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Integrated Design and Construction

vol. 3


Š 2012 Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program College of Architecture, Design and Construction Auburn University


Integrated Design and Construction


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

2011-2012 Timeline


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

DBLD Faculty

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11-12 Cohort

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Foley Sustainability Institute

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Chattanooga Heritage Museum

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Cordova Redevelopment

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Industry Partnerships

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Other Work

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Acknowledgments

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

Integrated Design & Construction FACULTY

Yann Cowart Adjunct Professor, Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program Bachelor of Architecture, Auburn University Bachelor of Science, Building Science, Auburn University

Josh Emig Assistant Professor and Co-Director, Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program Master of Architecture, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Bachelor of Arts, Lycoming College

C. Ben Farrow, PE Assistant Professor, McWhorter School of Building Science Master of Science, Civil Engineering, University of Texas at Austin Master of Business Administration, Vanderbilt University Bachelor of Science, Civil Engineering, Duke University David Hinson, FAIA Associate Professor and Head, School of Architecture Master of Architecture, University of Pennsylvania Bachelor of Architecture, Auburn University


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Paul Holley Aderholdt Professor and Co-Director, Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program Master of Business Administration, University of Alabama at Birmingham Bachelor of Science, Building Science, Auburn University

John C. Mouton Professor and Wilborn Chair, McWhorter School of Building Science Master of Building Construction, University of Florida Bachelor of Science, University of Louisiana-Monroe

Ryan Salvas Visiting Assistant Professor, School of Architecture Master of Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Bachelor of Architecture, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Anoop Sattineni Associate Professor and Graduate Program Officer, McWhorter School of Building Science Master of Science, Civil Engineering, Auburn University Bachelor of Engineering, Osmania University

Mike Thompson Visiting Industry Professor, McWhorter School of Building Science Bachelor of Science, Building Science, Auburn University


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

11-12 cohort Lee Eckert Design Track B. Arch., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Wilmette, IL

Kasey Entriken

Tamika Watts

Construction Track

Design Track

BS, Washington State University

B. Arch., Auburn University

Bow, Washingon

Tuskegee, AL

Cherilyn McCabe Construction Track BS, Northern Arizona University Flagstaff, AZ

Wilson Diaz Design Track B. Arch., Woodbury University Los Angeles, CA

Kyle Mead

Y-Linh Nguyen

Construction Track

Design Track

BS, Northern Arizona University

B. Arch., University of Houston

Flagstaff, AZ

Houston, TX


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Ying Tan

Kimberly Maul

Design Track

Construction Track

B. Arch., Tsinghua University

BS, Ferris State University

Chongqing, China

Grand Rapids, MI

Julian Vida

Brandon Clarke

Design Track

Design Track

B. Arch., Auburn University

M. Arch. Hampton University

Florence, AL

Lewes, DE

Jarrod Winslett Design Track B. Arch., Auburn University Oneonta, AL

Jonathan Deason Construction Track BS, Auburn University Roanoke, AL

Justin Mendoza

Shawn Mancill

Construction Track

Construction Track

BS, Louisiana State University

BS, Auburn University

New Orleans, LA

Eufaula, AL


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The City of Foley, Alabama requested proposals for the adaptive reuse of former elementary school buildings, a gymnasium, and an adjacent school library in order to develop a campus to house a “Sustainability Institute.” The campus required space for training, research, demonstration, and other administrative and flexible spaces.

SUSTAINA B ILITY INSTITUTE


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CITY OF FOLEY SUSTAINABILITY INSTITUTE


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

SUSTAINA B ILITY INSTITUTE

ECKERT WATTS DESIGN TRACK

mANCILL MENDOZA CONSTRUCTION TRACK

Our design focused on the redevelopment of the former middle school and auditorium, and the development of a new building for the Green Building Sustainability Institute. As an alternative to renovating the existing library on the site, we chose a complete demolition of the building to make way for a new, larger facility. The building will serve as the Green Building Science Institute (GBSI), a place to train workers in sustainable construction methods and provide them a space for hands on demonstrations. The former middle school classroom building will be transformed into a nonprofit center, where four organizations will have a dedicated office space to

plan and operate after-school activities and help students of all ages. The space will provide adequate room for offices, computer areas, and meeting areas where they can provide family resource information to parents. We propose to return the auditorium to its original purpose, a gathering space where both performances and conferences can be held. Representatives for both the city and non-profit organizations expressed interest in using this space for conferences and assemblies. The space will be flexible, with a collapsible stage which can be moved wherever necessary or taken down completely for an open floor.


ECK ERT, WATTS + MAN C ILL, MENDOZ A

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

SUSTAINA B ILITY INSTITUTE

DIAZ TAN

DESIGN TRACK

DEASON MAUL

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

The proposal for our project is based on the use of the library, the classroom building, and the auditorium, equaling approximately 18,000 square feet of space. We propose the library, classrooms, and the auditorium be leased by the Green Building Science Institute. This allows the city to recoup the costs of development by leasing the space for a period of at least ten years, giving the City of Foley a steady tenant to pay down the Alabama Department of Economic Affairs Local Government Energy(ADECA) loan. At the end of 10 years, the tenant would move into a larger facility capable of meeting their needs, leaving the Green Building Science Institute to be converted

into a technical high school through the Baldwin County Board of Education (BOE). This gives the BOE a facility at a much lower price than new construction. After ten years, the board of education could refinance the remaining principle and move into the high school at a drastically reduced cost.


DIAZ, TAN + DEASON, MAUL

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

SUSTAINA B ILITY INSTITUTE

NGUYEN WINSLETT DESIGN TRACK

MEAD

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

Our team viewed this site as an opportunity to create an entirely new, vibrant community space using the framework of the existing buildings. This afforded the most streamlined construction schedule, as well as the opportunity for the most cohesive design. Furthermore, we liked using only these three buildings because of the speedto-market aspect of their scope and the manageability of their rental spaces. Our proposal is rooted in making these buildings more sustainable, educating the academic community through the use of visible techniques, renewing this corner as a mainstay of the neighborhood, and fostering local commerce.

We have created a space that is inherently sustainable and historic. By reusing and improving the existing buildings, we have given new life to the rich history of these buildings that are central to many Foley residents’ sentiments. Our project incorporates new technology and a modern aesthetic that respectfully adapts to the form of the historic buildings. We have supported this balance through sensible programming and a feasible business plan in an effort that ultimately will transform this corner into an intersection of education and commerce.


NYUGEN, W INSLETT + MEAD

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

SUSTA IN A B ILITY IN STITUTE

CLARKE VIDA DESIGN TRACK

ENTRIKEN MCCABE

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

The Sustainability Institute plan proposes reusing the existing historical middle school and auditorium while providing new construction for future expansion. This Institute provides a study into passive and sustainable techniques while also showing how an adaptive reuse of existing structures saves money and is more sustainable, while preserving the historical nature of the buildings. To address the need for commercial development, we proposed the reuse of

the downtown structures and the church. These proposals not only provide studies into how to turn historical downtown buildings into sustainable spaces but also provide examples and opportunities for future positive growth in the city. This proposal shows that total new construction is not always the answer. However, by combining Foley’s history of its built environment and the new values of being a progressive sustainable city, an even better end result is achieved.


CLARK E, VIDA + E NTRIK IN, MCCA B E

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The Chattanooga Heritage Museum Project involved developing proposals for the transformation of two former industrial sites in the city into a museum celebrating the industrial past and innovative future of the City of Chattanooga.

CHATTANOOGA MUSEUM


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CHATTANOOGA Industrial Heritage Center


DEASON MCCABE

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

CLARKE NGUYEN

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DESIGN TRACK

CHATTANOOGA


CLAR K E, NGUYEN + DEASON, MCCAB E

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The goal of the Chattanooga Interpretive Center (CIC) is to showcase the rich history of Chattanooga through the use of “layers.” Chattanooga has many layers comprised of history, industry, landscape, and community with each having its own rich meaning. The CIC is meant to capture the important facts, locations, and ideas that have defined the city over the years. The site chosen for our project is the former U.S. Pipe site. The layers of the CIC help tell the story of Chattanooga, and it is important that the building express these layers through overlapping ideas and concepts to establish connections.

CHATTANOOGA

This location was chosen because the future extension of the River Walk will pass through the site on its way to Lookout Mountain. Having an approximate area of 42,000 square feet the CIC takes advantage of different sustainability measures that range from LEDs, photovoltaic panels, rainwater collection systems, geothermal wells, passive ventilation, and green roofs, to name a few. The CIC will house a brewery, a restaurant, a café, lab spaces, and, most importantly, rotating galleries that tell the history of Chattanooga. It will also have many outdoor spaces that will include a green roof, walking trails, and open lawn areas.


C LAR K E, NGUYEN + DEASON , MCCAB E

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MEAD MENDOZA

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

DIAZ ECKERT

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DESIGN TRACK

CHATTANOOGA


DIAZ, ECK ERT + MEAD, MENDOZ A

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The project focuses on providing a setting where Chattanooga’s industrial past and diverse future can come together. Using the Harley Grant’s 1908 warehouse on Manufacturer’s Road, the building will transform the built environment of this historic industrial neighborhood to become a center for exploring, celebrating, and fostering the roots of Chattanooga. It can be categorized as a commercial building, a museum, or a workshop; the diversity of programming reflects the diversity of Chattanooga’s history, heritage, and future.

CHATTANOOGA

This proposal has taken the heritage of one of the oldest North Shore buildings and transformed it by creating a series of spaces that focus on industrial artifacts and their transformation of traditional methods. The project focused around connecting our project with its three main user groups: craftsmen, manufacturers, and visitors, and will enhance visitor experience by providing amenities and retail areas. In addition to highly adaptive and diverse interior programming, this building will be transformed on the exterior planes.


DIAZ, ECK ERT + MEAD, MENDOZ A

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ENTRIKIN MANCILL

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

VIDA WINSLETT

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DESIGN TRACK

CHATTANOOGA


VIDA, WINSLETT + ENTRIK IN, MANCILL

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The building seeks to provide a museum that not only presents the industrial history of Chattanooga but also highlights the industrial structure under which the museum resides. The design centers on the idea of modular spaces that reside under the existing structural frame of the HGB. These spaces are fully exposed to showcase its historical industrial beauty through a continuous visual connection to the industrial history and the historical structures of Chattanooga. There are three main areas of the design that include a fully enclosed glass atrium entry space, the main gallery consisting

CHATTANOOGA

of eight prefabricated modular galleries and interlocking glass passageways, and the “East Bay” wing. To complement these programmatic spaces, the proposal includes the creation of an exterior amphitheater behind the structure of Harley Grant and a grand plaza entry to the museum on the southwestern façade of the site covered by a historical roof. The main gallery space consists of prefabricated modules, which can be utilized for the museum’s ever-changing needs and are proposed to house the industrial sectors of Chattanooga’s history.


VIDA, WINSLETT + ENTRIK IN, MANCILL

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MAUL

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

TAN WATTS

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

DESIGN TRACK

CHATTANOOGA


TAN, WATTS + MAUL

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

This design concept revolves around telling Chattanooga’s story through structure, form, and planning. The three most influential elements of Chattanooga will be interwoven throughout the site and the building: railroad, river, and bridge. In our design, we extracted the abstract logic from them and applied that rationality to organize the site and the building. The logic is a guide for us to generate form and method for the architecture to narrate the story of Chattanooga. The linear sequence of history and the linear form of the river

CHATTANOOGA

and train tack provide an intelligent and simple design solution: a linear logic system. This system tells the history of Chattanooga and provides visitors with a special linear experience that will correspond to people’s cognition of the Tennessee River and arouse their memory of train tracks. This concept provides the city with an iconic structure which will both draw tourists and be a symbol of pride for the community. The City’s commitment to a sustainable future also shows through in the design.


TAN, WATTS + MAUL

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CORDOVA


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CORDOVA REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT Cordova is a small town in northwestern Alabama in Walker County and is a truly multi-modal town with access to the Black Warrior River, active railroads, and interstate highways. During April of 2011, Cordova was hit by a series of devastating tornados which destroyed much of the residential and commercial infrastructure of the town, and it has been attempting to recover ever since. As a cohort, we focused on the development of four projects crucial to their redevelopment: a grocery store, library, city hall, and fire station.


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MCCABE

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CLARKE ECKERT

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

DESIGN TRACK

CORDOVA


CLAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

GROCERY/RETAIL

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The goal of our project was to produce a locally sited and appropriately sized grocery store to provide fresh groceries and produce to the residents and surrounding areas of Cordova. The store will distinguish itself through its close proximity to the downtown areas and the quality service that is focused on meeting community needs. It will also focus on supporting the local economy by generating tax revenue, and through the purchase of local food and the support of local groups such as the Cordova Blue Devils.

CORDOVA

The design of the Cordova Market is meant to transform what could otherwise be a ubiquitous store building into a transformative symbol of the future of Cordova. The Cordova Market is meant to efficiently use available funds in order to deliver a project that the city can afford and support, while also providing a valuable asset for the future of Cordova.


C LAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

On the southern end of the site, we designed an open community space that can be used for a variety of other functions, such as barbecues, local fundraisers, or even tailgating for the Cordova Blue Devils Football games. The proximity of this space to the Cordova Market also gives the market a more public presence in the city of Cordova. It allows the market to open up its doors and welcome users into the store, while also providing a desirable space in the center of the city . To reduce the utilities costs, a series of skylights have been added to the sales

CORDOVA

floor of the grocery store. By investing approximately $6000 the owner will save up to $133,608 over a 30-year period. The 20-ton HVAC system selected for the building will have a startup cost of $76,596, and the combined HVAC/ Geothermal system’s startup cost will be $99,146. These costs add an additional $23k to the cost of the building, but the owner will save up to $312,486 over a 30-year period.


C LAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

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DEASON MAUL

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

TAN WATTS

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DESIGN TRACK

CORDOVA


TAN, WATTS + DEASON, MAUL

FIRE STATION

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The Fire Station is propsed south of the Cordova Baseball Fields between Maple Street and School Street. Its central location within Cordova will allow the fire station to serve the community while also creating a presence within the city. The fire station was designed as a practical and affordable solution for Cordova. It provides integral services to the community that not only meet the city’s current needs but also acknowledge the limited funds that are available.

CORDOVA

It was also designed to take advantage of the change in elevation across the proposed site and to meet local building codes, which is evident through the use of natural building materials


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TAN, WATTS + DEASON , MAUL

Fema dawghaus In collaboration with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Auburn University’s Integrated Design and Construction students built two DAWGHAUS models for part of the FEMA Community Education Outreach Program. The models’ building structures were altered from previous versions as recommendations were made to help strengthen the integrity of the structures and stand strong in the event of a natural disaster. One of the models served as a display as it traveled through various states that were prone to tornadoes. The other was donated to North Carolina. The students were able to understand the responsibilities of building a better building with safety as a primary concern.


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

The enclosure of the building is made with a variety of natural materials including wood, brick, and stucco. The choice of materials not only makes the building more inviting, but it also complies with Cordova’s ordinance that mandates that a building’s exterior must be made of natural materials. The structure is a combination of loadbearing CMU and metal stud walls. The fire station has a pitched roof that is composed of prefabricated wood trusses. To allow the trusses to span the bay, a

CORDOVA

steel beam was installed to help carry the load of the roof. The west wall of the truck bay doubles as a retaining wall for that end of the building. The mechanical system chosen for the fire station provides multiple benefits. It is a high-efficiency system which reduces the operating cost over the life of the building as compared to a less-efficient model. This system is very similar to those that are installed in many residential homes and is referred to as a direct expansion or DX system.


C LAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

The Station Total Need: $807,685 Insurance Proceeds: $106,000 Gap: $701,695

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MANCILL MENDOZA

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

VIDA WINSLETT

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DESIGN TRACK

CORDOVA


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VIDA, W INSLETT + MAN C ILL, MENDOZ A

LIBRARY


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

When designing the library proposal for the City of Cordova we sought to provide the city with a humble yet elegant and flexible design. A design that not only reflected the resurgent spirit of the city after April 2011 tornadoes, but also utilized the availability of natural materials around the Cordova area. Proposed to be located on the western block of downtown on city-owned property, the library is placed in a prime location to become a catalyst for cultural growth. Located on the site of the former library, the new library proposal creates an emotional connection between the past and present. Over the course of

CORDOVA

the proposal development, we designed and studied three main options for the library. Those options include a singleand a double-story option and a third, more economical version of the singlestory option. In each of the alternatives, we studied how each design affected the surrounding context of the site and the cost feasibility of the overall building. All three options provided viable solutions; however, we chose to propose the singlestory design, as it provides for all the current and future needs of the city, while still remaining low in cost.


VIDA, W INSLETT + MAN C ILL, MENDOZ A

AU Conference Center Gingerbread HOUSE Project The students, led by Professor Paul Holley, had the opportunity to add four new buildings to the gingerbread campus during the 2011 Holiday Season. Digital 3-D Scans were done on Hargis Hall, The Hotel at Auburn University, Langdon Hall and Cater Hall, as the scans provided digital blueprints that allowed the students to create miniature modeled structures. Through collaboration between the College of Architecture, Design, and Construction and The Hotel at Auburn University, the new models were displayed at the Hotel’s lobby during the lighting of the Hotels Christmas tree ceremony. The new buildings made of wood will help keep the structures integrity as they will be used year after year.

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When designing the library’s interior, we wanted to create comfortable and intimate space that allowed patrons to feel at home within a flexible floor plan. Flexibility in the arrangement of the spaces in the floor plan allows the library and the city to have a space that could entertain multiple public events. The floor plan flows from Main Street westward. The first space is a sitting/reading area with couches and chairs. This space serves as a transition space into the main study area (2). The following area is the digital resource area which holds the library’s new computers ( five to be provided from a grant) and other forms of digital resources such as iPads and Kindles.

CORDOVA

Since the quantity of books in the surviving collection is minimal, the implementation of these new digital resources triples the number of volumes available and allows for the creation of new educational opportunities. The next area is the main book collection (4) in low level stacks. Low level stacks are used so that the librarian can have a clear line of sight into the final area, which is the children’s area (5). The administration and amenity rectangle is comprised of a small conference room (6), the main librarian’s desk (7), librarian’s office space (8), storage room (9), and restrooms (10).


C LAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

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ENTRIKIN MEAD

IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

CONSTRUCTION TRACK

DIAZ NGUYEN

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DESIGN TRACK

CORDOVA


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DIAZ, NGUYEN + ENTR IK IN, MEAD

CITY HALL


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

This proposal fits within a greater master plan, locating the City Hall as an anchor on Main street. The project is centered on the idea of renewing Cordova with a new building from which to govern serving as a centerpiece for the new downtown Cordova. Our team sought to take advantage of the pedestrian nature of Cordova and introduce a new East-West corridor through the main downtown block. This corridor becomes a mainstay of the design and exists to facilitate the flow of the populace from grocery to ballpark, or grocery to library. The design was intended to serve a

CORDOVA

threefold purpose: • Set the tone for the new era in Cordova as a place with a fresh beginning that reflects progression and optimism. • • Provide a hub for governance that connects multiple community nodes and facilitates the interaction between these key areas. • Serve as a catalyst for igniting private and public developments alike in the downtown area.


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DIAZ, NGUYEN + ENTR IK IN, MEAD

Industry Council

Advisory

This year’s student cohort presented it’s work to the Industry Advisory Council comprised of industry professionals. Council members provided feedback on student work to date. Students learned of recent experiences in the field as well as concepts such as BIM and IPD and their applications in industry.


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

This building was designed by considering a wide variety of factors that directly impacted the building’s shape, specification, and program. The building was designed by combining a method called “Set Based Design” (SBD) with traditional programming and form processes. Using SBD allowed our team to consider the long-term value of important design elements such as the overall massing of the building, the glazing strategy, and the performance of the roofing assembly. SBD is centered on

CORDOVA

evaluating many different design options simultaneously, and then using tools like science and economics to evaluate the long-term performance of different options against their up-front and continued maintenance costs. In parallel to the revitalization of the built environment, we believe it is equally important for the city to revamp its image in other ways. Business cards, websites, and brochures are also areas where Cordova can display a new image of itself.


C LAR K E, ECK ERT + MCCAB E

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INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

One of the main features of the curriculum is collaboration with industry partners. We experienced this through a variety of workshops, case studies, and site visits that covered topics such as Lean Manufacturing, Integrated Project Delivery, Building Information Modeling, as well as leadership and collaboration. We also visited architecture firms, construction offices, and industrial plants to get an insight into various areas of the collective industry.


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INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS COLLABORATIONS


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

WORKSHOPS

Throughout the year we took part in a series of workshops that allowed us to investigate different aspects of the design and construction fields. Workshops were held by industry professionals from around the country, including Vital Architect’s Nash Hurley and Taylor Keep, Ed Beck, Rebecca Bettler, and Ava Abramowitz, author of Architect’s Essentials of Negotiation. These workshops allowed us to gain insight from within the industry itself, something that is rare within a typical school setting.

Some of the activities that we undertook in these workshops were lessons in leadership and collaboration and in connecting with and understanding clients. We also learned about lean manufacturing procedures and the application of Building Information Modeling in the real world.


WORKSHO P S

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auburn practice field As part of our ID&C 7650 class, taught by Adjunct Professor Cowart and Professor Mouton, this year’s cohort visited the recently constructed Auburn Practice Field. Designed by Infiniti Architecture, the firm for which Professor Cowart practices, the Auburn Practice Field visit was a chance for the cohort to see some of our faculty’s work on site, as well as get an inside view on the construction one of Auburn’s athletic facilities.


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INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

INDUSTRY CASE STUDIES

Another way in which we interacted with the industry was through developing a series of case studies. In these case studies, we were tasked with studying specific parts of the industry and providing recommendations based on the results.

quickly became apparent that there were four strategies in which bridging could be done more effectively. The four strategies are:

In one of our research opportunities, we investigated how the Hoar Construction and Davis Architects were dealing with the process of bridging and managing design intent throughout the production of the Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts.

• ODC Selection

When we completed our research, it

• Kick-off Alignment Meetings • Continued Personnel Involvement,

• Creating Effective Communication Channels.


C ASE STUDIES

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Graduate Award Auburn University’s ID&C Team Mountain Top entered the Spring 2012 Graduate Research and Forum Symposium under the category of design. For the past two years ID&C student teams have brought home first place finishes. Team Mountain Top has made this the 3rd consecutive victory in the for ID&C teams. If nothing else, the student’s work is testimony to how the program continues to produce exemplary leaders with innovative ideas. The success of the project was due to Brandon Clarke, Julian Vida, Kasey Entrikin, and Cherylin McCabe.


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

INDUSTRY CASE STUDIES

In another research opportunity, the project team and industry partners looked at the possibility of adding new services to the AEC industry through the use of BIM. This study analyzed the ability of a firm to implement BIM and conducted a market study of industry practitioners. As predicted, we found that the industry felt that BIM was a necessary tool to be implementing in the industry. Most felt that the tool would add new services to their market segments. The most common of those services to be added were BIM-based facilities management

and the application of accurate energy modeling for building performance. It was determined that facilities management and energy modeling would serve as excellent services in the industry and that the value added to the owner would be shown through increased building efficiency and cost savings. For the firms, the added owner value directly related to increased profit and a competitive advantage in a new market segment.


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C ASE STUDIES

industry site visits As part of ID&C 7650 class, led by professors Mouton and Cowart, students visited local construction companies in order to understand operating methods as well as to see how different approaches impact building construction. This year, the cohort was split into two groups, with one visiting Gates Precast and the other visiting ABC Steel.


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OTHER WORK

The cohort was involved in a series of other activities throughout the course of the year. These activities supplemented the core work, while also allowing individuals to explore personal interests. The work includes the ASC Reno National Competition, radiant panel research, collaboration with industrial design students, and various independent studies.


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OTHER WORK COLLABORATIONS


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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

2012 ASC RENO NATIONAL COMPETITION

OTHER WORK


2 012 ASC RENO COM P ETITION

Another one of the many traditions that the Integrated Design and Construction program has developed over the years is its involvement in the Associated Schools of Construction Graduate Competition in Sparks, Nevada. This national competition, which is sponsored by Clark Construction, typically includes schools such as the University of Washington, Texas A&M, USC and Stanford University. This year’s project involved rethinking a proposal for a $70-million-dollar student housing

project for the University of California San Diego in only a matter of hours. Auburn’s Graduate Team, consisting of Lee Eckert, Kasey Entriken, Justin Mendoza, and Todd Smithermann placed second behind Stanford University.

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Habitat Radiant Panel Project

OTHER WORK


HABITAT RAD IANT PANEL P ROJECT

During the spring semester, ID&C students were enrolled in a sustainability course in which they conducted an experiment for Habitat for Humanity. The year’s cohort evaluated the cost-effective implementation of a radiant-wall system for Habitat clients. During this semester-long study, different parts of the experiment were designed and tested. First, material choices were evaluated for piping; followed by a look at prefabrication and

system implementation. The experiment continued into a summer independent study in which the panel was subjected to further testing to calculate output and energy usage as well as modeling Habitat designs with the proposed system. The findings were presented at the Fall 2012 Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Conference.

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IN T E G R AT E D D E S IGN AND CO NSTRU C TIO N ‘11-’12

INDEPENDENT STUDIES

OTHER WORK


INDEP ENDENT STUDIES

In the summer semester, students in both cohorts had the opportunity to do an independent study in an area of their choosing. This year students completed independent studies in a variety of areas including, but not limited to 3-D Scanning, golf course design, energy modeling, and industrial design methodologies. Other independent studies included investigations into digital fabrication, board game development, 3-D modeling and further research into radiant panel systems.

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INDUSTRIAL DESIGN

OTHER WORK


In te g rate d De si gn an d Co nstru cti o n + INDUSTR IAL DESIGN

During the Fall 2011 semester, the Construction Track students had the opportunity to team with seniors from Auburn’s Department of Industrial Design program. The INDD students were challenged with developing potential improvements for current construction products. This cross-college program was made possible by the Alabama Construction Industry Fund and directed by Professor Paul Holley and Tsailu Liu. Annually, multiple products and tools are

developed for the construction industry. Each is unique and leads to provisional patents that officially recognize the students’ efforts. In many cases, the product development also provides opportunities for the students to interact with construction firms and product manufacturers.

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Ackn owledgmen ts

Congratulations Integrated Design and Construction Cohort 10’-11’

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Book Graphic Design: Lee Eckert and Katie Lee Program Support and Resources: Dean Vini Nathan, College of Architecture, Design & Construction 2012 Industry Advisory Group: Eric Eitzen, Bill McMahon, Carrie Shaeffer, Ty Maloney Project Support for ’10-’11: City of Foley, AL; Chattanooga Community Design Forum; Chattanooga-Hamilton County Regional Planning Agency; Blythe Bailey; Jim Frierson; Pam Glaser; Cordova Long Term Recovery Committee; City of Cordova, AL; Beth Stukes, Paul Kennedy, Lauren Vance Special Thanks to Auburn University Hotel & Conference Center


Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program November 2012 Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.

2012 Master of Integrated Design and Construction Yearbook  

This book contains work from the Master of Integrated Design and Construction Program at Auburn University.

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