Issuu on Google+

EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

June 2013 No. 94


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

                                                        The  Newsletter  is  a  forum  for  the  exchange  of  news  and  views  amongst  the  members  of  the          Association.  The  opinions  expressed  in  the  Newsletter  do  not  necessarily  reflect  the  views  of  the  editors, the EARSeL Bureau or other members of the Association.   Articles  published  in  the  Newsletter  may  be  reproduced  as  long  as  the  source  of  the  article  is          acknowledged.             Front Cover – Matera, Italy, the Symposium and Workshops’ venue for the 33rd EARSeL Symposium.     Credits: Idéfix  Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cittadimatera1.jpg, Landsat TM, Shuttle Radar Topography  Mission 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

EARSeL Newsletter 

  Contents 

ISSN 0257‐0521  Bulletin of the European Association of  Remote Sensing Laboratories  http://www.earsel.org  June 2013 – Number 94   

EARSeL Newsletter Editors  Konstantinos Perakis          Athanasios Moysiadis  Department of Planning and Regional Development,  University of Thessaly, Greece  perakis@uth.gr                                       moysiadis@uth.gr  Phone: +30 24210 74465  Fax: +30 24210 74371    

Anna Jarocińska  Department of Geoinformatics and Remote Sensing  (WURSEL),                                                                      University of Warsaw, Poland  ajarocinska@uw.edu.pl    

Editorial Assistance  EARSeL Secretariat  Gesine Böttcher  Nienburger Strasse 1  30167 Hannover, Germany  Fax: +49 511 7622483  secretariat@earsel.org    

Published by:  Department of Planning and Regional Development  University of Thessaly, 38334, Volos, Greece   

Printed by:  Form Innovation Shahed  Hirtenweg 8  30163 Hannover, Germany   

Subscription Rates  Members receive the Newsletter as part of the  annual membership fee. For non‐members, the  annual rates (four issues) are as follows:  Within Europe  Outside Europe  Personal subscription from members  

80€  88€  30€ 

 

EARSeL Annual Membership Fee  Individual observer  Laboratory/Company with fewer   than 10 researchers  Laboratory/Company with 10   or more members 

330€  330€  500€ 

  Editorial .......................................................5  News from EARSeL .......................................6  New EARSeL Members................................ 6  National Reports ..........................................6  Remote Sensing Activities, Bulgaria, 2012.. 6  Remote Sensing Activities, Croatia, 2012 . 16  Remote Sensing Activities , the Netherlands,  2012 .......................................................... 21  News from Other Organisations ................. 33  Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital  Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences ........ 33  GEO Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services  related activities ....................................... 35  Report on the 35th International           Symposium on Remote Sensing of           Environment (ISRSE),  Beijing, China......... 40  EARSeL eProceedings ................................. 42  New Publications in Vol. 12(1), 2013........ 42  Book Releases ............................................ 43  Forthcoming EARSeL Conferences .............. 44  9th EARSeL Workshop on Forest Fires...... 44  Other Conferences ..................................... 46  Summer Schools and Advanced Courses..... 48   

                            3 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

EARSeL Bureau 

EARSeL Newsletter Editors 

Chairman: Dr. Ioannis Manakos  Centre for Research and Technology Hellas  (CERTH), Information Technologies Institute  6th km Xarilaou ‐ Thermi   Thessaloniki, 57001, Greece  Phone: + 30 2311 257 760  ioannis.manakos@earsel.org, imanakos@iti.gr  Vice‐Chairman: Lena Halounova, Ph.D.  Department of Mapping and Cartography  Czech Technical University in Prague  166 29 Prague 6, Czech Republic  Phone: +420 22435 4952  lena.halounova@earsel.org  Secretary General: Rosa Lasaponara, Ph.D.  Institute of Methodologies for Environmental  Analysis (IMAA‐CNR)   85050 Tito Scalo (PZ), Italy  Phone: +39 0971 427214  lasaponara@imaa.cnr.it   Treasurer: Dr. Samantha Lavender  Pixalytics Ltd  Tamar Science Park, 1 Davy Road,   Derriford, Plymouth, Devon, PL6 8BX, UK  Phone: +44 1752 764407  slavender@pixalytics.com  International Relations: Dr. Mario Hernandez  UNESCO  1 Rue Miollis  75732 Paris cedex 15, France  Phone: +33 1 45 68 4052  Email: m.hernandez@unesco.org  

Prof. Konstantinos Perakis,             Mr. Athanasios Moysiadis  Department of Planning and Regional          Development, University of Thessaly,   38334, Volos, Greece   Phone: +30 24210 74465  perakis@uth.gr                          moysiadis@uth.gr 

 

Honorary Bureau Members  Prof. Preben Gudmandsen  Danish National Space Center  Technical University of Denmark  2800 Lyngby, Denmark  Phone: +45 45 25 37 88  prebeng@space.dtu.dk  Prof. Gottfried Konecny  Institut für Photogrammetrie und                  Geoinformation  Leibniz Universität Hannover  30167 Hannover, Germany  Phone: +49 511 7622487  konecny@ipi.uni‐hannover.de    4 

 

Dr. Anna Jarocińska  Department  of  Geoinformatics  and  Remote  Sensing (WURSEL), University of Warsaw,   00‐927 Warsaw, Poland  ajarocinska@uw.edu.pl                           

Springer Series on Remote Sensing  and Digital Image Processing Editor  Dr. André Marçal  Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto  D.M.A., Rua do Campo Alegre, 687  4169‐007 Porto, Portugal  Phone: +351 220 100 873  andre.marcal@earsel.org   

EARSeL eProceedings Editor  Dr. Rainer Reuter  Institute of Physics  University of Oldenburg  26111 Oldenburg, Germany  Phone: +49 441 798 3522  rainer.reuter@earsel.org   

Webmaster  Dr. Rainer Reuter  Institute of Physics  University of Oldenburg  26111 Oldenburg, Germany  Phone: +49 441 798 3522  rainer.reuter@earsel.org   

EARSeL Secretariat  Mrs Gesine Böttcher  30167 Hannover, Germany  Fax: +49 511 7622483  secretariat@earsel.org 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Editorial    Dear members,     The 9th EARSeL Workshop of the SIG “Forest Fires”, entitled “Quantifying the environmental impact  of forest fires” that will take place on 15 ‐ 17 October 2013, at Coombe Abbey, Warwickshire, UK is  under preparation and this issue includes some important updates on this very special EARSeL event.  Other updates from EARSeL include a new EARSeL membership and our members’ national reports  for the year 2012 by Bulgaria, Croatia and the Netherlands, with a wealth of information of their last  year activities on earth observation.     The “News from Other Organisations” section includes very interesting articles and reports, starting  with  a  report  on  China’s  important  institution  in  geospatial  information  field,  the  “Institute  of         Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences” as well as an article on the  Group  on  Earth  Observations/GEO  Biodiversity  and  Ecosystem  Services  related  activities.  Feedback  on one of the most important remote sensing events, the 35th International Symposium on Remote  Sensing of Environment (ISRSE), that took place in Beijing, China last April, is also given in this section.     EARSeL’s Journal, the “EARSeL eProceedings” provides to the readers two more interesting scientific  papers.  You  are  invited  to  publish  your  research  activities  and  share  them  with  the  research          community via this EARSeL publication. Last but not least, new book releases, a list of conferences,  training courses and summer schools to attend in the near future closes this summer issue.    We will be pleased to hear your comments and suggestions on this issue. Moreover, you are more  than welcome to contribute with a science article or a report for the forthcoming issues.    Enjoy reading this June issue!   The Editors     

       

           


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

News from EARSeL  New EARSeL Members   We  want  to  extend  a  warm  welcome  to  the  new  member  who  has  registered  with  EARSeL.                      We  are  looking  forward  to  its  active  participation  and  contribution  to  the  EARSeL  activities,  and  in           collaboration  with  other  members,  in  this  long‐established  network  of  scientific  research                laboratories.    MGGP Aero, http://www.mggpaero.com  Slowackiego 33‐37,   33‐100 Tarnow  Poland    EARSeL Representative: Dr. Łukasz Sławik  lslawik@mggpaero.com   

  National Reports  Remote Sensing Activities in Bulgaria, 2012                                                       This  report  is  based  on  information  provided  by  Georgi  Jelev,  Eugenia  Roumenina,  Iva  Ivanova,  Lachezar  Filchev,               Petar Dimitrov, Roumen Nedkov, Vanya Naydenova, and Violeta Slabakova. 

  The Bulgarian EARSeL members are represented by two EARSeL groups at two of the institutes at the  Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS). They are namely: the Space Research and Technology Institute  (SRTI‐BAS) and the Fridtjof Nansen Institute of Oceanology (IO‐BAS). These groups have been EARSeL  members since 2009, when the two groups, consisting mainly from young scientists, applied to and  were accepted to EARSeL.  The  EARSeL  group  at  the  SRTI‐BAS  consists  of  10  researchers:  7  from  the  Remote  Sensing  and  GIS  (RS&GIS)  department  and  3  from  the  Aerospace  Information  (AI)  department.  Present  report  was  presented before Dr. I Manakos ‐ the EARSeL Chairman ‐ during a meeting with the Bulgarian EARSeL  members (1).  During  the  reported  period  the  EARSeL  members  from  the  RS&GIS  department  have  carried  out   research in:   Updating the thematically distributed satellite and sub‐satellite database for the aerospace  test sites on the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria (BAS‐TS) (2).   Implementing  the  PROAGROBURO  project  (3 i )  within  the  framework  of  the  PROBA‐V           Preparatory  Programme  chaired  by  the  PROBA‐V  International  Users  Committee  (IUC).  The  main  objective  of  the  Project  was  to  assess  the  quality  of  the  PROBA‐V  mission  as  a            continuity mission to VEGETATION 1 & 2 by comparison and validation of SPOT VEGETATION  and  PROBA‐V  simulated  data  (SD)  for  assessing  crop  status  on  chosen  test  areas  on  the       territory  of  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  Fig.  1  (1).  As  a  result  of  implementing  the  project          methodology, the following has been achieved: 1) developing methodological requirements;  2)  composing  a  geodatabase  with  integrated  satellite  and  in  situ  biophysical  and  biometric 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

reference  data;  3)  conducting  sub‐satellite  experiments;  4)  developing  empirical  models      describing  the  relationships  between  crop  data  obtained  from  simulated  PROBA‐V  data  (courtesy VITO) and in situ reference data; 5) composing land use/land cover (LU/LC) maps  based  on  unsupervised  and  supervised  image  classification  of  SPOT  VEGETATION  and   PROBA‐V images; 6) determination of crop status based on the NDVI, NDWI and LAI indexes  from SPOT VEGETATION data and PROBA‐V SD. The project partners were: the SRTI‐BAS, the  Romanian National Meteorological Administration (RNMA), and the National Institute of Me‐ teorology  and  Hydrology  at  the  BAS  (NIMH‐BAS).  As  a  result  it  was  found  that  PROBA‐V      mission  will  provide  better  results  in  LU/LC  classifications  of  agricultural  environments      compared  to  SPOT  VEGETATION.  The  significant  correlations  of  PROBA‐V  SD,  vegetation       indices  (VIs),  and  biophysical  products  with  ground‐measured  biophysical  and  biometrical  parameters provide to improve the monitoring of winter crops with additional products from  PROBA‐V. The main findings and deliverables of the project were presented and published in  a series of conference proceedings and peer‐reviewed journals (4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10).   

a

                b 

  Figure 1: (a) Location of the two test areas in the PROAGROBURO project and (b) simulated PROBA‐V image of  the Zhiten test area with vector layer showing the test field boundaries. 

 The  first  Bulgarian  capital  –  the  medieval  town  of  Pliska  is  one  of  the  most  significant            archaeological  sites  in  Bulgaria.  Non‐destructive  remote  sensing  and  GIS  methods  were     combined with technologies for archaeological terrain surveys and modelling of the – Pliska  and the National Historical and Archaeological Reserve Kabiyuk, together with a team from  the  National  Institute  of  Archaeology  with  Museum  –  BAS  (11,  12,  13).  The  ongoing  work  within a project proved that the integrated application of remote sensing and ground‐based  data are very useful in preventing turning regions into endangered archaeological structures  areas (14).   It  was  found  that  the  narrow‐band  VIs  from  EO‐1/Hyperion,  field  spectroscopy  data         measured with ASD HH FS granted by ASD Goetz Instrument Support Programme 2011, the  broad  band  VIs  from  very  high  spatial  resolution  (VHR)  multispectral  satellite  data  from  QuickBird, as well as the pigment content (chlorophyll‐a, chlorophyll–b, and carotene) can be  used  for  detection  and  assessment  of  abiotic  stress  in  coniferous  landscapes  (15).  A  Ph.D.  dissertation was defended in the beginning of 2012 (16).   In 2011‐2012 the feasibility of estimation and mapping coniferous forest attributes in the Rila  Mountain by SPOT, ASTER, and QuickBird images was studied (17, 18, 19). Regression models  for 13 attributes were developed and validated based on SPOT 5 spectral data and QuickBird  texture data. Maps of attributes such as dominant tree height, dominant diameter, volume  and aboveground biomass (AGB) were created, Fig. 2. One PhD Thesis was defended in 2012  (20). 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

  Figure 2: Map of coniferous forests AGB (t/ha) composed using SPOT 5 image and GIS (20). 

 Due  to  the  momentum  gained  by  the  wildfires  on  the  Vitosha  Mountain,  several                     investigations  were  carried  out  to  assess  the  scale  and  the  impact  of  the  wildfire  on  the      coniferous forests of the Bistrishko Branishte UNESCO MAB biosphere reserve, Fig. 3 (21, 22,  23). For the purpose, LU/LC maps were prepared for the state before and after the wild fire  using satellite images from Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+, Fig. 3 (a) (24). The areas of the  fire scars determined through visual interpretation of the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio  (dNBR) and the Relative differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (RdNBR) images were about 70  ha (Bistrishko Branishte biosphere reserve) (23). 

 (a) 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 (b) 

Figure 3: (a) LU/LC maps of the Bistrishko Branishte MAB biosphere reserve for 2007 and 2012 ( ii ) and (b) dNBR  and RdNBR images of two fire scars in the Vitosha Mountain from 2012 (23).   

 Geohazard  mapping  of  the  East  Rhodope  Mountain  aerospace  test  site  was  made.                    The  transformed  input  raster  datasets  from  the  15  thematic  layers  were  resampled  to  cell  size  of  30×30  m.  By  using  Spatial  Analyst  Tools  in  ArcGIS,  the  Fuzzy  Logic  approach  and         expert  knowledge  ‐  membership  functions  for  each  of  the  15  factor  layers  were  applied.  Fuzzy Overlay from Spatial Analyst Tools was used for the factor analysis. The separate layers  were combined using Fuzzy Sum approach, which is one of the specific approaches to define  the interdependence between factors in the Fuzzy Overlay analysis. As a result, a map with  degrees of potential geological hazard regions was prepared, Fig. 4 (25).   

  Figure 4: Map of the potential geologic hazard of the East Rhodope aerospace test site. 

During  the  reported  period  the  EARSeL  members  from  the  AI  department  have  carried  out                  investigations in the following research areas:   A  geodatabase  containing  a  DEM  (20  m)  of  the  Makocevska  (a  tributary  of  the  Lesnovska  river) and the Biserska river basins in South Bulgaria, has been generated based on satellite  data along with precise cut‐through profiles based on differential GPS measurements, Fig. 5  (b).  Based  on  the  results  obtained,  the  borders  of  the  flood  zones  of  the  rivers  have  been     described for fixed values of the water level (26).   In 2012, the satellite information efficiency and data quality specifications for a small satellite  mission for ecological applications were investigated (27). 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 The  results  of  continuing  research  on  the  floating  lakes  in  the  Danube  delta  have  been       published (28).   The ecological modelling of the forest ecosystems in Bulgaria using satellite data and GIS was  presented at an ESA symposium (29, 30).   The  group  members  from  the  Aerospace  Information  Department  are  also  performing  a  regular monitoring of land‐use for the municipality of Kardzhali (31).   The  department  performs  scientific  investigations  in  WEB‐based  information  systems  for  aerospace applications by creating and studying of structures, methods, and technologies for  building  a  WEB‐based  automated  information  systems  for  environmental  monitoring  (URL:  http://zmeiovo.space.bas.bg).   

(a) 

  (b)  Figure 5: (a) WEB‐based ecological monitoring of Zmeiovo region (b) precize cut‐through DEM profiles of  Biserska river basin (26). 

In  the  beginning  of  2010,  10  scientists  (2  associate  professors,  2  PhDs,  and  6  PhD  students)  from      IO‐BAS became EARSeL members with group membership. In 2011‐2012, the EARSeL group members  from the IO‐BAS worked on a couple of projects dealing with RS, namely:    BulArgo ­ a Bulgarian research infrastructure as a component of the Euro ARGO network   The  purpose  of  the  project  is  to  develop  a  new  national  marine  research  infrastructure  for  in  situ  observation  in  the  Black  Sea  based  on  autonomous  profiling  floats.  This  represents  the  Bulgarian  contribution  to the  EuroArgo network, which is a part of the  Global Argo programme. BulArgo is a  project funded by the Bulgarian National Science Fund  (NSF) and the  Ministry of Education, Youth,  and  Science  (MEYS).  The  project  partners  are:  the  IO‐BAS;  the  Department  of  Meteorology  and      Geophysics at the St. Kliment Ohrdiski University of Sofia; the NIMH‐BAS.  Under the BulArgo program, three Argo floats were deployed in the Black Sea in the Bulgarian EEZ  during the cruise of the Akademik research vessel (R/V) on 17‐19 March 2011. Each float measured  temperature and salinity between the surface and a pre‐determined depth (1500 m) at intervals of 5  days. As a result of this study, an interesting variation of the Black Sea halocline depth in the salinity  data gathered from Argo float 6900804 (Emona) was found. The trajectory of the float is shown in  Figure 6 (a) and the data in the 200 m thick layer are shown in Figure 6 (b). Correlation between sea  water salinity and Jason’s altimetry data can be noticed as well, Fig. 6 (c) (32). 

10 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 

 

 

Figure 6: (a) Trajectory and (b) Salinity [°C] measured by float 6900804 for the period March 2011 – July 2012,  (c) Altimetry data from Jason 2 (1 February 2012). 

  Development of prototype of geo­information system for Remote Sensing monitoring on  the sea water ecological status in the Bulgarian and Ukrainian Black Sea port areas  The project is funded by the Bulgarian NSF and the MEYS. The effective starting date of the project is  25.11.2012.  The  project’s  objectives  are:  1)  Analysis  on  the  contemporary  ecological  status  of        Bulgarian  and  Ukrainian  sea  port  water  areas  and  water  ways;  2)  Elaboration  of  scientific  and        technical  basis  and  methods  using  satellite  images  to  identify  Bulgarian  and  Ukrainian  water  areas  with  high  technology‐induced  and  man‐induced  pollution  rate;  3)  Development  of  satellite  image  interpretation methods for pollution tracing in water areas, forecasting, trends and change rates of  their ecological status, mapping of the environmentally vulnerable coastal areas; 4) Development of  GIS prototype for Remote Sensing monitoring of port water areas and water ways in the Bulgarian  and Ukrainian parts of the Black Sea for the following sources of technology‐induced  pollutions: 1)  Transport facilities (ships); 2) Infrastructure cargo and passenger transport servicing facilities (ports  and port industrial infrastructures and dockyards).    Bio­Optical  Characterization  of  the  Black  Sea  for  Remote  Sensing  Applications                 (NATO SfP Project No 982678)  The project, within the framework of the environmental security research topic, aims to implement a  tool  to  support  remote  sensing  applications  for  operational  environmental  monitoring  and  climate  studies in the Black Sea. The NATO project partners are the Institute of Marine Sciences (IMS); the  Middle East Technical University, Erdemli, Turkey; IO‐BAS, Varna, Bulgaria; the Marine Hydrophysical  Institute  (MHI),  Sevastopol,  Ukraine;  the  Shirshov  Institute  of  Oceanology  Moscow,  Russia;  the  Grigore Antipa National Institute for Marine Research Development, Constanta, Romania; the Joint  Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC), Ispra, Italy (33).  In  2011  and  2012,  four scientific  cruises  ware  carried  out  in  the  Western  and  Central  Black  Sea  on  board the Bulgarian R/V Akademik and the Romanian R/V Mare Nigrum. During the oceanographic  campaign  of  2011,  measurements  at  112  measurement  stations  were  carried  out,  and  during  the    bio‐optical cruise in September 2012, measurements at 107 measurement stations were carried out,  Fig.  7.  The  objective  of  the  bio‐optical  oceanographic  cruise  was  to  perform  state‐of‐the‐art  meas‐ urements,  including  comprehensive  apparent  and  inherent  optical  properties  of  the  Western  Black  Sea seawater, in addition to the concentration of optically significant constituents, Table 1. 

11 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 (a) 

 

 (b) 

Figure 7: Working area and location of the measurement stations of: (a) the 2011 bio‐optical cruise and (b) the  2012 bio‐optical cruise. 

  The  in  situ  data  was  used  to  develop  regional  bio‐optical  algorithms  and  models  for  the                   determination of optically significant seawater constituents in the form of concentration or inherent  optical  properties  based  on  remote  sensing  reflectance.  The  first  level  of  modelling  relies  on  the    development  of  statistical  relationships.  The  newly  developed  algorithms  and  models  for  Satellite  Ocean color products generation and delivery will be implemented in the JRC operational processing  chain  for  satellite  ocean  color  data  (namely  MODIS‐AQUA  imagery).  Products  like  chlorophyll         concentration, total suspended matter concentration, coloured dissolved organic matter absorption  coefficient and diffuse attenuation coefficient, will be made available as daily, ten‐day and monthly  composites through the JRC web interface.   Table 1: Apparent and inherent optical properties of the Western Black Sea seawater and the measurement  instruments. 

    Acknowledgements  The  EARSeL  group  members  at  the  SRTI‐BAS  and  the  IO‐BAS  are  obliged  to  the  EARSeL  Newsletter  Editors for their devoted work to make this report available to the EARSeL Newsletter readers. The  report was compiled with the kind consent of the PIs of the presented projects.    References  1.  Filchev  L, 2012.  The  8th  scientific conference  with  international  participation  "space  ecology  safety"  –  SES.  EARSeL  Newsletter,  92:  29‐31.  http://www.earsel.org/Newsletters/EARSeL‐Newsletter‐Issue‐92.pdf  (last  date  accessed: 26/04/2013). 

12 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

2. Roumenina E, A Gikov, H Lukarski, V Naydenova, G Sotirov, G Jelev, L Filchev, L Kraleva, S Fotev, M Cherven‐ yashka,  P  Dimitrov,  V  Kazandzhiev  &  N  Valkov,  2008.  Establishment  of  a  scientific‐information  complex  for  aerospace test sites on the territory of the republic of Bulgaria. In: Proceedings of the 4th Scientific Conference  with  International  Participation  ‘Space,  Ecology,  Nanotechnology,  Safety’  (SENS)  2008,  (SRI‐BAS,  Varna),  108‐ 113 http://www.space.bas.bg/SENS2008/3‐GIS.pdf.  3.  Testing  PROBA‐V  and  VEGETATION  data  for  agricultural  applications  in  Bulgaria  and  Romania                     (PROAGROBURO).  Contract  Ref.  Nr  CB/XX/16.  between  the  SRTI‐BAS  and  the  Belgian    Federal  Science  Policy  Office (BELSPO), under the PROBA‐V Preparatory Programme. Principal Investigator (PI): Prof. Dr. E. Roumen‐ ina.  4.  Roumenina  E,  L  Filchev,  P  Dimitrov,  G  Jelev,  V  Kazandjiev,  V  Georgieva  &  D  Joleva,  2011.  Monitoring  of      Winter  Wheat  of  the  Enola  Variety  on  the  Lozenets  Reference  Area  Using  Satellite  and  Ground‐Based  Data.  Field  Crops  Studies,  Cereals  Breeding,  2:  221‐232  http://dai‐gt.org/fcs/bg/pdf/fulltext_VII_2_2.pdf  (last  date  accessed: 26/04/2013).  5.  Roumenina E, V  Kazandjiev  &  G  Stancalie  (Eds.),  2012.  Methodological  Requirements  for  Testing PROBA‐V  and  VEGETATION  data  for  agricultural  applications  in  Bulgaria  and  Romania,  (Prof.  Marin  Drinov  Academic  Publishing House), 148 pp. (In Eng. and Bulg.)  http://www.baspress.com/pic/mp3/bMETHODOLOGICAL%20REQUIREMENTS%20Eng‐Bg.pdf  accessed: 26/04/2013). 

(last 

date       

6. Roumenina E, L Filchev, G Jelev, P Dimitrov, H Lukarski, V Kazandjiev & V Georgiev, 2012. Determination of  Wheat Crop Status after Winter Using Simulated Proba‐V and Ground‐Based Data. In: Proceedings of 7th Scien‐ tific Conference with International Participation ‘Space, Ecology, Safety’ (SES) 2011, (SRTI‐BAS, Sofia), 197‐207  http://www.space.bas.bg/SES2011/R‐1.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  7.  Craciunescu  V,  G  Stancalie,  E  Roumenina,  V    Kazandjiev,  G  Jelev,  L  Filchev,  E  Savin  &  S  Catana,  2012.           Interactive Web‐Mapping System for Satellite Based Agricultural Applications in Bulgaria and Romania. In: Pro‐ ceedings of 4th International Conference on Cartography and GIS, Vol. 1, edited by Bandrova T, M Konecny & G  Zhelezov (Bulgarian Cartographic Association, Albena), 429‐439.  8.  Roumenina  E,  L  Filchev,  V  Vassilev,  P  Dimitrov,  G  Jelev,  G  Stancalie,  E  Savin  &  D  Mihailescu,  2012.              Comparative analysis of crop maps for chosen test areas on the territory of Bulgaria and Romania using simu‐ lated PROBA‐V and SPOT Vegetation data. EARSeL eProceedings, 11(2), 155‐160  http://www.eproceedings.org/static/vol11_2/11_2_roumenina1.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  9.  Roumenina  E,  L  Filchev,  V  Vassilev,  P  Dimitrov,  G  Jelev,  G  Stancalie,  E  Savin  &  D  Mihailescu,  2013.              Comparative  analysis  of  land‐use/land‐cover  maps  for  chosen  test  areas  on  the  territory  of  Bulgaria  and        Romania  using  simulated  PROBA‐V  and  SPOT  Vegetation  data.  In:  32nd  EARSeL  Symposium  Proceedings        “Advances in Geosciences”, 1st EARSeL Workshop on Temporal Analysis of Satellite Images, edited by Perakis K  &  A  Moysiadis  (EARSeL,  Mykonos),  430‐435  http://www.earsel.org/symposia/2012‐symposium‐ Mykonos/Proceedings/14‐02_EARSeL‐Symposium‐2012.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  10.  Roumenina  E,  V  Kazandjiev,  P  Dimitrov,  L  Filchev,  V  Vassilev,  G  Jelev,  V  Georgieva  &  H  Lukarski,  2013.        Validation of LAI and assessment of winter wheat status using spectral data and vegetation indices from SPOT  VEGETATION and simulated PROBA‐V images. International Journal of Remote Sensing, 34(8): 2888‐2904. DOI:  10.1080/01431161.2012.755276 (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  11. Stamenov St, V Naydenova & A Aladjov, 2012. GIS‐based concept for conservation of the archaeological site  of Pliska. In: Proceedings of the 1st European SCGIS conference “Best practices: Application of GIS technologies  for  conservation  of  natural  and  cultural  heritage  sites”,  (SRTI‐BAS,  Sofia),  63‐71  http://proc.scgis.scgisbg.org/S2‐3_Stamenov.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  12. Stamenov St, 2012. Modern land cover and land use of the outer town of the medieval Bulgarian capital  Pliska  using  satellite  images  with  high  spatial  resolution.  In:  Proceedings  of  7th  Scientific  Conference  with         international participation ‘Space, Ecology and Safety’ (SES) 2011, (SRTI‐BAS, Sofia), 236‐240   http://www.space.bas.bg/SES2011/R‐6.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  13.  Stamenov  St  &  A  Aladjov,  2012.  Application  of  geographic  information  system  for  survey  of  the              archaeological  site  Pliska.  In:  Proceedings  of  3rd  National  Conference  on  Archaeology,  History  and  Cultural  Tourism: Journey to Bulgaria „Bulgaria in the World Cultural Heritage”, (National Archaeological Institute and  Museum – Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Shumen). (in print).  14. Development of primary geodatabase and GIS of the Outer town of the Medieval Bulgarian capital Pliska.  Contract No.453/ 11.06.2010 between the NAIM‐BAS and SRTI‐BAS, 2010‐2013. 

13 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

15. Filchev L & E Roumenina, 2012. Detection and assessment of abiotic stress of coniferous landscapes caused  by uranium mining (using multitemporal high resolution Landsat data). Geography, Environment, Sustainability,  5(1): 52‐67 http://int.rgo.ru/wp‐content/uploads/2012/03/GES_01_2012.pdf  (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  16.  Filchev  L,  2012.  Model  for  detection  of  stress  situations  in  coniferous  landscapes  with  the  use  of               multispectral and hyperspectral satellite data, PhD Thesis, (SRTI‐BAS), 163 pp.  17. Dimitrov P & E Roumenina, 2012. Studying the relationship between some attributes of coniferous forests  and spectral data from the ASTER satellite sensor. Aerospace Research in Bulgaria, 24: 116‐128.  18. Dimitrov P, 2012. Using of multispectral satellite images for estimation and mapping of coniferous forest  aboveground tree biomass. Problems of geography, 1‐2: 90‐104.  19. Dimitrov P, 2012. Mapping of coniferous forests’ structural attributes in Rila Mountain, Bulgaria by satellite  data.  In:  Proceedings  of  1st  European  SCGIS  Conference  with  International  Participation  “Best  practices:        Application of GIS technologies for conservation of natural and cultural heritage sites” (SCGIS‐Bulgaria, Sofia),  44‐52 http://proc.scgis.scgisbg.org/S1‐7_Dimitrov.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  20.  Dimitrov  P,  2012.  Estimation  and  mapping  of  structural  attributes  of  coniferous  forests  by  multispectral  satellite images. PhD Thesis, Space Research and Technology Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 103 pp.  21.  Filchev  L,  2012.  An  Assessment  of  European  Spruce  Bark  Beetle  Infestation  Using  WorldView‐2  Satellite  Data.  In:  Proceedings  of  1st  European  SCGIS  Conference  with  International  Participation  ‘Best  practices:        Application of GIS technologies for conservation of natural and cultural heritage sites’, (SCGIS‐Bulgaria, Sofia),  9‐16 http://proc.scgis.scgisbg.org/S1‐2_Filchev.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013).  22.  Filchev  L,  2012.  Land‐use/land‐cover  change  detection  of  Bistrishko  Branishte  biosphere  reserve  using      high‐resolution  satellite  data.  In:  CD  Proceedings  of  22nd  International  Symposium  on  Modern  Technologies,  Education and Professional Practice in Geodesy and Related Fields, (Union of Surveyors and Land Managers in  Bulgaria, Sofia), Nо 35.  23. Gikov A & P Dimitrov, 2013. Application of medium resolution satellite images for assessment of damages  caused  by  the  wildfires  in  Vitosha  Mountain  in  2012.  In:  Proceedings  of  the  8th  Scientific  Conference  with      International  Participation  ‘Space,  Ecology,  Safety’  (SES  2012),  edited  by  (SRTI‐BAS,  Sofia)  (in  Bulgarian)  (In  print).  24. Filchev L, L Feilong & M Panayotov, 2013. An assessment of land‐use/land‐cover change of Bistrishko bran‐ ishte biosphere reserve using Landsat data. In: Proceedings of 35th International Symposium on Remote Sens‐ ing of Environment "Earth Observation and Global Environmental Change ‐ 50 Years of Remote Sensing: Pro‐ gress and Prospects" (ISRSE 35), (RADI‐CAS, Beijing). (in print).  25.  Jelev  G,  2012.  Fuzzy  logic  based  method  for  assessment  of  geological  hazards  in  the  Eastern  Rhodope  mountains. In: Proceedings of 8th Scientific Conference with International Participation ‘Space, Ecology, Safety’  (SES 2012), (SRTI‐BAS, Sofia). (in print).  26. Ivanova I, R Nedkov, N Stankova, M Zaharinova, M Dimitrova, S Nikolova & K Radeva, 2013. Flood analysis  on  the  territory  of  Bisser  based  on  satellite  and  GPS  data  of  February  2012  using  GIS.  In:  Proceedings  of  8th  Scientific  Conference  with  International  Participation  ‘Space,  Ecology,  Safety’  (SES  2012),  (SRTI‐BAS,  Sofia).       (in print).  27. Nedkov R,. 2012. Assessment of information efficiency and data quality from microsatellite for the need of  ecological monitoring. Aerospace research in Bulgaria, 4: 146–150.  28. Ivanova I & R Nedkov, 2012. Estimation оf the Dynamics of the Lumina Lake Floating Reed Islands in the  Territory  of  the  Danube  Delta  Biosphere  Reserve,  Using  Aerospace  and  GPS  Data  for  the  Period  1972–2009.  Ecological engineering and environment protection (EEEP), 2: 21‐26.  29.  Lyubenova  M,  N  Georgieva,  V  Lyubenova,  R  Nedkov,  I  Ivanova  &  E  Ivanova,  2012.  Ecological  Space           Modelling  as  a  Pattern  of  Forest  Vegetation  Investigation  (Example  with  Belasitsa  Mt.,  Bulgaria),  Comptes    rendus de l’Academie bulgare des Sciences, 65(4): 483‐490 http://www.proceedings.bas.bg (last date accessed:  26/04/2013).  30.  Lubenova  M,  R  Nedkov,  A  Chlkalanov,  I  Ivanova,  N  Georgieva  &  V  Lubenova,  2012.  Ecological  Space         Modeling  of  Forest  Ecosystems  and  Their  Dynamics  in  Three  Mountains  of  Bulgaria.  In:  2nd  TERRABITES         Symposium, (ESA‐ESRIN, Frascati‐Rome), 38  http://www.terrabites.net/fileadmin/user_upload/terrabites/PDFs/2012/2012.02.6‐ 8/Program_and_abstract.pdf (last date accessed: 26/04/2013). 

14 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

31. Nedkov R, I Ivanova, D Panayotova, M Dimitrova & M Zaharinova, 2013. Ecomonitoring investigation of land  cover of the municipality of Kardzhali using aerospace and GPS data. Ecological Engineering and Environment  Protection (EEEP) (in print).  32.  Palazov  A,  V  Slabakova,  E  Peneva,  V  Marinova,  A  Stefanov,  M  Milanova  &  G  Korchev,  2012.  BulArgo         Activities  in  the  Black  Sea.  In:  Proceedings  of  the  International  Jubilee  Congress  “50th  Anniversary  Technical  University of Varna”, edited by Farhi O & H Skulev (TU‐Varna, Varna), 110‐115.  33. Bio‐Optical Characterization of the Black Sea for Remote Sensing Applications (NATO SfP Project Number  982678, Project sheet.  http://www.nato.int/science/studies_and_projects/nato_funded/pdf/BioOptical%20Characterization%20of%2 0the%20Black%20Sea%20for%20Remote%20Sensing%20Applications%20982678_.pdf   (last date accessed: 26/04/2013). 

  Chief Asst. Lachezar Filchev, PhD  SRTI‐BAS  lachezarf@space.bas.bg  http://www.space.bas.bg    Appendix – EARSeL group members at SRTI­BAS and IO­BAS   Space  Research  and  Technology  Institute  at  the  Bulgarian  Academy  of  Sciences  (SRTI‐BAS),  Acad.  Georgi  Bonchev Str., bl. 1, P.O. Box 799, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria  (URL: http://www.space.bas.bg)    RS&GIS Department (URL: http://www.rse‐sri.com)  Prof. Eugenia Roumenina, PhD; roumenina@space.bas.bg  Chief Assistant Georgi Jelev; gjelev@space.bas.bg  Chief Asst. Lachezar Filchev, PhD; lachzarhf@space.bas.bg  Chief Asst. Petar Dimitrov, PhD; petar.dimitrov@space.bas.bg  Asst. Stefan Stamenov, PhD student; stamenov@space.bas.bg  Assoc. Prof. Vanya Naydenova, PhD; vnaydenova@space.bas.bg  Asst. Vassil Vassilev, PhD student; vassilev_vas@yahoo.com  AI Department (URL: http://www.space.bas.bg/asic/en/index.html)  Prof. Roumen Nedkov, PhD; rnedkov@space.bas.bg  Chief Asst. Iva Ivanova, PhD student; ivaivanova@space.bas.bg  Nataliya Stankova, PhD student; natalia_hs@space.bas.bg  Fridtjof Nansen Institute of Oceanology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (IO‐BAS), 40, First of May  Str., Asparuhovo quarter, P.O. Box 152, 9000 Varna, Bulgaria  (URL: www.io‐bas.bg)  Coastal Dynamics Department (URL: http://coastaldyn.io‐bas.bg/en‐us/home.aspx)  Chief Asst. Natalia Andreeva; n.andreeva@io‐bas.bg  Assoc. Prof. Nikolay Valchev, PhD; valchev@io‐bas.bg  Chief Assistant Petya Eftimova; eftimova@io‐bas.bg  Marine Geology and Archaeology Department (URL: http://www.io‐bas.bg)  Assoc. Prof. Valentina Doncheva, PhD; valentinadonceheva@gmail.com  Ocean Technologies Department (URL: http://www.io‐bas.bg)  Chief Asst. Violeta Slabakova; v.slabakova@io‐bas.bg  Chief Asst. Veselka Marinova; marinova@io‐bas.bg 

 

15 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Remote Sensing Activities in Croatia, 2012  Scientific Council for Remote Sensing of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts     Section for Photography, General Interpretation and GIS  (Reports by: Dubravko Gajski, Andrija Krtalić, Ivan Landek and Jonatan Pleško)  According to the plan of developing digital orthophoto maps for the purposes of updating the ARKOD  (the  terrain  use  registry),  52  percent  of  the  Croatian  territory  was  photographed  in  the  following  regions: the Dubrovnik‐Neretva County, the Istria County, the Karlovac County, the Lika‐Senj County,  the  Primorje‐Gorski  kotar  County,  the  Sisak‐Moslavina  County,  the  Split‐Dalmatia  County,  the  Šibenik‐Knin County, the Zadar County, the Bjelovar‐Bilogora County, the Zagreb County, and the City  of Zagreb.  At  the  Faculty  of  Geodesy  of  the  University  of  Zagreb  in  2012,  the  following  curricular  activities      related  to  remote  sensing  were  held:  compulsory  programmes  Remote  Sensing  (undergraduate    studies,  5th  term)  and  Advanced  Remote  Sensing  (graduate  studies,  2nd  term),  and  facultative         programmes  Applied  Remote  Sensing  (graduate  studies,  1st  term)  and  Remote  Sensing  –  PROJECT  (graduate studies, 2nd term).  Remote sensing research carried out at the Faculty of Geodesy of the  University  of  Zagreb  are  related  to  the  FP7  project  Toolbox  Implementation  for  Removal  of             Anti‐personnel  Mines,  Submunitions  and  UXO  (TIRAMISU),  which  commenced  on  1st  January  2012  and should last (provided the research results prove worthy of a follow‐up) until the end of 2015. The  project‐related research aims at improving (technically and methodologically) the present operative  Advanced  Decision  Support  System,  in  order  to  assist  humanitarian  demining  experts  in  making     decisions  regarding  defining  the  mine  suspected  area.  The  Faculty  of  Geodesy  of  the  University  of  Zagreb  and  the  Croatian  Mine  Action  Centre  –  Testing  and  Training  Centre  (with  the  latter,  the         co‐owner of the said System, the Agreement on Technical Cooperation was signed) are two partners  in the consortium of a total of 24 partners from 11 European countries.  The Chair for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing of the Faculty of Geodesy participated in the 22nd  International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Congress, which was held 25th  August  –  1st  September  2012  in  Melbourne,  Australia,  with  a  paper  Increase  of  readability  and       accuracy of 3D models using fusion of Close Range Photogrammetry and Laser Scanning, authored by  M.  Gašparović  and  I.  Malarić.  A  brief  report  by  M.  Gašparović  may  be  found  on  http://fodi.geof.hr/images/e‐knjiznica/izvjesca/izvjesceisprs2012.pdf.  A  new  Order  on  Air  Imaging  was  passed  (procedures  for  acquiring  approval  for  photographing  have  been  harmonised  with      European norms).    The Geology and Geophysics Section   (Report by: Ivan Hećimović)  The members used remote sensing methods respecting thereby the set organisational, financial and  market  rules.  At  the  Croatian  Geological  Survey,  the  application  of  remote  sensing  methods  was    focused  on  the  implementation  of  the  programme  The  Geological  Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia,  which encompasses eight scientific projects. These are: the Basic Geological Map of the Republic of  Croatia  in  scale  1:50.000  as  the  largest  project;  the  Basic  Hydrogeological  Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia; the Basic Engineers' Geological Map of the Republic of Croatia; the Basic Geochemical Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia;  the  Geothermal  Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia;  the  Structural‐ Geomorphologic  Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia;  and  the  Tectonic  Map  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia.  The Ministry of Science, Education and Sports financed all the projects. The remote sensing methods  application  is  further  articulated  through  the  bilateral  Japanese‐Croatian  project  Risk  Identification  and Land‐use Planning for Disaster Mitigation of Landslides and Floods in Croatia, which focuses on 

16 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

the identification of the landslide sites, the composing of the landslide register, and the developing  of the landslide risk map for the greater Zagreb area.  The  member  INA‐SD  Research  and  production  of  oil  and  gas  (earlier:  INA‐Naftaplin)  used  remote  sensing methods, inter alia, for developing a 3D model of the Hrastilnica‐2 oil well. Apart from that,  satellite images for developing 3D models of a part of the Dinarides were acquired.    Section for Vegetation, Forestry and Agriculture  (Reports by: Renata Pernar and Ante Seletković)  In 2012 research dealing with inspecting the possibility of applying multi‐spectral and hyper‐spectral  imaging  in  detecting  mistletoe  on  fir‐trees  was  carried  out.  Research  objective  was  to  develop  an  efficient  and  an  as  reliable  as  possible mistletoe‐detecting  method,  which  would  enable  examining  the correlation between the emergence of mistletoe and the damaging of fir‐trees, and monitoring  the health  condition of fir‐trees. With this aim in  mind, hyper‐spectral scanner imaging in  the area  covering  the  forest  management  Gospić,  the  forestry  Otočac,  and  the  unit  Crno  jezero‐Markovića  rudine  was  performed.  The  multi‐spectral  imaging  confirmed  the  possibility  of  defining  the  health  condition  of  fir‐trees.  The  research  results  do  not  considerably  differ  from  the  results  acquired  by  usual fieldwork methods for assessing the level of forest damage. The most significant result of the  presented method was successful detection of mistletoe on hyper‐spectral images, whereby the SAM  classification (spectral angle mapping) for 5° proved as the best classification method. The first spec‐ tral signatures – endmembers – for fir and mistletoe were defined; they now make a part of the spec‐ tral library database. Taking the gained results into consideration, a quick and economic application  of multi‐spectral and hyper‐spectral imaging has proved necessary not only for the purposes of forest  protection, but also for the needs of other scientific disciplines.  According  to  the  plan  for  the  year  2012,  research  aimed  at  inspecting  the  possibility  of  applying     digital  aerial  photogrammetric  images  in  various  spatial  resolutions  for  the  purposes  of  forest        inventory was carried out. The data acquired  by  classic terrestrial methods of forest inventory and  the  data  acquired  by  photogrammetric  methods  were  compared  and  analysed  for  the  area  under  examination. To this aim,  field measuring, aerial imaging, photogrammetric  measuring, subsequent  control  field  measuring,  as  well  as  statistic  processing  and  analysis  of  the  results  were  performed.     In isolated sections, a systematic sample of exemplary surfaces equalling to approximately 2 % of the  total  section  surface  were  positioned.  Exemplary  surfaces  had  the  shape  of  a  circle  with  radius  of  either 8 or 12 m, depending on the stand density. On exemplary surfaces, chest diameters of all trees  were measured, as well as were the heights of a defined number of trees, on the basis of which the  height curves for all tree species were developed. Furthermore, qualitative stand/section description  per  cadastral  plot  was  carried  out.  In  the  examined  area,  multi‐spectral  (RGB  and  NIR)  aerial          photogrammetric  imaging  supported  by  GPS/IMU  technology  was  conducted.  Infrared  and  colour  digital  aerial  photogrammetric  images  in  spatial  resolution  of  10  and  30  cm  are  a  result  of  aerial     imaging. On the basis of digital aerial images, for the needs of the examined area, the digital relief  model  (DRM),  the  digital  height  model  (DHM)  and  the  digital  orthophoto  were  developed  in  the    digital photogrammetric station. On the basis of digital images in spatial resolution of 10 cm, DOF1  (pixel 10 cm, scale 1:1000) was developed; whilst on the basis of digital images in spatial resolution  of 30 cm, DOF5 (pixel 50 cm, scale 1:5000) was developed. Stratum delineation (stand isolation) was  carried out in the stereo‐model, on the digital photogrammetric working station Racurs Photomod. In  thus  delineated  strata  in  digital  photographs,  a  net  of  systematic  samples  identical  to  the  field       sample of exemplary surfaces was positioned. The photogrammetric measuring of specified tree and  stand elements, was carried out in the stereo‐model. On photogrammetric surfaces, tree heights, the  width  of  tree  crown,  number  of  trees,  and  tree  species  were  measured  and  evaluated.  DRM  and  DHM were used for tree height evaluation. Based on the already known and the newly established  correlations,  tree  chest  diameters  and  other  important  parameters  were  defined  in  order  to  be     compared  to  the  terrestrially  measured  values.  Regression  models  of  the  evaluation  of  chest        

17 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

diameters of major tree species including the diameter of tree crown and tree height as independent  variables were prepared. Considering the results of the regression analysis, as well as the graphic and  analytic testing of every individual model, it might be concluded that the prepared regression models  could be used for evaluating tree chest diameter using the method of photogrammetric imaging. The  comparison of the results of economic division confirmed that there existed no statistically significant  differences;  this  was  further  confirmed  and  justified  by  stand  isolation  carried  out  through  the  photointerpretation  of  aerial  images.  By  measuring  the  structural  stand  elements  using  various  methods, no statistically significant differences were found in connection with photogrammetrically  evaluated tree heights, tree basal areas, and volume at section levels.  The health condition of the trees in the City of Zagreb area was determined by applying remote sens‐ ing methods. To this purpose, imaging aiming at developing satellite images of high spatial resolution  – WorldView 2 (0.46–0.52 m panchromatic or 1.84–2.08 m multi‐spectral) was ordered. The satellite  images of such a high spatial resolution enabled the interpretation of the damage of the major tree  species in the Park Forests of the City of Zagreb, and the development of the theme maps of spatial  damage  distribution.  In  order  to  conduct  the  assessment  of  the  health  condition  of  two  diagonal  trees closest to the centre of the raster, out of the delivered satellite image, a digital infrared colour  orthophoto of the area under examination and a systematic sample of the net of points 25 x 25 m  were  developed.  Based  on  the  results  of  the  interpretation  of  satellite  images,  damage  indicators  were calculated (damaged; medium damaged; damage index; mean damaged of considerably dam‐ aged trees) for individual tree species, for all interpreted species together and in total for the entire  imaged area.    The Oceanography Section  (Report by: Mira Morović)  Since  the  projects  by  the  Ministry  of  Science,  Education  and  Sports  were  prolonged,  we  have         continued to work within several years‐long scientific projects that are supposed to be concluded in  2013.  Field  measurements  were  carried  out  within  the  existing  and  a  few  new  projects  dealing  with  the  monitoring  of  the  Adriatic.  Many  oceanographic  data  were  collected  within  the  framework  of  field  research – spectral optic data among them. The cooperation between the Institute of Oceanography  and  Fisheries  and  the  Croatian  Meteorological  and  Hydrological  Service  continued  within  the      framework  of  the  inter‐institutional  virtual  laboratory  (ViLab).  Mutual  participation  in  the  HYMEX  project  has so far been  postponed, but we  took part in  the international HYMEX workshop held in  Primošten in May. We also took part in the PORSEC conference in Kochin. In the Proceedings of the  Pan  Ocean  Remote  Sensing  Conference  2012,  among  other  papers,  the  following  ones  were           published:  M. Morović, B. Grbec, Ž. Kovač and F. Matić, Ocean color variability of the Adriatic Sea.  Ž. Kovač, M. Morović and F. Matić, Space and time structure of the Adriatic Sea color satellite data.    Spatial Planning and Environmental Protection Section  (Reports by: Ivan Landek and Jonatan Pleško)  On 2nd March 2012 at the National Hall in Zagreb, the State Geodetic Administration presented the  monograph  entitled  The  Topographic  Maps  in  the  Territory  of  Croatia  (a  historical  review  of           topographic maps). The new Geoportal – a survey of spatial data was presented. Every citizen of the  Republic of Croatia has been enabled to search and review the data according to the type and name  of  spatial  unit,  cadastral  office,  branch‐office,  cadastral  municipality  and  plot.  In  this  manner,  the  digital  orthophoto  map  (scale  1:5000),  aerially  photographed  in  2011  (developed  in  2012  for  the    purposes of the Act on the Legalisation of Buildings in the Coordination System HTRS96/TM), has also 

18 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

been  made  available  to  citizens  of  the  Republic  of  Croatia,  the  cadastral  offices  and  the                   administrative bodies.   The State Geodetic Administration and the Ministry of Construction and Spatial Planning have drawn  up a draft plan of normative activities for 2013, foreseen by the Act on State Survey and Real Estate  Cadastre.  At  the  State  Geodetic  Administration,  the  topological  data  processing  related  to  photogrammetric  mapping (for the Basic topographic databases) was concluded for the entire Croatian territory; the  prototype of the new TK25 (new design) was developed; 21 TK25 maps were issued in a circulation of  2,100  copies  (formatted  map  with  a  new  title  page  and  a  new  sheet  division);  the  Product              specifications for the Croatian basic map (HOK), version 1.0 and the Product specifications for digital  orthophoto maps, version 1.2 were drafted.    The Hydrometeorology Section  (Reports by: Nataša Strelec Mahović and Bojan Lipovšćak)  Satellite meteorology  During 2012, the working group of the Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service took active  part in the operation of the consortium of EUMeTrain, an international scientific and development  project,  in  which  Croatia  has  been  participating  since  2004.  The  project  consortium  encompasses,  apart  from  the  Croatian  Meteorological  and  Hydrological  Service,  meteorological  services  from      Austria, Germany, Finland and Portugal. The project included drafting computer‐learning material for  interpreting  satellite  images  and  their  linking  to  other  meteorological  data;  and  organising  on‐line  training  and  seminars  in  satellite  meteorology  and  satellite  data  application.  In  2012,  the  working  group of the Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service wrote a new chapter for SATMANU –  manual in synoptic satellite meteorology to the topic Overshooting convective cloud tops. It further  participated  in  organising  three  on‐line  seminars  dealing  with:  cyclones  in  the  Mediterranean;        satellite data application in climatology (Climate SAF); and using data from polar satellites. Moreover,  it held three Weather Briefings – analyses of current weather conditions using satellite products via  Internet. All product‐related material, including lectures held in on‐line seminars, is available on the  Internet in the format adjusted for interactive learning (http://eumetrain.org). In the capacity of the  delegates of the Republic of Croatia, representatives of the Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological  Service  took  part  in  the  meetings  of  EUMETSAT  delegate  bodies.  The  meetings  addressed  current  issues regarding the maintenance of geostationary and polar satellites in the orbit, and technical and  financial  plans  related  to  launching  new  satellites.  The  representatives  of  the  Croatian                     Meteorological  and  Hydrological  Service,  Dr.  Sc.  Nataša  Strelec  Mahović  and  Petra  Mikuš,               participated in the EUMETSAT annual satellite conference held in Sopot, Poland in September.    Radar meteorology  During 2012, the Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service took active part in the work of the  EUMETNET project OPERA, the objective of which is the standardisation, collection and exchange of  meteorological radar data. Within the project, a database on meteorological radars used in project  member  countries  was  opened.  Throughout  the  year,  every  15  minutes,  from  the  radar  stations    Bilogora and Osijek, repeated radar meteorological measurements were conducted operatively and  the  data  thereof  sent  for  international  exchange.  Thanks  to  modernised  machinery  and  program  equipment at the radar station Osijek, its operation has been elevated to the Bilogora station level;  this enabled the development and application of the composite images of two radars, available from  http://vrijeme.hr/aktpod.php?id=kradar&param=stat.  Radar  measuring  related  to  hailstorm          protection in the north‐western part of Croatia was conducted in the period from May to September,  2012. The parameters of convective (Cumulonimbus) clouds were measured on eight meteorological  radar  stations  (Puntijarka,  Varaždin,  Trema,  Stružec,  Gorice,  Bilogora,  Osijek  and  Gradište).  The  S  wave  radars  were  used,  and  the  measurements  were  carried  out  when  necessary  and  when  Cb  clouds appeared. The results were published in the documents issued by the Croatian Meteorological  19 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

and Hydrological Service.  Dr. Sc. Bojan Lipovšćak and Zvonko Komerički participated in the work of  the European Radar Conference.    Lightning measurements   The  LINET  system  lightning  data  were  used  in  everyday  forecast‐related  work  and  in  the  scientific  research  on  convective  phenomena.  Hence,  in  2012,  the  lightning  data  were  compared  to  the       occurrence  of  overshooting  convective  CB‐cloud  tops  in  order  to  define  the  characteristics  of         lightning in such situations. P. Mikuš and N. Strelec Mahović made the preliminary research results  public at the EUMETSAT conference in the form of poster entitled Characteristics of lightning activity  in  deep  convective  cloud  with  the  overshooting  tops.  The  lightning  data  were  further  used  in  the       research  aimed  at  estimating  the  accuracy  of  linking  the  satellite  atmospheric  instability  indices  to  the  convection  development  represented  by  the  lightning  data.  Z.  Bahorić  published  the  research  results in his graduation thesis. The follow‐up of both researches is underway.  Published scientific papers:  P. Mikuš, N. Strelec Mahović, Satellite‐based overshooting top detection methods and an analysis of  correlated weather conditions, Atmos. res., 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosres.2012.09.001.  P.  Mikuš,  M.  Telišman  Prtenjak,  N.  Strelec  Mahović,  Analysis  of  the  convective  activity  and  its          synoptic background over Croatia. Atmos. res., 2012, 104/105, 139‐153.  J. Šepić, I. Vilibić, N. Strelec Mahović, Northern Adriatic meteorological tsunamis: observations, link  to the atmosphere and predictability, Journal of Geophysical Research, 2012, 117, C02002‐1‐C02002‐ 18.  Z. Bahorić, Statistic link between the satellite indices of instability and the occurrence of lightning for  the wider Croatian area, final paper – graduate/integral studies, 2012.    The Archaeology and Historic Heritage Section  (Report by: Bartul Šiljeg)  The analysis of web search engines and online surveys (ARKOD, Geoportal, Google Earth) continued  with the aim of analysing the known archaeological localities and discovering new ones. B. Šiljeg and  H.  Kalafatić  photographed  the  Slavonian  area  between  Čepin  and  Đakovo  using  a  series  of  oblique  images, which resulted in discovering new localities. V. Glavaš performed the photographing of the  Velebit area; while on Hvar, the Field of Starigrad and the entire island are regularly imaged. Within  the  scope  of  ERASMUS,  an  intensive  programme  entitled  Ditecur  (Digital  technologies  in  cultural  landscape research) was held in Zagreb 30 January – 12 February 2012, where B. Šiljeg lectured on  Aerial  archaeology  in  Croatia.  Two  Croatian  experts  took  active  part  in  the  International  aerial       archaeology  conference  AARG  2012  held  13–15  September  in  Budapest.  V.  Glavaš  held  a  lecture    entitled Troubles with Everything: Flying over Velebit, while B. Šiljeg presented the poster Slavonian  circles.  Council Chairman                      Croatian EARSeL Representative                  Prof. Marinko Oluić  Prof. Marijan Herak    geo‐sat@zg.t‐com.hr 

     

20 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Remote Sensing Activities in the Netherlands, 2012                                                            Earth Study and Observation  Introduction   The Netherlands has the following member laboratories:  1.  Rijkswaterstaat Data en ICT Dienst (DiD) Department of Geo‐information and ICT     2.  Netherlands Institute for Sea Research      3.  Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI)    4.  National Aerospace Laboratory   5.  Centre for Geo‐Information Wageningen UR   6.  University of Twente, Faculty of Geo‐Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC)     7.  Department of Physical Geography Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences   8.  TerraImaging B.V.    For  full  contact  details,  please  consult  the  EARSeL  directory  of  members.  The  UT‐ITC  is  for  long      Netherlands  representative  in  the  EARSeL  Council  for  which  Freek  van  der  Meer  acts  as                   representative.  As  Netherlands  council  member  I  have  invited  all  the  Dutch  members  and  the       Netherlands Space Organisation (NSO) to contribute to this report. Below are contributions received  from the members listing remote sensing activities in their organisations during 2012 with in part an  outlook to activities foreseen in 2013.    University of Twente, Faculty of Geo­Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC)     Representative: Prof. Freek van der Meer    At  the  International  Institute  for  Geo‐Information  Science  and  Earth  Observation  (ITC),  240  staff    including  15  professors  devote  their  efforts  to  developing  knowledge  of  geo‐information                 management.  By  means  of  education,  research  and  project  services,  we  contribute  to  capacity      building in developing countries and emerging economies. In doing so, considerable attention is paid  to the development and application of geographical information systems (GIS) for solving problems.  Such  problems  can  range  from  determining  the  risks  of  landslides,  mapping  forest  fires,  planning  urban infrastructure, implementing land administration systems, monitoring food and water security,  to designing a good wildlife management system or detecting environmental pollution.    Mission  The mission of ITC is twofold. At the heart lies education and research in geo‐information sciences.  But  ITC  is  also  committed  to  alleviating  the  shortage  of  skilled  middle  managers  in  developing       countries  with  the  ultimate  aim  of  building  sustainable  capacity  in  the  battle  against  poverty.  ITC  derives its sui‐generis status largely from this 'ODA' (Official Development Assistance) remit.    Education  The  ODA  remit  of  ITC  is  reflected  in  the  (entirely  English‐taught)  educational  programmes  and  its  target group: international students with hands‐on experience who already have a Bachelor's degree  or equivalent. ITC students are, on average, ten years older than the rest of the student body at UT.  They  also  live  in  their  own  accommodation  in  the  centre  of  Enschede.  The  core  of  the  educational  curriculum  consists  of  accredited  MSc  and  PhD  degrees.  The  institute  also  runs  an  (accredited)      Master's programme in higher professional education, along with postgraduate diploma programmes  and short courses. There is no Bachelor's programme at present because the traditional target group  21 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

is mid‐career professionals. Other important educational ventures ‐ offshoots of the ODA remit ‐ are  the Joint Education Programmes with international partners.     Research  Education and research are closely intertwined at ITC. From 1 January 2010 the research will not be  managed and coordinated by a research institute ‐ as is customary at UT ‐ but by the faculty dean  who has, to all intents and purposes, the same powers as a director of a UT research institute. But in  no way will ITC be an odd‐man‐out. The new rector, Professor Tom Veldkamp, certainly expects that  integration  with  UT  will  raise  the  standard  of  research  at  his  faculty  even  further.  As  UT  staff        members, the professors will be accorded independent rights to confer doctorates. In 2012 a total of  22 researchers received their doctorate degree from UT‐ITC.  As  an  example  below  are  activity  overviews  for  two  departments  of  UT‐ITC  namely  the  earth          observation science department and the earth systems analysis department:  The department of earth observation science at ITC has a long record of knowledge and knowledge  exchange in the domain of remote sensing. The focus is in the remote sensing domain at present on  multispectral images, radar images, and lidar imagery. As the latter is mainly airborne or terrestrial,  the  below  summarizes  some  of  the  recent  achievements  in  satellite  remote  sensing.  To  a  small      degree  the  department  also  addresses  hyperspectral  images.  Key  issues  are  at  this  stage  the          following:   Superresolution  mapping  (SRM).  With  SRM  efforts  are  successfully  done  to  be  able  to       identify within pixel information. On the basis of classification and segmentation techniques  class proportions within pixels can be defined. To some degree it allows to develop and apply  subpixel mapping.    Object based segmentation and classification techniques are being applied successfully and  at an increasing range of applications. Important questions in our research are issues of spa‐ tial data quality of the identified objects. Fuzzy and random set techniques are used for that  purpose.   Multitemporal  remote  sensing  has  been  applied  to  various  studies.  Critical  aspects  such  as  correspondence of flight lines, matching of resolution and changes between the seasons are  taking into account.   Spatial  interpolation  of  missing  values.  Serious  work  is  done  to  fill  the  gaps  in  images.       Starting  with  the  obvious,  small  gaps,  currently  techniques  are  developed  and  applied  to      interpolate larger patches of missing data.   Use of remote sensing imagery in deterministic models. The combination of satellite images  with  field  data  and  deterministic  models  has  made  recently  a  good  step  forward,  where  Bayesian networks have been applied successfully in the difficult modeling of GPP and LAI.    Spatial  data  quality  issues  are  interesting  an  intriguing  in  the  domain  of  remote  sensing.  Starting  with  the  MAUP,  currently  attention  is  shifting  towards  the  IFOV,  registration          precision and the effects of distortions at the earth surface and the atmosphere on derived  products.  In terms of applications, a wide range of topics is addressed. Particular attention has been given to  identifying trees in the city, to LAI and related Biomass determination, whereas at present steps are  made towards hydrological modeling.   The  Department  of  Earth  systems  analysis  has  recently  launched  a  new  research  programme:          4D‐EARTH.  Earth  scientists  at  the  Department  of  Earth  Systems  Analysis  (ESA)  strive  at  providing    reliable earth science information that is used to understand and model earth dynamic processes in  all three dimensions and variation over time. The research aims to find answers to sustainability and  economic  development  issues:  depletion  of  mineral  resources  and  environmental  effects  of           exploitation,  geothermal energy, and mitigation of natural disasters caused by processes in and on  the  earth  surface.  The  departmental  research  is  embedded  in  a  programme  called  4D‐EARTH         

22 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

supported  by  two  chairs:  Sustainable  Energy  and  Georesources  (Prof  van  der  Meer)  and  Natural    Hazards and Disaster Risk Management (Prof Jetten). 

  Dealing with such issues and problem areas requires that adequate spatial and temporal information  on  earth  systems  and  processes  is  available  and  accessible.  A  good  understanding  of  the  earth  systems and processes, their dynamics in time and space, and their influence on society is necessary.  We  combine  this  understanding  with  state  of  the  art  know‐how  in  remote  sensing  and  GIS  technologies,  including  spatio‐temporal  process  modeling,  predictive  modeling  and  geostatistics,  object oriented remote sensing and contextual filtering, hyperspectral remote sensing, airborne and  spaceborne geophysics and geochemistry.   ITC in 2012 organized and hosted (in its building in Enschede) the following conferences/workshops:   Workshop  Cost‐move  Space‐Time  cube  (EU),  11‐12  June  2012,30  participants,  organizer  Menno‐Jan Kraak   SENSE Summer school, 18‐22 June 2012, 100 participants, organizers Paul van Dijk    5th  International  Workshop  on  Catchment  Hydrological  Modelling  and  Data  Assimilation  (CAHMDA‐V), 9 ‐ 13 July 2012, 150 participants, organizer Bob Su   World  Cycling  Research  Forum  (WOCREF  2012),  13‐14  September  2012,    70  participants,      organizer, Martin van Maarseveen   VCWI‐KI Sino‐Dutch Forum, 21 September,150 participants, organizer Bob Su   ITC‐ESA GOCE Solid Earth Workshop, 16‐17 October 2012,70 participants, organizer Mark van  der Meijde    Centre for Geo­Information, Wageningen University & Alterra  Representative: Dr. Jan Clevers  Report written by Dr. Jan Clevers (WU) and Dr. Sander Mücher (Alterra)    

23 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

The  Centre  for  Geo‐Information  (CGI)  is  a  joint  undertaking  of  the  laboratory  of  Geo‐Information  Science  and  Remote  Sensing  (http://www.geo‐informatie.nl)  of  Wageningen  University  and  the     department  of  Geo‐Information  (http://www.wageningenur.nl/en/Expertise‐Services/Research‐ Institutes/alterra/About‐Alterra/Teams‐Alterra/Earth‐observation.htm)  of  Alterra.  The  Centre  for  Geo‐Information  comprises  two  full  chairs:  Geo‐Information  Science  with  special  emphasis  on  GIS,  Prof.  dr.  ir.  A.K.  (Arnold)  Bregt,  and  Geo‐Information  Science  with  special  emphasis  on  Remote      Sensing, Prof. dr. M. (Martin) Herold. In addition, one chair is affiliated with the Centre, namely the  former  remote  sensing  chair  holder  Prof.  Dr.  Michael  Schaepman,  who  is  now  at  the  University  of  Zurich.  The  Centre  focuses  on  education,  fundamental  research  and  applied  research  within  the    Geo‐Information domain.  Concerning education the centre is in particular focused on the Master programme Geo‐Information  Science (http://www.mgi.wur.nl/UK). Besides the MSc Geo‐Information Science, we also participate  in  the  part‐time  MSc  in  Geographical  Information  Management  and  Applications  (GIMA)  (http://www.msc‐gima.nl). PhD research is mainly affiliated with the C.T. de Wit Graduate School of  Production Ecology & Resource Conservation (PE&RC) (http://www.pe‐rc.nl).  Research within the Laboratory of Geo‐Information Science and Remote Sensing (GRS) has been fed  from a steadily growth of the geo‐information market for science, services and policy. Although this  market  initially  was  driven  by  separately  evolving  strategies  in  separate  segments,  nowadays         geo‐information  science  has  become  a  multidisciplinary  and  collaborative  scientific  environment.  This  trend  is  reflected  in  the  activities  of  the  GRS‐group  of  Wageningen  University  that  includes  about  40  researchers.  Research  always  has  a  fundamental  character,  but  with  a  clear  link  to  the  Wageningen  application  fields.  Research  activities  include  spatial  data  infrastructures,  spatial  data  modelling,  geo‐visualization,  quantitative  remote  sensing,  and  national,  European  and  global  scale  land  mapping  and  monitoring.  Staff  is  working  in  collaboration  with  various  national  and                  international  research  institutions  and  organizations,  including  the  government  and  private  sectors  to  provide  research  in  geo‐information  science  in  order  to  support  policy  development  and  the      design and management of rural areas at various scale levels.  Main fields of research activities within GRS:  Remote Sensing Science  This  field  deals  with  quantitative,  physical  and  statistical  based  retrieval  of  land  surface            parameters  relevant  for  multiple  monitoring  applications  and  earth  system  modelling  and  with  improved in‐situ data analysis for the next generation remote sensing data and products.  Spatial Data Infrastructure & Sensors  This field of research focuses on two major connected themes: spatial data infrastructures and  geosensor networks.  Integrated Land Monitoring  This  field  deals  with  the  human  impact  on  the  Earth’s  surface  in  terms  of  biodiversity,  climate  and social‐economic processes.  Society, Space and Decision  This  field  of  research  focuses  on  two  major  themes.  The  first  theme  is  a  physically  and               statistically oriented theme "spatial analysis". The other theme aims at society oriented research  within the theme "Geo‐Information (GI) and society".  Global context & societal benefits of Earth Observation  This  field  deals  with  solutions  for  policy  needs  and  the  increasing  role  of  earth  observation  in  monitoring, reporting and verification. Moreover, it deals with harmonization and validation for  large‐area land cover assessments.  Notable activities: 

24 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 PhD  graduation  Rogier  de  Jong,  “Analysis  of  vegetation‐activity  trends  in  a  global  land        degradation framework” (http://edepot.wur.nl/210966).   PhD  graduation  Marion  Obbink,  “Functional  classification  of  spatially  heterogeneous           environments:  the  Land  Cover  Mosaic  approach  in  remote  sensing”  (http://edepot.wur.nl/176596)   Global  Observation  for  Forest  Cover  and  Land  Dynamics  (GOFC/GOLD)  is  a  coordinated       international effort working to provide ongoing space‐based and in‐situ observations of the  land  surface  for  the  sustainable  management  of  terrestrial  resources  and  to  obtain  an          accurate,  reliable,  quantitative  understanding  of  the  terrestrial  carbon  budget.  The  ESA  GOFC‐GOLD  Land  Cover  Project  Office  (GOFC‐GOLD  LC  PO)  is  hosted  by  Wageningen            University in the Netherlands (http://www.gofcgold.wur.nl)   WU  Terrestrial  Laser  Scanning  Research:  The  scientific  community  has  and  will  witness  a    significant  increase  in  the  availability  of  different  global  satellite  derived  biophysical  data  sets. However, the use of such data is currently not supported by accurate in‐situ biophysical  measurements in both a research and operational context for the monitoring of forest and  land  dynamics.  Terrestrial  LiDAR  is  a  ground‐based  remote  sensing  technique  that  can          retrieve the 3D vegetation structure in high detail (http://www.lidar.wur.nl).   WU Laboratory Goniometer System is available for performing multi‐angular measurements  under  controlled  illumination  conditions.  A  commercially  available  robotic  arm  enables  the  acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time  span.  In  addition,  the  set‐up  enables  assessment  of  anisotropic  reflectance  and  emittance  behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition  of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a  thermal  camera  allows  directional  observations  of  the  thermal  emittance.  The  speed  and  flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniome‐ ters.   WU Unmanned Airborne Remote Sensing Facility has been established since autumn 2012.  The  facility  includes  a  multicopter  and  fixed  wing  platform  and  several  high‐resolution      cameras and a hyperspectral sensor system. The added value of this facility is that compared  to  for  example  satellite  based  remote  sensing  more  dedicated  science  experiments  can  be  prepared. This includes for example higher frequent image acquisitions in time (e.g., diurnal  observations),  observations  of  an  object  under  different  observation  angels  for                     characterization  of  BRDF  and  flexibility  in  use  of  camera  and  sensor  types.  In  this  way,       laboratory type of set‐ups can be tested in a field situation and effects of up‐scaling can be  tested.   WU Time series analysis research: More detailed and long time series of satellite images are  available (Landsat, AVHRR, MODIS). Methods to analyse these data sets are urgently needed  to better understand impacts of climate change on vegetation and automatically detect and  characterize the impact of natural disasters (floods, fires, droughts). We have developed an  open‐source  toolbox  for  detecting  and  characterizing  change  (http://bfast.r‐forge.r‐ project.org). Detecting disturbances (e.g. deforestation events) in near real‐time is one of the  key focuses of current research.  Within the Centre, Alterra has recently formed a new team Earth Observation and Environmental  Informatics (co‐ordinated by S. Janssen & C.A. Mücher, http://www.earthobservation.eu). A number  of  remote  sensing  activities  have  been  identified  which  can  be  regarded  as  the  core  expertise  of    Alterra‐CGI: 

25 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Crop  yield  monitoring  and  Food  Security.  Core  objectives  here  are:  1)  the  use  of  RS  derived           observations  for  improved  crop  modeling  and  crop  yield  forecasting  through  data  assimilation  and  recalibration  techniques;  2)  the  direct  use  of  remote  sensing  derived  indicators  in  crop  yield          forecasting  systems  through  statistical  approaches.  Additionally,  RS  techniques  are  used  for          stratification  of  spatial  domains  and  (qualitative)  validation  of  crop  model  parameter  settings          (e.g.  sowing  dates).  A  characteristic  of  the  research  done  in  this  domain  is  that  there  has  been  an  emphasis on near‐realtime application and that analysis techniques and the research approach has  been designed with NRT in mind.  Vegetation  dynamics.  The  core  objective  is  to  obtain  a  better  spatial  identification  and                    characterization  of  habitats  and  landscapes  using  RS  derived  indicators.  Integration  of  RS  derived  information  with  other  spatial  data  sources  and  in‐situ  data  plays  a  crucial  role.  For  example,  the  improved spatial identification of European habitats (inside and outside protected areas) by habitat  modeling  with  RS  indicators  provides  a  better  basis  for  habitat  monitoring  and  design  of                   Pan‐European Ecological Network (PEEN). A better characterization of European landscapes in terms  of landscape  structural elements  derived from RS, next  to habitat identification, leads to improved  ecological  modelling.  For  example,  used  as  important  variables  for  ecological  dispersal  and            population  modelling  (e.g.  with  LARCH  model).    Concerning  time‐series  analyses,  expertise  is  well  developed on analyses of RS time‐series focuses on techniques for cleaning, filtering and information  extraction  from  time‐series  of  RS  data  mainly  provided  by  sensors  as  like  SPOT‐VGT,  MODIS  and  NOAA‐AVHRR. The expertise is applied in several projects such as Ecochange (trends in phenology),  China‐drought (land surface temperature and vegetation anomaly detection for drought monitoring),  Land  degradation  in  the  Sahel,  Geoland‐Carbon  (validation  of  global  carbon  models)  and  eSOTER  (PhD Rogier de Jong). The techniques that have been developed are currently applied to analyses of  sowing  windows  for  global  crop  models,  drought  monitoring  and  prediction,  and  analysis  of           vegetation dynamic change in relation to climate change (e.g. EU‐FP7 CEOP‐AEGIS).  Drought  monitoring.  Deriving  land  surface  energy  balance  components  mainly  using  the  optical  spectral domain has been a long standing area of research. Surface energy balance models, e.g. SEBI,  SEBAL, SEBS, S‐SEBI and a dual‐source model, have been developed by the researchers. Expertise has  been  developed  on  the  application  of  the  approaches  for  surface  energy  balance  (as  further  step  evapotranspiration) mapping at  different temporal  and spatial scales through various projects over  the past and currently on‐going (EU‐FP7 CEOP‐AEGIS, AQUASTRESS, etc). Highly specialized radiative  transfer  models  to  retrieve  both  atmospheric  variables  (atmospheric  volumetric  water  content,     aerosol  optical  depth  etc.)  and  land  surface  variables  (directional  fractional  cover,  land  surface       temperature, and soil and vegetation component temperatures etc.) using multi‐angular and multi‐ spectral radiometric observations have been developed and evaluated. An image simulation system  for the thermal infrared domain has been developed and applied to several ESA projects. The system  can be used to simulate the processes of radiative transfer and heat and water exchanges within the  canopy  and  between  the  land  surface  and  the  overlying  atmosphere,  in  turn  the  bottom  of             atmosphere  (BOA)  TIR  images.  By  combining  with  atmospheric  profiles,  Top‐Of‐Atmosphere  (TOA)  TIR images can be generated.  Land  monitoring.  Considerable  expertise  has  been  obtained  on  land  use/cover  mapping  and          monitoring  in  projects  such  as  LGN,  CORINE  Landcover,  PELCOM  and  GLC2000.  CGI  creates  and     maintains the LGN national land use database (http://www.lgn.nl, now version 6 is already available)  and  CORINE  land  cover  database  for  the  Netherlands  (1990,  2000,  2006)  which  gives  a  strategic     advantage  for  many  projects.  This  knowledge  is  also  used  and  combined  in  more  advanced  (and     partially  derived)  products  such  as  the  European  Landscape  Classification  (LANMAP,  http://www.alterra.wur.nl/UK/research/Specialisation+Geo‐Information/Projects/lanmap2).   Notable activities: 

26 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 Octocopter Altura AT8 has been acquired together with multispectral TETRACAM for direct  acquisition of imagery over specific terrains. Processing chain is being set‐up is collaboration  with Wageningen University. Hyperspectral camera will be acquired by WU in 2013. 

  Figure 1. Recently acquired 3D imagery with Octocopter over Dutch BIOSOS test site showing recent             deforestation. 

 Co‐ordination  EU‐FP7  project  MOCCCASIN  (till  2014).  The  MOCCCASIN  project  targets  the  development of a monitoring system for estimating planted area, growth and yield of winter‐ wheat in the Tula region in Russia. It aims to achieve this through satellite mapping of winter‐ wheat  fields  and  agro‐meteorological  modelling  combined  with  satellite  estimates  of  crop  biophysical variables.   EU‐FP7 BIOSOS: “BIOdiversity Multi‐Source Monitoring System: from Space TO Species” (till  2014). BIO_SOS is a pilot project for effective and timely multi‐annual monitoring of NATURA  2000  sites  and  their  surrounding  in  support  to  management  decisions  in  sample  areas  in  Europe and  Brazil and for the reporting on status  and trends according to  National and EU  obligations.  The  aim  of  BIO_SOS  is  two‐fold:  1)  the  development  and  validation  of  a            prototype  multi‐modular  system  to  provide  a  reliable  long  term  biodiversity  monitoring      service at high to very high‐spatial resolution; 2) to embed monitoring information (changes)  in innovative ecological (environmental) modelling for Natura 2000 site management.   Preparations have been started for CORINE land cover 2012 for the Netherlands   Preparations have been started for version 7 of the National Land Use Database ‐ LGN7, see  also www.lgn.nl.   EU‐FP7 project HELM: Harmonised European Land Monitoring. The overall objective of HELM  is to initiate a move that will make European land monitoring more productive by increasing  the  alignment  of  national  and  subnational  level  land  monitoring  endeavours  and  enabling  their integration to a coherent European LULC data set.    EU‐FP7  project  AGRICAB  (till  2014).  AGRICAB  aims  to  enhance  agriculture  and  forestry      planning and management processes in Africa through strengthened Earth Observation (EO)  Capacity and better exploitation of satellite data available through GEONETCast. The project  contributes  to  a  sustained  EO  data  provision  and  a  continued  exploitation  and  access  to       satellite data available through GEONETCast and ITC. Twinning partnerships between African  and  European  institutes  improves  integration  of  Earth  observation  in  predictive  models  for  management purposes. Alterra works together with DRSRS (Kenya), CSE (Senegal), and INAM  (Mozambique)  for  what  concerns  monitoring  and  yield  forecasting  of  food  crops.  Through  the African specialized institutes, CGIAR/ILRI and its partners ASARECA, FANRPAN and FARA a  link  is  established  between  the  research  efforts  and  the  policy.  The  obtained  results  are  broadcasted to member states of OSS (Tunisia), RCMRD (Kenya) and AGRHYMET (Niger). 

27 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 EU‐FP7 project E‐AGRI (till 2014). The E‐AGRI project aims to support the uptake of European  ICT  research  results  by  setting  up  an  advanced  crop  monitoring  service  in  two  developing  economies, Morocco and China. The activities of capacity building will be carried out in the  third  developing  country,  Kenya,  to  raise  the  interest  of  local  stakeholders  on  European       agricultural  practices  and  to  pave  the  way  for  an  eventual  technological  transfer  in  the         future.   MARSOP3, service contract from JRC. The main goal of the MARSOP3‐project is to monitor  weather  and  crop  conditions  during  the  current  growing  season  and  to  estimate  final  crop  yields  for  Europe  and  other  continents  by  harvest  time.  To  facilitate  the  monitoring  and       estimation,  tools  ranging  from  remote  sensing  techniques  to  agro‐meteorological  models  (CGMS,  FAO‐WSI)  are  applied.  Immediate  users  of  the  projections  are  the  European              Directorate  General  for  Agriculture  and  Rural  Development  and  the  EuropeAid  Office.         The  MARS  project  also  has  links  with  the  Food  and  Agriculture  Organization  of  the  United    Nations  (FAO)  and  national  research  organisations,  such  as  in  China.  More  information  can  be obtained through the URL: www.marsop.info   QUICKS, service contract from EEA. A policy support system allowing decision makers to play  with choices as they do in their day‐to‐day work. The modelling system offers a ‘quick scan’  method  to  evaluate  within  a  short  period  of  time  integrated  issues.    QUICKS  is  a  modular  modelling environment supporting indicator‐ and ecosystem service quantification at various  spatial‐  and  temporal  scales  by  relating  reasoning  rules  to  each  other  and  to  spatial  data.  QUICKS is a generic modeling environment and has been applied in the fields of landscape,  ecology, nature, agriculture, hydrology, integrated studies and is currently being applied for  the green economy and green infrastructure. We use QUICKS both for the expert’s desktop  as well as in participatory planning and modelling   GYGA yield Gap Atlas. Contract with Bill Gates Foundation. This project will provide the first  easily accessible, transparent, reproducible, and agronomic accurate web‐based platform to  estimate  exploitable  gaps  in  yield  and  water  productivity  for  the  world’s  major  food  crops,  enabling  policy‐makers  and  funders  to  identify  regions  with  the  greatest  potential  to            sustainably increase global food supply. The Atlas and all underpinning data will be available  on the websites of the University of Nebraska Water for Food Institute and the Wageningen  University, as a resource for scientists, policy makers and others worldwide. Thus, the project  directly  aligns  with  Gates  Foundation’s  Global  Development  strategies  related  to                 “Agricultural  Development”  and  “Policy  and  Advocacy.”  This  alignment  is  a  result  of  an        emphasis on analyzing data to improve decision‐making and research prioritization; building  web‐based  platforms  that  compile  and  disseminate  data;  encouraging  greater  investment  and  involvement  in  agricultural  development;  and  capacity‐building  efforts  in  Sub‐Saharan  African and South Asia.  Workshops/conferences hosted in 2012:   Workshop “Step‐wise approaches for national forest monitoring and REDD+ MRV capacity  development”, 3‐5 September, 2012, Wageningen, Netherlands   The “REDD+SCIENCE+GOVERNANCE” symposium, 10‐13 April, 2012, Wageningen,             Netherlands   Workshop “Sensing a Changing World 2”, 9‐11 May 2012, Wageningen, Netherlands    Upcoming events in 2013:   GOFC‐GOLD Symposium, 15‐19 April 2013, Wageningen, Netherlands  (http://www.gofcgold.wur.nl)       

28 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands  Representative: Prof. Steven M. de Jong  Report written by: Steven M. de Jong, Edwin H. Husanadjaja, Niko Wanders & Elisabeth A. Addink    Introduction  The  Faculty  of  Geosciences  of  Utrecht  University  in  The  Netherlands  is  a  successful  research  and    educational  organisation  (www.geo.uu.nl).  The  Faculty  has  four  departments:  Physical  Geography,  Earth Sciences, Human Geography & Planning and Innovation & Environmental Sciences. The faculty  has 5 bachelor programs, 16 master programs and a total of 2300 students. The remote sensing, GIS  and  geostatistical  research  and  educational  activities  are  mainly  housed  in  the  Department  of      Physical Geography. In the past year we continued our research work on applied remote sensing for  soil  moisture  and  groundwater  monitoring  using  microwave  remote  sensing,  plague  surveillance  using optical earth observation and imaging spectrometry activities for mapping vegetation and soil  properties. Below we present some examples of new projects and ongoing research projects.    1. PhD project: Use of soil‐moisture remote sensing products to assess groundwater  Dr Edwin H. Sutanudjaja obtained on December 14th, 2012 his doctorate title of Utrecht University on  this  project.  In  this  study  the  possibilities  of  using  spaceborne  remote  sensing  for  large‐scale  groundwater  modeling  are  explored  in  the  context  of  a  soil  moisture  product  called  European       Remote  Sensing  Soil  Water  Index  (ERS  SWI)  representing  the  upper  profile  soil  moisture.  As  a         test‐bed,  we  used  the  Rhine‐Meuse  basin,  covering  ±200000  km2  and  having  abundant  in‐situ  groundwater  head  observations.  The  thesis  explores  the  potential  of  using  SWI  in  an  empirical      transfer function‐noise (TFN) model and in a physically‐based model PCR‐GLOBWB‐MOD.   First  it  is  shown  that  there  is  correlation  between  groundwater  head  and  SWI  dynamics,  which  is  apparent  mostly  for  shallow  groundwater  areas.  For  deep  groundwater  areas,  the  correlation  may  become apparent if delay time is considered. Given such correlation, head predictions based on SWI  should be feasible. Hence, we performed two exercises in which SWI time series were used as TFN  model input. For the first exercise ‐ focusing on temporal forecasting, the parameters were calibrated  based  on  head  measurements  in  the  period  1995‐2000.  Then,  the  forecasts  were  validated  in  the  period 2004‐2007. In the second exercise ‐ aiming for spatio‐temporal prediction, model parameters  were predicted by using a digital elevation map. Using these estimated parameters, spatio‐temporal  head  prediction  was  created.  Both  exercises  show  that  observed  head  dynamics  can  be  well          simulated,  especially  for  shallow  groundwater  where  its  fluctuations  correlate  to  soil  moisture      dynamics.  In this study we also introduce a physically‐based and coupled groundwater‐land surface model PCR‐ GLOBWB‐MOD (1 km resolution), built by using only global datasets. We started building it by modi‐ fying  PCR‐GLOBWB  land  surface  model  and  then  performing  its  daily  simulation  to  estimate       groundwater  recharge  and  river  discharge.  Subsequently,  a  MODFLOW  groundwater  model  was    created  and  forced  by  the  recharge  and  water  levels  calculated  by  the  land  surface  model.  Results  are  promising  despite  the  fact  that  an  offline  coupling  procedure  was  still  used  (i.e.  both  models  were  sequentially  simulated).  The  model  can  reproduce  the  observed  discharge  and  groundwater  head reasonably well.  We  also  introduce  the  online‐coupled  version  of  PCR‐GLOBWB‐MOD  including  a  two‐way  feedback  between surface water and groundwater dynamics and between groundwater and upper soil stores,  enabling groundwater to sustain upper soil moisture states and fulfil evaporation demand (during dry  conditions). For this online coupled model, we explored the possibility of using SWI to calibrate it by  performing more than three thousand runs with various parameter sets and evaluating their results  against  discharge,  SWI  and  head  data.  From  these  runs,  we  conclude  that  SWI  can  be  used  for       calibrating upper soil saturated conductivity, affecting groundwater recharge. However, it is difficult 

29 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

to calibrate the model by using SWI only. Discharge data should be included to resolve equifinality  problems  of  fitting  soil  moisture  dynamics  and  to  constrain  aquifer  transmissivities  and  runoff‐ infiltration  partitioning.  Moreover,  head  measurements  are  important  to  capture  finer  resolution  heterogeneity, which cannot be captured by current resolution of spaceborne soil moisture products  (50 km).  Further Reading:   Sutanudjaja  E.H.,  2012,  The  use  of  soil‐moisture  products  for  large‐scale  groundwater       modelling  and  assessment.  Utrecht  Studies  in  Earth  Sciences  series  025  (USES  025).             PhD thesis, 185pp.   Sutanudjaja  E.H.,  S.M.  de  Jong,  M.F.P.  Bierkens  &  F.C  van  Geer,  Using  ERS  spaceborne          microwave  soil  moisture  observations  to  predict  groundwater  heads  in  space  and  time.       Remote Sensing of Environment, under review.   Sutanudjaja E.H., L.P.H. van Beek, S.M. de Jong, M.F.P. Bierkens & F.C van Geer, 2011, Large  scale  groundwater  modeling  using  globally  available  datasets:  a  test  for  the  Rhine‐Meuse     basin. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 8(2) 2255‐2608.    2. PhD project: Improving near real‐time flood forecasting using multi‐sensor soil moisture assess‐ ment   In  collaboration  with  the  Joint  Research  Centre  in  Ispra,  Italy  we  investigate  the  possibilities  of  re‐ mote sensing to assist and improve flood forecasting. Niko Wanders is the PhD candidate working on  this project funded by NWO/SRON‐GO and the European Commission. Flooding is a major environ‐ mental problem in various parts of the world. The European Commission is developing an early warn‐ ing  system  referred  to  as  EFAS:  European  Flood  Forecasting  System.  EFAS  combines  near  real‐time  meteorological  and  river  flow  observations,  ensemble  weather  forecasts,  land  cover  maps,  soil  in‐ formation and topographical information in the LISFLOOD model. The EFAS‐LISFLOOD modelling sys‐ tem produces for any location along the main European rivers discharge forecasts and soil moisture  for 10 days. One of the weaker points in the EFAS‐EDO approach is the lack of reliable information on  the  surface  soil  moisture  dynamics.  Initial  soil  moisture  is  an  important  variable  because  it  deter‐ mines how much water can be stored in the soil before runoff starts. Currently, soil moisture status is  computed using a water balance approach with data from meteorological stations as input. However,  such soil moisture estimates suffer from model uncertainty transferred to errors in flood forecasts.  Consequently,  if  additional  remotely  sensed  soil  moisture  data  were  used  to  improve  estimates  of  soil  moisture  status,  flood  forecasts  are  expected  to  improve.  The  objective  of  this  study  is  to  im‐ prove the LISFLOOD soil moisture module by using SMOS, ASCAT and AMSR‐E derived daily soil mois‐ ture maps. Remote sensing is used here to improve model input, to improve model parameterisation  through model calibration and to improve state estimation through data assimilation. Figure 1 shows  some first results showing the correlation and errors of satellite‐measured top soil moisture contents  and ground‐based soil moisture measurements of the REMEDHUS datasets in Spain.  The correlation values are highest in the South‐Western part of Spain for all three satellite products  and lowest in the North‐Eastern locations for SMOS and ASCAT. AMSR‐E shows low R values in the  Northwest and high R values in the South and interior of Spain. Error values are lowest in Northern  and  central  Spain  with  some  high  to  very  high  values  for  AMSR‐E  and  SMOS  in  the  North‐Western  locations due to the proximity of the sea in combination with increased vegetation and topography  Further Reading:   Wanders  N.,  D.  Karssenberg,  M.F.P.  Bierkens,  R.M.  Parinussa,  R.A.M.  de  Jeu,  J.C.  van  Dam,  S.M.  de  Jong,  2012,  Observation  uncertainty  of  satellite  soil  moisture  products  determined  with physically‐based modeling. Remote Sensing of Environment 127, pp.341‐356.   

30 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

  Figure 1 Correlation (top) and satellite standard error (bottom) for the three satellite soil moisture products  for the period January 2010–June 2011 over Spain. Meteorological stations are indicated by crosses. 

  3. Collaboration UU and EC‐JRC  The Faculty of Geosciences of Utrecht University and the EC Joint Research Centre already work to‐ gether for over 20 years. Last year the collaboration reached a new phase by the professor appoint‐ ment of Dr APJ de Roo at Utrecht University. De Roo is and will remain Action Leader of the Weather  Driven  Natural  Hazards  activity  on  floods  at  JRC  but  will  additionally  be  involved  in  research  and  teaching at the UU. De Roo is appointment on the chair ‘Hazards and Impact’. De Roo held his inau‐ gural speech on August 31st, 2012 titled ‘Water: potential hazard or economic essence’. An important  part  of  the  collaborative  research  will  be  how  remote  sensing  can  be  used  to  monitor  and  model  natural hazards and to mitigate negative consequences of natural hazards for society.     4. Special Issue Elsevier JAG of the GEOBIA2010 Conference  In  2010  Utrecht  University,  Ghent  University  and  ITC  organised  the  third  GEOBIA  conference         ‘Geographic Object‐Based Image Analysis’ from June 29th until July 2nd  after the previous meetings in  Calgary and Salzburg. GEOBIA2012 took place in Rio de Janeiro and GEOBIA 2014 will be located in  Greece. In January of 2012 a special issue of the International Journal of Applied Earth Observation  and Geoinformation (JAG) based on the conference papers and presentation in Ghent was published.  Nine papers are published presenting new ideas for algorithms, methods and GEOBIA applications in  urban, land cover and vegetation studies.   Three papers are presented within the theme methods for land cover and vegetation mapping:   Thoonen  et  al.  present  a  new  procedure  for  detailed  land  cover  mapping  (24  classes)  of  heath  land  areas  and  compares  object‐based  approaches  with  Markov  Random  Fields.  The  last method proves to be superior over the other for the fine‐scale land cover patches in this  study area.   Lizarazo  introduces  the  concept  of  fuzzy  segmentation  of  images  as  an  alternative  for          discrete  land  cover  classification  and  change  analysis.  The  method  is  illustrated  by  an           example  of  land‐cover  mapping  (impervious  areas)  using  Landsat  TM  images  of  1990  and  2000 acquired over a study area in Maryland, USA. The use of the fuzzy approach increased  the accuracy of impervious area mapping.   Chen  et  al.  present  a  novel  method  for  forest  parameter  estimation  (canopy  height,        aboveground biomass and stand volume) by integrating QuickBird imagery with transects of  airborne LIDAR data and by applying image segmentation at the individual tree crown level 

31 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

The next three papers present novel approaches for urban‐related studies.   Doxani  et  al.  monitor  urban  changes  in  Thessaloniki  in  Greece  using  multi‐temporal              QuickBird  and  IKONOS  imagery.  The  novel  method  first  applies  morphological  filtering        embedded  in  an  object‐based  classification  scheme  and  next  uses  multivariate  alteration     detection to identify changes at the individual building and roof level with high precision.   Stow  et  al.  investigate  the  histograms  of  different  urban  and  land  cover  objects  after           segmentation and next, apply a histogram curve matching method to compare and classify  various urban areas visible in a Quickbird image of the city of Accra in Ghana. Results show  that  image  object  histograms  can  have  distinct  different  shapes  and  properties  for  urban  classes and that they are useful for classifying urban areas.   Ardila‐Lopez  et al. present a study to identify individual trees in QuickBird images acquired  over  two  cities  in  the  Netherlands.  A  framework  comprising  seven  approaches  of                  object‐based analysis is introduced e.g. to mask out grassland, to identify trees along roads  or trees in groups. Although the proposed method comprises still a lot of manual work, the  approach seems promising for mapping individual tree crowns in complex urban areas.  The next three papers introduce new algorithms or methods for GEOBIA.   Laliberte  et  al.  worked  on  an  important  issue  in  object‐based  image  analysis  i.e.  feature       selection  (spectral  bands,  object  spatial  properties,  contextual  and  textural  properties)  for  vegetation  mapping  at  fine  resolution  using  very  high  spatial  resolution  (6  cm)  airborne       imagery.  Three  feature  selection  methods  are  compared  and  evaluated.  Classification  Tree  Analysis proved best for their application and study area.   Muad and Foody present  a super‐resolution  mapping approach to extract objects i.e. lakes  from  multi‐temporal  Landsat  ETM+  and  MODIS  images  of  a  study  area  in  Quebec,  Canada.  Two  super  resolution  mapping  methods  were  evaluated,  the  Hopfield  neural  network  ap‐ proach and a new multi‐temporal halftoning technique. The new method appeared superior  in identifying lakes and characterizing their shape. Although this super‐resolution mapping is  a bit far from the conventional approach of object‐based mapping, we believe the proposed  method integrates the spatial domain in image analysis in a very interesting way.    Zabala et al. present an interesting study on the effect of eight different levels of image com‐ pression on the information loss of segmentation‐based image classification results. The im‐ portance of such study is obvious since the data volumes collected by remote sensing sen‐ sors are enormous. Their main conclusion is that compression levels of 40:1 or higher lead to  unacceptable loss of information.  The nine full papers and introduction to the topic are available in:   Addink  E.A.,  F.M.B.  Van  Coillie  &  S.M.  de  Jong,  2012,  From  Pixels  to  Geographic  Objects  in  Remote  Sensing  Image  Analysis.  International  Journal  for  Applied  Earth  Observation  and  Geo‐information 15, 1‐6 (Special issue GEOBIA 2010 Ghent).      Freek van der Meer  University of Twente, Faculty ITC  f.d.vandermeer@utwente.nl       

32 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 

News from Other Organisations  Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth  (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences    The  Institute  of  Remote  Sensing  and  Digital  Earth  (RADI),  Chinese             Academy of Sciences (CAS), founded in 2012, is a comprehensive research  organization for promoting the development of cutting‐edge scientific research and meeting national  strategic  demands  in  the  fields  of  remote  sensing,  Earth  Observation  and  Digital  Earth.  RADI  was  established  as  a  major  initiative  through  consolidating  two  CAS  institutes:  the  Institute  of  Remote  Sensing Applications and the Center for Earth Observation and Digital Earth.  RADI has 9 laboratories or research centers at national or CAS level, 2 national key infrastructures for  spaceborne and airborne Earth Observation (hosted China Remote Sensing Satellite Ground Station  and  CAS  Airborne  Remote  Sensing  Center)  ,  and  4  international  S  &  T  platforms  supported  by  UNESCO  or  ICSU.  In  terms  of  human  resources,  RADI  has  a  team  of  about  700  researchers  or          engineers, including 96 professors and 173 associate professors. With one postdoctoral program and  six doctoral and master’s programs, it currently has more than 500 graduate students.   RADI has become China’s important institution in the geospatial information field, with competence  in  various  key  areas,  including  spaceborne‐airborne‐ground  remote  sensing  data  acquisition  and  processing, basic research in remote sensing and geospatial information science, Digital Earth science  platform and information analysis on global environment and resources. RADI also has a competent  research  team  covering  a  broad  spectrum  of  academic  disciplines,  and  S&T  international                 collaboration.  The  competence  enjoyed  by  RADI  is  the  very  foundation  on  which  we  build  and        develop our institute.     Strategic Positioning   Exploring  leading  technologies  in  Earth  Observation,  geospatial  information  science,  and  the       mechanisms for acquiring and disseminating remote sensing information; Constructing and operating  major  Earth  observation  infrastructures  and  the  spaceborne‐airborne‐ground  Earth  observation  technology system; Enhancing its capacity for providing spatial information on natural resources and  the  environment  at  regional  and  global  scale  creating  a  Digital  Earth  scientific  platform;  thereby     creating a comprehensive, world‐class research institute.  Anticipated Breakthrough Progress     Developing a spaceborne‐airborne‐ground‐based Earth Observation system   Building a multi‐station satellite receiving system covering the entire Chinese territory and even the  whole  world,  a  high‐performance  airborne  remote  sensing  system,  and  a  system  for  ground‐based  remote  sensing  experiments;  Making  breakthroughs  in  key  technologies  such  as  global  high‐speed  acquisition  of  remote  sensing  satellite  data,  airborne  multi‐payload  integration,  quasi‐real‐time      processing  of  mass  data,  web‐based  high‐speed  data  transmission  and  service;  Developing  an        information  processing  platform  for  comprehensive  applications,  payload  experiments,  and           validation.    Establishing a global spatial information system on resources and the environment  Carrying  out  studies  in  key  technologies  of  earth  observation  information  processing,  including  mechanisms  for  acquiring  and  distributing  geospatial  information  and  retrieving  key  parameters  of  earth observing objects, data assimilation and data‐intensive computing, web‐based organization of  multi‐source  heterogeneous  mass  data,  computing  integration  of  spatio‐temporal  process  in  earth 

33 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

science,  multi‐dimensional  presentation  and  multi‐user  collaboration  for  Earth  system  analyses;  Building up a system to safeguard national space information; Developing a system to guarantee the  national space information, providing national decision‐makers with quasi‐real‐time information for  the environment, resources and emergency response at the global level, constructing a platform for  Digital Earth science and advancing geospatial information science.    Devising an advanced simulation system for Earth Observation  Probing  into  fundamentals  of  Earth  observation  in  all‐band,  multi‐platform,  multi‐scale  spatio‐ temporal, multi‐polar, and multi‐angle analyses; Exploring mechanisms of remote sensing to address  key factors of the Earth’s system, including land, oceans, and the atmosphere, and demonstration of  remote sensing mechanism; Developing a standardized production and validation system for satellite  information  products,  simulating  remote  sensing  data  and  information  products,  integrating  Earth  observation  and  relevant  information  communication  technologies,  and  setting  up  an  advanced  a  simulation system for Earth observation.   Major Research Directions to Be Fostered          

Space data‐intensive science and big data technology;  Mechanisms and methods of spaceborne and airborne intelligent Earth Observation;  Space information simulation of Earth system processes;  Comparative studies of global environmental between the earth and other planets and,  Geospatial information science.  

The RADI Headquarters 

  Contact  No.9 Dengzhuang South Road, Haidian District,  Beijing 100094, China  Tel: +86‐10‐82178008   Fax: +86‐10‐82178009  Email: office@radi.ac.cn  Website: www.radi.ac.cn 

34 

Prof. Dr. Changlin WANG  Director, International Academic Division  Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth,  Chinese Academy of Sciences  wcl@ceode.ac.cn 

   


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

GEO Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services related activities  

By Georgios Sarantakos (GEO Secretariat)   

Introduction  Parties  to  the  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity  (CBD)  are  committed  to  updating  their  National  Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans and to review and assess the information they have to assess  progress  against  the  20  Aichi  Targets  of  the  Strategic  Plan  for  Biodiversity  2011‐2020.  Many           countries, however, do not yet have sufficient capacity for gathering and making systematic use of  biodiversity‐relevant observations and applying analytical tools to use these observations to detect  biodiversity change. This can limit their ability to design, implement and review the effectiveness of  interventions aimed to counteract biodiversity loss, and, therefore, limit their ability to reach the 20  targets for 2020.  Furthermore,  even  for  the  countries  that  have  the  tools  and  capacities,  there  is  not  always             interoperability  among  the  national  biodiversity  monitoring  products  and  coordination  among  the    in‐country  capacity  building  activities.  Therefore,  the  global  and/or  regional  impact  on  the              biodiversity status of these ongoing national and sub‐national biodiversity activities is difficult to be  accurately assessed. This prevents the policy makers and the experts from identifying and analyzing  the global biodiversity and ecosystem services knowledge and capacity gaps, assessing for instance  the  progress  towards  the  achievement  of  the  2015  Aichi  Targets.  The  development  of  global  and  regional  thematic  or  integrated  tools  is  required  for  the  measurement  of  the  regional  and  global  status and trends of biodiversity and ecosystem services in a cost and time efficient way. However,  these activities lack sufficient financial support in order to be effective.  For this purpose, the GEO Secretariat in consultation with the CBD Secretariat prepared a report that  aims at addressing this issue, by presenting an overview of the ongoing or due to be developed by  2015 GEO biodiversity and ecosystems services related projects. 1  Background information  In  order  to  address  the  lack  of  global,  regional  and  national  biodiversity  and  ecosystem  services  monitoring  issues  mentioned  above,  the  Intergovernmental  Organization  Group  on  Earth               Observations (GEO), in close collaboration with the CBD Secretariat, has initiated an effort to better  meet  the  needs  of  Parties  to  the  CBD.  This  effort  mobilizes  the  entire  GEO  community  in  the          production and dissemination of biodiversity and ecosystem‐related products, tools and services and  the development of capacity building activities. The concept note of this initiative was presented at  the  eleventh  Conference  of  the  Parties  to  the  Convention  on  Biological  Diversity  (COP  11)  as  an      information document 2 .  Under  the  umbrella  of  GEO  experts  from  different  communities,  focused  on  environmental            management  and  human  well‐being,  join  forces  in  order  to  address  national,  regional  and  global  monitoring  challenges  of  their  sectors  and  tackle  cross‐cutting  issues.  At  this  effort,  the  GEO           Biodiversity  Observation  Network  (GEO  BON)  is  playing  a  leading  role,  with  significant  contribution  though from other GEO biodiversity‐related communities, working on the ecosystem management,  forest  carbon  and  crops  monitoring,  water  and  ocean  health  issues  amongst  else,  that  represent  both the remote sensing and the in‐situ data communities.                                                                    1 2

 For additional information please contact: Georgios Sarantakos (gsarantakos@geosec.org) (GEO Secretariat)   http://www.cbd.int/doc/meetings/cop/cop‐11/information/cop‐11‐inf‐49‐en.pdf 

35 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Structure of the report  For  the  preparation  of  this  report,  the  GEO  Secretariat,  in  close  collaboration  with  the  CBD             Secretariat,  called  the  entire  GEO  community  for  biodiversity‐  and  ecosystem‐services  related       products, tools and services. As a result, the GEO Secretariat received and compiled inputs from 50  Group Leaders from the GEO Biodiversity, Global Land Cover and Ecosystem communities expressed  in 19 thematic or region‐specific projects related to capacity building activities and/or development  of  datasets,  tools,  products  and  services  have  been  received.  In  additional,  the  GEO  Secretariat      compiles  a  list  of  other  biodiversity  and  ecosystem  services‐related  programmes  of  the  work  plan  from the GEO Ocean, Water, Forest and Agriculture task. The CBD Secretariat has contributed with  inputs on the kind of information that this report should include in order to assess the benefits of the  activities included for Convention’s Parties and the requirements of the funding mechanisms.  The GEO biodiversity and ecosystem services activities and programmes compiled are presented in a  summary  table  (below).  There  is  a  clear  distinction  between  the  projects  (sent  by  the  GEO           community) and the programmes (compiled by the GEO Secretariat).   Each  of  these  products  and  activities  serves  for  the  monitoring  of  global  or  regional  marine  (dark  blue), freshwater (light blue), or terrestrial (green) species and ecosystems, or all of them (gray).   Also, each of these projects is developed and implemented under one or more components of the  GEO  Biodiversity  Initiative,  in  order  to  ensure  interoperability  among  the  systems  and  avoid           duplications. Therefore, the activities under this effort are organized in four groups as follows:  1. Observation and information datasets, and products   This  component  aims  at  supporting  countries  to  assess  and  fulfill  their  specific  national  needs  for  biodiversity observations and information, to address both national and international commitments.  This  component  will  facilitate  the  sustained  provision  of  observations,  but  will  also  include,  as  needed,  some  or  all  of  the  chain  of  observation  gathering,  data  coordination,  product  generation,  and analysis. Priority will be given to identified, agreed‐upon needs, such as those reflected in treaty  decisions, especially those of the CBD, and the systems and tools to fulfill them cost‐effectively.  2. Capacity Building on observation approaches, database development, analysis and reporting,  and harmonization protocols   This component includes  both the regional and national activities for the building of in‐country ca‐ pacity required for the development of national biodiversity observation and monitoring systems and  the use of the observations, information and products available from the activities in Component 1.  Capacity building includes both institutions and people and covers all parts of the system, from data  collection to processing, analysis, and use. The priority is under‐serviced areas, topics and domains,  which are often in the biodiversity‐rich but information‐poor tropics.  3.  Observation System Research and Development activities   This component aims at supporting the coordination of research activities related to improving the  observation  system  (this  is  not  simply  basic  scientific  research)  and  the  identification  and  filling  of  gaps.  4.  Data access and sharing, outreach and communication   This component connects the GEO Biodiversity Initiative with technical partners on one end and us‐ ers on the other. It may include a) development of a web platform (portal) connected to the GEOSS  Common Infrastructure (GCI), b) development of communication and outreach materials.              36 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Outcome and Next step  As a result of this effort, this report currently includes global marine, terrestrial and freshwater ac‐ tivities,  regional  activities  such  as  in  ASEAN,  Artic,  Asia‐Pacific,  Europe,  Africa,  Amazon,  Third  Pole,  and hot biodiversity spots such as Protected Areas, World reserves, Tropical Forest and Wetlands.     

 

 

  The next step of this effort is, in collaboration with the CBD Secretariat, to undertake a gap analysis  based on the reports of the Parties to the CBD and identify their needs that are not covered by these  activities. In the meantime, this is a living report that keep updated with more activities of the GEO  community.    Scale/Applicability: 

Type/GEO  biodiversity  initiative  component: 

National  (China,  Japan  and  two  African  countries  System  (tbd))/Global  (Wet‐ (prototype)  land)  / C1, C4 

Name: 

Aichi Targets ad‐ dressed: 

Due to be  delivered by: 

Estimate  cost: 

Global  Wetlands  Observation  Sys‐ tem  (GWOS)  Regional  Proto‐ type 

1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11,  14, 19 and 20 

2015 

$ 430,000 

Fine‐scaled  as‐ sessment  and  Product  monitoring  of  (Online  biodiversity  rep‐ interactive  resentation  Global  (Protected  Map)  /  C3,  within  terrestrial  Areas)  C4  protected areas 

11 

2015/2016 

$4,500,000 

2, 4, 5, 10, 11, 15  and 17 

2015 

N/A 

Multinational  (a  natural  and  a  cul‐ tural  site  in  each  region  of  Asia,  Africa  and  Latin  America)/  Global  (all  the  World heri‐ tage  sites,  World  biosphere  reserves  and  Global  geoparks) 

Capacity  building  activities  on  the  use  of  space  technologies  for  Capacity  building  +  developing  coun‐ tries  in  Asia  and  products/  C2, C3, C4  Africa 

37 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Assessment  of  biodiversity,  eco‐ system  processes  and  ecosystem  Data  and  services  in  se‐ Regional  (selected  models  /  lected  mountain  high‐altitude areas)  C1, C3  areas 

12 

2015 

$ 2,700,000 

Change  in  global  area  of  old  growth  (sub‐)  tropical  forests  Product  using  indicator  Regional  ((sub‐)  (Map)  /  C1,  species  and  earth  C3  tropical forests)  observation 

5, 7, 12 and 14

2014 

$ 130,000 

Use  of  biological  information  in  planning,  installa‐ tion  of field  infra‐ structure,  data  management  and  Capacity  availability,  and  Building  /  surveys  of  target  C2, C4  taxa 

1, 2, 11, 18 and 19 

2016 

$ 1,028,000 

Capacity  building  for  Association  of  Southeast  Asian  Nations  (ASEAN)  member  states  and  other  coun‐ tries interested to  adopt  the  inter‐ Regional  (ASEAN  Capacity  operable  data‐ member  Building  /  base  structures  states)/Global  C2, C4  and encode data.  

1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 11 and  12 

2015 

$ 493,000 

Integrated  Pan‐ Arctic  biodiversity  monitoring  –  the  Circumpolar  Bio‐ Product and  diversity Monitor‐ (Arctic  Services  /  ing  Program  (Arc‐ C1, C4  tic BON) 

5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12  and 14 

2015 

$ 4,800,000 

5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11,  12, 14 and 15 

2015 (first  stage of im‐ plementa‐ tion) 

$ 5,000,000 

Regional  (Amazo‐ nia)/Global 

Regional  States) 

Regional  (30  coun‐ Species  monitor‐ tries in Latin Amer‐ ing  in  globally  ica,  Sub‐saharan  Capacity  underrepresented  Africa,  and  South‐ building  /  regions  (“gap  east Asia (tbd))  C2, C4  regions”) 

Global 

Product  (Online  interactive  Map)  /  C3,  C4 

Status  of  global  marine  species  distributions  and  diversity  

6, 9, 11 and 12

2015 

$4,000,000 

Global 

Product  (Online  interactive 

Status  of  global  terrestrial  species  distributions  and 

12 

2015/2016 

$3,500,000 

38 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Map)  /  C3,  diversity  C4 

Global 

Products  and  Ser‐ vices/  C1,  C3 

30  m  resolution  global  land  cover  and land use data  for  2015,  2010,  2000 and 1990 

5, 7, and 11 

2016 

$5,000,000 

Global 

Products/  C1, C3 

Multi‐Temporal  Global Land Cover  Map Products 

1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 15,  and 19 

2014 

$500,000 

Improved  data‐ sets  for  biodiver‐ sity  and  ecosys‐ C1,  tem  services  monitoring 

1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 15,  17, 18, and 19

2015 

$340,000 

A  Toolkit  for  Visualization  and  Crowdsourcing  of  Biodiversity  Data‐ sets 

1, 5, 7, 9, 11, and  14 

2015 

$ 550,000 –  780,000 

Automated  geo‐ spatial  informa‐ tion  generation  by  landscape  Regional (Europe) /  Products  photographs  Global  and services  (Auto‐GiG) 

5, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13  and 19 

2016 

$ 2,656,780 

Global 

Product  (Data  layers  and Maps) /  C1, C3 

Development  of  data  layer,  maps  and  classification  of  marine  ecosys‐ tems of the world 

5, 6, 8, 10, 11, 14  and 15 

2015 

$ 240,000 

Global 

Capacity  Building and  Global  Environ‐ Data/  C1,  mental  Stratifica‐ tion  C2, C3 

5, 7, 9, 14, and 15 

2015 

$ 520,000 

General  Habitat  Category  moni‐ toring  and  ex‐ change system 

5, 7, 9, 14 and 15 

2015 

$ 520,000 

Global 

Global/National  Sub‐national 

Data/  C3 

Product  ‐  (toolkit)/  C1, C4 

Regional  (parts  of  Capacity  Africa,  Australia,  building/  Europe)/Global  C1, C2, C3 

Other biodiversity and ecosystem related activities (programmes) of the GEO 2012‐2015 Work Plan  Capacity  building and  Global  (agriculture  Tools/  C1‐ areas)  C4 

Supporting  sus‐ tainable  agricul‐ ture  and  combat‐ ing desertification 

7, 13 and 14 

2015 

Improving  water‐ resource  man‐ Capacity  agement  through  building and  better  under‐ Tools/  C1‐ standing  of  the  C4  water cycle 

4, 5, 8 and 14 

2015 

Global  Initiative  Capacity  Global  (tropical  building and  for  Tropical  For‐ forest area)  Tools/  C1‐ est Monitoring 

7 and 14 

2015 

Global (water) 

39 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

C4 

Global  area) 

Capacity  building and  Coastal  vulner‐ (coastal  Tools/  C1‐ ability assessment  C4  and management 

5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 14  and 15 

2015 

  For more details, please contact:    Georgios Sarantakos  Group on Earth Observations Secretariat    7 bis, avenue de la Paix, CP 2300  CH‐1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland  Tel: + 41 22 730 84 31  Fax: + 41 22 730 85 20  email: gsarantakos@geosec.org  http://www.earthobservations.org   

  Report on the 35th International           Symposium on Remote Sensing of           Environment (ISRSE),  Beijing, China    The Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), a  new  major  institute  of  the  Chinese  Academy  of  Sciences  (CAS) created through the merger of the Institute of Remote  Sensing  Applications  and  the  Center  for  Earth  Observation  and  Digital  Earth,  hosted  the  35th  International  Symposium  on  Remote  Sensing  of  Environment     (ISRSE35) in Beijing from 22 to 26 of April.  Attracting more than 1000 people from 56 countries and  regions,  the  symposium,  under  the  theme  “Earth  Observation  and  Global  Environmental  Change”,  had  1,249  abstracts,  429  full  papers,  and  376  posters  submitted  from  scientists  from  all  over  the  world. As the first symposium in the ISRSE series being held in China, this symposium reviewed the  developing  progress  of  remote  sensing  technology  and  gave  an  outlook  on  its  future  to  address  global sustainable development.   In  1962,  “Remote  Sensing”  was  named  at  the  first  ISRSE  in  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan.  In  its  50  years  of  development,  Earth  observation  has  advanced  significantly,  and  remote  sensing  has  become  a       mature  science  and  technology  for  observing  the  Earth  and  for  monitoring  global  environmental  change.  Over  the  period  of  five  days,  the  ISRSE35  brought  together  stakeholders  from  academia,  research, and industry, and put forward possible solutions that can benefit our Earth. In the opening  ceremony,  Prof.  Guo  Huadong,  Director‐General  of  RADI,  gave  a  keynote  presentation  of  “China’s  Earth Observation in the Global Context”. Barbara Ryan, Director of the Group on Earth Observation  (GEO)  contributed  a  keynote  on  the  topic  of  “GEO  building  a  Global  Earth  Observation  System  of  Systems���.  In  the  following  days,  eighteen  invited  keynote  speakers  gave  their  talks  in  five  plenary  sessions,  and  346  selected  papers  were  presented  for  oral  presentations  at  63  parallel  sessions      focusing  on  15  topics  of  the  symposium.    In  addition,  a  panel  discussion  on  “Remote  Sensing  and  Global  Environmental  Change”  was  held  in  the  morning  of  23  April,  and  an  exhibition  on  Remote  Sensing  Technology  with  34  exhibitors  from  geospatial  industries,  institutions  and  international     organizations was convened throughout the symposium period. 

40 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

The ISRSE35 focused on applications and theories that make Earth Observation a crucial element in  the study of phenomena related to global environmental change. Remote sensing technologies have  long  been  indispensable  tools  in  numerous  fields  of  environmental  science,  and  its  role  today  is    significant  in  the  still‐nascent,  interdisciplinary  linkage  of  Earth  system  science.  With  increased       accessibility  to  interactive  maps  and  virtual  data,  along  with  the  development  of  spatially‐aware    devices  and  sensors,  Earth  observation  is  experiencing  a  rebirth  with  unprecedented  potential  for  innovation and discovery.   This  symposium  was  co‐organized  by  the  International  Center  for  Remote  Sensing  of  Environment,  the International Society for Digital Earth, the Group on Earth Observation, the International Society  for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, and Chinese Academy of Sciences. EARSeL in collaboration  with the ISRSE35 Secretariat promoted this event through its website and was recognized as a Media  partner.  Dr.  Ioannis  Manakos  attended  the  symposium  and  chaired  the  session  on  “RS  Capacity     Building and EO Missions Contributing to GEOSS”.     

  The opening ceremony of the ISRSE35 

  Chairman of the opening ceremony   

41 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

  Exhibition at the ISRSE35 

Prof. Dr. Changlin WANG  Director, International Academic Division  Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth,   Chinese Academy of Sciences  wcl@ceode.ac.cn 

  EARSeL eProceedings  New Publications in Vol. 12(1), 2013  A GIS­based flash flood runoff model using high resolution DEM and meteorological data  Evangelia Gioti, Chrisoula Riga, Kleomenis Kalogeropoulos, and Christos Chalkias    Abstract  Read full paper online: http://www.eproceedings.org  Natural  hazards  are  historically  a  substantial  threat  to  the  progress  and  development  of  human  communities.  Floods  hold  a  dominant  position  among  these  specific  phenomena  due  to  their        frequent occurrence as well as their large spatial spread. Certainly, the aforementioned facts become  more visible under the light of the assessment of the dramatic effects brought about by their occur‐ rence. Consequently, the need to deal with the impact of floods on human communities with an ef‐ fective way leads to a systematic involvement of the international scientific community on the sub‐ ject of "Management of Natural Hazards".  The present study describes an attempt to model surface runoff in a typical ungauged basin, which is  directly related to catastrophic flood events, by creating a system based on GIS technology. The main  object was to construct a direct unit hydrograph for an excess rainfall by estimating the stream flow  response at the outlet of a watershed. Specifically, the methodology was based on the creation of a  spatial  database  in  GIS  environment  and  on  data  editing.  Moreover,  rainfall  time‐series  data  came  from  Hellenic  National  Meteorological  Service  and  they  were  processed  in  order  to  calculate  flow  time  and  the  runoff  volume.  Apart  from  the  meteorological  data,  background  data  such  as             topography, drainage network, land cover and geological data were also collected. A high resolution  DEM was of great importance in order to achieve the final result. The study area is the sub‐basin of  Achaia  Olympia  (Kladeos  sub‐basin)  in  Greece,  and  the  examined  event  occurred  on  February  5th,  2012. 

42 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Water  constituent  retrieval  and  littoral  bottom  mapping  using  hyperspectral  APEX  imagery and submersed artificial surfaces  Sebastian Rößler, Patrick Wolf, Thomas Schneider, Stefan Zimmermann, and Arnulf Melzer    Abstract  Read full paper online: http://www.eproceedings.org  The analysis of littoral bottom properties such as bathymetry and coverage (i.e. plant identification)  often requires knowledge about the composition of relevant optically active water constituents like  phytoplankton, suspended particulate matter and coloured dissolved organic matter, which influence  the radiative transfer in water due to scattering and/or absorption. These inherent optical properties  (IOPs) of the water column can be retrieved in optically deep water (i.e., with no reflectance contri‐ bution of the bottom) by using physically based inversion techniques. In shallow water ‐ which often  differs  from  deep  water  in  the  amount  of  water  constituents  due  to  terrestrial  input  from  the        shore ‐ a reliable estimation of IOPs requires at least a valid bottom reflectance, which is difficult to  measure  in  water.  An  accurate  estimation  of  water  constituents  is  essential  to  the  retrieval  of       bottom reflectance and subsequent identification of invasive aquatic plants, which was the main goal  of this project.  In an experimental approach, the application of artificial surfaces for retrieving water constituents as  well  as  bottom  depth  was  tested  during  the  hyperspectral  APEX  campaign  2011  covering  Lake       Starnberg in southern Germany. Two silo foils (10 metres wide and 50 metres long) were spread on  the littoral bottom covering depths from 0.5 to 16 metres and acting as a very bright (white side of  the foil) as well as a very dark (black side of the foil) reflective bottom albedo for the ENVI add‐on  BOMBER in terms of water constituents retrieval and bottom depth estimation. Reflectance spectra  of  the  foils  are  known  from  laboratory  measurements.  In  situ  measurements  were  performed  in   water using RAMSES spectrometers and processed using the algorithms implemented in BOMBER as  well  as  the  inversion  software  WASI.  The  results  show  best  performance  for  the  black  sided  foil     regarding pixel unmixing, water constituent retrieval and depth estimation, which agreed well with  the  WASI  inversion  results  of  the  downwelling  irradiance,  which  was  used  for  validation  due  to        lacking bottom influence. 

  Book Releases   Hyperspectral  Data  Processing:  Algorithm  Design  and       Analysis  is  available  from  Wiley‐Interscience  written  by   Chein‐I Chang.   The  book  is  a  culmination  of  the  research  conducted  in  the  Remote  Sensing  Signal  and  Image  Processing  Laboratory  (RSSIPL)  at  the  University  of  Maryland,  Baltimore  County.        It  treats  hyperspectral  image  processing  and  hyperspectral  signal  processing  as  separate  subjects  in  two  different         categories. Most materials covered in this book can be used in  conjunction  with  the  author’s  first  book,  Hyperspectral      Imaging:  Techniques  for  Spectral  Detection  and            Classification, without much overlap.  The  author  includes  in  the  book  various  aspects  of            endmember  extraction,  unsupervised  linear  spectral  mixture  analysis,  hyperspectral  information  compression,     hyperspectral  signal  coding  and  characterization,  as  well  as  applications  to  conceal  target  detection,  multispectral 

43 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging.   Hyperspectral  Data  Processing  compiles  an  algorithm  compendium,  with  MATLAB  code  in  an         appendix, to help readers  implement many important algorithms  developed in this book and write  their own code without relying on software packages.   

Bistatic  SAR  Data  Processing  Algorithms  written  Xiaolan  Qiu,  Chibiao Ding and Donghui Hu was published by Wiley.   This book focuses on bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar    signal  processing,  mainly  on  imaging  aspects.  Bistatic  SAR  is  one  of  the  most  important  trends  in  SAR  development,  as  the        technology renders SAR more flexible and safer when used in  military environments. Imaging is one of the most difficult and  important aspects of bistatic SAR data          processing.   The  Authors  present  the  status  and  trends  of  SAR                  development.  Focusing  on  imaging  aspects  of  bistatic  SAR    signal  processing,  this  book  covers  resolution  analysis,  echo  generation  methods,  imaging  algorithms,  imaging  parameter  estimation, and motion compensation methods. Topics include  bistatic  SAR  resolution  analysis,  echo  generation  methods,  imaging  algorithms,  imaging  parameters  estimation,  and      motion compensation methods.  

  Forthcoming EARSeL Conferences  9th EARSeL Workshop on Forest Fires  'Quantifying the environmental impact of forest fires'  15 ‐ 17 October 2013 Coombe Abbey, Warwickshire, UK   

 

 

 

More info 

  General  As we attempt to model the Earth System it is important that the impact of forest fires on the Earth  System  is  fully  understood  and  quantified.  These  impacts  can  be  on  climate,  the  biosphere,            ecosystem  functioning,  society  and  livelihood.  Fire  disturbance  has  been  identified  by  climate        modellers as an Essential Climate Variable. Forest disturbance and the associated carbon flux needs  to be measured and reported under the United Nations REDD+ programme. Furthermore, we have  been  very  good  at  understanding  the  short  term  impacts  of  fire  on  forests,  but  less  good  at            understanding  the  response  of  vegetation  under  different  fire  frequency  and  severity  scenarios.      The workshop will draw out the state of the art research being undertaken to identify and quantify  these impacts. All relevant institutions and interested individuals are invited to attend.    Following an extension to the first call for papers, 50 high quality abstracts have been received and  are underway within the review process. These contributions cover the following topics:   Characterising the impact of fire severity and fire frequency across vegetation types 

44 


EARSeL Newsletter      

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Validation methods for burned area mapping  Monitoring and modelling vegetation recovery after fire disturbance  Scaling from regional to global burned area maps  Mapping forest fires for REDD+ MRV  Using active fire mapping and fire radiative energy to inform on fire severity and impact 

  The workshop format will facilitate interactive poster sessions and extended oral presentations that  will give each speaker up to 20 minutes to convey their results and at least 5 minutes for questions.   A strong emphasis will be placed on networking, interaction and feedback.    Keynote Speakers  Moreover,  the  following  keynote  speakers  have  confirmed  their  presence  at  the  workshop,  to            address  themes  from  the  observation  of  fire  scars  in  the  landscape  to  detecting  flaming  fires  and  onto fire emission databases.  These are:   Prof. Chris Justice, University of Maryland, USA, who will talk about fire monitoring from the  JPSS VIIRS System”   Dr.  Guido  van  der  Werf  from  VU  University  Amsterdam,  The  Netherlands,  who  will  talk  on  global fire emissions and potential fire‐related climate mitigation options.   Dr.  Luigi  Boschetti  from  the  University  of  Idaho,  USA,  who  will  talk  about  his  research  on  global burned area mapping and validation (exact title TBC).   Dr.  Gareth  Roberts  from  the  University  of  Southampton,  UK,  who  will  present  a  talk  on      quantifying wildfire fuel combustion using active fire observations.    Special Issue Opportunity  There is also a call for papers at a special issue on the topic of Quantifying the Environmental Impact  of  Forest  Fires  with  Remote  Sensing  ‐  Open  Access  Journal,  to  give  the  authors  the  opportunity  of  further  disseminating  their  work  to  a  wider  community  following  the  peer‐review  process.               The deadline for submission is 31 December 2013. More details can be found at:  http://www.mdpi.com/journal/remotesensing/special_issues/environmental_impact_of_forest_fires  In  addition,  EARSeL  encourages  the  publishing  of  the  full  version  of  manuscripts  to  the                EARSeL eProceedings.    Social Programme  The social programme is also coming together. Recently, the remains of the former King of England ‐  Richard  III  (2  October  1452  –  22  August  1485)  have  recently  been  discovered  in  a  car  park  in         Leicester.  Leicester  is  also  famous  for  the  amount  of  restaurants  known  as  curry  houses.                        A pre‐conference activity is being scheduled (Sunday night ‐ Monday morning) for those who plan to  arrive in Leicester on the Sunday before the workshop begins, then move on at the workshop venue,  a secluded 12th century monastery (with Wi‐Fi) in the middle of the English countryside on Monday  afternoon, a dinner on Monday evening and the workshop commencing on Tuesday morning.    For more detailed information please visit the Workshop website at:  http://www.earsel.org/SIG/FF/9th‐workshop.      

45 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Other Conferences   

7‐8 June, 2013: National Conference on Microwaves, Antennas & Remote Sensing.   Dehradun, India.  

 

12‐14 June, 2013: 6th International Conference on Recent Advances in Space Technologies  (RAST 2013).  Istanbul, Turkey. 

 

17‐19 June, 2013: 7th International Atmospheric Limb Conference.  Bremen, Germany.   

17‐21 June, 2013: 13th Conference on Electromagnetic and Light Scattering.   Lille, France. 

 

25‐28 June, 2013: Workshop on Hyperspectral Image and Signal Processing (WHISPERS).  Gainesville, Florida, USA.  1‐3 July, 2013: Satellite Soil Moisture Validation & Application Workshop.  Frascati, Italy. 

 

2‐5 July, 2013: GI_Forum 2013.   Salzburg, Austria.  4‐5 July, 2013: PROBING VEGETATION Conference: from past to future .  Antwerp, Belgium.  7‐11 July, 2013: 9th European Conference on Precision Agriculture.  Lleida, Spain.  

 

21‐26 July, 2013: IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium.  Melbourne, Australia.  22‐24  July,  2013:  The  4th  International  Conference  on  Computing  for  Geospatial  Research  and Application.  San Jose, CA, USA. 

46 

 

12‐16 August, 2013: The Second International Conference on Agro‐Geoinformatics.   Fairfax, VA, USA. 

 

25‐30 August, 2013: 26th International Cartographic Conference.   Dresden, Germany. 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

4‐6 September, 2013: Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry Society Annual Conference.  Glasgow, United Kingdom.   9‐10 September, 2013: Workshop on UAV‐based Remote Sensing.   Cologne, Germany.   

9‐13 September, 2013: ESA Living Planet Symposium 2013.   Edinburgh, United Kingdom.  12‐14 September, 2013: 14th N‐AERUS Conference.  Enschede, The Netherlands.  16‐20 September, 2013: 2013 EUMETSAT & 19th AMS Satellite Conferences.  Vienna, Austria. 

 

23‐26 September, 2013: 2013 SPIE Remote Sensing Symposium.  Dresden, Germany.  23‐25 September, 2013: Interdisciplinary Conference of Young Earth System Scientists 2013.  KlimaCampus, University of Hamburg, Germany.  20‐24 October, 2013: 34rd Asian Conference on Remote Sensing.  South Kuta, Bali, Indonesia. 

 

22‐24 October, 2013: XV Congreso de la Asociaciσn Espaρola de Teledetecciσn.   Madrid, Spain.  

 

11‐15 November, 2013: First COSPAR Symposium.   Bangkok, Thailand.  12‐13 November, 2013: ISPRS Workshop.   Antalya, Turkey.   13‐16  July,  2014:  Second  International  Conference  on  Vulnerability  and  Risk  Analysis  and  Management  (ICVRAM2014)  &  Sixth  International  Symposium  on  Uncertainty  Modelling  and Analysis (ISUMA2014).  Liverpool, United Kingdom.   2‐10 August, 2014: 40th Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR).  Moscow, Russian Federation. 

 

47 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

Summer Schools and Advanced Courses   

3rd Advanced Training Course on Ocean Remote Sensing  23‐27 September 2013, European Space Agency, Ireland  Deadline for application: 31 May 2013 

 

Pavia 2013 International Summer School on Data Fusion of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data  16‐20 September 2013, University of Pavia, Italy  Deadline for application: 1 June 2013 

 

IGSSE Autumn School of the Institute of Photogrammetry and Cartography  25–27 September 2013, Technische Universität München, Dienten, Austria  Deadline for application: 31 July 2013  2013 Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing Training School  30th September ‐ 4th October 2013, MOS Barcelona Expert Centre, Barcelona, Spain  Deadline for application: 28 June 2013 

                                                         

48 


EARSeL Newsletter 

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

                                                                              Back Cover – Matera, Italy, the Symposium and Workshops’ venue for the 33rd EARSeL Symposium.    Credits: Valerio Li Vigni  Source: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/670/gallery   

49 


EARSeL Newsletter           

June 2013 ‐ Number 94 

 

.

                                                                       i Testing PROBA-V and VEGETATION data for agricultural applications in Bulgaria and Romania (PROAGROBURO). Contract Ref. Nr CB/XX/16. between the SRTI-BAS and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), under the PROBA-V Preparatory Programme. Principal Investigator (PI): Prof. Dr. E. Roumenina

50 


EARSeL Newsletter, Issue 94 - June 2013