 10% of the water used in conventional agriculture. The crops are safer from infection and disease, therefore are pesticides free. The system becomes almost self-sufficient by incorporating aquaponic system. The plants cleanse the water that farms fish, whose waste becomes the natural nutrients for the plants. To highlight both the functional and festival aspects of the greenhouse, modular roofs are the key feature of the structure that emphasise lightweight and transparency in contrast with the heavy-based industrial elements. This is further accentuated by elevated floor grating, light wells and arrangement of plant stations surrounding the roof columns. In conclusion, the project proposes to bring heritage and community, function and recreations together, with considerations of the contemporary festival’s impact on urban spaces.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

THE GASWORKS GREENHOUSE FESTIVAL

SITE CONTEXT COLLAGE

109


KEY AREAS GREENHOUSE

HEIGHT TO MATCH HERITAGE STRUCTURE

ACCESS + ACTIVITY

FESTIVAL CANOPY

RESPOND TO HUMAN SCALE

SITE ISOMETRIC

MODULE ROOF FOR RAINWATER COLLECTION

PLUMBING + WASTE TRUCK ENTRY FROM FIRST STREET

GROUND + WALL WAYFINDING PROJECTIONS

110


“THE SITE AND CONCEPT OF THE FESTIVAL ADDRESSES URBAN FESTIVALS’ COMMON DRAWBACKS OF ENGAGING LOCAL COMMUNITIES AND IMPLEMENTING LONG-TERM PLANS FOR THE AWARENESS THEY RAISE.”

WATER CIRCULATION

RESERVOIR OVERFLOW TO EXTRA RAINWATER STORAGE TANK

RAINWATER DIRECTION RAINWATER RESERVOIR + TANK FILTERED CLEAN WATER DIRECTION DUCKWEED BIOFILTER FOR SOLIDS NUTRIENT WATER DIRECTION FISH TANKS

111


3

STUDIO ANTHONY COUPE

“WHILE THE STUDIO ASKED STUDENTS TO MAKE DECISIONS ABOUT SITE SELECTION AND PROGRAMMING (DEVELOPING A BRIEF) IT ALSO OFFERED APPROACHES TO DESIGN BASED ON FICTIONAL LITERATURE, ENCOURAGING A CLOSE-READING OF THE SUBJECT – BE IT THE CULTURAL – HOW IT SITS WITHIN OUR CULTURAL CONSCIOUSNESS, OR THE PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES OR PROPERTIES OF WATER AS AN ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENT.”

112


THE TRUE COLOUR OF THE SEA STUDENTS

116 122 126 130 134 138

Deng Shichao Sally Rowett Mitchell Lobb Shaun Norton Jack Korcz Claudine Rivers 113


Within the framework of the final project studio course, this studio group condensed around a single theme – WATER. Students were asked to develop their own project that in some way addressed the theme. Concerned with the role of architects and architecture in/ as agency and advocacy students were responsible for site selection, programming and entering into an ‘issue;’ framed in a way to lift students’ social responsibility and engagement in the world as a good citizen. While the studio asked students to make decisions about site selection and programming (developing a brief) it also offered approaches to design based on fictional literature, encouraging a close-reading of the subject – be it the cultural – how it sits within

our cultural consciousness, or the physical attributes or properties of water as an architectural element. This might be it’s fluidity, reflectivity, sustainability, colour, or simple ‘otherness.’ LEARNING OUTCOMES On one hand, students were encouraged to think extremely broadly and provocatively and had the freedom to develop their own project on a very broad scale. On the other they had to participate in quite specific exercises relating to architecture and fictional literature through a workshop with author Dr Cameron Raynes exploring the use of Haiku poem formats relating to texts they were given as part of the course material; Robert Drewe’s The True Colour of the Sea, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Winton’s Breath, and

“ON ONE HAND, STUDENTS WERE ENCOURAGED TO THINK EXTREMELY BROADLY AND PROVOCATIVELY AND HAD THE FREEDOM TO DEVELOP THEIR OWN PROJECT ON A VERY BROAD SCALE. ON THE OTHER THEY HAD TO PARTICIPATE IN QUITE SPECIFIC EXERCISES RELATING TO ARCHITECTURE AND FICTIONAL LITERATURE .”

114


others – potentially from their own readings and research. In response to the relative ‘freedom,’ students cast a wide net, settling on issues related to seal level rise, water scarcity, cultural identity, burial, and well-being. Sites were similarly dispersed, with projects situated in Ningaloo, Port Adelaide, Kiribati, Tokyo Bay, Wilson’s Promontory, Waverley and the Head of the Bight. As a self-directed research programme students developed a solid level of expertise around these subjects – both the issues and the proposed programming. They investigated a range of typologies and made informed decisions about the direction for their proposal. Where it was possible, students visited the site. Where there was no opportunity to do so, students forged connections to other experts, professionals,

researchers and community embers that provided the physical and cultural contexts such as topography, vegetation, dimensions, historical background, geological structure, access, emerging developmental contexts, geo political framework, amongst others. ANTHONY COUPE Studio Leader

115


116


DENG SHICHAO

In response to the studio’s central theme of water, the design programme is built around a crematorium and sea burial facility, in part to offer alternative burials, and in order to decelerate the predicted exhaustion of grave plots in next twenty years in New South Wales. According to Metropolitan Sydney Cemetery Capacity Report, the capacity of cemeteries in the Central, South and North regions has extreme limited numbers of available grave plots compares to the evaluated deaths for those regions in the upcoming decades. Established in 1877, the Waverley Cemetery in Sydney is an iconic landscape set in an enclosing shallow valley, perched on the cliffs above the Tasman Sea. The distinctive Cemetery is characterised by the open and exposed landscape of vertical monuments facing the open ocean. The project site is situated in the right front to the open valley, which stands within the sea with main body elevated above the water. The form of the building was derived through studying and abstracting haiku poems. By converting literature into images in order to find the architectural form to develop further. Connected to the land by a bridge enveloped in a dense fog reflects the idea of a path leading to another world. The building incorporates an open deck where ashes of the deceased can be scattered in the sea. Alternatively, the deceased’s family may choose a sea burial where the full body of deceased is dropped into the deep sea, 60km offshore. In either case, the ceremonies are based around water as the ultimate resting place. The artificial mist around the bridge leads people into another world. When entering into the fog mass, visual and acoustic references are erased, leaving only an optical “white-out”, sensory intuitive becomes the only thing to rely on. When people looking back, they already cannot see the land. Keep moving, step into an another world.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LETHE

CONCEPT SEA BURIAL

117


Foyer PROGRAM Foyer

Foyer Foyer Foyer Ceremony Room

Foyer FOYER Ceremony Room

Ceremony Room Ceremony Room Administration Ceremony Room CEREMONY ROOM Administration Ceremony Room Administration Administration ADMIN Administration Memorial Administration Memorial Memorial MEMORIAL Memorial Cremation Memorial Cremation Memorial CREMATION Cremation Cremation Cremation Dining DINING Cremation Dining Dining Dining Dining Dining

118


FORM GENERATION

Form Generation

on

Bridge of Forgetfulness INTERPRATIVE SKETCHES sea blurred by a creeping mist FROM TEXT

Placing drawing in SKETCHES INPUTTED multipleXYZ directions ACROSS AXIS

a portal frees the soul

TEST Combine the drawing COMBINATIONS with different angle

ery has e compare purpose of y limited burial slot

ope ng shallow k path edrock d from ion charts. pe as well.

Fo Tracing the drawings TRACEwith VIEWdifferent OF WORKPLANES workplane

y operties.

Adjust the position LINEWORK of different lines INTERPRET to form INTO potential enclosure VOLUME

Applying the surface APPLY SURFACE TO to get enclosure solid form CREATE SOLID

C

1

ustrated edestrain arse, n from RPLAN by

2

3

5

1. Spot for hearse to leave the coffin for the bereaved or cemetery stuff 2. Platform 3. the Bridge 4. Reception 5. Ceremony Room 6. Waiting Hall 7. Furnace Hall (including cold storage room) 8. Memorial Area, Wall niche, open deck for scarttering ashes.

4

5

Entry Floor Plan Scale: 1: 500

ve

liffs

ng mist

WAVERLEY CEMETERY MASTER PL AN For Waverley Council August 2018

y Cemetery Master Plan

7. Furnace Hall (including cold storage room) 9. Ceremony Room 10. Dining area 11. Habour (boat for carrying body burial at sea) 12. Wall niche, Memorial 13. Administration (cemetery offices, maintenance

9

119 13


120


121


122


SALLY ROWETT

To explore the theme of water for this studio I first considered what this meant to me. Through my personal love and connection to the ocean i have always been drawn to the rich abundance of coastal landscapes around Australia. In particular how movement of water is affected by environmental elements such as wind, tide and swell and how this changes how the ocean moves, connects with the shoreline. I am also drawn to remote locations and the Aboriginal history and culture of each place and how different nations view the landscape through dreamtime stories. This inspired exploration of remote site locations round Ningaloo where the arid landscape meets the immensely bio diverse Ningaloo Reef and the cultural history and evidence of communities inhabiting the area dates back more than 32,000 years. Through discussion with archaeologist Kate Morse, finder of a series of objects in including the twelve beads at Mandu Mandu Creek rock shelter in Cape Range National Park it was evident that this was an area for many years that was frequented often for long periods of time and seasonally. The language of this area is no longer known or spoken. In order to address this issue, I explored other regional Aboriginal Communities and larger cities in order to understand how they are addressing culture and language preservation. It was also made evident that in many government housing and aged care facilities for aboriginal communities, consultation has been largely overlooked. For this studio, in order to address these areas of interest, the following design explores the potential for an assisted living and aged care facility. The architecture aims to provide opportunity to facilitate care, language schools, and both local community engagement and tourism. Design of this architecture is in direct response to the landscape, the ocean and a minimal intervention in a location that connects people.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

DEEP WATER

SITE

123


GROUND PLAN

1

2 2

3

5 4

9

15 15 14 5

6 6 13

1 GALLERY / TOURISM 2 LANGUAGE SCHOOL 3 RECEPTION / STAFF 4 HOSPICE 5 RESPITE 6 ASSISTED LIVING 7 INDEPENDENT LIVING 8 STAFF ACCOMMODATION 9 MEDICAL REFRIGERATION & STORAGE 10 KITCHEN 11 DINING 12 COMMUNAL FIRE PIT 13 FIRE PIT 14 LAUNDRY 15 WASTE DEPOT 16 RANGER STATION 17 SERVICES INC. GENERATOR AND SOLAR BATTERY 18 RANGER STATION

6 6

10

7 13

11 7 11

12 13 7

7

13 7

7 8

8 8 8

124

8

8 13

8

8 0

5

10

25


LVL 1 PLAN

8

8 8 8

UP

8 8 8 8 UP

“NINGALOO WHERE THE ARID LANDSCAPE MEETS THE IMMENSELY BIO DIVERSE NINGALOO REEF AND THE CULTURAL HISTORY AND EVIDENCE OF COMMUNITIES INHABITING THE AREA DATES BACK MORE THAN 32,000 YEARS”

125


1.

5.

8.

3. 2.

4. 3.

7. 6.

3. 3.

4.

8.

1.MAIN PUBLIC ENTRANCE 2. SKY-LIGHT BOARDWALK 3. RE-VEG GREEN ROOF 4. SECONDARY RESEARCH ENTRANCE 5.OBSERVATORY 6. CLIFF EDGE BOARDWALK 7.LOWER COURTYARD 8.EXISTING PATHWAYS 9.LOOKOUT

SITE PLAN

9.


The structure itself sits along one of the longest stretch of non-stop cliffs in the world, the Bunda Cliffs, and key design considerations were researched right from the beginning to ensure that the site edge is both respected and at the core of the design framework. The building is conceived as though it is barely there, and not an imposition on the landscape. The aim of the project is to prompt users to develop the ‘Call of the Void’ as they experience the internal spaces of the building. Through choreographed views and spatial arrangements, public movement is prompted forward towards the edge of the cliff, while professional movement is projected sideways and round the visitor centre. Form generation was explored through the use of haiku considerations, and alongside physical site features and paintings were produced. These paintings were laid on the landscape, and reinterpreted as building with minimal intrusion on that landscape. The structure is designed to co-exist with the landscape and to maximise the potential of the unique environmental characteristics that the surrounding landscape provides. Green roofs are utilised with louvered windows underneath to allow extraction of hot air, while majority of the structure is located underground to ensure cooling of thermal mass. Material is kept to natural and thermally beneficial materials that allow the structure to co-exist, rather than stand-alone.

MITCHELL LOBB

Built around a concept called “L’Appel Du Vide” (Call of the Void) the design explored ideas around the experience of the feeling of wanting to step off or over - a cliff edge. Essentially the project is a replacement for the existing visitor centre at the head of the Great Australian Bight and in the face of increased activity related to shipping and resource exploration, hosts additional research facilities for marine and astronomical research.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

THE EDGE

GENESIS HAIKU

Legend: 1. Main Public Entrance 2. Sky-light Boardwalk 3. Re-veg Green Roof 4. Secondary Research Entrance 5. Observatory 6. Cliff Edge Boardwalk (path continuation) 7. Lower Courtyard 8. Existing Pathways 9. Lookout 127


GENERATIVE PROCESS

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

OUTCOME

128


129


130


SHAUN NORTON

The concept of Perennial Power began with the acknowledgment of water shortage concerns in an ever-increasing global population. This provided the basis of the project which later developed into addressing issues around food security and the future of sustainable food production. It has been estimated that two-thirds of the world’s population could be facing water shortages within the next five years. Currently 75 percent of South Australia’s water supply is consumed by agricultural practices, which is dominated by mono-culture and relies heavily on the continued use of pesticides. These methods can not only damage the health and longevity of the soil but can also cause adverse effects on human health. By taking root on a site surrounded by gas fired power stations and a quarantine station that, for over 100 years, served to protect South Australia from harmful diseases – Perennial Power serves as a symbol for sustained health. Much like the extensive root systems of perennial plants which infuse life into the soil, this project seeks to rejuvenate the neglected site of Torrens Island and reimagine the future of food production. The building integrates an agricultural research institute with a remote residential campus for on site farming and food production education for high school students interested in a career in the food industry. The addition of an on site seawater desalination plant drastically reduces the reliance on South Australia’s freshwater resources for plant irrigation, whilst the incorporation of an algae bioreactor facade provides both a source of sustainable food supplementation and power generation through the production of bio-fuels.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

PERENNIAL POWER

GEESNI E GEN S S IGSE N E S I S The began initial form began by thinking about how the site The initial by thinking about how the site The initial form form began by thinking about how the site had been previously been encounted: both had previously been encounted: both by land by anby had previously encounted: both byan land byland an by sea. sea. sea. The this intersection sequence The form follows this form intersection sequence and then The form follows this follows intersection sequence and then and then adopts of both growing plantspath (through path adopts qualities of both growing plants (through path adopts qualities ofqualities both growing plants (through of least and wateradhesion (through adhesion and of least resistance) and resistance) water (through adhesion and and of least resistance) and water (through cohesion) to develop intoentity. a unified entity. cohesion) to develop into a unified entity. cohesion) to develop into a unified

GENEIS

MODES OF ARRIVAL ADHESION PATH OF LEAST2.RESITANCE 1. Modes of Arrival Path of Least Resistance 3.3.Adhesion (Cohesion) 1. Modes of Arrival 2.2.Path of LeastResistance Resistance 3.3.Adhesion (Cohesion) 1. Modes of Arrival 2. Path of Least Resistance Adhesion (Cohesion) Modes ofof Arrival Path of Leastof Adhesion (Cohesion) 1.1.Modes Arrival 2.2. Path Least Resistance 3.3.Adhesion (Cohesion) (BOTANICAL) 1. Modes of Arrival Path of Least Resistance Adhesion (Cohesion)

131


SECTION 01 1:1500

132


SECTION DETAIL 1:50

GREEN ROOF DETAIL

NUTRIENT RICH WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE PUMPED FROM SEAWATER DESALINATION PLANT SITE IS FED INTO THE TUBULAR SYSTEM

ALGAE IS HARVESTED AND USED TO PRODUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENTATION AND BIO- FUELS FOR ENERGY GENERATION

DIRECT SUNLIGHT FROM NORTHERN EXPOSURE COMBINED WITH WATER AND CO2 ENCOURAGES ALGAE GROWTH

ALGAE BIOREACTOR FACADE SYSTEM VEGETATION GROWING SUBSTRATE FILTER LAYER DRAINAGE LAYER MOISTURE RETENTION LAYER WATERPROOF PROTECTION BARRIER THERMAL INSULATION MEMBRANE PROTECTION COURSE WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF SLAB UNVEGETATED GRAVEL BARRIER

D1

1:100

SECTION 2

SECTION 1 133


OBSTACLE COURSE

FLOATING STRUCTURES SUBMERGERED STRUCTURE

134


JACK KORCZ

In response to the studio brief – water – the project seeks to investigate issues around sea-level rise in large urban waterfront centres, and how some of the thinking around this can produce dynamic and interesting urban design outcomes. Taking a site within Tokyo Bay that offers rather uninteresting watefront engagement, A Rise in Time consists of 2 dominate structures. The first structure is anchored to the ground whilst the other structure floats with the tide, maintaining its position relative to the water level. The anchored structure is comprised of a large room that acts as a warehouse and small commercial farm with produce for the other structure. The second structure consists of three stories. On the lower level is a large open foyer where exhibitions take place and on the other side is a restaurant that exposes underwater views. The middle floor’s internal spaces act as an opportunity to move from one floor to the next, externally a large, covered courtyard allows pedestrians to explore right to the water’s edge and maintain views across the harbor. The highest floor consists of a large cooking classroom and an observation deck to look out over the harbor. Connecting these 2 structures is a floating jetty that stays level relative to the floating structure allowing access via pedestrians during low sea levels and via boats during high sea levels. Drawing inspiration from Japanese game shows a large array of steppingstones of varying sizes and heights have been used as a temporary form of access and discovery between the mainland and the structures. As the sea level rises these steppingstones will become submerged and transform into an artificial reef further supporting the local ecosystem.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

A RISE IN TIME

SITE

135


EDUCATION BUILDINGS

HISTORIC LAND RECLAMATION

Connecting these 2 structures is a floating jetty that stays level relative to the floating structure allowing access via pedestrians during low sea levels and via boats during high sea levels. Drawing inspiration from Japanese game shows a large array of steppingstones of varying sizes and heights have been used as a temporary form of access and discovery between the mainland and the structures. As the sea level rises these steppingstones will become submerged and transform into an artificial reef further supporting the local ecosystem.

LAND RECLAMATION

1592 PROGRESS LAND 1592RECLAMATION

1854

1854

DESIGN1592DEVELOPMENT

commercial farm with produce for the other structure. The second structure consists of three stories. On the lower level is a large open foyer where exhibitions take place and on the other side is a restaurant that exposes underwater views. The middle floor’s internal spaces act as an opportunity to move from one floor to the next, externally a large, covered courtyard allows pedestrians to explore right to the water’s edge and maintain views across the harbor. The highest floor consists of a large cooking classroom and an observation deck to look out over the harbor.

1925

1925

1970

1970

2012

2012

SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN

1854

1925

1970

2012

STARTING POINT

CUT AWAY

RECONNECT

MASSING

INTERVENING

EXISTINGSTARTING POINT

CUTAWAY CUT AWAY

RECONNECT RE-CONNECT

MASSING MASSING

INTERVENING INTERVENING

PROGRESS

0

0

ELEVATION

1:200

SITE PLAN

0 A1688477

0

“THE PROJECT SEEKS TO INVESTIGATE ISSUES AROUND SEA-LEVEL RISE IN LARGE URBAN A1688477 WATERFRONT CENTRES, AND HOW SOME OF THE THINKING AROUND THIS CAN PRODUCE DYNAMIC AND INTERESTING URBAN DESIGN OUTCOMES.”

OBSERVATION DECK THEATRE

UNDERWATER THEATRE

ELEVATION

1:200

COOKING THEATRE OUTDOOR THEATRE

ENTRANCE FOYER

D1

SECTION 1 136


WIND PROOF LAYER

D3

SOIL FILTRATION LAYER DRAINAGE LAYER ROOT BARRIER Elevation S-2 1:10

INSULATION WATERPROOF MEMBRANE ROOF DECK

D2

Elevation S-2 1:10

PRECAST CONCRETE GINA GASKET OMEGA SEAL ANCHOR GASKET SUPPORTING PLATE STEEL STUD

Elevation S-2 1:10

D1 1.7M X 2M, 200MM ACRYLIC PANEL CHEMICAL BOND Elevation S-2 1:10

SILICON JOIN WATERPROOF MEMBRANE Elevation S-2 1:10

GROUT STEEL BRACE BOLTS REINFORCED CONCRETE

UNDERWATER BAR

WAREHOUSE AND FARMING D3

DELIVERY AREA

D2

SECTION 2 137


138


CLAUDINE RIVERS

Rising sea levels are an increasing and significant threat to low-lying countries. The Republic of Kiribati, a collection of 33 atolls located in the Pacific, is at high risk. At the same time in Port Adelaide, the former Penrice Soda Factory is rendered abandoned on the banks of the Port River. In response to the studio, the project was built around the investigation of possible outcomes for climate refuges by combining the the two places, and the idea of re-utilising the the former factory space to design for people who don’t have a home to go back to – climate refugees. The program developed through consideration of three principles: robustness, shared spaces and emancipation; this progress the project to allow for mixed program spaces that relate to Kiribati’s identify of being linked to the sea as well as recognising the industrial nature of the site. First Dawn proposes mixed use of spaces such as; boat building, marina, marine training school, embassy, residential, communal spaces, daycare, restaurant and shared spaces. The project is aimed at creating an environment that goes beyond the house and provides support for existing and new residents of the area. The design process began by examining the existing building on the site and linking them through drawing to create atoll forms. The linework is then inputted into digital modelling software to generate form through different interpretations of the atoll pathways. Then the process developed into examining artwork depiction of how the I-Kiribati people see their home. The study resulted in identifying horizontal soft curves and lines, as well as repeated triangle shapes that can be linked to the Maneabe building, a traditional meeting space. This then informed the selection of the forms generated to create spaces that are visually connected to the image of Kiribati living.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

FIRST DAWN

STRUCTURE

139


18

14 15 16

17

13 3 2 1 12 4 10 9

11

140

7 7

8

5

6


SITE PLAN 1. MANEABA 2. MARINA + MANEABA GUEST DOCKING 3. MANEABA MEETING SPACE - INTERIOR 4. MANEABA MEETING SPACE - EXTERIOR 5. KIRABITI EMBASSY 6. EMBASSY LIBRARY 7. SOCIAL HOUSING 8. COMMUNAL GARDEN 9. RECREATIONAL SPACE 10 WORKSHOP ADMIN 11. PRIVATE PARKING 12. BOAT BUILDING SHED 13. BOAT YARD 14. KIRABITI MARINE SHCOOL WEST WING W/ GYMNASIUM 15. AMPITHEATRE 16. KIRABITI MARINE SCHOOL EAST WING 17. WATERFRONT RESTAURANT 18. RESTAURANT PARKING

141


4

STUDIO JAMES CURRY

“THE STUDIO SOUGHT TO BUILD ARCHITECTURE SKILLS RELATED TO ATMOSPHERE, DETAILED SITE ANALYSIS AND PRECEDENTS BEYOND TOPOLOGY. THE FOCUS WAS AWAY FROM COMPOSITIONAL CONCERNS AS AN ORIGIN FOR DESIGN TO SPATIAL CONDITIONS IN RELATIONSHIPS. “

142


TOURIST FACILITY IN MYPONGA STUDENTS 146 150

Bianca Caterine Kruass Mitchell Heynen 143


The social context of this studio is the reopening of the Myponga reservoir to recreational use, the influx of tourism in the area and the preservation of local community and culture. The design brief for the studio is the design of a small eco-hotel of 4000sqm on the Myponga reservoir on the parcel of land owned by SA water (outlined on the following map). The design task was to negotiate: 1.Conflict between solar orientation and view direction (west) 2.Conflict between a hotel typology and a courtyard typology 3.The dramatic topographical condition.

Students began by studying the context and investigating local constraints as opportunities for formulating design strategies. Alongside these concerns the studio sought to build architecture skills related to atmosphere, detailed site analysis and precedents beyond topology. The focus was away from compositional concerns as an origin for design to spatial conditions in relationships. JAMES CURRY Studio Leader

“THE SOCIAL CONTEXT OF THIS STUDIO IS THE REOPENING OF THE MYPONGA RESERVOIR TO RECREATIONAL USE, THE INFLUX OF TOURISM IN THE AREA AND THE PRESERVATION OF LOCAL COMMUNITY AND CULTURE. “ 144


145


146


BIANCA CATERINE KRAUSS

Curate: Verb. English.1. Select, organize, and look after the items in a collection or exhibition; 2. Select the performers or performances that will feature in an arts event or program; 3. Select, organize, and present, typically using professional or expert knowledge. Cura: Noun. Portuguese.1. Related to medicine, restoration of health, method of treatment; 2. Improvement, solution, correction.Cura-te / Te cura: an advised or wish for someone else. to feel better, to heal, to take care of yourself. The Cura.te Retreat Hotel gathers the outstanding views of the Myponga reservoir with the spirit of Latin America’s healing traditions and architecture where nature is key. The strength of the landscape, use of water, and the connection with the sun conducts this project and invite guests to contemplate and correlate with space, to treat the body and the mind, to cure. One art and events pavilion, a floating restaurant, a wellness center, a mindfulness spa, 32 rooms, and many other buildings where carefully designed and developed to provide unique views and feelings. References of the Mexican architect, Luis Barragán can be found on the use of strong colours and shapes, framed views, and water manipulation.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

CURA.TE RETREAT HOTEL

CASE STUDY BARRAGÁN RENDER STUDIES

147


1. BAY ROOM ACCESS 13. DECK 2. WATER PATIO 14. PRIVATE POOL 3. WATERFALL 15. CLIFF ROOM ACCESS 4. WATER MIRROR 6. REFLECTION HALL 7. MEZZANINE 8./18. BEDROOM 9./19. CLOSET AND VANITY 10./20. BATHROOM 11./17. LIVING 12./21. VERANDAH

BAY ROOMS PLAN

148


149


240

235

230

225

0

22

5

21

21 5

21

0

210

150


Edge to Edge is a resort on the banks of the Myponga Reservoir, an hour out of Adelaide. Designed as a sequence, commencing with a ferry trip to the resort, the journey continues under the existing pine plantation, exploring its scattered light and soft shadows. The final destination is the accommodation wing on the western bank with uninterrupted views of the reservoir and setting sun. Two things drove my design; the unique tranquil and fresh climate of the reservoir and a case study of Luis Barragan’s Casa Barragan where he combined multiple rooms and functions as one continuous volume with the use of niche/ half walls and established edges. The resort experience begins at a ferry terminal at Myponga township and continues at the Edge Arrival Dock. The ferry arrival across the water provides visitors with an immersive experience of the reservoir as well as an initiated slow sequence of architecture (1st foci). A large hidden courtyard before the resort’s lobby, introduces visitors to a varying scale of architecture and the inner conditions of the pine plantation. Upon exiting the lobby, views of a monolithic form appears as the next destination within the sequence. Entering via the east, visitors are met with a triple height glazed courtyard, filling the interior space with natural light and offering distant views (2nd foci). Once out of this building on the western side, a series of steps leads one past a series of pavilions hidden by walls and nature towards a double height accommodation wing. Entering within the pine plantation, once in their luxury suite, guests are treated to an uninterrupted view of the water (3rd foci). The resort boasts multiple facilities in separate pavilions which encourages movement throughout the site as part of the experience. The central building, which holds multiple lounges, AM dining, a gallery and library, as well as the conference pavilion are open to the public. A building by the water’s northern edge holds a bar and restaurant for evening dining and entertaining. The accommodation wing features individual courtyards as well as a generous stepping terrace to the water’s edge, perfect for the setting sun and attaining calming winds off the water.

MITCHELL HEYNEN

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

EDGE TO EDGE

LOCATION

ADE LAIDE CBD ADELAIDE

MY PONGA R ESERVOIR

MYPONGA

PRO XIMI TY

151


1

ARRIVAL DOCK 2 LOBBY 3 STAFF WING 4 GOLF CART GARAGE 5 STAFF QUARTERS 6 PUBLIC BUILDING 7 CONFERENCE PAVILION 8 FUNCTION CENTRE 9 PAMPER PAVILION 10 FITNESS PAVILION 11 YOGA PAVILION 12 POOL 13 POOL HOUSE 14 RESTAURANT AND BAR 15 ACCOMMODATION WING 16 SPAS

16

15

11 12 10 9

13

8 14

7 6 0

21

230 215

225

220

3 2

4

5

1

152


ACCOMODATION AXO

ACCOMMODATION EDGE SUITE

153


5

STUDIO DAVID KROLL

“IN THIS STUDIO, THE STUDENTS DEVELOPED VISIONS FOR NEW KINDS OF ‘VERTICAL COMMUNITIES’ FOR A SITE IN THE ADELAIDE CBD, WHICH CAN ENRICH AND CONTRIBUTE MORE BROADLY TO LIFE IN THE CITY. “

154


HORIZONTAL + VERTICAL LIVING STUDENTS 158 162 166 172 178 182

Sneha Abraham Marc Davis James Gillett Mohammad Jawad Rezaie Junnan Ji Jingxin Xu 155


In this studio, the students developed visions of new kinds of ‘vertical communities’ for a site in the Adelaide CBD, which can enrich and contribute more broadly to life in the city. The term ‘living’ is taken here in a broader sense and not exclusively about housing. The proposals reimagine high-rise mixed-use architecture and often include diverse types of housing, such as affordable housing, co-housing, student housing and retirement living. At the same time, the proposals also consider how housing can be integrated with other types of uses and amenities that are essential to a thriving city, such as child care, health clinics or public spaces. The proposals are located at 10 Pitt Street, which was used by Uniting Communities as their

premises before moving to U City. The site is to be redeveloped at some point in the future and is located on a crucial section of the ‘Adelaide Laneway Strategy’. This section around Pitt Street could be vital for linking the Central Market and laneways around Hindley Street in order to create more pedestrian activity and active public spaces in the city. The studio was also coordinated in collaboration with Uniting Communities and their input has been invaluable to provide students with real-life industry considerations and requirements. These considerations were taken on board and many were incorporated into the design proposals. At the same time, the students responded to the provided brief and input with their own related

“AT THE SAME TIME, THE PROPOSALS ALSO CONSIDER HOW HOUSING CAN BE INTEGRATED WITH OTHER TYPES OF USES AND AMENITIES THAT ARE ESSENTIAL TO A THRIVING CITY, SUCH AS CHILD CARE, HEALTH CLINICS OR PUBLIC SPACES. ”

156


creative design research enquiries and themes to solutions for vertical living that go beyond what is standard practice today. DAVID KROLL Studio Leader

157


PROCESS

PROJECTION

VOLUME INTERSECTION TESTS

SELECTED ITERATION

APPLY SKIN - GRC PANEL


SNEHA ABRAHAM

Spaces, placed together or apart, enclosed or open, can determine the nature and character of a project. A voiceless dialogue experienced. Tangible, yet not heard. Both seen and felt. Speechless, yet evident, dialogue is created between these spaces, impacting its users, directly or indirectly. A positive dialogue could have a positive impact on its user and a negative can have a negative impact on its user. So what is the nature of this dialogue in a mass housing project? What could future living look like? What could it look like in a growing city like Adelaide, with its own unique identity? Over the next decades of predicted population growth, is there a way that a tone could be set for a desirable city with housing through apartments that have a positive impact on its users and in turn on the population? Those were the premises for this project that drove the idea of creating dedicated and desirable communal spaces, interjected throughout the structure connecting various user groups. The program creates and supports a dialogue between the user groups. The building does not exist independently of its users or its program or site context. This projects aims to create a dialogue between these parameters. The faรงade is like a skin or a drape around this complex program, which minimises the harshness of direct sunlight, while also adding character to the communal spaces and providing a visual connection between the building and the city.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

DIALOGUE

GENESIS FACADE PROJECTION MAPPING


APARTMENTS FOR FAMILIES MONTESSORI SCHOOL

EARLY LEARNING CENTER/

APARTMENTS FOR ELDERLY

APARTMENTS FOR STUDENTS/ YOUNG WORKING ADULTS

“THE PROGRAM CREATES AND SUPPORTS A DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE USER GROUPS. THE BUILDING DOES NOT EXIST INDEPENDENTLY OF ITS USERS OR ITS PROGRAM OR SITE CONTEXT. “

SECTION




MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

MARC DAVIS

INT-GEN-COM The site of 10 Pitt Street (becoming 24 Pitt Street), is located along the Adelaide laneway strategy which is supposed to link the riverbank to the central market, but unfortunately isn’t widely used due to the narrow, congested roads as you get closer to the market. Int-Gen-Com short for Intergenerational Community will provide a range of programs to draw multiple age groups into the site. Not only will this create a unique environment, but programs are also in some cases a necessity due to the large amount of demand for affordable housing, aged and child care, which are underprovided within the CBD. The idea is to create affordable housing for a large demographic ranging from youth to the elderly, and connecting these with the adjoining U-City building. This connection will allow for the creation of an intergenerational community which learn from each other. The array of community-driven programs provided by INT-GEN-COM include a kindergarten, residential youth care, residential aged care, retirement residences and affordable housing. To allow for these socially rich programs to operate within the CBD, other functions that generate high-rental yields, such as offices, gym and retail will need to be implemented to facilitate cross-financing between programs. This will allow the building to be overall feasible from a cost analytics point, while still providing the high social value originally intended. To ensure the inclusion and interaction between generations, programs are not split between floorplates, instead they are spread across the same floors with the goal of shaping views and connections out from the building as well as forging new ones through the implementation of communal spaces. These allow for collaboration and meetings between generations through shared space.

CONCEPT

REVITALISE LANEWAYS

ACTIVATE STREET LEVEL

INTERGENERATIONAL COMMUNITY

ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS

CREATE AFFORDABLE HOUSING


14TH FLOOR PLAN AFFORDABLE HOUSING / RETIREMENT RESIDENCES

4TH FLOOR PLAN YOUTH CARE / RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE

GROUND FLOOR YOUTH CARE / RESIDENTIAL AGED CARE

164


RETIREMENT RESIDENTIAL

YOUTH CARE

EAST FACADE FROM GROUND

“TO ENSURE THE INCLUSION AND INTERACTION BETWEEN GENERATIONS, PROGRAMS ARE NOT SPLIT BETWEEN FLOORPLATES, INSTEAD THEY ARE SPREAD ACROSS THE SAME FLOORS“

165


166


JAMES GILLETT

Verticalis Suburbium aims to reimagine high-rise buildings as community-driven and diverse vertical suburbs. The proposed site at 10 Pitt Street, located in the central CBD, offers great potential for a new development. However, the current conditions include closed-off facades and limited vegetation. The new development will assist the area by encouraging movement through the building and streetfacing tenancies. The program is heavily influenced by the site’s neighbouring property, U City, and its retirement living. As the land is owned by U City, their intention is to create a new building that will be complementary. Thus, offering aged-care living allows residents of U City to transfer to the assisted living facilities of Verticalis Suburbium maintaining location familiarity and routine. This strategy then results in movement between the communities bringing greater foot traffic into the proposed building. The child care will service the aged-care facilities as well as the surrounding context. By encouraging intergenerational collaboration each group can benefit from the other. The GP Plus will service the aged-care dwellings by providing onsite assistance and services thus centralising many of the residents’ needs. Finally, providing various hospitality tenancies throughout the building and on ground level motivates people to visit the development. The building form emerged from design explorations to take account of both context and visual connections. It challenges conventional high-rise projects by breaking the building mass into three segments to create a less intimidating structure. Informed by site conditions, the street level façade has been offset from the boundary to open the footpath and create a protected niche for pedestrians. Laneways through the building have also been created to connect Pitt Street and Penaluna Place, resulting in an arcade for shop fronts to open onto.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

VERTICALIS SUBURBIUM

SITE

167


CONCEPT

CONNECTING LANEWAYS

FUNCTIONAL COLLABORATION

SITE / GROUND PLAN 168

OPEN STREET LEVEL

CONNECTION TO NATURE

CORRELATION TO CONTEXT

DYNAMIC SYSTEM


“VERTICALIS SUBURBIUM AIMS TO REIMAGINE HIGH-RISE BUILDINGS AS COMMUNITY-DRIVEN AND DIVERSE VERTICAL SUBURBS. ”

STRUCTURE

169


170


171


172


MOHAMMAD JAWAD REZAIE

COVID-19 exposed cracks in the Infrastructure of living and caring at a global scale. Adelaide City, like other cities, has been affected by the pandemic. In tough restrictions and possible lockdowns, people can become prisoners in their own homes. One of the issues is imposed generic design solutions that do not take account of changing user requirements. Repeating the same use vertically, shrinking room sizes and outdoor spaces might generate wealth for developers but does not necessarily support the health and well-being of the occupants. Additionally, the pandemic has changed our behaviours. Remote working, teaching, studying, and virtual cultural activities are new parameters of normal life across the world. These parameters must be considered in post-pandemic living spaces. No one more than the occupants and users understand these parameters in a post- pandemic world because they have gone through it and understand their housing needs and the issues with the current market offering. In this studio, a new design approach is tested through a partnership between architects and occupants to pick and fix these issues in the design process. Such a partnership accepts the users as a central design driver and parametric design tools make this partnership much easier. For instance, the client can select and change the sizes of bedrooms, balconies, and living room by moving sliders. They can change the whole layout by moving sliders. Furthermore, users have the chance to increase or decrease the height of living spaces. This approach does not diminish the role of architects but push it into a new world of coding, parametricism and algorithms. This approach gives architects a huge flexibility in form finding and design process. By moving the sliders to the right and to the left, the form and massing of the building changes. In a short period of time, the architects can generate multiple design iterations and design options. After that there will be a selection process and short-listing task to do considering the site-specific conditions, standards, and regulations. As required, architects and users can take over to make adjustments to the design manually.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

USER - DRIVEN VERTICAL LIVING

GENESIS PARAMETRIC SLIDER

173


DECORATIVE CEILING DESIGN CUES TO MOUNT LOFTY FORMS

MULTIPURPOSE HALL

RESIDENTIAL

CHILDCARE

OFFICE / COMMERCIAL

VERTICAL WASTE DUCTS

RETAIL / HOSPITALITY

EXPLODED ISOMETRIC 174


ALGORITHMIC ITERATIONS FOOT PRINT

8

1

9

2

10

“A NEW DESIGN APPROACH IS TESTED THROUGH A PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN ARCHITECTS AND OCCUPANTS... SUCH A PARTNERSHIP ACCEPTS THE USERS AS A CENTRAL DESIGN DRIVER AND PARAMETRIC DESIGN TOOLS MAKE THIS PARTNERSHIP MUCH EASIER.”

3

11

4

12

5

6

14

7

15

MANUAL INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE STRUCTURAL STABILITY

SITE CONTEXT DIAGRAM 175


176


177


FARMING FRAMES

FIRE STAIRS LIFT

VERTICAL FARM

VINE

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR

GLASS ATRIUM

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR

DOUBLE LAYER VOID

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR

LIVING ROOM BEDROOM

SEATING

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR

NURSERY VERT. GREENING

VERT. GREENING

SKY GARDEN SKY GARDEN

FARMING FRAMES

178

RESIDENTIAL FLOOR


MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

JUNNAN JI

INTERGENERATIONAL COMMUNITY The design focuses on caring for the elderly, as a vertical retirement village that builds and strengthens connections between generations. With the improvement of medical treatment, the life expectancy of Australians has been extended, but the quality of life can decrease with age. In a research study, some elderly volunteers improved their health and happiness after a few weeks of contact with some elementary school children. Activities between them were learning together, Reading, talking, planting, games and so on. Both young and old can benefit from this interaction. In terms of function, the ground floor is used as a cafĂŠ, as well as for building services and loading areas. The first and second floors are for medical services for the elderly. And the third to eighth floors is a multipurpose space with a library and functions for elderly and children, rather than specific functional partitions. This space is more like a large container. The users are surrounded by light, and walk through the ramps on each floor. Children and elderly can meet here by chance. Above level nine are residences for the elderly. Independent housing is provided for the semi-self-care elderly, and affordable housing is provided for retirees. The top floor is a vertical farm that provides green vegetables for residents and the cafĂŠ downstairs

FUSION

ELDERLY

CHILDREN

NEW BONDS FORM

179


MEZZANINE FIRE STAIRS

ATRIUM

VERTICAL FARM LECTURE ROOM

RESERVED SPACE CLASSROOM

INTEREST LEARNING LECTURE ROOM

RESERVED SPACE CLASSROOM

INTEREST LEARNING

RESERVED SPACE

LIBRARY MEZZANINE LADDER SEAT ATRIUM BATHROOM STAIRS RAMP

HOMOGENEOUS SPACE

LIBRARY

CONSULTING ROOM

2ND FLOOR (REHABILITATION) SERVICES TRAINING ROOM

VOID

WARDS

1ST FLOOR (HEALTH CARE) SERVICES

BATHROOM

CAFE

CAFE

FIRE EXIST POCKET GARDEN

CAFE

GROUND FLOOR

180

GREENERY LOCATION


“THE DESIGN FOCUSES ON CARING FOR THE ELDERLY, AS A VERTICAL RETIREMENT VILLAGE THAT BUILDS AND STRENGTHENS CONNECTIONS BETWEEN GENERATIONS.”

181


182


JINGXIN XU

The architectural research topic is affordable housing, which is addressed through the concept of a flexible and reversible building. This building can be increased and demolished. The building program, including the residential spaces, can be reconfigured as required. People only rent or lease the dwelling space they need. This is the future of affordable housing. The structural steel framing system allows its components to be ‘detachable’ and ‘grow-able’. The structural system has two principle levels. The primary structure is arranged on a grid. The secondary structure supports the load of the ‘inserted’ building components which comprise the program of the individual spaces. The concept of the building is inspired by food available at the Adelaide Central market (such as fruits and candy) to which the building seeks to establish a connection. The forms of these food elements of the central market of cheese, bananas, cookies, lemons, and candy are integrated into the design of the building. The program of the building is mixed use. The upper floors provide accommodation for students and retired people. The south side of the ground floor is a candy tasting shop. The first floor is a coffee shop and a gym that supports health and fitness of the building’s residents and the neighbourhood. In the middle of the building is a three-floor medical centre providing medical care for residents of the building and the surrounding area. The library and study rooms on the third and fourth floors of the building, support a conducive learning environment for students.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

FLEXIBLE CITY

GENESIS

INITIAL CONCEPT 1

INITIAL CONCEPT

183


Cheese Cheese

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

Change Change of of position position

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

Cheese Cheese

CHEESE

Mixed arrangement Mixed slement arrangement slement Gummy candy Gummy candy

MIX AND ARRANGE ELEMENTS

Change of position

Gummy Gummy candy candy

Change of position CHANGE OF POSITION GUMMY CANDY slement Mixed arrangement Mixed slement arrangement

Add core Chage the shape Chage the shape Mushroom Mushroom

SCULPT SHAPE

Add core

ADD CORE

“THE CONCEPT OF THE BUILDING IS INSPIRED BY FOOD AVAILABLE AT THE ADELAIDE CENTRAL MARKET ... TO WHICH THE BUILDING SEEKS TO ESTABLISH CONNECTION” Add core Add core Add circulation A Add circulation

184

Mushroom Mushroom

MUSHROOM Chage the shape Chage the shape

Add circulation

ADD CIRCULATION

Add circulation


6

4

5

1 MASTER BEDROOM 2 BEDROOM 3 LIVING ROOM 4 ELEVATOR 5 EXAMINATION ROOM 6 OFFICE 7 MEETING ROOM 8 KITCHEN

2

3 39000 7800

7800

7800

2

1

7800

7800

3

1 10 8

2

5

6800

2

9 4 20400 6800

11700

4

8

8

2

8

3

6 6800

1

2

7

2

7

2

2 3

LVL 3

10

1 HEALTH CENTRE 2 RETIRING ROOM 3 WAITING ROOM 4 EQUIPMENT ROOM 5 CANDY TASTING 6 TERRACE 7 OFFICE 8 OPERATING ROOM

6

6

6800

4

2 2

4 3

8 9 20400 6800

5

7

1

8 200 7

6800

7 6

6 7 PITT STREET

6

5

4

3

2

1

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

185


186


187


6

STUDIO SAM RIDGWAY

“WORKING CREATIVELY, STUDENTS EXPLORED BOTH THE THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTION THROUGH ENGAGEMENT WITH A REAL SITE AND A COMPLETELY PLAUSIBLE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN ADELAIDE’S CBD.”

188


RESURRECTING THE KINGS HEAD STUDENTS 192 196 200

Tyler Schmidtke Gabriella Marciano Nadia Jamal 189


In the last several years, the city of Adelaide has witnessed a surge in the construction of tall buildings. This year, in the supportive environment of Final Architecture Project, students engaged with this phenomenon and the many challenges and opportunities it presents. Not least among these is the question of how tall buildings are altering Adelaide’s existing low-rise urbanism. This issue is foregrounded when, as is the case with the King’s Head project, a tower is proposed adjacent to a heritage-listed building. Recognising the importance of heritage buildings in the urban fabric of Adelaide’s CBD and the enormous value their thoughtful union with a new building can bring was a key element of the studio. Of equal importance in this time of accelerating climate-change, is how to design a tower that continues to provide a safe place to dwell during extreme weather conditions, particularly extreme heat events. Central to this is

an emphasis on, and a return to, core architectural knowledge of façade design according to orientation, particularly in relation to the movement of the sun. The brief to resurrect the King’s Head was to design a pencil tower/boutique hotel on the rear section of the site and to meaningfully incorporate the existing two-storey heritage hotel building into the project. Following closure of the King’s Head during the early stages of the pandemic its interior is currently undergoing a modification and fit-out to give it new life within the Adelaide pub scene. This pause in trading allowed us to visit the site and to begin to understand the buildings mood, characteristics, spatial qualities, and materiality, and to think about how its powerful presence could be incorporated into the project. Students found inspiration for their new hotel’s boutique program within the heritage hotel ranging from: exploring the relationship between

“OF EQUAL IMPORTANCE IN THIS TIME OF ACCELERATING CLIMATE-CHANGE, IS HOW TO DESIGN A TOWER THAT CONTINUES TO PROVIDE A SAFE PLACE TO DWELL DURING EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS,” 190


water and architecture after visiting the cellar and original water well; the generative qualities of music through discovering the King’s Head was the birthplace of the iconic 60s band the Master’s Apprentices; and a forwardlooking return to the heyday of micro brewing and the local production of craft beer. Working creatively, students explored both the theoretical and practical aspects of architectural production through engagement with a real site and a completely plausible development project in Adelaide’s CBD. In doing so this final studio acted as a space where architectural imagination could prosper to create a bridge and a transition between academia and practice. ASSOC. PROF. SAM RIDGWAY Studio Leader

191


192


TYLER SCHMIDTKE

This design started with the question, how do you design a building in C major? The design explored the relationship between architecture and music through concepts and techniques common to both: Rhythm, Accent, Proportion, Dynamics, and Texture. Inspired by the story of King’s Head as the rehearsal space for the iconic 60s band the Master’s Apprentices, the program for the repurposing of the existing pub and the new tower is a centre for the writing, recording and performing of music. A place where the music-loving public can rub shoulders with musicians who are preforming, writing or recording. Rhythm - The building features a prevalent rhythm when viewed from the street and as experienced when moving through the internal spaces. This is achieved through the use of repeating elements. The beat of the new tower is faster and more exuberant than the more sombre pulse of the existing building. Accent - The building includes a working recording studio within the base of tower. This provides an accent to both the program and the architecture. The studios protrude from the tower in the form of an angled precast concrete shell which breaks up the rectilinear forms of the street level. Proportion: Music in a major key is uplifting. This idea is explored architecturally through the buildings proportions. The building employs an immense verticality with spaces drawing the eye upwards. Light, reflective materials exaggerate the sense of space within the building providing a light and airy atmosphere. Dynamics - To reinforce the happiness of the major key, the building lightens its footprint on the earth through the design of its glazing. All windows face either north or south to minimise the effects of harsh east and west sunlight. Glazing in the new tower contrasts with the old building through the use of floor to ceiling glazing which provides generous views and light. Texture -This subtle idea was explored through the material palette chosen for the building. Materials were chosen for their sensory qualities. Within the old building traditional textures are retained through stonework, imperfect plaster and highly detailed cornice and skirtings. Existing hard wood floors are restored. In the new tower sensory materials such as concrete tiling and natural timbers are used and left with raw finishes to interact with the light.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

MAAK: STUDIOS + HOTEL

GENESIS MUSIC + EMOTION

193


B

“THE DESIGN EXPLORED THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ARCHITECTURE AND MUSIC THROUGH CONCEPTS AND TECHNIQUES COMMON TO BOTH: RHYTHM, ACCENT, PROPORTION, DYNAMICS, AND TEXTURE.”

A

A

SITE/GROUND PLAN B

28 HOTEL ROOMS

LIFT CORE/ STAIR

ANGLED WESTERN FACADE

EXISTING ROOF

ROOFTOP BAR

ENTRY /LOBBY WRITING AND MIXING SPACES

ATRIUM

PRECAST CONCRETE PANEL

BAR/HOTEL/ DINING MUSIC RECORDING STUDIO

194


B

B

A

A

B

B

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 6

L6

L1

GF

SECTION A

SECTION B 195


196


GABRIELLA MARCIANO

The King’s Head Hotel, completed in 1875, was Adelaide’s first licensed pub and has become a symbol of South Australia’s culture and history of local pubs and brewing. The hotel was once a place where working people finished their day by socializing with their mates and consuming locally sourced food and drink. Today, the King’s Head Hotel’s striking Victorian era architecture has deteriorated and requires nurturing back to health as a bustling iconic pub. While the rise of mass-produced beer is responsible for the failure of many local breweries and pubs, the recent revival of craft brewing has prioritized the boutique experience. At the King’s Head Brewhouse, the architectural program is designed to provide a strong connection between the production and the consumption of beer, and it acknowledges the rich history of local brewing. The project proposes a transition from a down-at-heel pub serving mass-produced beer and “pub food” to a new engagement with local food and craft beer. The heavy, dark architecture of the old hotel is contrasted with a new light and airy hotel cultivating a multisensory experience including the aroma of beer production and glimpses of brewing equipment. The tasting rooms and renovated original front of house bar serve local seasonal food which may also be enjoyed along with a craft beer while taking pleasure in the views from high up in the tower in the privacy of the rooms and suites of the boutique hotel.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

KING’S HEAD BREWHOUSE

GENESIS

197


198 TYPICAL HOTEL FLOORPLAN Lower Loft Level

1:200 Upper Loft Level

TYPICAL HOTEL FLOORPLAN

1:200

STRUCTURE

LOFT UPPER LVL

LOFT LOWER LVL

STRUCTURE

STEEL


EGRESS

FACADE SUN CONTROL

8MX5M GRID

STRUCTURE

HERITAGE

PRODUCTION ATRIUM

EXISTING SITE

199


200


NADIA JAMAL

This project proposes a boutique hotel that focuses on healing both the old architectural body of the King’s Head hotel and tired human bodies. The King’s Head, despite its current deteriorated state, is a beautiful piece of architecture with unique spatial qualities that require restoration. In order to do this, therapy in the form of restoration and repurposing are applied to the old architectural body. Similarly, the human body is restored through immersion in water of different temperatures and characteristics, including in the form of mist and steam. The bathing experience begins in the underground baths which were inspired by the original water well that still exists in the hotel’s dark and mysterious cellar. From the underground baths with their subdued lighting and strong connection to place, the bather progresses to the new hotel tower and to an aerial experience of scented mist, steam and distant views. Calming and balancing the mind by restoring the body is further achieved in the privacy of the hotels suites in an individually crafted spa experience which may include aromatherapy. The building’s program focusses on creating a therapeutic union between water and architecture. This is achieved through the thoughtful creation of bathing spaces that have a strong connection to either the earth or the sky. The bathing experience is enhance through the use of materials with a particular sensory quality, and mood enhancing light. The result is a building that engenders a sense of wellbeing and helps restore a balance between mind and body.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

HEALING THE KING’S HEAD

CONCEPT SECOND SKIN

ACRYLIC SKIN CURVED CONCRETE PANEL TO WEST

201


GENESIS

EXTRUDE SITE LVL 16 AERIAL BATHS

CARVE TO CONTEXT

LVL 10 HOTEL

STRUCTURE

STURT STREET

DEFINE ENTRY

GROUND LOBBY

LIGHT KING WILLIAM STREET

SKIN

LVL - 1 UNDERGROUND BATHS

202


203


7

STUDIO PETER SCRIVER

“STUDENTS WERE ASKED TO RE-IMAGINE AND RE-PURPOSE REDUNDANT ARCHITECTURES AS PLACES OF REFUGE, SPECIAL CARE AND/ OR SUPPORT FOR VULNERABLE GROUPS OR INDIVIDUALS.”

204


FABRIC, CULTURE, ARCHITECTURE: RE-HUMANISING REDUNDANT BUILDINGS AS ARCHITECTURES OF COMMUNITY STUDENTS 208 212 216 222 228 234

Daniel Grilli Georgie Warren Caitlin Roy Olyvia Solomon Eleanor Hughes Fiorina Donato 205


‘Architecture’ could be defined, in the broadest of terms, as the embodiment of social order and values in physical form and space. Conversely, architecture has often been conceived as a tool to construct and constrain cultural practices through the design of fit-for-purpose microcosms – worlds within worlds – for the users that they serve. Indeed, social engineering could be regarded as one of the prime functions of institutional architectures such as hospitals, schools, military barracks, and prisons; and even social clubs and places of community or worship such as churches, temples, and mosques. Buildings also embody the energy and resources invested in their design and construction, and become receptacles of cultural memory as they live-on and age. They may therefore evoke emotion as well – comforting or disturbing depending on the case – for the communities that they accommodate, or for whom they are the familiar and enduring features of the built environment around them. But how can past architectures help us re-imagine future design possibilities, when the world around a building changes, or the worlds within the institutions or industries that gave those buildings their original forms? How can the built fabric and intrinsic order of such structures be adapted to new

purposes or cultural practices? And, how might the tectonic culture of redundant architecture be enlisted creatively to assist rather than resist growth and change? Again this year, students who chose to address these core questions in this research-studio option were asked to re-imagine and re-purpose redundant architectures as places of refuge, special care and/ or support for vulnerable groups or individuals. Beginning in each case with an intensive physical, historical, and qualitative design description and deconstruction of the existing built fabric, each student was then required to identify a different community at risk as their hypothetical client and to research and develop an original brief and design proposal for how that fabric could be sensitively but creatively adapted to accommodate the social as well as the residential and/or vocational needs of the focus group. This year the scope of sites and relevant client/user scenarios ranged from several ‘difficult’ heritage sites in Adelaide, to an old prison and a redundant railway terminus re-imagined by students working remotely in Sydney and Chongqing, respectively. Historic prisons were the focus of three different projects, including two that revisited the Old Adelaide Gaol (George Kingston 184048). Each of these schemes sought

“SOCIAL ENGINEERING COULD BE REGARDED AS ONE OF THE PRIME FUNCTIONS OF INSTITUTIONAL ARCHITECTURES SUCH AS HOSPITALS, SCHOOLS, MILITARY BARRACKS, AND PRISONS; AND EVEN SOCIAL CLUBS AND PLACES OF COMMUNITY OR WORSHIP SUCH AS CHURCHES, TEMPLES, AND MOSQUES.” 206


to transcend the heavy histories of their sites and re-imagine how the distinctive geometries and mass of the existing buildings could support altogether different needs. Alternative programs varied from a rehabilitation retreat for substance abuse, and a sanctuary for women and children escaping domestic abuse, to social housing in combination with a new community hub for multicultural Parramatta in Western Sydney. Another difficult heritage site was the disused historic barracks and fortifications at Fort Largs which were reconceived as a progressive natural conservation focused new highschool for the growing population in the industrially renewed Port Adelaide area. Two other projects focused on holistic approaches to the roles that architecture and environmental design can play in health and well-being. One proposal develops a scheme to retrofit the brutalist architecture of a former ‘hospital for incurables’ into an assisted-care residential complex that ‘brings the hospital home’. Another scheme extends and re-deploys the qualities of safety and sanctuary embodied in a long disused church to create a temporary residence for family and supporters of hospitalised patients in critical care.

A cluster of heritageprotected but economically and environmentally stressed commercial buildings was the focus of three further schemes that sought to revitalise their fabric and capture latent opportunities of the site. These included another assisted living proposal to provide disabled former military personal with residential and allied social and vocational support in a small, conveniently located and convivial inner-suburban mixed-use complex. Another scheme proposed to extend and retrofit the cluster as a theatre and studio/gallery complex incorporating cooperative housing for struggling artists, whilst the third scheme sought to provide temporary housing and social support for homeless youth at risk. Finally, homelessness was also the focus of a scheme, in the context of intense urban development and renewal pressures in contemporary China, to repurpose a recently de-commissioned railway terminus and hotel in the centre of Chonqing as a temporary residential gateway to the city for poor economic migrants arriving from the countryside. ASSOC. PROF. PETER SCRIVER Studio Leader

207


208


DANIEL GRILLI

103 Fisher St: An address, a place, a home. For over a hundred years the site has been a place of refuge and care as the Home for Incurables, yet now it and its buildings sit quiet and empty. What if the original mission of the Home could continue on the site, not as an isolated institution but as a connected part of the surrounding community? In other words, not as the home, but as homes? A series of operations on the existing 1970s East Block building bring light and air into its depths, readying it for the residence of those in need and those who desire alike. Its distinctive balconies are transformed into winter-gardens, turning its old, impersonal facade into a slow rhythm of opening, closing, moving and arranging as the seasons pass and the needs of each unit’s occupants change. The enchanting grounds of the site are also opened up to the wider community. Firstly, they play host to a new type of suburban medical facility, providing care for residents of the building that need it while also serving the surrounding community. Spaces in between the buildings and trees are converted into community garden plots, bringing in visitors to the site on a daily basis. Finally, the rooftop of the building is transformed into a destination, sharing with the public for the first time its majestic views of hills and city.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

103 FISHER ST

EXISTING SITE N

Current site Buildings retained

209


PROCESS

1. UNDRESS EX. 1) Undress 1) Undress

2. EXCAVATE VOIDS .III 5) Excavate voids III

5) Excavate voids III (FOR PUBLIC DECK) (for public deck) (for public deck)

2. REMOVE 2) RemoveROOF roof

Excavate voids 2. 3) EXCAVATE VOIDSII 3) Excavate voids (for light) (FOR LIGHT) (for light)

2. BUTTRESS

7. DRESS UP

2) Remove roof

6) Buttress (FOR VERTICAL CIRCULATION) 6) Buttress (for vertical circulation) (for vertical circulation)

.I

4) Excavate VOIDS voids II 2. EXCAVATE .II 4) Excavate voids II common areas) (FOR(for COMMON AREAS) (for common areas)

2. ADD DESTINATIONS Add destination (FOR8) EVERYONE!) 8) Add destination

7) Dress up 7) Dress up

(for everyone!) (for everyone!)

PROGRAM RESIDENTS Residents’ common COMMON areas AREA

Residents’ common areas

PROGRAM OVERALL OverallSITE site Community health COMMUNITY HEALTH

COMMUNITY GARDEN PROGRAM STUDENT ACCOMADATION Community garden

107 STREET 107FISHER Fisher St Retail // HOSPITALITY hospitality RETAIL Church / /gathering CHURCH GATHERING

Student accommodation

Overall site

Roof deck ROOF DECK Community health COMMUNITY HEALTH

Carparking PARKING

Student accommodation STUDENT ACCOMADATION

107 Fisher St

Community health

Retail / hospitality

Apartments

Roof deck

Community garden

Church / gathering

Residents’ storage

Community health

Carparking

Student accommodation

Student accommodation

FACADE

Apartments APARTMENTS Residents’ STORAGE storage RESIDENT

New cores

Existing cores New shear walls

STRUCTURE

New cores NEW CORES

EXISTING CORES Existing cores NEW New SHEAR WALLS shear walls

Bracing to untethered columns

STRUCTURE

to BRACING TOBracing UNTETHERED untethered columns COLOUMNS

Steel bracing support columns that have been cut, while shear walls of the the new circulation towers allow them to act as ‘braces’ for the original structure. Steel bracing support columns that have been cut, while shear walls of the the new circulation

STRUCTURE 210

FACADE Why does cladding all have to be the same? The balconies of 107 Fisher St are re-imagined

as ‘wintergardens’ of many FACADE forms, each allowing individual

control of its environment. Fixed Why doesshade cladding have to and louvres the all public deck be the same? The balconies of external lift. 107 Fisher St are re-imagined


“WHAT IF THE ORIGINAL MISSION OF THE HOME COULD CONTINUE ON THE SITE, NOT AS AN ISOLATED INSTITUTION BUT AS A CONNECTED PART OF THE SURROUNDING COMMUNITY? “

211


n gto llin e We quar s

Private 1/10 physical /visual connection

212

Public 10/10 Physical /visual connection

PRIVATE Private 1/10 physical /visual connection

PUBLIC Public

10/10 Physical /visual connection


MANSFIELD ST

20

22

24

26

28

23-21

27

RESEARCH LOCAL TYPOLOGIES

239

GOVER ST

12

GEORGINA WARREN

Guardian is an adaptive reuse scheme for the once thriving primitive Methodist Church, neighbouring chapel and cottages, located on the corner of Tynte street and Wellington square, North Adelaide. Commencing on site, investigations reveal the idea of an aperture as a ‘boundary to atmosphere’ with atmosphere interpreted in this design as a ghost like substance, something undefined that is evident through the defined form. Early Christian theologians believed that these forms or ‘beautiful buildings’ would improve us morally. This project questions this idea in relation to mood. Could a ‘beautiful’ building protect a person’s mood? like an atmosphere that becomes encompassed within the form. This idea of atmosphere is further interrogated in relation to the role the façade plays in producing the internal atmosphere. The brief begins with an understanding of the dedication to the church whilst it was designed and constructed, and the importance that its heritage form radiates as a result. If a morally suitable program is then placed within the church, the intent is that the heritage building would continue to radiate importance for the group housed within, just like it would have when initially built. This proposal is for a ‘family care centre’. A protector for families with seriously ill or injured children. The design aims to create certain atmospheres that will assist in dulling, distracting, and counteracting the anxieties and confusion associated with medical treatments of family members. The architecture aims to act as a guardian to positive and manageable moods and protect from overwhelming unnecessary anxieties. This is achieved through a design that offers residents the tools to decide how and when they want to interact with others through strategic visual connections and circulation options. It aims to provide ‘indirect support’ ensuring people are continuously aware and in subtle contract with each other but allowing them also to retreat when needed. These focus on shared hub spaces radiating from the heritage forms with framing gardens.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

GUARDIAN

WELLINGTON SQUARE

1870’S

THE WELLINGTON HOTEL

213


“COMMENCING ON SITE, INVESTIGATIONS REVEAL THE IDEA OF AN APERTURE AS A ‘BOUNDARY TO ATMOSPHERE’ WITH ATMOSPHERE INTERPRETED IN THIS DESIGN AS A GHOST LIKE SUBSTANCE, SOMETHING UNDEFINED THAT IS EVIDENT THROUGH THE DEFINED FORM. “

214


GROUND PLAN 0m

2m

4m

6m

10m

215


1994

THE LEINSTER BUILDING WAS HOME TO A BELLY DANCE STUDIO WHCIH STILL RUNS TODAY.

1967

OLD EAST ADELAIDE TIMBER COY IN BETWEEN DUKE OF LEINSTER AND BELL’S PLUMBER SHOP

1949

COTRELL, W.C CHEMIST IN BON MARCHE BUILDING

1939-1945

WW2

1937

DUKE OF LEINSTER BUILDING CONSTRUCTED

1930 - 1930

THE GREAT DEPRESSION

1914 - 1918

WW1

1903 - 1913

JOLLY, B. D. CHEMIST IN BON MARCHE BUILDING

1901

FEDERATION OF AUSTRALIA

1900

RESIDENTS IN BON MARCHE: GOOD, J. H AND CO. DRAPERS PREMIER BOOT CO.- GRIFFIN Y.G BARNES, FRUITER

1883

ADELAIDE PAYNEHAM AND PARADISE TRAMWAY COMPANY CONNECTED THE CITY PAYNEHAM LINE.

D

RESIDENTS IN BON MARCHE : JOLLY, B. D. CHEMIST WAGNER, A. E, BICYCLE AND MOTOR MANUFACTURER SHAKESPEARE THEATRE BROWN & PEDDY, GROCERS & FRUITERERS

ROA

1911

HAM

MOORE & BINKS CHEMIST IN BON MARCHE BUILDING

NE PAY

1913

216


CAITLIN ROY

This project looks at the sites’ history and people (culture), existing built form (fabric) and proposed experience (architecture). How can the past be remembered on a site with rich histories that is overwhelmed by everyday transit? How can this site be the new home to a community that needs support and recognition? The site is located opposite the historic Maid and Magpie Hotel where 5 suburbs, with their own unique histories meet at a prominent intersection. The site consists of the Bon Marche Building (1883- State Heritage), Bell’s Plumber Shop (1883 - State Heritage) and the Duke of Leinster Building for the Leinster Druids (1937 Local Heritage) An enormous amount of research was conducted on the existing heritage buildings and how their stories intertwined. Me Bell a plumber was a Leinster Druid which influenced proposing programs that supported each other.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

INTERSECT

- Druids equated to Returned Service League Club. - Bon Marche, home to many chemists over the years, translated to a Mental Health Repatriation Village. - The Plumber Shop and the goods/services in Bon Marche influenced a Trade, Art and Wellness Centre. Forms were generated from intersect cuts that both represented past programs and reacted to context. These intersect cuts challenged the facade and displayed a dramatic effect; of traffic overtaking the streetscape and built form. Representations for creating a home were cut out of the new wrapping facade of the repatriation village. Each element was selected from stories of those around when asked the question ‘how to you recognise that you are home?’ Is it a movement, a built object or atmospheric quality? Massing the voids related also to history, material being the main driver. The Plumber Shop was built with excellent craftsmanship and therefore the roof structure and use of timber and brick was repeated throughout. CONCEPT

217


1883

DAVID BELL PLUMBER MOVED INTO THE PLUMBER SHOP, WHERE THE BUILDING GOT ITS NAME.

1883

THOMAS MILLER, MARBLE MERCHANT LIVED AND WORKED IN THE PLUMBER SHOP FIRST.

1883

BON MARCHE BUILDING OWNED BY BLACKEBY A BOOTMAKER

1883

THE BON MARCHE BUILDING WAS BUILT AND MR BELL’S PLUMBER SHOP CAME LATER THAT SAME YEAR.

1 2

3

4 5

1882

MAID AND MAGPIE REDEVELOPMENT

6

1859

DUKE OF LEINSTER LODGE FORMED IN NORWOOD. MEETINGS WERE HELD AT MANY DIFFERENT HOTELS IN THE AREA

1851

FIRST AUSTRALIAN DRUIDS LODGE WAS FOUNDED IN ADELAIDE SOUTH AUSTRALIA

1848

THE MAID AND MAGPIE WAS BUILT

1836

ADELAIDE WAS FOUNDED BY SIR COLONEL WILLIAM LIGHT

1781

1000 BC 1000 AD

218

THE ‘ANCIENT ORDER OF THE DRUIDS’ (AOD) WAS FOUNDED IN LONDON UK AT ‘THE KING’S ARM’S’ TAVERN.

ANCIENT DRUIDS EXISTED IN THE ANCIENT CELTIC TIMES IN BRITAIN, IRELAND AND FRANCE (GAUL)

7

LEVEL 1 FLOOR PLAN LVL 1 FLOOR PLAN 0

4

8

20


REPATRIATION VILLAGE 1. UNIT 6 (1ST LVL) 2. UNIT 7 (1ST LVL) 3. UNIT 8 (1ST LVL) 4. UNIT 9 (1ST LVL) 5. UNIT 10 (FIRST LVL) BON MARCHE BUILDING 6. GYM 7. CARPENTRY/METAL WORK/ ELECTRICAL & PLUMBER STUDIO 13

BELL’S PLUMBER SHOP 8. VOID SPACE OLD TIMBER YARD

11

12

9

9. GALLERY SPACE/ FUNCTION SPACE ALTERNATING DUKE OF LEINSTER BUILDING

8 10

10. DANCE STUDIO/ FUNCTION SPACE ALTERNATING 11. FEMALE BATHROOM 12. MALE BATHROOM 13. OUTDOOR DECKING

219


220


221


PHENOMENOLOGICAL MAPPING

222


OLYVIA SOLOMON

The Old Adelaide Gaol was built and in use from its opening in 1841 until it closed in 1988. It housed over 300,000 prisoners and saw 45 executions. It is interesting to note that at the time, South Australia was a free state and the need for a prison was minimal. The gaol is a stark reminder of the horrific occurrences of the time. Its troubling past brings many complexities to how it can be adapted for new purposes. Along with extensive historical research through libraries, museums and journals, this project took a phenomenological approach to understanding the nuances within the site. Stories of the site became the catalyst for this project. From embroidery to neglect and inequality, these sometimes hard to digest truths developed the rich history of the site. This project aims to right the wrongs of the gaol. It aims to re-imagine the site as a safe place for women to seek refuge from domestic violence. Women and their families can stay up to 3 months while they find appropriate housing. A merging of phenomenological site studies with histories of female inmates at the prison resulted in drawings and models that informed the overall design. Insertions of new structure within the bones of the existing buildings allowed for the facades to remain intact. Some buildings with a significantly awful past were demolished but the remains of these buildings exist within the landscape. The half radial form was completed to create a nest, with the understanding of a closed circle symbolising safety. The landscape takes form as connections are drawn between buildings and pods and the spaces in-between. The voids demarcated within this emergent geometry provide additional spaces for gardening and activities such as a playground for young children.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

NEST

SITE

223


A

C

B

A

D

G

SERVICES

H SERVICES

E

5m

0

A

F

0

224


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1852 1852 1852 1852

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MEDITATION GARDENS

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HISTORIC PROGRAM

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PROGRAM DIAGRAM

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C

Mother Mother Mother Mother reaches reaches reaches reaches out outout out and and and Elizabeth and Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth moves moves moves moves to to Adelaide to Adelaide toAdelaide Adelaide at at age at age atage 18age 18 1818

Bru Brutal tal B rutal Brut l y lassult y al lassulted y l yassulted assulted ed at at atat a gaeg age 7 e age by 7 by 7a7by drif aby drifter ater adrifter drifter

5m

M oMth oM e thM o r eth a or n th eadre na ste rd naste dnpdfa ste pste th fape th fa pr e fa thr th e re r m omve omve dm o to ve do ve to dMdto eMlb to eM olbM u eorlb eu nlb orenuoa erunrae dnnead nadn d th e th a eth ba th e ubse eau bse ag ubo se ugtse owo gt owo grtose wo tr se wo r se r se

B

18 16 816 186 86666

18 17 812 7 182 87722 Eliza Eliza Eliza bEliza ebth e bth wa ebth wa esthwa still s wa still s sstill still a daddicte ad dicte addicte dto dicte to do pdto oiup tom oiupom iu p iu mm a nadn a wo d nawo du n ld dwo u wo ld guald guinaldgin itagin ita init it a naywa n aywa nayywa nsh yywa sh ey yco sh e sh co u e ld eco u ld co u ld u ld

18 17 810 7 180 87700

WITH POND

o r i g i n a lo rbiugo iir lni dag ili nn gbaul uioslrb ediu :iginilgndaiulnsgeb:uuisled:i n g e n t r a n c ee nttorean gnt acr oea l ntc aoe nedgntatoorlagnaaconeld taon dg a o l s a l l y p o rsta l lsyaplolrytp o rsta l l y p o r t n e w b u i lndeiwn n gbeuw uislb edu :iinlgndeiuwnsgeb:uuisled:i n g u s e : c o u r t y a rcdo ugrc ato ryu dar ert ndy agracd eroadug serantrydaaerrnedaasgraeradse n f o r m e d iftoart f imoer nd.imteadtiiftooanrt.imoend.i t a t i o n . o r i g i n a lo ruisgo eirni oag fli nuasleo ruoisfgei noafl u s e o f s t a c k e d sbtraics ckt kea sdc k tbe ord pipcsb iktr nsai gcctkkoespdptibonrpgipciknsg t o w a l l s u sweadl lw tsa o lul css oendu ns etwe coad tlcltoson nucesocentdn etcot c o n w i t h t h ew istihw ti ett ’hh se t psh aie stwteis’tisht ept’ahssetpsaistte ’ s p

NEW PROGRAM

H

CELL BLOCK YARD 4 o r iogriingoairlnioagr blii u ng ibai luln dia ilbl ndugiibnlugdi s il eund :sgien:ug s eu :s e : c e lcle lblcl eoblclle kolcbl ikln obicl ynko ac ryik dan ri 4dyn a 4ry da r 4d 4 n e wn ebwu nibeluwn die ilbw ndugiibnlugdi s il eund :sgien:ug s eu :s e : p s ypcshyicpahstiyp racs ithy sric tiahsti +tra it+sr ti s +t + p s ypcshyocplhsooyp glcs iohy sgoc tilhsootgl io sg ti s t

PSYCHIATRIST AND PSYCHOLOGIST

REMAND CELL BLOCK / REMAND CENTRE

HISTORIC PROGRAM

o r iogriingoairlnioagr blii u ng ibai luln dia ilbl ndugiibnlugdi s il eund :sgien:ug s eu :s e : r e mraenmdar necdmr e ae lcnm ledaln blcd l eoblclle kol ,cblkl ,ob cl ko ,c k , r e mraenmdar necdmr e ae ncnm teda rnn etcdre enc te rn et r e n e wn ebwu nibeluwn die ilbw ndugiibnlugdi s il eund :sgien:ug s eu :s e : c o mcmoumnmcauolnmcamo llum a nm ulau naln dua rnll yda,rulyna,du rn yd ,r y , k i tkcihtecknhi,etknci d,ht i ec ndnh ii,e nnn gid,niagnd n ii dannngidn ag n da n d l o ulnogu nlhgoa ulhno lagulnlhg a lh la l l

COMMUNAL LAUNDRY / KITCHEN / DINING AND LOUNG HALL

NEW PROGRAM

5m

“INSERTIONS OF NEW STRUCTURE WITHIN THE BONES OF THE EXISTING BUILDINGS ALLOWED FOR THE FACADES TO REMAIN INTACT. SOME BUILDINGS WITH A SIGNIFICANTLY AWFUL PAST WERE DEMOLISHED BUT THE REMAINS OF THESE BUILDINGS EXIST WITHIN THE LANDSCAPE.”

225


226


227


228


ELEANOR HUGHES

Fort Largs is a site that contradicts itself in many ways. It held a formerly regimented program yet is a mismatch of architectural styles in a disjointed configuration. It holds a long-lasting connection and importance to the surrounding community and conversely overlooks and disregards the significance of the site to the local Kaurna people through its discovery as an archaeological burial ground and oral water source. Due to this, the implanted program and built form will attempt to bond the fragmented pieces and history of the site, both metaphorically and physically. To begin to connect the past and present, an education program is proposed for the currently vacant site. Expanding the existing Ocean View College by moving the high school component is a logical step for the currently expanding area, with many new developments appearing around the port. This helps to connect past and present as it reverses a process of moving and expanding that first occurred in 1942 when the guns from the Fort were moved 600m north, to what is now the site of Ocean View College. An additional program of a conservation park will be intertwined and surround the educational spaces. This will both rehabilitate the local landscape and aid in sensory connection and place-making for school students, especially those with sensory impairments, disabilities and mental health issues. The new builtSITE formBOUNDARY of the site weaves between the heritage, at points intersecting and fragmenting to acknowledge the damage the site has played in the lives of the local HERITAGE Indigenous community. The additions to the site are quite contrasting to the current material palette yet reference existing forms in key and public parts of the school to assist in melding the old and new.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

FORT LARGS HIGH

SITE HERITAGE ITEMS

229


GENESIS LANGUAGE FOLDS

01. PATROL 01.

PATROL

“THE NEW BUILT FORM OF THE SITE WEAVES BETWEEN THE HERITAGE, AT POINTS INTERSECTING AND FRAGMENTING TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE DAMAGE THE SITE HAS PLAYED IN THE LIVES OF THE LOCAL INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY.”

02. RECONNAISSANCE

02. RECONNAISSANCE

03. ENCIRCLEMENT 03. ENCIRCLEMENT

OPEN LOCKER AREA THROUGHOUT FORT CONVERTED TO THEATRE 400 SEATS ELEVATED SKYBRIDGE VIEWS OVER SCHOOL AND COAST

04. OVERWATCH 04. OVERWATCH

05. SEIGE05.

04. AMBUSH

SIEGE

06. AMBUSH

230


PROGRAM DIAGRAM CONSERVATION PARK MAINTAINED BY STUDENTS

5 GLA CLASSROOMS FORMER BARRACKS CONVERTED TO GREEN HOUSE RAISED VEGGIE GARDEN

FORMER DRILL HALL CONVERTED TO GYM/ GROUNDS MAINTENANCE STORAGE

CUBICLES SEPARATED NON-BINARY

231


232


233


234


FIORINA DONATO

The site selected for my final project was the Old Adelaide Gaol, Designed by Architect George Strickland Kingston in 1841. At the time of construction the gaol was considered unnecessary by many. South Australia was intended to be the “perfect colony”; free settlers, no crime and no mental illness. However, within 3 years, plans of a permanent gaol were established. The first few operational years the Gaol would see an average of two prisoners a month. These prisoners were usually jailed for small crimes, mainly for being drunk and disorderly, debtors and mentally unstable. The Gaol quickly received the nickname Astons Hotel, after the first warden, as it was perceived as a place where people in need would receive free housing. However, as the years passed the need for and associated investment in the gaol became more defensible as its original capacity was exceeded and further cells were added. The Gaol was decommissioned in 1988 as it was considered outdated. “Metamorphosis” is a scheme for the adaptive re-use of the redundant complex that attempts to reverse the function, program, and form of the gaol. The new program is a substance abuse rehabilitation centre. The site has a deep and difficult history as a place of incarceration in which many of the inmates were suffering with substance abuse. The reimagined complex will provide, by contrast, a nurturing space to grow. The new program aims to reverse the function of the building and remove all elements which previously made it a gaol. Through extensive site analysis a catalogue was collated of all the aspects that make the site and buildings incarcerating spaces. The main points which were pulled from this was the separation of prisoners and buildings. The prisoners were restricted to their tiny cells for 23 hours a day, only for one hour were they able to exit and enter the courtyard. These buildings are all separated by inner walls and courtyards. I then zoomed-in further into the details and decided that the key elements that truly make the site a gaol and keep one in are the openings. All enclosing doors and windows were therefore removed, along with the buildings with particularly traumatic histories, such as the southern maximum security cell-block where hangings were carried out, as well as minor utilitarian structures built with temporary materials. transform their lives.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

METAMORPHOSIS

GENISIS

235


EXISTING SITE

TRACE SITE LINES

restroom

FENESTRATION STUDY

induction centre + activity room womens kitchen cells mess/recreation canteen hanging tower cells

remand cells + centre observation tower visitors centre

mess/recreation womens cells

cells

hanging tower cells

remand cells + centre

O F F IC E R S O NLY

observation tower sally port + admin building

remove doors and windows site intervention

NORTH ELEVATION 236

EXTEND TO GRID


EXTRUDE FORM FROM GRID

MANIPULATE BY PROGAM

PROGRAM AXO LAUNDRY GROUP THERAPY KITCHEN AND DINING SOBER HOUSING (40) FLEXIBLE SPACE SMALL LIVING RECEPTION EXAMNIATION ROOMS DETOX HOUSING (80 GROUP THERAPY GYM OFFICES STORE

237


8

STUDIO AMIT SRIVASTAVA

“BY SETTING UP A PROJECT IN OUTER SPACE, THE STUDIO REMOVES THE FRAMEWORK OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN A STANDARD URBAN PRACTICE, AND FORCES THEM TO DEAL WITH ALL ASPECTS OF THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PROCESS. ”

238


LUNAR HABITAT STUDENTS 242 248 252 256 260 266

Dushyant Kathuria Daikun Li Tian Wang Rakkesh Mohan Ma Zheming Stavros Grafyadel 239


The final project offers an opportunity to both inspire and challenge the students through the establishment of a unique design project. Students are often presented with a large and complex project that has various social, cultural and technical dimensions, so that they may exercise their disciplinary knowledge. But it is also important to challenge any inherent assumptions about the profession and test the limits of this knowledge by breaking away from the predictable and the mundane. The Space Architecture Studio achieves this by setting up a unique design challenge. The Studio asks students to bring their architectural skills to bear upon the exciting proposition of designing a human habitation on the Moon. This complex design project builds on the growing interest in space exploration and

South Australia’s place of privilege in this sector as the new home of the Australian Space Agency (ASA). The project also benefits from the research of the Studio Leader as part of the Lunar Construction Group (LCG) and the Centre for Sustainable Planetary and Space Resources (CSPSR) at the University of Adelaide. The ongoing research projects deal with processes for In-Situ Resource Utilisation (ISRU) and students are encouraged to learn about and employ the latest materials and construction techniques being developed. At the global scale the studio engages with the work of premier international space organisations like NASA and ESA to ensure the sustainable shift from short-term expeditions to longer-term human settlements. But beyond setting up an inspiring and exciting design project, the Studio also has the task

“THIS COMPLEX DESIGN PROJECT BUILDS ON THE GROWING INTEREST IN SPACE EXPLORATION AND SOUTH AUSTRALIA’S PLACE OF PRIVILEGE IN THIS SECTOR AS THE NEW HOME OF THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE AGENCY (ASA). ” 240


of testing the limits of disciplinary knowledge and challenging any inherent assumptions about the profession. By setting up a project in outer space, the Studio removes the framework of design and construction available to students in a standard urban practice, and forces them to deal with all aspects of the design and construction process. The students are already encouraged to use the latest research on materials and construction techniques in accordance with the need for ISRU. But they also need to consider unfamiliar environmental concerns such as cosmic radiation or micro-meteorite attacks, and completely rethink any assumed formal or construction language that they may employ on Earth. Finally, the impact of this extra-terrestrial environment on the human body further challenges the assumption of internal programming

and spatial design. In addition to these disciplinary challenges, students are also exposed to the psycho-social effects of being in an isolated alien environment, and the role architecture can play in ensuring our psychological wellbeing. Â Â It is expected that understanding these aspects of the discipline in an alien environment will make the students more attuned to the importance of continually innovating and updating disciplinary understanding, and set them up for the profession of the future. Â DR AMIT SRIVASTAVA Studio Leader

241


OUR DESTINATION

242


DUSHYANT KATHURIA

The last century has been characterized by immense technological developments along with research in the area of space exploration and habitation. This process contains within it a steady undertone of the eventuality of extraterrestrial colonization. To address this future inevitability, we must explore our preexisting collective image of what this future entails. This would involve examining the images within popular-cultural imagination such as science fiction and by extension what the influences for this may have been. For example, the influences of Middle Eastern super adobe architecture and Nader Khalili’s collaboration with NASA in the late 20th century, on the imagination of the sciencefictional planet of Tatooine in Star Wars. This in turn has influenced our collective image of life in space. Here, archives serve an essential function in allowing us to retrace our footsteps through history to find these points of divergence between the origins and function of these formal languages. These archival references reveal that the divergences are actually the product of contemporary limitations such as technological capacity, imaginative ability and what is truly possible in the given time period. As a designer it then becomes possible to revisit these formal languages and engage them once again with the opportunities afforded by current technologies. This project aims to highlight the value of archives while simultaneously re-creating a collective vision of our future in space. This vision is based on the images embedded in our collective subconscious and the actuality of this future based on our contemporary technological capacity and the need of the hour.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LUNA-TECTURE

GENESIS EARTH ARCHITECTURE

243


ast 200 lunar days nce.

aft to travel the tion of the south or rockets to refuel sible.

6

5 4 7

8

2 3

5

BIOLOGICAL MODULE

HYDROPONICS MODULE 4

6

1. AIRLOCK 2. GALLERY 3. BIO COMP 1 4. BIO COMP 2 5. BIO COMP 2 6. EVA LOCK 7. PANTRY 8. CIRCULATION

3

1

1. AIRLOCK 2. GALLERY 3. R & D 4. SERVICES AND EQUIPMENTS 5. STOWAGE SHELVES 6. HYGEINE COMPONENTS

2

1

4

3 1

1

2

WASTE & WATER MANAGEMENT MODULE

UNDERGROUND LIVING MODULES 1. ELEVATOR 2. HYGEINE COMPONENT 3. FOYER 4. LIVING POD

4

3

2

2

1. FOYER 2. POWER LIFT 3. WASTE MANAGEMENT 4. WATER MANAGEMENT 5. EXPERIMENTS 6. WORKSHOP

4

3

6

5

14

15 12

13

5

5 11

3 S1

2

10

1

1

2

3 4

4 6

CIRCULATION MODULES 1. AIRLOCKS 2. FOYER 3. ELEVATOR 4. LOGISTICS 5. STOWAGE 6. HYGIENE COMPONENTS

8

S1

9 6

5 6

7

3

2

1

4

ADMIN MODULE 1. 3 LEVEL AIRLOCK 2. DUST CONTAINMENT & ESCAPE SUIT 3. EQUIPMENTS 4. EQUIPMENTS 5. FOYER 6. REMOTE OPERATIONS 7. REMOTE OPERATIONS 8. R&D 9. LIBRARY 10. STOWAGE 11. R&D 12. HYGEINE COMPONENT 13. HYGEINE COMPONENT 14. INLET AND OUTET 15. EVA LOCK

STRUCTURAL OUTRIGGERS

UNDERGROUND LIVING VERTICAL BICYCLE CIRCULATION SYSTEM

DISPLACED POSITION LADDER SYSTEM

TION SYSTEM

RETAINING WALL SYSTEM

244 LUNACRETE FLOOR SLAB SYSTEM

Lunar Cons


7

2. GALLERY 3. BIO COMP 1 4. BIO COMP 2 5. BIO COMP 2 6. EVA LOCK 7. PANTRY 8. CIRCULATION

8

2

The Shackleton crater of the lunar base can make it possible for spacecraft to travel the farther side of the moon for more explorations of raw materials. The location of the south pole is also nearer to earth to the lower orbit of the earth. So, it is easier for rockets to refuel at the international space station and reach the south pole as fast as possible.

3

SITE

6

5 MODULES 1

BIOLOGICAL MODULE

4

SHACKLETON CRATER RIM

ZORO POD / 7 CIRCULATION

1. AIRLOCK 2. GALLERY 3. BIO COMP 1 4. BIO COMP 2 5. BIO COMP 2 6. EVA LOCK 7. PANTRY 8. CIRCULATION

8

2 3 1

4

3

OBSERVATION ZONE

1

2

LANDING ZONE RESOURCE ZONE

3

4

PHEONIX 2.0 / MEDICAL FACILITY

1

2

UNDERGROUND LIVING MODULES

Location Map of the moons south pole RESOURCE ZONE

2

1. ELEVATOR 2. HYGEINE COMPONENT 3. FOYER 4. LIVING POD

LUNAR SOUTH POLE

LANDING ZONE

3

6

5

OBSERVATION ZONE SHACKMINES HABITAT

UNDERGROUND LIVING MODULES

Location Map of the moons south pole RESOURCE ZONE

1. ELEVATOR 2. HYGEINE COMPONENT 3. FOYER 4. LIVING POD

LUNAR SOUTH POLE

LANDING ZONE OBSERVATION ZONE

14

2

15

3

4

13

12

5

6

5

SHACKMINES HABITAT

11 2

1

14

15

7m

4

S1

6

8

Shackleton Crater rim

S1

4

1. AIRLOCKS 2. FOYER 3. ELEVATOR 4. LOGISTICS 6 5. STOWAGE 6. HYGIENE COMPONENTS

2

11

710

6

1

ADMIN 8

ZORO POD

9

CIRCULATION MODULES 4 3 5 2 6

CIRCULATION MODULES 1. AIRLOCKS 2. FOYER 3. ELEVATOR 4. LOGISTICS 5. STOWAGE 6. HYGIENE COMPONENTS

Shackleton Crater rim

9

5

5

CIRCULATION MODULESUTAM 101 / 3

10

13

12

7m

3

7

3

2

4

1

Shackleton Crater section 1

8.5 m

Shackleton Crater section

Earth architecture This project is looking at the archives of nasa on Nader Khalili proposal for the lunar base building to NASA. He presented the techniques for building on the Lunar MARRAKESH 29base / with earth and fire on the planet earth with the potential possibilities of building on the lunar base with the lunar soil ( Regolith) and fire, WASTE AND WATER i.e. heat of the sun on the moon. Nader Khalili’s sand-based domes atMANAGMENT cal earth institute propose building methods on planet surfaces using local resources - In-situ resource utilisation (ISRU).

PHOENIX 2.0

MEDICAL FACIL

The cornerstone of this project is Nader Khalili’s construction model of earth architecture comprising of the sandbag technique. Through this process, we may bring his idea into the 21st century and potentially take it beyond with new industrial means of production with a focus on material research and ISRU. The overarching aim through this project is to usher in the new industrial revolution(Industry 4.0) located on the Moon. Output and production from this Moon-based industry will eventually see Earth based benefits as well. The mining base on the Shackleton crater will use a smart robotic infrastructure that will change the construction industry, thereby becoming a key figure in the new industrial revolution.

5 UPPER BEARING PLATE

6 3

4 WALLS SIDE LOWER BEARING PLATE 2 UPPER BEARING PLATE

SEISMIC ROLLER ISOLATION SYSTEM SIDE WALLS

1

1. AIRLOCK 2. GALLERY 3. R & D 4. SERVICES AND EQUIPMENTS 5. STOWAGE SHELVES INITIAL POSITION 6. HYGEINE COMPONENTS

DISPLACED POSITION

SEISMIC ROLLER ISOLATION SYSTEM

LOWER BEARING PLATE

SEISMIC ROLLER ISOLATION SYSTEM

AVANTI 201 / HYDROPONICS MODULE WASTE AND WATER MANAGMENT

HYDROPONICS MODULE

12 m

BIOLOGICAL MODULE

1. AIRLOCK 2. GALLERY 3. BIO COMP 1 4. BIO COMP 2 5. BIO COMP 2 6. EVA LOCK 7. PANTRY 8. CIRCULATION

4

Secondly, the Shackleton crater has got relatively ample sunlight for at least 200 lunar days which can be useful for creating solar power to enable the surface presence.

INITIAL POSITION

DISPLACED POSITION

LUNACRETE FLOORING

SEISMIC ROLLER ISOLATION SYSTEM

UTTAM 101

LUNACRETE FLOORING

ADMIN MODULE

ROLLER SEISMIC ISOLATION BEARING LUNACRETE FLOOR SLAB

SEISMIC ROLLER ISOLATION SYSTEM

ROLLER SEISMIC ISOLATION BEARING LUNACRETE FLOOR SLAB

3

245 4


246


247


1.

2.

3.

4.

CONCEPT MODULAR UNIT ASSEMBLY 1. LANDING 2. EXPANDING 3. INFLATING 4. STRUCTURE 5. FORMING

248

5.


DAIKUN LI

Frontier Research Habitat is a modular system of building designed for early stages of human exploration in space. The main focus of the design is the feature of modularity, where the units can be set up quickly and easily, providing greater potential for incremental expansion. For this reason, the primary units are designed with materials and sizing to allow for interstellar transportation, where multiple units can be transported at once and the inflatable structure can be easily assembled. The overall design is composed of two main parts, the protective dome frame and the modular functional unit, which are deployed in five phases. First, the modular unit is dropped to a predetermined location. Then the Transit Modular Unit is connected with the Modular Function Unit and the inflatable section is deployed. This allows for the overall configuration and sizing to be determined and the outer dome protection frame is calculated through specific program logic. Once the supporting structure is constructed through 3D printing, it is finally covered with a layer of Regolith and sintered using lasers. So, in addition to transportable modular units the design also relies on In Situ Resource Utilisation (ISRU). The material for the supporting structure of the protective dome is Alumina, the second most abundant metal in the moon, and the covering layer of the protective dome is formed by solidification of lunar dust. This protective dome can help isolate solar radiation and cosmic rays, and also prevent against meteorites. Since this is a modular system and a range of arrangements and combinations of modular units is possible, the design shows different scales by defining a potential use scenario. Indeed, this modular nature gives the design self-evolving characteristics which point towards a future of architecture where need based evolution will be paramount.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

FRONTIER RESEARCH HABITAT

GENESIS FORMAL LANGUAGE

249


“THE MATERIAL FOR THE SUPPORTING STRUCTURE OF THE PROTECTIVE DOME IS ALUMINA, THE SECOND MOST ABUNDANT METAL IN THE MOON, AND THE COVERING LAYER OF THE PROTECTIVE DOME IS FORMED BY SOLIDIFICATION OF LUNAR DUST. “

250


CONFIGURATION A

251


252


TIAN WANG

The Gravitor project aims to provide a unique holiday experience for space tourism where guests can enjoy various extreme sports activities in the unique lunar environment. First of all, the project is entirely based underground in an old lavatube under the Moon’s surface. This has two obvious advantages. The lavatube is located several meters underground and this offers protection from cosmic radiation. But also, the lunar surface is covered with a fine abrasive dust like regolith that can adversely affect human health as well as machinery. So, the underground location protects the guests from the lunar regolith and provides a better habitation environment. The location of the hotel in the lavatube offers the design its unique advantage. The modular design of the hotel further builds on two classic examples, namely the Nakagin Capsule Tower and Habitat 67. Based on this precedence the hotel rooms are developed as separate modules that face different directions and are connected by a main vertical structure that acts like an elevator. Here the height of the room can be controlled to give the guest an opportunity to experience the lavatube environment from different heights and angles. This lavatube space is itself isolated by two large ETFE walls that create an air controlled ‘external’ environment for guests to enjoy. The ETFE membrane provides excellent airtightness and structural strength, while allowing guests to enjoy views of the natural environment of the lavatubes outside. This controlled ‘external’ space is accessible by hotel guests for special extreme sports activities which take advantage of the lavatube location and Moon’s low gravity. The guests will also be provided with excursions into the natural lavatube environment. The hotel modules are themselves made of Aluminium and Kevlar fabric panels which come preassembled from Earth.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

GRAVITOR HOTEL

LOCATION

LOCATION

PHILOLAUS CRATER

253


LUNAR SURFACE 00

- 40,000

- 60,000

SUB LUNAR SURFACE PLAN

ENGINEERING AND EQUIPTMENT

254


HOTEL ISOMETRIC

SOLAR ENERGY FARM

ENTRY

AIRLOCK

CENTRAL ELEVATOR

STRUCTURAL SUPPORT FRAME

GUEST ROOMS X 6 (HEIGHT ADJUSTABLE) VEGETATION FARM

STAFF CLIMBING SCAFFOLD

LUNAR SPORT GROUND

DINING ROOMS ENGINEERING AND EQUIPTMENT

255


256


RAKKESH MOHAN

Today humans can enjoy the luxuries of air travel and fly across the globe in mere hours. But this was not the case some 60 or 70 years ago, and it was not until the development of jet engines and the post war commercialization of air travel that this opportunity became available to the general population. The current proliferation of air travel and the global work culture that depends on it has deprived us of the magic of flight. But imagine the novelty and excitement of air travel in the 1950s and 60s, when architects around the globe were using their imagination to capture this flight of fantasy. We are at a similar crossroads once again, this time for space flight, and several new companies are trying to capture the thrill and excitement of space exploration and tourism. So, this project offers a proposal for a new generation of space portals for interplanetary flight that can capture the excitement of travel deeply embedded in the human spirit. One of the private agencies currently operating in this space is Space-X, whose recent chrome covered rockets speak to the child like imagination of space flight. This project uses Space-X as a potential client and proposes a space portal that will serve its various ventures in space mining, space tourism and lunar habitation. But the project is not just about providing a site for launching or receiving the spacecraft, or providing for its maintenance and service. The design is also about the clash of two different landscapes: the hostile landscape of the abrasive regolith covered moon surface, and the landscape of human construction which is inviting and appealing for the arriving travellers. In that sense, the project looks at the future of the continuously evolving disciplinary debate between architecture and landscape.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LUNAR SPACEPORT

CONTEXT

257


AIRLOCK

SECURITY LAUNCH MISSION CONTROL

LANDING

MEDIC

MEDIC

ENTRY

LOUINGE

AIRLOCK

GROUND FLOOR

KITCHEN

PAYLOAD PROCESSING

GYM

HYGEINE CREW

STORE

BASEMENT 1

LAB

STORE

PARKING

PAYLOAD PROCESSING

PARKING LIFE SUPPORT

BASEMENT 2

258

TRAINING


FILLING STATION

LAUNCH PAD

MINING

G

LAUNCH AIRLOCK CHECK - IN MEDICAL SUIT ROOM

LANDING

B1

AIRLOCK MEDICAL LOUNGE CHECK-OUT CONTROL ROOM

QUARTERS

B2

ACCOMMODATION DINING KITCHEN HYGEINE WORKSPACE GYM MEDIA ROOM

LUNA HOTEL

PAYLOAD LOADING LIFE SUPPORT PLANT NURSERY STORAGE MEDICAL LAB TESTING / REPAIR TRAINING VEHICLE PARKING

“THIS PROJECT OFFERS A PROPOSAL FOR A NEW GENERATION OF SPACE PORTALS FOR INTERPLANETARY FLIGHT THAT CAN CAPTURE THE EXCITEMENT OF TRAVEL DEEPLY EMBEDDED IN THE HUMAN SPIRIT.”

AGRI - LAB

259


260


MA ZHEMING

Space exploration is a global effort and a global industry. As a result, before we consider any other issue, we need to address basic human requirements to ensure long term human habitation in space. In addition to basic needs of shelter, this includes access to fresh food. The project, thus, aims to address the fundamental problem relating to diet of astronauts and space travellers by proposing a Lunar Agriculture Laboratory. For long, vacuum packaged food has been the source of sustenance for astronauts in space. But this is only a temporary solution for short term exploration. When considered over a longer term, it does not only have nutritional implications but can also impact the mental health of the astronauts. There are other physiological and psychological benefits of having access to fresh food grown on the lunar environment. So, the design seeks to establish a research facility that will allow for a group of scientists to live on the Moon for six months and carry out experiments for possible plant growth. To achieve this, the project is divided into four main parts: the space farm, the main laboratory, the living pods and the airlock systems. Together these four modular elements provide the basis for the entire complex. The entire process is based on a proposed circulatory system of plant growth. The plants are planted in a nutrient solution where the fulvic acid will decompose regolith into components close to Earth’s soil composition. Then the addition of manure piles will allow for better plant growth. LED systems serve as an artificial light source. There is provision to grow wheat, soybeans, rice, sweet potatoes, lettuce and peanuts. Not only are these foods available to the astronauts but the system also produces oxygen for astronaut consumption and the biological excrement from astronauts can be used in the planting process.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

LUNAR AGRICULTURE LABORATORY

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1. SPACE ROVER CONNECTION 2. LUINAR GREEN HOUSE 3. GREEN HOUSE CONNECTION 4. MEDICAL CENTER 5. ESCAPE COMPARTMENT 6. AIRLOCK 7. UNIT CONNECTION 8. BEDROOM 9. KITCHEN 10. LIVING 11. BEDROOM 12. AIRLOCK 13. VIDEO ROOM 14. MUSIC ROOM 15. DUTY ROOM 16. BEDROOM 17. DUTY ROOM 18. BEDROOM 19.AIRLOCK 20. BEDROOM 22. AIRLOCK


“THE DESIGN SEEKS TO ESTABLISH A RESEARCH FACILITY THAT WILL ALLOW FOR A GROUP OF SCIENTISTS TO LIVE ON THE MOON FOR SIX MONTHS AND CARRY OUT EXPERIMENTS FOR POSSIBLE PLANT GROWTH.”

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STAVROS GRAFYADEL

As a designer it would be exciting to imagine fascinating new structures in the surface of the Moon. But what if we stop to consider the lives of those that will labour to realise these dreams for the rest of humanity? Here on Earth, we encounter this weird relationship between desire and labour in the use of penal labour to produce everyday objects for consumption. Radical Notion looks at this relationship of labour and incarceration by proposing a prison and rehabilitation centre on the Moon. The design process takes its cue from the monumental concrete structures in Yugoslavia known as Spomeniks. Working with the raw concrete aesthetics and the monumental forms of socialism, the design deconstructs these into a language of an anti-monument. The forms and the fragments of negative space that constitute these structures were abstracted and manipulated to develop a unique architectural object, which was then translated into a series of thin card models for further consolidation. The resulting forms were then deployed into three structures: the Prison, the Rehabilitation Centre and the Spiritual Third Place. Together these places and journey to the Moon are seen as part of a process of pilgrimage that aims to move away from the notion of punishment to that of reform. The design aims to highlight the problems with the way we think about human life, criminality, punishment, and social cohesion. It excavates the convoluted relationship we have with labour where it is both a source of self-fulfilment and torture. And finally opens up the opportunities of distance and journey as processes of human self-discovery and transformation. As such, Radical Notion hopes to take us on a journey to the Moon so that we may look more closely at our home here on Earth, and better grasp our human condition.

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

RADICAL NOTION

GENESIS MONUMENT

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TANYA COURT - STUDIO FIELDWORK: DESIGNED LANDSCAPES AT WAITE CAMPUS

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JO RUSSELL-CLARKE - STUDIO KI: KANGAROO ISLAND ART MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN

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SCOTT HAWKEN - STUDIO TIDAL ZONES: DESIGN FOR NOVEL, EMERGING, ECOLOGIES

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Final Landscape Architecture Project is a self-directed design studio in which students are asked to develop a landscape architectural proposition in response to the sites or thematics raised by the studio. The design project progresses along the student’s own areas of curiosity and investigation with the role of the studio leader to support the students in their design research. Students also benefit from presenting to the whole group and all four studio leaders at key moments during the semester. The final presentation is to a panel including members of the landscape architectural profession.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

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TANYA COURT


STUDIO FIELDWORK: DESIGNED LANDSCAPES AT WAITE CAMPUS STUDENTS 278 282 288 292

Jiaming Ma Azhrudin Coulthard Stephanie Pope Niveta Chawla 275


Studio Fieldwork is an ecological, spatial, cultural and social laboratory to test landscape architectural ideas and design. The studio will use the Waite Campus as the site for investigations and experimentations including 1:1 testing of designs on site. Precedents for this sort of work are diverse. Brett Milligan’s Design Fieldwork, reverses conventional design process with experiments such as seeding native grass in intriguing patterns before documenting what happens and undertaking further design operations. Milligan also famously installed goats on an abandoned urban site and recorded the community’s response. Other precedents include Shin Egashira’s work over 10 years in Koshirakura, Japan with student groups and locals intervening with small structures

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and installations in response to the landscape and the community’s needs. Also pertinent are Landworks’ projects, espe- cially in Sardinian where participants responded to the cultural and historical context. The role of Waite Campus is being reconsidered by the university. The site was gifted through an act of Parliament and cannot be sold. It must still respond to the terms of the gift as an educational facility with a focus on agriculture. There are many diverse landscapes within the campus for students to choose. The centre of the site might focus on campus life and student activation. The conservation area is degrad-ed yet beautiful bushland with needing both revegetation, management of feral animals and amenities for visitors. The agricultural areas are perhaps ripe for consideration of urban


agriculture, while the arboretum, as a living tree library, has enormous potential for improvement. There is an opportunity to connect with the other disciplines working on this campus including horticulture, agriculture and wine-related research. We may also work with other stakeholders including friends’ groups: Friends of Urrbrae, Friends of Waite Arboretum and the Friends of Waite Conservation Reserve. Studio Fieldwork aims to create pedagogical land- scapes where the student is also learning more about appropriate, varied and experimental design processes. TANYA COURT Course Coordinator and Studio Leader

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JIAMING MA

In order to alleviate the monotonous experience and negative streetscape in the heart of Waite campus, this project has a strong focus on reconsidering and choreographing movement and views. It launched a vision of stimulating the existing campus heart to become an inclusive, welcoming and participatory destination for students, campus stuff, visitors and residents. “The environment exists for the purpose of movement (Lawrence Halprin, 1963).” This project is a practice to start landscape design from the idea of movement and views as the core. It started with several famous movement theories and precedents such as Godon Cullen’s serial vision, Tschumi’s Cinematic-promenade in Parc de la Villette and Lawrence Halprin’s ‘Motation’ and score. This project applies these theories to assess and evaluate the site from different aspects: ‘Streetscape’, ‘Pedestrian linkage’ and ‘Open space experience’. After that the design was developed in three layers. Layer 1) Serial focal points. This layer concerns the seriality and progression of movement. Colorful symbols are extracted from serial sketches of streetscapes. The symbols become serial landscape nodes with various functions, creating interesting and dramatic spatial contrasts. Layer 2) Dynamic motion channel. This layer uses a meandering movement pattern to link various part of the site. The motion channel evokes connections and freedom of movement, providing unexpected encounters. Layer 3) Participatory open space sequence. This layer applies movement notation to programme, analysing and redesigning the movement experience to propose a new entry plaza and string of open space sequences. Additionally, it condenses and simulates natural elements from the Waite Conservation Reserve to promote participation. The three layers combined with different planting strategies together integrated to the project Rhythm of Movement. With a new sense of drama and discovery, this project enhances visual appeal, activates the negative streetscape, stimulates freedom of movement and creates abundant scenic views.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

RHYTHM OF MOVEMENT: CHOREOGRAPHING MOVEMENT AND VIEWS FOR A PARTICIPATORY CAMPUS

CASE STUDY

G. CULLEN

B. TSCHUMI

L. HALPRIN

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1. GATE 2. BIKE CENTER 3. BBQ DECK 4. BUS STATION 5. CARPARK 6. OBSERVATION DECK 7. THE WAITE BUILDING 8. CORRIDOR 9. THE LAWN 1O. WEATHER STATION 11.THE GROVE 12. ENTRY PLAZA 13. COMMUNITY GARDEN 14. CAFE 15. STUDENT CENTER 16. STAGE 17. LIBRARY PLAZA 18. THE ARCH 19. VERTICAL GREENING 20. VISITOR FACILITY


LAYER 1 SERIAL FOCAL POINTS

LAYER 2 DYNAMIC MOTION CHANNEL

LAYER 3 OPEN SPACE SEQUENCE

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The ‘Waite Conservation Reserve Native Bird Sanctuary’ is a regenerative master plan proposal for the University of Adelaide’s Waite Conservation Reserve. It aims to recreate this neglected region of the campus currently seen as a hindrance to the University, rather than a valuable asset. The project focuses on the opportunity to redevelop and rebrand the site with reference to the property’s rich surviving indigenous habitat. Due to the site’s ecological importance as well as close proximity to the CBD and surrounding parks and reserves, it offers great potential for growth and economic benefits for the University of Adelaide through creating a uniquely managed destination. The design proposal for a Native Bird Sanctuary has originated from the need to protect bird life of the Mount Lofty Ranges, under threat from habitat loss. This design would provide a unique and highly significant habitat that is essential to protect more than 200 species of birds found in the region. More than 11 of these bird species have recently been classified as having gone extinct, with 69 species being considered as potentially going extinct nationally. The design will make a fundamental contribution to enhancing the 7% of remaining pre-colonial habitat of the Mount Lofty Ranges. The space will provide opportunities for visitors to engage with native birds on a more intimate level including species which would be considered uncommon near the CBD or suburbs. It will also give people the chance to learn about the different bird species found within the region. By doing so it will help to foster a significant emotional connection between birds and humans, contributing to their protection. This space will help to nourish endangered populations, enhancing and restoring the currently damaged ecological community of the Mount Lofty Ranges, resulting in a more resilient bird habitat that will set a benchmark for surrounding parks and reserves.

AZHRUDIN COULTHARD

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

A FRACTURED PIECE IN A LOST PUZZLE

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

ADL HILLS + MT. LOFTY RANGES Adelaide Hills & Mount (ALMR) Lofty Ranges Native Bird Priority NATIVE BIRD PRIORITY

REMNENT VEGETATION Remnent Vegetation and Revegetation Focus + REVEGITATION FOCUS

AMLR BIRD OpportunityNATIVE Observe & learn about the AMLR Native Birds AWARENESS

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RARE NATIVE BIRD FOCUS LIST

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360.1M ABOVE SEA LEVEL

MOVEMENT + CONNECTIONS

EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES

HARDSCAPE + SOFTSCAPE

- WAY FINDING - KEY LANDMARKS - STRUCTURED CIRCULATION - EASY ACCESSIBILITY

- LEARNING HUBS - INFORMATIVE OUTDOOR ED FACILITIES - HUMAN + WILDLIFE INTERACTIONS - OUTDOOR ED - INFORMATIVE SIGNAGE

- ORGANIC RE-VEGETATION -EVENT SPACES -DETAILED MATERIALISM -STRUCTURED INTERVENTIONS


SECTION - PRECINCT 01- TRANQUILITY + NOURISHMENT ZONING

S CT SE IN TA AND A S CU S LIE AR IRD TS RF IA | B A EC TE IAT INS UT SIN CT’S O B S CE ND CA TRA S& AN S A LA CT AT YL SE A L RD UC | BI PH , IN E O L S CR DS LA CT’ MI | BIR ME TRA XIA ’S AT TA ACT U E TR AT

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- WAY FINDING - KEY LANDMARKS - STRUCTURED CIRCULATION - EASY ACCESSIBILITY

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- ORGANIC RE-VEGETATION -EVENT SPACES -DETAILED MATERIALISM -STRUCTURED INTERVENTIONS

RELAXATION POD

REVEGETATED UNDERSTOREY PLANTING (RUP)

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REVEGETATED UNDERSTOREY 350M ABOVE SEA LEVEL

PROJECT STRATEGIES

SITE ACTIVATION & EXPOSURE

BIRD SANCTUARY

ECOLOGICAL PRIORITY

- WIDER CONNECTIONS - ESTABLISHED PROGRAMMING - RECREATIONAL ACTIVATION - ECONOMICAL SUSTAINABILITY

- ENDANGERED BIRD LIFE PRIORITY - ESTABLISHED PROGRAMMING - CAREFULLY INTRODUCED BIRD HOMES

- REVEGETATION - WILDLIFE PRIORITY -ENHANCEMENT OF HABITAT - WEED PREVENTION

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STEPHANIE POPE

Located in Urrbrae, South Australia, the Waite Arboretum can act as a platform for unique ecosystem management strategies. Dominated by non-native plant species, the site encourages public dialogue and education towards understanding Australia’s diverse ecological habitats, as well as management techniques aimed at controlling invasive species and environmental stressors. In order to increase ecosystem biodiversity and environmental resilience, future weed management strategies must understand the connection between local communities, landowners, and government agencies. Invasive species are often indicators rather than drivers of change, and as a result they dominate our heavily-altered urban centres. Too often, environmental management strategies increase the disconnect between nature and people living in urban environments, as conservationists continue to emphasise the idea that non-indigenous ecosystems are inherently undesirable. Understanding the way in which people perceive and connect to nature in our modern communities must be at the forefront of future environmental management strategies. The Co-Exist project explores an ecologically hybrid design whereby strictly-managed native ecosystems sit within a mosaic of emerging novel ecosystems and colonial settings. The use of mounds and hedges divides these spaces, degrading overtime and allowing zones of diverse program and management strategies to generate new, novel spatial expressions. Whilst valuing the existing remnant trees and grasslands, and encouraging the expansion of native ecosystems in future years, the project acknowledges the complex connections between non-native species and cultural ideas of place. With a focus on retaining all existing trees, and using understory planting and topography manipulation to drive spatial and ecological qualities, the Co-Exist project is designed to evolve with environmental and cultural changes. The implementation of permaculture strategies, such as Hugelkultur mounds, in combination with flexible landscape design techniques encourages community members and site managers to act as key agents driving the site aesthetic and development over time.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

CO-EXIST

CONCEPT

HUGELKULTUR MOUNDS

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HIGH TIDE

“THE PROJECT ACKNOWLEDGES THE COMPLEX CONNECTIONS BETWEEN NON-NATIVE SPECIES AND CULTURAL IDEAS OF PLACE. WITH A FOCUS ON RETAINING ALL EXISTING TREES, AND USING UNDERSTORY PLANTING AND TOPOGRAPHY MANIPULATION TO DRIVE SPATIAL AND ECOLOGICAL QUALITIES”

TOPOGRAPHY MANIPULATION

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MASTER PLAN 1. MAIN ENTRANCE 2. WAITE PLAZA 3. PARKING 4 WAITE STREET 5. CENTRAL PLAZA 6. ALMOND AND HEALTH FOOD CAFE 7. HEALTH FOOD AND CALORIE GARDEN 8. READING GARDEN 9.PLANTING BED 10.GREEN AMPHITHEATER 11.BUZZ GARDEN 12. SOIL EROSION CONTROL GARDEN 13. GLASSHOUSE 14.SUNKEN PLANTING BED 15. BARBEQUE AREA 16. RETENTION POND 17. WINE GRAPE GARDEN 18. EVENT GARDEN 19. PARKING 20. BERRY GARDEN 21. PLANT NURSERY

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NIVETA CHAWLA

Educational experiences in an outdoor environment are conducive to establishing a human-nature relationship and encouraging learning & creativity. Collaborative and meaningful links between the campus gardens and university education and research within the buildings create an ideal situation for outdoor teaching and learning for students. It also creates a venue for community engagement, campus activation and university branding. Gardens are more accessible and easily enjoyed compared with built structures and offer more nuanced opportunities for learning. The University of Adelaide, Waite Campus has more than eight hundred students. It houses the schools of agriculture, food and wine, and biological sciences, with undergraduate, post graduate, masters and PHD in the various related fields. This project aims to integrate university education with outdoor learning by designing a campus landscape that offers a glimpse of the culture of research in the University. Learning in these spaces is a pleasant change for the university students and plays an important role in spreading knowledge and awareness within the community about the different fields of research that the university has to offer. The project’s Vision for Waite Campus is: “To create a Campus that inspires and engages with students and the community to deliver research-based learning through its planting design program and landscape experience.” The four key considerations for achieving the vision are providing educational planting design programs, improving pedestrian experience, enhancing existing landscapes, and creating a Campus heart. As well as improved opportunities and experience for student learning, the enhanced gardens will provide spaces for staff and visitors, as well as cleverly reveal and promote the research activities inside adjacent buildings. Selected species and their arrangement will showcase the plant-related studies of wine, agriculture and biological sciences, turning the visibility of University teaching and research Inside Out!

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

INSIDE OUT: WAITE RESEARCH CAMPUS

PRINCIPLES

EXPERIMENTATION

OUTDOOR CLASSROOMS

SELF-EDUCATION

SELF EXPRESSION

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WAITE PLAZA

EROSION CONTROL GARDEN

WAITE ROAD

BUZZ GARDEN

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WAITE PLAZA

“AS WELL AS IMPROVED OPPORTUNITIES AND EXPERIENCE FOR STUDENT LEARNING, THE ENHANCED GARDENS WILL PROVIDE SPACES FOR STAFF AND VISITORS, AS WELL AS CLEVERLY REVEAL AND PROMOTE THE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES INSIDE ADJACENT BUILDINGS.”

PLANT RESEARCH GARDEN BUZZ GARDEN

EROISION CONTROL GARDEN

WAITE ROAD

BUZZ GARDEN

PLANTINGBED PATHWAY

HARTLEY GROVE ST.

LEUCOPHYTA BROWNII

CORREA REDEX

EXITING TREE

EXITING TREE

ACACIA MYRTIFOLIA

SENNA CASSIA

SECTION - BUZZ GARDEN

LAVANDULA ANGUSTIFOLIA

A’

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NATIVE PLANTING BED PATHWAY

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JO RUSSELL-CLARKE


STUDIO KI: KANGAROO ISLAND ART MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN STUDENTS 300 306 310 314

Eden Leah Bonython Samantha Godakumbura Luke Kluske Dengxiao Xia 297


Located at Kingscote on crown land already identified, the Studio KI investigates a current proposal for an art gallery by a local interest group. In addition to siting a gallery an architectural footprint will be supplied the brief includes an extended, site-responsive sculpture garden, along with ancillary requirements for car and coach parking, and outdoor event, film screening and performance space. Themes for student investigation could include recent commentary on an old war about the role of public sculpture. Perhaps ‘refused’ colonial sculptures could be relocated and contextualised here? The lack of indigenous perspectives in public art and the telling of local histories may also be explored. The studio

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will consider the history of ‘sculpture gardens’ and the role of site-specific art including both permanent and temporary or ephemeral art and landscape interventions. The studio will not involve the creation of any art pieces, but must provide space and explore ideas and arguments for enabling particular art to be located. The recent death of artist epicwrapper Christo has drawn attention to the links between landscape, place and perception heightened by art. In the context of economic recovery for Kangaroo Island following last summers’ fires, art-led tourism, of which there are many precedents, could be highly significant with potential links to established art events and festivals across various media including film, music and


dramatic performance. How can Kingscote be a stage to host national and international programs? Key considerations include physical and other relationships with the town (food and accommodation, employment, seasonal festival and short stay opportunities) and views to the ocean and key scenic points of interest, as well as the wider context of tourist travel and experience of KI where this is planned as a major attractor. In addition, consideration of the role of fire, its past economic, ecological and social impacts, and mitigation or management of potential future threats, may be considered. DR. JO RUSSELL-CLARKE Studio Leader

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EDEN LEAH BONYTHON

Kangaroo Island was recently devastated by bushfires, becoming a kill zone for animals and decimating 46 percent of the island, ironically, living up to its indigenous name ‘Karta: Island of the Dead’. The proposed Up in Smoke Art Museum & Sculptured landscape design is derived from burnt timber tracings that erode into and imprint onto the landscape. These depressions vary in scale and the type of artwork they host. The inground immersion, like an open grave, takes patrons six feet under to engage with permanent sculpture(s) that reference skeletal remains. Lighter depressions have softer imprints in the landscape and host ephemeral artworks, playing on the concept that bushfires leave their mark but can also promote beauty and change. This project immortalises the concept of smoke through understanding the layers of bushfire impact and brutality, whilst also encapsulating the beauty of the burnt landscape. In literal form, smoke guides you through the site and is used as a tool to hide and reveal pathways to sculptures. To heighten your engagement with the artworks and landscape, there is an array of consumable plants that can be smoked evoking calm and euphoric feelings. Not only to be enjoyed during the day - and if enjoyed a little too much - there are also camping facilities with fire pits and food stations to allow patrons to delve into smoked meats at night. Whether you get lost in your mind or in the haze, Up in Smoke is a dark experience that will leave you feeling high.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

UP IN SMOKE // DOWN IN DEPRESSION

GENESIS

301


“THE IN-GROUND IMMERSION,LIKE AN OPEN GRAVE, TAKES PATRONS SIX FEET UNDER TO ENGAGE WITH PERMANENT SCULPTURE(S) ...LIGHTER DEPRESSIONS HAVE SOFTER IMPRINTS IN THE LANDSCAPE AND HOST EPHEMERAL ARTWORKS”

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MASTER PLAN 1. ENTRY TO “UP IN SMOKE” 2. ASHPHALT CARPARK 3. ACCESS DRIVEWAY TO ART MUSEUM & CAFE 4. DISABILITY CARPARK 5. ART MUSEUM 6. CAMPING GROUNDS 7. FIRE PITS 8. “SUNBURNT LAND” FEATURE PATHWAY 9. ASHPHALT PATHWAYS TO “6 FEET UNDER” DEPRESSIONS 10. SMOKING STATION: MEATS & PLANT CONSUMPTION 11. CHARRED TIMBER FEATURE SEATING 12. SECRET ARTIST RESIDENCE 13. TYPICAL “LIGHT TOUCH” DEPRESSIONS - EPHEMERAL ARTWORKS 14. TYPICAL “CUT & FILL” DEPRESSIONS - CHANGING MANIPULATION 15. “6 FEET UNDER” DEPRESSIONS - PERMANENT SCULPTURES

16. EXISTING TREES 17. RED PLANT PALETTE 18. BLACK PLANT PALETTE 19. SMOKE BUSHES 20. SMOKE-ABLE PLANTS 21. BLACK SEDGES/BUSHES/GRASSES 22. BARREN LAND

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SAMANTHA GODAKUMBURA

Historical focus on the colonial narrative has led to other stories being lost in time. What’s left of these stories are often told in fragments. In trying to piece together KI’s history, it was realised that a significant period of the island’s timeline remains forgotten: the sealer men and their abducted Indigenous ‘wives’ who made up the crucial first generation of Kangaroo Islanders. The ‘Fragments’ art museum and sculpture garden reveals what is left of these stories. In doing so, it challenges the typical historical authority of museums by shifting attention to what stories are being told. Moreover, in recognising the importance of understanding different perspectives, the museum uses digital technology to reveal visual fragments of the island’s history through multiple lenses. Upon entering, visitors find their way through a series of sequenced gardens, each of which represents a different era in KI’s history. The planting schemes, layouts and sculpture programs are linked to the narratives told in each space. Within the first zone, a sense of intrigue is created through fragments of quartz, chert and flint embedded in the ground which hint at the discovery of early Indigenous stone tools. Within the next zones, stories of Kangaroo Island’s history are told through short video excerpts, found by scanning digital markers located on sculpture plinths. Visitors enter spaces where they learn about Matthew Flinders then Nicolas Baudin, chronologically, followed by areas dedicated to the stories of first generation islanders. Visitors then break free from the sequenced path as they enter the Fragment Garden, a space which uses the disorderly placement of existing trees to create an atmosphere of disorientation. The garden intentionally lacks pathways and other wayfinding devices to instil in visitors a sense of disconnection and confusion. As guests come across digital markers, located in the landscape in no particular order, they will discover the fragmented stories of first generation islanders - in all their confusion, complexities and contradictions.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

FRAGMENT: GARDEN OF BROKEN HISTORIES

GENESIS FRAGMENTS

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“UPON ENTERING, VISITORS FIND THEIR WAY THROUGH A SERIES OF SEQUENCED GARDENS, EACH OF WHICH REPRESENTS A DIFFERENT ERA IN KI’S HISTORY.” 6

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3

1 2

MASTER PLAN 1. K.I INDIGENOUS SCULPTURE GARDEN/ HEATHLAND 2. EUROPEAN SCULPTURE GARDEN / ENGLISH GARDEN 3. EUROPEAN SCULPTURE GARDEN 2 / FRENCH LANDSCAPE 4. LOCAL K.I SCULPTURE GARDEN/ GEOLOGICAL GARDEN 5. INTERIOR ART GALLERY 6. S.A + TASMANIAN INDIGENOUS SCULPTURE GARDEN 7. MAIN SCULPTURE GARDEN 8. STUDIO + ARTIST RESIDENCE 9. THERAPY GARDEN / HARDSCAPE 10. ROCK + MINERAL FRAGMENTS WITH QR CODES / SAND 11. BOARDWALK 12. CAFE

308


10

12

9

7

11 8

309


9

MASTER PLAN

7

8 5

6

4

10 1 3 1. ART MUSEUM 2. OCEAN VISTA REVEAL PLAZA AND EXHIBITION SPACE 3. REEVES VIEW RESTAURANT 4. VIEWPOINT JUNCTURE AND SCULPTURAL TERRACE GARDENS 5. SURROUNDING CONTEXT AND LINEAR BOULDER FORMATIONS 6. GOV. WALLEN WALKING TRAIL CONNECTOR 7. ROTATING ARTISTS ISOLATION ACCOMMODATION 8. NATIVE VEGETATION ZONE AND VEGETATIVE VIEW DIRECTORY VOIDS 9. AUSTRALIAN CONTEXT CONTEMPLATION AND SELF RETROSPECTIVE BRIDGE 10. VIEW OBSCURING NATIVE GRASS PLANTERS 11. ARRIVAL TENSION AND ANTICIPATION RAISING PROMENADE 12. PROMENADE DIVISION PAUSE POINT COURTYARDS 13. DIVERSIFIED NATIVE PLANTING AREA

310

2

12 11

14


LUKE KLUSKE

Nature Framed imagines a new landscape and garden for the proposed Art Museum of Kangaroo Island (AMKI) outside Kingscote. The proposal challenges ideas about conventional spaces for art and sculpture in the realm of Landscape Architecture, to suggest instead that the landscape itself can provide rich, varied and carefully calibrated experiences of the immediate and wider context of a site. This is firstly accomplished by providing a suite of instances throughout the AMKI gardens where views are drawn, framed by landform and vegetation – such as voids cut through existing scrub and new pleached native trees – and directed by elements such as rocks placed as lines out into the landscape. Coordinated with these explorations into the potential of manipulating sightlines and ‘framing nature’ as a method of generating a sense of place, the project plays with additional possibilities. Motion-oriented design strategies, visibility manipulation tactics and a heightened sense of connection between human occupants and the landscape all help to showcase ‘nature as art’. While eschewing the need for outsourced art and sculpture, the design presents an approach based intimately on locality and close observation of the landscape. It utilises the region’s unique character to attract artists to the site, providing artists’ residences. Local, national, and international artists can inhabit the gardens where they are encouraged to stay, create and contribute to visions of the site and the wider island. AMKI, its gardens and its borrowed views become a hub for the production and sharing of art on a national – even international – scale. Lastly, although focused on programmatic opportunities relating to art and landscape experience, the design also enriches recreational and tourist possibilities for the town of Kingscote. A café, restaurant, mixed use promenade and plaza space with connections back to the town, encourages a sense of community for locals as well as visitors to Kangaroo Island.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

NATURE FRAMED

SITE

311


312


KEY PRINCIPLE DEVELOPMENT

FRAMING OF KEY NATURE ELEMENTS

SITE LINES TO DIRECT VIEWS

DEFINE AND EMPHASIZE KEY VIEWPOINTS

INCLUDE VIEW ‘TEASE’ POINTS

CREATE A SENSE OF MYSTERY TO ENTICE

DEFINED ZONES OF VARYING INTENSITIES

CONCEPTUAL UNDERPINNINGS

FRAMING NATURE

KEY PRINCIPLE OUTCOMES

CONNECTION BETWEEN HUMAN + NATURE

KEY PRINCIPLE OUTCOMES

MOTION ORIENTATED DESIGN

KEY PRINCIPLE OUTCOMES

DEFINE SMALLER CREATE ZONES INCLUDE ZONES WITH NATURAL ELEMENTS PAUSE POINTS CREATED THAT ENCOURAGE MINIMAL HUMAN AS A METHOD OF THROUGH DIVERSIONS CONTEMPLATION. INTERVENTION DEFINING SIGHT LINES INTERVENTIONS TO ARTIST ACCOM. TO DESIGN MOVEMENT AS ARTIST ACCOMM. WALKING AS A METHOD FRAME VIEWS BEYOND ALLOW 360 DEGREE OPPOSED TO SPACE TO PROMOTE SELF OF DEVELOPING A SITE BOUNDARIES VIEWS OF NATURE. REFLECTION AND SENSE OF PLACE SOLITUDE

PLANTING STRATERGY

DIVIDE SITE INTO SEPERATE ZONES

VOID AS A METHOD OF FRAMING VIEWS

INCLUSION OF GARDENS OF STRUCTURE + FORM

LINEAR PLANTING TO DIRECT SIGHT LINES

MASS GRASSLANDS TO OBSCURE VIEWS

NATIVE GRASS RAISED PLANTER BEDS DIVERSIFIED NATIVE FOREST RAISED SANDSTONE PLANTERS + SCULPTURAL TERRACE GARDENS MASS NATIVE GROUNDCOVER PLANTING AREAS NATIVE RE-VEGETATION ZONE EXISTING CONDITION LAWN AREAS

313


314


DENGXIAO XIA

Avenue De La Mouton (Sheep Avenue) references the names of fashion centres around the world such as the Avenue des Champs-Elysees. The main feature of this proposal on Kangaroo Island is for a series of events centred on sheep, the wool industry and fashion. This project is for the grounds and siting of an art museum gallery and sculpture garden in Kingscote, a small town in South Australia on Kangaroo Island. Kingscote is the oldest European colony in South Australia and the largest town on the island. The Art Museum of Kangaroo Island (AMKI) gallery and sculpture garden will complement Kangaroo Island’s natural landscape and showcase its unique charm to residents and visitors as a new cultural and arts destination. Australia has been a country that rode on the back of sheep. Sheep farming has not only contributed hugely to Australia’s economy, but has been a tradition for many Australians for generations, and an iconic part of rural life. Unfortunately, in the recent Australian bushfires the largest number of any animal species on Kangaroo Island lost was sheep. This project investigates multiple elements of landscape design related to sheep. Live events include wool exhibitions and wool-related workshops, shearing competitions, fantastic wool fashion shows and a stargazing night station. Aside from a building to house art, there is a cafe to eat and play with lambs and accommodation for artists and models. These activities can promote the economic development of Kangaroo Island and attract tourists. The wool industry is again becoming important to the Australian economy and people’s lifestyle. The proposal is important for farmers and those interested in the wool industry, as well as for fashion designers and artists. It aims to establish a contemporary centre for new wool production, fashion, and sheep-friendly ideas!

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

AVENUE DE LA MOUTON: A PARK OF SHEEP STORIES FOR AMKI

GENESIS

315


LLEN GOV WA

ROAD

GO VW AL

LE

N

RO AD

11

12

10

9

8

7 5

6

4

3

2

1

SEAVIEW ROAD

316


MASTER PLAN 1. SCULPTURE GARDEN 2. CARPARK 3. ACCOMMODATION 4. GRAZING LAND 5. SHEEPFOLD 6. SINKING SPACE 7. SCULPTURE GARDEN

8. LAMB CAFE 9. CENTRAL SQUARE 10. ART MUSEUM / GALLERY 11. SCULPTURE GARDEN 12. RUNWAY

317


3

318

SCOTT HAWKEN


STUDIO TIDAL ZONES: DESIGN FOR NOVEL, EMERGING, ECOLOGIES STUDENTS 322 328 332 336

Yu Lin Stephanie Clutterbuck Leo Bassano Kaihang Zhou 319


“this is a landscape so dynamic that .....I do believe it to be true that the landscape here is demonstrably alive, that it does not exist solely or even incidentally, as a stage for the enactment of human history; that it is [itself] a protagonist’) ( Ghosh 2016, p.6). Climate change represents a severe risk to anthro-pogenic tidal zones and the communities that rely upon them. Tidal zones are experiencing increased seawater intrusions and other changes as a result of anthropogenic trends that have altered a suite of ‘land-water’ or ‘source-to-sea’ system systems. This trend is predicted to continue however planning and design for the emergent ecologies at this dynamic

320

tidal interface is in its early stages with communities around Australia seemingly oblivious even as the waters rise around them. These environments are a disaster zone with whole settlements and infrastructures submerged, but also rich in economic and ecological possibilities that must be explored. There is no other choice. Coastal, estuarine and delta systems present a range of ecoystem services for agribusiness, recreation, housing, heritage and biodiversity values. Consequently, there is a need to develop and evaluate different scenarios for coastal communities to manage, adapt and plan such economic uses in this changing environment. In order to develop scenarios this studio will examine the


landscapes of Port Adelaide which will experience serious inundation due to climate related sea-level rise. Strategies for response to sea water intrusion and the associated ancillary issues of land loss, more saline watertables and emerging ecosystems can be considered by students. Attention will be given to new possible economic land-uses that may become apparent as coastal ecosystems change, such as aquaculture, recreation, and other forms of green-blue infrastructure. SCOTT HAWKEN Studio Leader

321


MASTER PLAN

P1 P2

P3 P4

P4 - BIO PONDS FILTRATION SYSTEM

P1 - FLOODED DUNE WETLAND

322

P2 - STORMWATER WETLAND FILTRATION SYSTEM


Globally sea level rise is a catastrophic problem and will cause human and non-human habitats and infrastructure to degrade and even disappear if action is not immediate and decisive. Since European settlement, Adelaide Port River and its estuary have undergone significant changes, and multiple studies have shown that human activities have led to ecosystem degradation. As the area is low lying, it is vulnerable to sea level rise and different types of flooding. This design research project addresses the multiple intersecting problems associated with sea level rise through modelling and better understanding estuary landforms and habitats. The project generates new landforms by simulating the natural flow processes within modified and natural tidal river flats. Digital and physical geomorphological models where built to gain insight into potential forms. The Shape of Flow proposes micro-topographic interventions to increase the stormwater storage area on land, to reduce the negative impact of pollutants in the runoff and to develop a buffer zone to guard against tidal erosion caused by the Port River. This strategy alleviates current and future potential damage to the estuarine ecologies and reduces the risk of flooding from sea level rise, storm surge, tidal extremes, and stormwater runoff.

YU LIN

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

SHAPE OF FLOW

In ‘The Shape of Flow’ the landscape is divided into four types to manage the different flow and flood regimes and generate diverse habitats for colonisation by future intertidal organisms. Although the four landscape types have their own characteristics, they merge with each other and build a complex trophic web, which achieves the purpose of restoring the estuary ecosystem in Port River and generating a novel ecology.

Final Landscape Architecture Project | Shape of Flow

06 METHODOLOGY

METHODOLOGY

[GENERATION PROCESS 02] USE LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE TO GENERATE MASTERPLANS

STRUCTURE

CONNECTION AND EMBRACING

GRIDS

Edge

Visual focal point Community Embrace

Traffic node

Future Embrace Estuary Embrace

Visual focal point

Economy Embrace

Residential

Ecology Embrace Factory Within a circle with a radius of 600 meters, the main elements of the site are included. Find the key points of the site through the center of the circle, including factory ruins, houses, important traffic nodes, visual focal points, etc.

The linear structure connects and embraces different functional areas and plays different roles to improve the ecological and activity diversity of the site.

Construct a grid through three points in the landscape structure. Landscape facilities and landscape elements will be combined with the radial grid in the structure

323


HABITAT DYNAMIC PROCESS

THE BOARDWALK SYSTEM CONNECTS THE ENTIRE SITE TO GUIDE VISITORS TO EXPERIENCE DIFFERENT ESTUARY WETLAND HABITATS

THE LESS SALT-TOLERANT SHRUBS GROW IN MORE TERRESTRIAL AREAS (E.G. NITARIA BILLARDIEREI).

1 YEAR LATER

RESTORATION OF SLATMARSH HABITAT BASED ON ELEVATION AND SOIL SALINITY

THE LOWER TERRAIN CAN STORE STORMWATER

15 YEARS LATER

SIMILAR TO THE DUNE SYSTEM, SEA LEVEL RISE MOVE MANGROVES TO HIGHER AREAS

AUSTRALIAN WHITE IBIS

324

THE PONTOON BRIDGE CAN FLOAT WITH THE RISE AND FALL OF THE TIDE

ASSIG


PLATE 3 SALTMARSH FILTRATION SYSTEM

LITTLE EGRETS SLENDER-BILLED THORNBILL

SALTMARSH MOSQUITO

YELLOW-FIN WHITING BLUE SWIMMER WESTERN KING CRAB PRAWN

GARFISH

325


326


327


CONCEPT DIAGRAM ANTHROPOCENE ABSTRACT

328


+

STEPHANIE CLUTTERBUCK

Politics in Aesthetics is a project that aims to explore the idea and confrontation of current landscapes within the consequential realms of the Anthropocene. Post-industrial and contaminated wastelands are the result of a persistent and human-centric demand for materials and natural resources. As idealization and innovation of new forms of materiality drive an endless cycle of supply and demand, disruptions to biodiversity highlight the urgency of addressing the moral dilemmas of the Anthropocene. Developed as an investigative blueprint to navigate the complexities of geo-political views and issues of the Anthropogenic dilemma, an “Anthropogenic Botanical Garden” is proposed for the abandoned Penrice Soda Products Factory, located in Osborne, South Australia on the Le Fevre Peninsula. Once an iconic but controversial bicarbonate production facility, the old Penrice site will be developed into a research-orientated botanical garden that will investigate post-industrial remediation whilst providing the opportunity for public engagement and interaction. Designed within the framework of a viable coexistence between people, program and environment, the site will adapt to inevitable change, including accommodating rising sea levels that currently threaten the coast of Le Fevre Peninsula. The masterplan of the site focuses on ecological succession where the site is coordinated for remediation experimentations and research. It will gradually transform to become un-programmed public space that will evolve of its own accord and “rewild” where the landscape meets the accommodated rising sea levels. The end product of the former industrial site is a landscape in flux designed to test and prove if this way of thinking is a viable solution for post-industrial landscapes in the future. The fundamental purpose of the redevelopment is to ensure that the botanical garden functions outside of a purely aesthetic appreciation, serving instead to contribute an innovative understanding of people, programs and the environment and the coexistence of all Edward three. Burtnysky Manufactured Landscapes

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

THE POLITICS IN AESTHETICS: AN ANTHROPOGENIC BOTANICAL GARDEN

Exploration

GENESIS

EDWARD BURTNYSKY - MANUFACTURED LANDSCAPES

329


MASTER PLAN 01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

SOIL EXPERIMENTATION AND MATERIAL COLLECTION SEED VAULT LABORATORY AND HYDROPONICS EQUIPMENT STORAGE NURSERY AND MARKET SHED WATER TREATMENT FACILITY REMEDIATION BOTANICAL DISPLAY SALT EVAPORATION POND GARDENS OPEN PARK COASTAL ISLAND CAILSILT LOOKOUT MATERIAL PAVILION ROCK TERRACE REWILDING PRECINCT

06

08 05

03

“ [THE SITE] WILL GRADUALLY 02 TRANSFORM TO BECOME UNPROGRAMMED PUBLIC SPACE 04 THAT WILL EVOLVE OF ITS OWN ACCORD AND ‘REWILD’ WHERE THE LANDSCAPE MEETS THE ACCOMMODATED RISING SEA LEVELS. THE END PRODUCT OF THE FORMER INDUSTRIAL SITE IS A LANDSCAPE IN FLUX”

330

07

01


10 13

14 11

12

09

331


332


The project’s initial stages are based on two scales of site analysis. The large-scale study was focused on Port Adelaide Enfield. The second, medium-scale site analysis was focused on Port Adelaide. From these analyses, two vulnerability maps, and three possible scenarios were proposed. These three scenarios were designed following different design strategies: protect and retreat, divert, and accommodate and attack, keeping in mind the challenge of low and high tides in the study area.

LEO BASSANO

This project aims to provide a possible solution to address sea-level rise through landscape and urban design interventions to protect Port Adelaide’s built form. The project is located in Port Adelaide, important as a cultural, historical, and economic centre within the City of Port Adelaide Enfield. Given its historical performance as an industrial harbor and its urban port identity, it is an excellent opportunity to protect and preserve this area from challenges related to rising sea levels while increasing residential density.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

AN OVERSALTED PORT ADELAIDE

The “protect and retreat” strategy was chosen for further design development and resulted in the proposal ‘An Oversalted Port Adelaide’. The proposal aims to protect the built form that provides urban identity to Port Adelaide from the sea level rise by retreating buildings located at the highest risk zones and increasing residential density in the overall area. The design has two key elements: an outer bracket and an inner loop. The first strategic design element is the outer bracket which contains the proposed higher residential density and public spaces for recreation. This bracket tried to create a new intertidal ecosystem, which is now nonexistent. On the other hand, the inner loop contains the idea of a garden wreck which manages the sea level rise during low and high tides. In addition, a second flood zone is proposed for future sea-level rise challenges for Port Adelaide.

ANALYSIS

HIGH TIDE - YEAR: 2100

333


FUTURE SCENARIOS

Sea level rise - predicted - flooded areas(2100) +0.74 mts

SEA LEVEL RISE - PREDICTED - FLOODED AREAS (2100) +0.74 MTS

divert

PROTECT + RETREAT PROTECT + RETREAT

01

divert

DIVERT

ACCOMMODATE + ATTACK

02

SELECTED

ACCOMMODATE + ATTACK

ACCOMMODATE + ATTACK

03

ESC: 1:7500

334


MASTER PLAN YEAR 2100 - LOW TIDE

YEAR 2100 - HIGH TIDE

335


336


KAIHANG ZHOU

Sea level rise is a consequence of global climate change, posing significant impacts on infrastructures along coastal areas. Compared with other utilities, wastewater treatment systems are under greater threat due to their unique characteristics, such as low-lying location and centralized treatment. This project will not only continue to provide efficient and safe wastewater treatment, but also provide holistic ecosystem services, such as storm water filtration, habitat restoration, recreational and educational functions for the public. Located twenty kilometres from Adelaide, the Bolivar High Salinity Wastewater Treatment Plant is the largest wastewater treatment plant in South Australia, treating more than 170 megalitres of wastewater per day. At present, excess nutrient from the effluent is a major cause of poor water quality along Adelaide’s coasts, contributing to coastal habitat loss. With future sea level rise, two consequences will emerge. The mangroves and saltmarsh will vanishas they cannot migrate up the saltpan levee banks. At the same time, plants in the lagoon will experience inundation during the increasingly frequent and intense storm surge events. In response to these challenges, the Novel Coastal Wastewater Treatment System scheme will respond in three ways: First, breaking up the existing levees provides opportunity for the mangroves to migrate inland, while the broken levees could capture sediments from the tide, creating space for the saltmarsh and woodland. Second, creating a series of constructed wetlands to replace the existing stabilization lagoon, minimize the nutrients from both effluent and storm water. Third, applying the latest water reclamation technology used in Singapore, and relocate a new plant at higher elevation. The new hybrid coastal system of levees, sediment islands, mangrove and constructed wetlands could effectively mitigate the wave energy, improve the water quality, as well as provide habitats for both marine creatures and birds.

MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

NOVEL COASTAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

CONCEPT CONSTRUCTED WETALNDS

337


7.

MANGROVE ISLANDS

3.

MIGRATORY BIRDS MUDFLATS

4.

WASTEWATER TREATMENT WETLANDS

6.

STORMWATER TREATMENT WETLANDS

338


3

2

8

5

4

7 9

6

1

MASTER PLAN 1. VISITORS CENTER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT EXHIBITION CENTER 2. NEW WASTEWATER RECLAIMATION PLANT 3. MIGRATORY BIRD MUDFLAT 4. WASTEWATER TREATMENT ISLAND 5. POND WETALNDS 6. STORMATER WETLANDS 7. MANGROVE TRAIL 8. MAGROVER OVERPASS 9. SEDIMENT ISLANDS

339


1

340

STUDIO DAVID COOKE - RE-THINKING THE URBAN VILLAGE


URBAN DESIGN MASTERS OF PLANNING (URBAN DESIGN) The Urban Design Project is regarded as the capstone design studio for students in the M.Planning (Urban Design) program. The course focuses on the definition, development and description of a major culminating urban design project that both challenges and demonstrates students’ skills in and knowledge of urban design. The project will be of moderate complexity, negotiating issues at several scales and alert to multiple social, political and biophysical environmental and engineering contexts. Responses should demonstrate familiarity with common processes and competency in typical phases of urban design thought and practice. The final presentation should show thorough integration of all major urban design considerations as taught in the academic program and be inclusive of relevant broader planning knowledge. 341


1

STUDIO DAVID COOKE

“THIS STUDIO UNPACKED THE HISTORICAL PRINCIPLES OF PLANNING PHILOSOPHIES FOR URBAN VILLAGES, REVIEWING AND ANALYSISING THEIR SUCCESS WITHIN AUSTRALIAN CITIES “

342


RE-THINKING THE URBAN VILLAGE STUDENTS 346 350 354

Rachel Stuppos Reb Rowe Siddhesh Bhaindarkar 343


In 2020 the Urban Design Project course set its sights on re-thinking the urban village for key parts of metropolitan Adelaide. The Urban Village approach to city planning is not new, with its roots embedded within the principals of New Urbanism, nor is Adelaide’s application of this city planning approach to multiple metropolitan precincts. Given the current postpandemic environment city planning leaders confront, the ideologies underpinning Urban Villages is once again being re-emphasized as frameworks for future city growth, sustainability, affordability and livability. This studio unpacked the historical principles of planning philosophies for Urban Villages, reviewing and analysising their success within

Australian cities and proposing how these ideas can be reconsidered and applied within a real-world design context. What does the successful urban village of the future look like? “In the future, we see neighborhood hubs and urban villages where people are out of their cars, using the streets and sidewalks. Thriving stores, restaurants and services are clustered next to public open spaces that attract people at all times of day. Public transit has become more comfortable, more frequent and faster, and the streets have been reshaped around people walking, biking and using scooters, rather than around cars. As a result, streets are quieter, greener and safer. The

“THECOURSE SET ITS SIGHTS ON RE-THINKING THE URBAN VILLAGE FOR KEY PARTS OF METROPOLITAN ADELAIDE.” 344


familiar landscape of postwar singlefamily homes is still here, but now there’s something to walk to.” Reference: Kristy Wang, SPUR, Whitepaper November 2019, ‘It Takes a Village, Strategies for successful implementation of San Jose’s urban village vision’. DAVID COOKE Course Coordinator and Studio Leader

345


346


0

0

0

15

10

30

45

20

40

20

40

60

60

RACHEL STUPPOS

This project tackles the major environmental issues which the City of Unley currently faces, such as poor stormwater management, high urban heat island impacts, low levels of green open space through the implementation of new recreation spaces and a wetlands which will see the cleaning and storage of 450 million litres of stormwater. Research into current wetlands in Adelaide’s metropolitan area was conducted to understand the scale that the wetland will need to be and waterflow in and out of the site is also considered. The water will come into the site from the Brownhill Creek and Keswick Creek Catchment areas and then once cleaned, will be distributed to residential streetscapes, as well as reserves and open spaces. It is suggested that CSIRO will fund the wetland in conjunction with the government for their research purposes. Six old buildings are proposed to the repurposed into their laboratory through a new extension. Additionally, the project will create 1500 new apartments to welcome younger families and couples to the area, while also creating 110,000 square metres of commercial, retail and office space. Ecological wonderland also aims to create strong connections with its surroundings through new linkages through a sculptural pavilion and plazas to the Wayville Showgrounds, the south-west Adelaide Parklands and the Wayville train station to increase the usability of these areas. The site also remembers its history through the revitalisation of its State Heritage building through its adaptive reuse into the new army museum. To the north of this building will be a new memorial gardens forecourt which will respond to the architecture in it planting and paving. Furthermore, a memorial wall will be cut into the existing topography of the site at its highest point, north of ANZAC Highway. Its positioning here will embody its importance to the ANZACs.

MASTER OF PLANNING (URBAN DESIGN)

ECOLOGICAL WONDERLAND

75M

80

80

100 M

120

160

200M

SITE existing

FLOOD ANALYSIS

243835 m2

0

10

20

40

60

80

100 M

347


STRONG VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS

WATER BODY TO BETTER SERVE THE COMMUNITY

PROTECT SITE HISTORY

CREATE SOUND BUFFERS

ESTABLISH NODES OF RECREATION

FOCUS TOWARDS HAPPY, VIBRANT STREETS

348


349


FRAMEWORK EXISTING STRUCTURES

PROPOSED PROGRAM

RESIDENTIAL CO-OP FARM COMMUNITY RECREATION COMMERCIAL FARM UTILITY

ROOF TREATMENT

SOLAR PANELS GREEN ROOF

MAIN CIRCULATION ROUTES

TRANSIT STOP PEDESTRIANS VEHICLES

350


Transition Town - Prospect begins a necessary pivot for modern settlements. This new urban village pairs the benefits of urban living and a more traditional lifestyle to build a resilient place which supports community and country into the future. This is achieved for four key pillars: Connection: Integrate the site to surrounding area design to build resilience enhance public transport enhance walkability and cycling welcoming and safe environment Empowering people: Improve visibility into the site with active frontages, prioritizing pedestrian street design and providing Urban living that is high quality and affordable to many cultures Purpose and meaning: A mix of land uses, diverse dwelling types that heighten a mix of densities shape a unique identity. The opportunity to create quality recreation spaces that represent and respect the history of the area, particularly that of the area’s Kaurna People Thrive with nature: Enable people to live sustainably, promote energy generation on site repurpose existing buildings protect existing trees and harvest and use rainwater sustainable design. This proposal provides a roadmap to transition to a sustainable urban village

REB ROWE

MASTER OF PLANNING (URBAN DESIGN)

TRANSITION TOWN - PROSPECT

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

CONNECTION

EMPOWERING PEOPLE

PURPOSE AND MEANING

THRIVE WITH NATURE

351


352 COMMUNITY CENTRE CHI LD

7

WORM FARM | PLANT

PRODUCE PROCESSING

GREENHOUSE

5

OFFICES VENUE HIRE

RE-EDUCATION

SH

BU

KA

TU K

MASTER PLAN ORCHARD

COW

RET AIL

8

CAR E

ORK ING

DOG PAR K 1 TRAIN ION STAT F ROO DECK

2

DELI

3

10


ORCHARD SHED BUS SHELTER

impression

PLANT

6

stage 1

stage 2

PROGRAM DISTRUBTION

5

BAR

GREEN HOUSE

4

MARKET

COMMUNITY GARDEN

project achievements

$ 111 homes per hectare

70% affordable homes

36% green + recreation area

35% food production area

2.6 ha solar panels

reb rowe

|

a1618879

landuse diversity

|

university of adelaide

|

urban design project 7030

9

- COMMUNITY - FITNESS - EDUCATION

44%

- NON-RESIDENTIAL - UTILITY 17%

- DWELLINGS - RECREATION 39%

A

353

|

2020


MASTERPLAN

B

1. DEFENCE HOUSING 2. CADET TRAINING CENTER 3. COMMUNITY PLAYGROUND 4. OMMUNITY CENTER 5. RECRUITING CELL 6. ADMINISTRATION AND MESS 7. KNOWLEDGE CENTER 8. THEMED ESCAPE ROOMS 9. BOUTIQUE HOTEL 10. HORSE RINK

B

10

AN

ZA CH

IGH

WA Y

9

8 7

C

C

A

6

A

5

3

4

D

2

LEADER STREET

354

D

1.


SIDDHESH BHAINDARKAR

The Keswick Army Barrack’s site has a rich history for the Australian Armed Forces. Historically the site was the primary military base in South Australia and still continues to offer this function. In order to develop the site, and not take the primary user group, Army out of the site; the proposal focuses on to indulge programs that include the army as well as the civilians. A new museum has been proposed as an extension to the old museum in order to create curiosity and act as the crowd magnet. The site also has several other areas that focus on attracting the people into the site and educate them regarding the rich history of the Australian Army. The site pays respects to the great sacrifices made by the Army by curating a plaza with a Peace Memorial which is the highest point on the site. The extended museum also has a viewing gallery located high to gasp the view of the total site with the Peace Memorial in its full respects. The site also hosts the old architectural buildings on the site and re-programs a few structures to match the gist of the current programs active in and around the site. Towards the southern side of the site, the proposal locates a Defence Housing scheme that accommodates the home of defence personnel near the city and amenities like The Defence Training Unit, The Army Museum and other recreational areas around the site. The creek running through the site are equally glorified with beautiful and engaging landscape strips. The proposal on the site is a sympathetic gesture that respects the Victorian architecture, respects the culture and heritage of the site alongside validating the same it to the current generation.

MASTER OF PLANNING (URBAN DESIGN)

S.A ARMY MUSEUM

Activity Mapp MUSEUM EXTENSION

3 Parkland Station

Museum Extension355


PEACE MEMORIAL

Sections Sections Section A-A’ SECTION A - A

Section B-B’ SECTION B - B

Section A-A’

Section B-B’

Section C-C’

Sec

Section SECTIONC-C’ C-C

Sec

356


MUSEUM

Museum Plan

1:14 HEIGHT = 16.2M

ACCESS VIA EX. MUSEUM BASDEMENT

ction D-D’

ction D-D’

SECTION D - D

WINDOW SLITS TO CREATE CURIOSITY

357


358


359

CLASS OF 2020


ARCHITECTURE

SNEHA ABRAHAM

KRISTOPHER ABENOJA

SITE ANALYSIS

UNVEILING THE MASK CIRCULATION

SITE EXTENT & BOUNDARY

JIANJUN BI

PUBLIC TRANSPORT & PARKING

1

ZIHE CHEN

2

EXTERIOR Crossing the intersection

CLOISTERED COURTYARD Extension of The Plumber Cafe

3

ATRIUM Main central space that is the heart of The Mask

THEATRE The Shakespeare Theatre

7

PRIVATE RESIDENCE OUTDOOR SPACE Leinster Roof top Garden

MARC DAVIS

THIEN THANH DANG

ivate

off nd car

t the ucture.

y sold

Push boundaries to create connection and accessibility with surroundings

Requires better road crossing solution

Lessen carparks and bring back trams

KEY ACCESS POINTS

VIEWS

TRAFFIC DENSITY

amilton s the

un as still

ts tion.

Create more accessibility from Payneham Road and Hartford Lane

Retain and improve views from site with additional level

WEATHER

VEGETATION

5

SHICHAO DENG

Consider sun-path and bringing light into the structure

6

ART GALLERY The Bon Marche Gallery

BRINDER SINGH DHILLON

KATELYN DIPROSE

PING XIU GAN

JAMES GILLETT

DANIEL GRILLI

YU GU

RT

AM

FO

RD

RO AD

LA NE

7

OL

PA YN EH

HA

6

LI BA RE

HE

ST

ET RE

Y ST NR

ET

LIFT 1

Retain historic trees and create more user-friendly outdoor spaces

1 MAGILL ROAD

5 2 E

RR

TE

4

FULLARTON ROAD

H

RT

NO

AC

N

FIORINA DONATO SCALE 1 : 2000

3

Surrounding Buildings

Suburbs

m & St Peters

Burnside

College Park

Norwood

Walkerville

Stepney

Burnside

1 Maid & Magpie 2 House & Garden 3 Mitre 10 4 On The Run

5 99 Bikes 6 Seventh-Day

Adventist Church

7 The Bobbin Tree

MAIN STAIRS

SERVICES

MAIN FOYER / ATRIUM

UNIT 6 LIVING

BEDROOM 1

BEDROOM 1

BEDROOM 2

BEDROOM 3

BATHROOM

BATHROOM

UNIT 7 LIVING

LIFT 3

KITCHENETTE

B

LIFT 2

KITCHENETTE

IFT 1

Additional side street to help with traffic congestion

BEDROOM 3

EXTERNAL STAIRCASE

CORRIDOR

RESIDENCE COMMUNITY SPACE

C

BEDROOM 2

STAVROS GRAFYADEL RESIDENCE COMMUNITY SPACE

RESIDENCE OUTDOOR SPACE

A

B

THE BON MARCHE GALLERY

B THE PLUMBER CAFE

LIFT 2

LIFT 3

MAIN STAIRS

360

SERVICES

DANCE STUDIO

C


ARCHITECTURE

MITCHELL HEYNEN Final Project RUOXUAN HUANG a1684106

YIRUI HUANG

RUOXUAN HUANG FLOOR Plans

7. Division of Glazing based on Concept of Light and Shadow West Building: create dim atmosphere at the lower two levels without penetration of light. Experiencing the contrast of light and shadow when enter the top floors.

Light can perform an appearance of sculptural forms in space

Plans

Meditation Hub Ground Floor

1:300

West Building Function: Private Cells for Mindfulness Retreat and Spiritual Retreat

East Building: Divide the structure horizontally

East Building Function: Common Room, Retail, Change Room, Sanitary Room.

to experience light and shadow.

25

Common Space

00 0

Private Cells

Change Room

6. Paramatric facade Parametric facade allows light to be more vivid and create harmnonious forms in-

Dining Place

spired by ocean’s waves

Meditation Hub First Floor

1:300

odution

Meditation Activities

design structures serve as permanent facilities to support meditation events. Medon Events are scheduled all years around and specific festivals of Soul Sea Festiare schedules between Mid March till April. The Annual Soul Sea Festivals provides ace for spiritual connections, culture exchange and soulful talk. Soul Sea Festivals r a unique proposition and aims at sharing personal experiences and memory. Furmore, the festivals offer a new to experience the culture and relax, recharge and renect with yourself all at the same time. The retreat focuses on series of chargeable itation actives, but also provide lots of juicy creative time with live music and art brations. During the Soul Sea Festivals, it is welcome for meditation experts join events as volunteers to conduct a variety of meditation events, no charge applied to icipants. The meditation centre is designed to enhance the communities, the Soul poesses simplicity to fully-immersive meditation and learning centres.

Online Group Meditation(Free) In response to global COVID-19 crisis, Soul Sea offers remote methods for meditation to satisfy the person who desire some ease on temper but worries about on pandemic. Spiritual retreat and Mindfulness retreat (sitting) Regular mindfulness meditation provides benefits to physical and metal health and relief from stress and greater capacity to be compassionate.

Floorl Area 1850m2

Cafe 25m2

West Building Function: Private Cells for Mindfulness Retreat and Spiritual Retreat

Yoga retreat Panoramic Yoga Studio is located at the meditation hub where is orientated for sunrise and infinity ocean views. The room are decorated in soothing neutrals and natural fibers.

East Building Function: Mindfulness Retreat and Yoga Retreat

Wild View Retreat(Private) The meditation is mainly set in the private resort where introduces an exclusive view of ocean to reduce anxiety and stress, to stay calm and focus. Breath and Sounds Retreat Breath together to freshly curated music and mediate on the sound of resonant instruments ‘played’ by the Sounds hub, which is applied with specific techniques to amplify the sounds of surrounding sea. Designed for all levels to access a sensorial state of mind and deeper insight.

5. FLoors East-half of the building is lowered by one storeys, which provide the sufficient views and sufficient light conditions for meditation hub and create a harmonious combi-

Zhuhai weather is generally warm and humid whole year without ad clear division of seasons. Climate: Subtropical monsoon climate Year average temperature: 21 - 29 Solar radiation: Strong Annually rainfall: 2000mm - 2200mm Extreme weather: July and August

Kitchen

Cinema 190m2

Common Space

Restaurant 455m2

Private Cells Yoga Studio

Storage

nation with the other one.

Bar

Desire direction and time period for Festival Hub: Desire Direction: East Sufficient sunlight, frequent wind.

S W O T

Circulation Pedestrian -Street artists -Public recreational space -Lookout -Climbing -Exercise -Landscape -Food service -Stops

Circulation Pedestrian Pedestrians are allowed to access all parts of Yeli Island with new-built footpath.

Female Toilet 15m2

Meditation Hub Second Floor

Desire time period: May and June Yeli Island The proposed site is allocated along the east coast of Yeli island, an natural island renovated and constructed in 2012, which mainly serves as public recreational space for residence. The new built of City Grand Theater is located the north edge of the island, designed with series commercial activities on and underground. The mountain at the central has a height of over 300m, which is constructed with two laneways and lookouts at the top.

1:300

West Building Function: Spiritual Retreat, Mindfulness Retreat.

4. Functional nodes The object is divided into two forms with the appearance of symbol of ‘Yin and Yang’ by complementing each other functional nodes: -Meditation Hub-Private(West) - Meditation Hub-Public(East)

Services

The North part of Yeli Island owns series of services including retail, public activities. The South part lacks of commercial services and activities.

Male Toilet 15m2

-High traffice density entering and within the site -Limit parking area

Office 12m2 Wind and Solar Analysis

Eastern winds at Summer. Southwestern winds at winters.

Car circulation and parking

Vehicles are not permitted enter into South part of islands that provides moderate quite space for meditation activities.

Food Growth Chamber 90m2

Proposed Site

Meditation Festivals and hubs are proposed along the east coastlines of Yeli Island.

3. Circulation The division according to ying and yang concept allows circulation through the two structure. Entrance, exits, walking routes Each building has its own entrance in both

-Natural disaster(unpreditable typhon) -The effect on natural environment

ation Hub and the Sounds Hub

Cafe 15m2

Cinema 190m2

Meditation Retreat -Transportation access -Central area -Rich surrounding contents -Well maintainance of infrastructure -Weather condition fits the main theme

-Large green space -Reachable supplies -Event combinations with surrounding contents

The Sounds Hub

Render-Private Resort

Office 12m2

1:100

The Sounds Hub serves as a unique place for Breath and Sounds Retreat. The technique of suspend “Zheng” string on the ceiling to amplfy the sounds of sea with the blows of winds. The building design evokes the feeling of being inside the sea.

direction.

Office 12m2

0

ELEANOR HUGHES

Parametric Modelling Based on Spark’s Pattern

The public festivals center proposal implement the use of philosophical ‘yin and yang’ as the main form driver of the structure as the symbol of two origins through complementarity and interaction, which spatially divides two space two opposite functional nodes.

Facade

1. The Place The curves forms maximum the view towards ocean. The site is located at the middle of small moutains and ocean. 2. Landscape The new design boundaries is to create new green zone between and near two structure.

The Private Resort 1:50

The Private Resort serves as unique place for Wild View Retreat where has a exclusive view of ocean. The resort serves simple furnitures to support personal journey of meditation. The combination of lines and curves provides the sense of fluidity in interior space. The use of wood and concrete material present in the space creates complementarity and contrast between rawness and warmth.

Coolroom 35m2

Meet 4 Storage 25m2

Models

Location & Site Plan

Services Room

Services Room

Section 1:100

Natural Contents The natural contents include exisiting and modified landscape, ocean and moutains,

Lab 60m2

Office 15m2

00

60

JUNNAN JI

NADIA JAMAL

The Meditation Hub

Level 3 Plan Scale 1:200

Level 2 Plan Scale 1:200

Meditation Hub

Meditation Hub West Building

Meditation Hub East Building

The Sounds Hub Private Resort

Yoga Studio

Yoga Studio

Common Space

Private Cells

Females Change Room

Private Cells Common Space

Males Change Room

Dinning Room

= Scale of 1:43,200 =

Symmetry

AL

FL 43000

MUNAN JIANG

Posidonius Crater

ANGUS JOHNSON

20km

NIKOLA KALIK

FL 23000

FL 18000

FL 13000

FL 8000

FL 3000 Site Plan Scale 1:500

FL 0 FL -2000

DUSHYANT KATHURIA

NCE

KIYANA KHALILI

MARY KMIOTEK

FL -7000

SITE PLAN 1:200

0.6km Stops Alpha Rays ROYAL ADELAIDE HOSPITAL: Stops Beta Rays

Stops Gamma Rays & X-Rays SECTION AA

Stops Neutron Rays

Paper

GROUND PLAN 1:200

JACK KORCZ

In between communal spaces - enhancing : social connection - connectivity - livability

VIDHI KOTHIYA

UPPER FLOOR PLAN 1:200

Aluminium

Lead

Concrete

BIANCA CATERINE WallKRAUSS & Floor Details 15mm Steel Framework for the Concrete Wall

Radiation Protective Layer Lead 25mm / Aluminium 5mm / Paper 2mm

Aluminium Framework 50mm x 100mm

Plasterboard 10mm

300mm Concrete Wall Fiberglass insulation 50mm

Wall to Wall Detail Scale 1:10

Reinforced Concrete Wall 300mm

Reinforced Concrete Slab

60mm Bolt

361 Steel Angle Plate Bolted to Wall &

Steel Decking


ARCHITECTURE

XTERIOR

CHURCH INTERIOR

SIU YIN MARVIN KWAN

SAVINA LAM

NTERIOR

LIBRARY EXTERIOR DAIKUN LI

CHURCH INTERIOR TIANXIAO LIU

HAOBO LIU

GAURAV MEHRA

RAKKESH MOHAN

XTERIOR

GABRIELLA MARCIANO MARKET EXTERIOR

2150

2100

ZHEMING MA GALLERY EXTERIOR

2020

NTERIORMITCHELL LOBB

LIBRARY INTERIOR ZHIJUN LIU

GROCERY EXTERIOR

NUR IZRIN MOHD ZAHIDI

RESIDENCE EXTERIOR

6.4MM GLASS GLAZING

N

INTERIOR WALL STUD

TIANYU NI

SHAUN NORTON

YANUO QU

TRENCH GRATE

200

MIN

150

LEVEL 0 - RL 3.5

150

0.2MM THICK POLYETHYLENE MEMBRANE

1N16 STEEL REINFORCEMENT 300

SL 72 STEEL MESH

GROUND BEAM AS SCHEDULED

ED

SL 72 STEEL MESH N12@200 CTS. LIGATURE

GROUND BEAM AS SCHEDULED 1N16 STEEL REINFORCEMENT

362

BORED PILE

0.2MM THICK PO


ARCHITECTURE

RASHIKA RAJPAL

MOHAMMAD JAWAD REZAIE

CLAUDINE RIVERS

NICOLE ROSARIO

SALLY ROWETT

CAITLIN ROY

TYLER SCHMIDTKE

CHENG SHANG

RUXUAN SHI

BRIAWAN SIDHARTA

OLYVIA SOLOMON

SANJUUTHAA THIRUSELVAN

HARTLEY TOWN

DUC HUY TRAN

QUANG THANG TRAN

363


ARCHITECTURE

ALESSIO TROLIO

KEVIN UNG

TIAN WANG

YIFAN WANG

YIHAO BARRY WANG

GEORGINA WARREN

JINGXIN XU

MINXU YU

HANYU ZHANG

INSPIRATION – MODERN GALLERY DOOR + TIMBER SHADING WALKWAY

RENDERED VIEW 1: STREET CORNER GARDEN WITH TIMBER SHADING

NORTH SECTION

XINYU ZHANG

YUMENG ZHAO

YI ZHENG

PLAN VIEW 1: GROUND LEV

HOTEL

PUB SALON

BASIC DISTRIBUTION: HOTEL - PUB - SALON

ART SUBDIVISION: LEVEL 1

364

INITIAL ASSUMPTION: SPECIFIC FUNCTION AREA

HOTEL PART SUBDIVISION: LEVEL 2

RENDERED VIEW 2: EXTERNAL CORRIDOR BETWEEN GALLERY AND JOHN STREET

RENDERED VIEW 5: SMALL L


01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

SOIL EXPERIMENTATION AND MATERIAL COLLECTION SEED VAULT LABORATORY AND HYDROPONICS EQUIPMENT STORAGE NURSERY AND MARKET SHED WATER TREATMENT FACILITY REMEDIATION BOTANICAL DISPLAY SALT EVAPORATION POND GARDENS OPEN PARK COASTAL ISLAND CAILSILT LOOKOUT MATERIAL PAVILION ROCK TERRACE REWILDING PRECINCT

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

LEO BASSANO EDEN LEAH BONYTHON NIVETA CHAWLA

JIAYI CHENG STEPHANIE CLUTTERBUCK AZHRUDIN COULTHARD

05 06

08 10

11 13

03 09

02

XINYANG FENG 12 14

04

01 07

SAMANTHA GODAKUMBURA KRISANDRA GOMES

Adele Langusch AGRI-CULTURE

LUKE KLUSKE BOHUI LEI HENGCHANG LI

JUNYI LI

SHIYAO LI

ZHENYANG LI

365


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

YU LIN

ZIHAN LIU

JIAMING MA

TIANFENG PAN

STEPHANIE POPE

ZIYAN QUE

LIN SHI

FRANCES SHUTTLEWORTH

YAN SONG

SHANGYUAN SUN

KE WANG

BEN WESLEY

DENGXIAO XIA

ZHIYUN ZHANG

XINTAO ZHANG

366


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

KAIHANG ZHOU

YADI ZHOU

YULONG ZHU

367


orial

URBAN DESIGN

SIDDHESH BHAINDARKAR

RAGHUL RAJ ELANGOVAN

MOHAMMAD ASHIKUR RAHMAN

north section

A

1:1000

A 10m

25m

50m

75m

100m

A

orchard shed bus shelter

plan

orchard

SAMPURNA SIKDAR

kk

a

REB ROWE

community garden

5

re d ca

chil

g

rkin

cowo

dog

il

9

2

train n statio roof deck

deli

plant

3

|

produce processing

greenhouse

1

10

A

NING ZHU

WANYING ZHU

offices venue hire

re-education

YI SUN

park

worm farm

community centre

reta

5

B

bar

B

7

1:1000 10m

25m

50m

75m

N

100m

ents

legend 3

5

7

public art

9

car share existing tree water tank 6

4

8

bench table train line car park

10

ast section

B

1:500 20m

reb rowe

368

RACHEL STUPPOS

6

plant

green house

4

market

bu

sh

tu

8

|

a1618879

|

50m

university of adelaide

100m

|

150m

200m

urban design project 7030

|

2020





The University of Adelaide, School of Architecture & Built Environment [08] 8313 5836 www.architecture.adelaide.edu.au

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 4, 2020 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & BUILT ENVIRONMENT, UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE PRINT RUN: 450 COPIES



NET VOLUME: 489 ml


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