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Bird Bash Bands Announced please see page 6 for preformer names

Wednesday, September 22 , 2010

Volume 9, Issue 4

ONLINE

classifieds eaglenews.org

EN

www.eaglenews.org

Long distance

love

Senate passes bill that gives print credit By Megan Hoolihan Senior staff writer

S

Men’s soccer stuns Ohio St.

FGCU’s men’s soccer team upsets nationally ranked Ohio State in front of a record crowd. See SPORTS on page 15

Light up street before tragedy

Film puts focus on trying to keep the old flame burning from afar By Kayla WIllis Contributing writer “Going the Distance” is a movie that focuses on the relationship between Erin and Garrett. Erin is a summer intern rounding out her last month as a journalist for the New York Sentinel, while Garrett manages the latest boy band at a record company. They meet one night and bond over their love of the “Centipede” video game and bar trivia. After spending the night together, Erin admits that her internship is over in six weeks and she’ll be moving back to San Francisco. Both agree to a low-key, light relationship. As the six weeks dwindle, they both realize that they are not ready to part, and decide to test a long-distance relationship. please see LOVE on page 4

Read an opinion on the safety of the road to North Lake Village. See OPINION on page 12

Gym equipment is quite fitting

enate passed a bill allocating $2.50 to all registered students for both the remainder of fall 2010 and spring 2011, explicitly for printing and copying costs at university copiers, library printers and computer lab printers. The funds will be available only until the end of each semester, at which time all accounts will be swept and the remaining funds will be returned to SG’s unallocated account at the end of the fiscal year. All of FGCU’s approximately 12,000 students will receive these funds, adding to a total cost of $58,375 for the school year. SG allocated about $28,000 in printing funds last semester, but only about $7,800 was used. Due to the low percentage of funds that were used by students last semester, it was suggested the bill be amended to include only the fall semester to see if the percentage of funds used would improve before spring. This amendment, however, failed 20-6. SG Vice President Andrew Graziani sponsored the bill. “I think that it is great SG could do this. This bill helps the students so much. This is what we’re here for,” he said. The bill passed 24-2 at Tuesday’s meeting.

Greek life expanding with university By Chealsye Bowley Contributing writer

F

Find out about the new offerings in the fitness center. See A&L on page 10

Energy drinks losing popularity? Read what a poll of FGCU students suggests about thirst quenchers. See NEWS on page 4

Index News ....................... See page 3 A&E ......................... See page 8 Opinion ................. See page12 Sports .................... See page 15 Fun & Games ............ See page 11 Kappa Delta pledges on Bid Day. EN photo/ Eric Barreto

GCU’s community and Greek Life family grew over the weekend as the Kappa Delta Eta Tau chapter colonized Sept. 19. Sunday night bids were extended to approximately 160 FGCU women. The event was filled with excitement as girls met their new sisters. Fellow sisters from the University of South Florida and Florida Southern College, as well as KD alumni, were in attendance to welcome the new chapter. Erin Stanley, a junior majoring in public relations, went through the KD recruitment because she wanted to start something new on campus. “I’m very excited to have all of the new sisters and friends,” she said. Tiffany Massey, a sophomore majoring in clinical lab

science, shares a similar opinion to her new sister. Massey wanted to rush KD because “it is a colony and I love their philanthropies, and I want to get more involved on campus.” KD has two philanthropies: Girl Scouts and Prevent Child Abuse America. The new FGCU members will soon begin working with a local Girl Scout troop. KD values leadership, friendship, civic engagement and confidence in women. In 2009, the sorority started the Confidence Coalition, a national initiative to promote self-confidence among girls and women. This information is what led Mariah Weingarten, a sophomore in nursing, to rush KD. “Everything I heard about KD, I love,” Weingarten said. “I love their philanthropies and the girls I have met in the process.

“It’s nice to have sisters.” Sam Shipman and Megan Smith are two former presidents of their respective Kappa Delta chapters and now work for the National Chapter Development Council (CDC). Shipman and Smith led the recruitment and colonization weekend. Shipman, a graduate of Louisiana Tech, will remain a CDC-in residency at FGCU until November, while she transitions the chapter officers from new to initiated members and leaders on campus. Kappa Delta was founded in 1897 at the State Female Normal School (now Longwood University) in Farmville, Va. FGCU sorority Zeta Tau Alpha was also founded there. On Nov. 14, the new Kappa Delta sisters will be fully initiated and the installation of the Eta Tau chapter will be complete.


Campus

2 eagle news • SEPTEMBER 22, 2010 •WWW.EAGLENEWS.ORG

Eagle News staff Editor-in-Chief Allison Gagliardi

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Senior Staff writers Megan Hoolihan

Staff writers

Melissa Bell Amarin Cannon Adrienn Wiebe Jacob Welch Veronica Vela Carlos Soria Katie Egan Katie Donnellan Mandie Rainwater Jeffrey Haut

Locations 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 36

Griffin Hall Reed Hall Library Howard Hall McTarnighan Hall Wellness Center Central Energy Plant Broadcast Center Family Resource Center Campus Support Complex Academic III Whitaker Hall Information Booth Egan Observatory Arts Complex Alico Arena Student Union Margaret S. Sugden Welcome Center Athletic Building Kleist Health Ed Center Academic 5 Lee County FGCU Aquatics Center Sugden Hall Lutgert Hall Holmes Hall SoVi Dining- South Village Dining Facility South Central Energy Plant Academic 7 Campus Rec Sports Modular Grounds Maintenance North Lake Village Housing South Village Housing Complex North Modular Village South Modular Village Music Modular

Compiled by Eagle News from public logs available at the University Police Dept., Police Beat is in no way associated with the UPD. Some details have been left out in accordance with Eagle News policy to protect privacy. Police Beat is intended to provide raw data regarding the reports generated by UPD officers in the course of their duty. We urge readers not to draw conclusions from this unanalyzed information. Any questions or concerns about the Police Beat should be directed to the Eagle News Press Room at 239-590-7996. Suspects are innocent until proven guilty by a court of law.

Crime & Safety info is now available at http://admin.fgcu.edu/police/homepage.htm

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Sept. 15, 2010, through Sept. 19, 2010 Wednesday, Sept. 15 at 2:20 p.m.: The Sugden Hospitality and Resort Management fire alarm went off on the second floor. The fire department was notified, but was then advised that no alarm was going off at that location. Then, a call was received from the SU advising that the alarm was going off there. The fire department was dispatched to that area. Wednesday, Sept. 15 at 11:09 p.m.: An officer investigated a suspicious vehicle in the auxiliary lot. The driver stated she was praying. Her Illinois plate came back as invalid. Complainant stated her parents just re-registered her vehicle in Illinois. The officer helped her replace the invalid tag with her still valid

Florida tag. Thursday, Sept. 16 at 11:25 p.m.: A panic alarm at Building L was activated. Officers responded and determined it was an accidental pull. Saturday, Sept. 18 at 9:16 p.m.: Complainant stated she had been cooking food in her oven in the Honors dorms when the food caught on fire. She used her fire extinguisher to put out the fire and then opened her window to air the apartment out. The smoke detector was silenced when officers came to the scene. All was secured.

Published weekly during fall and spring semesters, and monthly in summer, at Florida Gulf Coast University

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Corrections and clarifications n In Volume 9 Issue 3, Makeda Amadi contributed to “The Chirp’ on page 3.

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Campus News

Energy Buzz By Sofia Shepard

I

Staff writer

53%

Don’t drink them

47%

Rely on energy drinks

Other responses: 5-Hour Shots: 6 Gatorade: 4 Vitamin Water: 2

n order to wake up for that morning class, students are known to down energy drinks. However, a recent poll of 141 FGCU students revealed t h a t more than half either omit the drinks altogether or get their energy elsewhere. “I don’t really drink (energy drinks),” said Amber Dykstra, a freshman majoring in English. For the 45 percent of students devoted to energy

drinks, the beverage of choice is a tie between Monster and Red Bull. Every student who prefers a Rockstar beverage is a woman. Most of the nondrinkers are also women. Students who avoid the beverages said they are either too expensive or too unhealthy. According to a study by Dr. Karrie Heneman at the University of Californnia-Davis, the amount of caffeine in popular brands can range from 72 to 150 mg per serving in addition to ingredients such as ginseng and guarana (1 g is equivalent to 40 mg of caffeine). F u r ther more, many companies increase the serving size per container to

2

25

Non-energydrinkers

66

2 2

1

What they said:

psychology major, drinks Amp, but prefers Monster. “Monster is so much better,” Friedgen said. “It’s just so much more expensive.” Others elect to get their caffeine elsewhere. English II instructor Jesse Millner even believes the highly sugared energy drinks will kill a person if overconsumed. “I think (students) should drink coffee instead,” Millner said. “Coffee is ancient and multicultural; it’s been around for forever.”

1 1

2 2

two or three. This does not include the approximately 27g of sugar per serving. For more information, visit http:// nutrition.ucdavis. e d u /c o n t e n t / i n foshe et s / Energ yDrinks.pdf. “I’m a health freak — that’s why I don’t drink them,” said Jessica Moorhead, a sophomore majoring in biology. “I prefer the 5-hour energy shots, which have like two sugars in them.” 5-Hour Energy actually claims to have no sugar and 4 calories per shot, according to the maker’s website, 5hourenergy.com. For those not counting calories, sometimes price can get in the way. Freshman Andrew Friedgen, a

The most popular energy drinks based on a survey of 141 FGCU students.

w“I like Monster more. It’s just so much more expensive” – Andrew Friedgen, psych, freshman w“Monster – the green one. It tastes like Poprocks” – Jenn Espinosa, hospitality, senior w“Red Bull because it gives you wings” – Dominic Dijamco, undecided, sophomore w“I don’t really drink [energy drinks] that often” – Amber Dykstra, English, freshman w“The blue can of Rockstar is the only one I like” – Kelly Frey, psychology, senior w“Red Bull is my favorite. It’s just a good brand” – Mike McDonald, English, senior w“I love them all. I guess for favorite I’m between Monster and Cherry Amp” – Garrett Colas, computer science, sophomore w“I think [students] should drink coffee instead. Coffee is ancient and multicultural; it’s been around for forever” – Professor Jesse Millner, English Instructor

WWW.EAGLENEWS.ORG •September 22, 2010 • eagle news 3

SG executives determined to lead by example By Megan Hooihan Senior staff writer

S

tudent Government serves as the official voice through which student opinion may be expressed. As of this past summer, Kimberly Diaz has taken on a pivotal role in maximizing student potential and enhancing student success by accepting the responsibility of student body president. Diaz, a senior majoring in communications, was elected to serve as vice president this spring and subsequently ascended to the position of president by means of the Student Body Constitution when the elected president, Peter Ryther, resigned in the summer. Diaz said she took a keen interest in helping to build and improve FGCU the first time she arrived on campus in 2007. “I think what really, truly intrigued me was the fact that the school was so new. Seeing what was already established and what had already been accomplished, I saw that there were people who were really passionate about it, and that made me feel passionate about it as well,” she said. Despite the passion Diaz felt for helping FGCU grow upon her first visit, she did not expect that she would eventually take on the challenge of SG president. “It wasn’t my initial intent to be president. I’m much more of a working girl and the vice president position fits that better. But now, serving as president, I look at the word leadership and what it means to me: to be honest, humble, and to make decisions rationally instead of immediately.” Diaz also explained how a key attribute, courage, is needed in this role. “Courage is also a huge part of leadership. You need to have the courage to get out there and meet people and accomplish goals,” she said. “I am comfortable and confident enough in my leadership abilities to assume this role.” Diaz plans to utilize the leadership experience she has gained to pursue politics on a more widespread level. “I want to pursue state politics and get into the whole D.C. world … maybe someday pursuing a Senate seat and becoming an ambassador,” she said. After Diaz’s ascension to the presidency, Anthony Graziani, a senior majoring in resort and hospitality, was selected to serve as vice president. The vice president has several roles in SG, including assisting the president with anything he or she needs and serving as an adviser. The VP also serves as an SG representative at faculty Senate and as the chairman of executive cabinet meetings. While vice president has many responsibilities, Graziani says he is well-equipped for the job. “Kim and I work very closely together. I already work very well with the cabinet and we thought it was the best decision for Student Government,” Graziani said. Like Diaz, Graziani believes his SG leadership experience may one day lead him to a career in mainstream politics. “I just had an internship in D.C. this summer and I love politics; I would also love to work for my fraternity as a travelling consultant,” he said. Though Diaz and Graziani share a similar passion for improving FGCU through SG, they claim to have very different personalities outside of the office. please see SG on page 6


4

eagle news ���September 22, 2010 • www.eaglenews.org

campus briefs

It’s never too early to consult your adviser Students are urged to make appointments with their academic advisers now, or at least no later than late September to early October. “It’s never too early to make an appointment,” said Melanie Stanis, academic adviser for the College of Arts and Sciences. Priority registration for seniors will begin Oct. 25. Juniors can register Oct. 28, sophomores Nov. 1 and freshmen Nov. 4. FGCU uses priority registration to manage term enrollment. Also referred to as Eagle Registration, priority registration ensures students are able to enroll in the classes they need to complete their degree in a timely manner. Those who are closer to degree completion have the ability to register before students who are further from graduation, according to the Academic Catalog on FGCU’s website. Registration occurs through Gulfline. Term registration dates are also published in the academic calendar at fgcu.edu/registrar.

Free meal comes with freedom lesson Students are invited to find out what their First Amendment rights mean to them when they exchange their rights for a free meal at the Perch on Thursday, Sept. 23 starting at 7:30 p.m. This second annual event, “Eat Free or Live Free! You Can’t Do Both!” is in celebration of Constitution Week and is sponsored by FGCU’s SG Civic Engagement Office, the Service-Learning Program, BEEP and Eagle News. First Amendment rights include the freedom of speech, religion, press, to assemble and to petition. If students try to act on any of these rights that they waived for the night, they will be “arrested” by the “goon squad,” who are volunteering students armed with riot shields. Jessica Rhea, interim director of the Office of ServiceLearning and Civic Engagement, is hoping students will gain more knowledge about their First Amendment rights. “I hope this experience shocks students into seeing what life could be like without their First Amendment rights in a creative and interactive manner,” Rhea said. Only the first 200 FGCU students will be admitted to the event. Last year, 226 students participated in the event.

— Eagle News staff

Campus News

Week of events ensures censorship finds no refuge anywhere on campus By Samantha League News editor

D

uring the last week of every September, the U.S. celebrates our freedom to read with national Banned Books Week. Attention is brought to the issue of censorship and to the thousands of books that have been challenged over the years. In honor of this week, the RSO and honors service team Cities of Refuge Project will be hosting a series of events focusing on these issues. The Cities of Refuge Project is dedicated to establishing a City of Refuge in Southwest Florida. According to the International Cities of Refuge Network, a City of Refuge is an asylum for persecuted writers in other countries. “Last year alone, 13 writers were killed for reasons directly linked to their writings on peaceful political activities,” said Alex Fisher, a senior majoring in

Love continued from page 1 We get to see the pair meet and fall in love with one another, but there is no silly argument, no misunderstanding, because they have something real to deal with: a long distance relationship. By the time Erin heads back to San Francisco, the audience feels a connection with the two characters. They’re funny, they’re smart. They’re best friends and soul mates. We feel their pain and their longing for each other, because it’s something we can relate to. College students everywhere are dealing with long distance relationships and trying to make it work just as Erin and Garrett are. We can relate to their pain of expensive flights and a three-hour time difference. We can relate to their trust issues and their frustration at not being able to physically be with one another everyday. Much like the two characters, college students know the feeling of not being able to afford something. With an average round-trip flight costing anywhere from $100 or more, it certainly isn’t easy to pack a suitcase, hop on a plane and fly to be with one another anymore. Between classes, work and everything in between, long distance relationships really rely on communication; it’s key when it comes to being separated from a loved one. Lindsey, a sophomore at FGCU, says that the hardest part about being away from her boyfriend “is missing out on the day to day things with him.” Her boyfriend attends Georgia Tech in Atlanta. “At first, being apart was very hard because I don’t like to talk on the phone, so we had a difficult time communicating with each other. We both had to work at being honest and open with each other and making the effort to talk at least once a day, whether it be text messaging or Facebook.” Dan, 18, a freshman at FGCU, also agrees that keeping each up to date on day-today activities is key.

English and philosophy, and the team leader for the SWFL Cities of Refuge Project. The Cities of Refuge Project is responsible for the poetry clothesline set up on campus along Reed Hall. It contains 60 poems, along with informational papers and fliers about Banned Books Week. On Monday, Sept. 27 at 5 p.m. in Sugden Resort and Hospitality Management 240, a Spoken Word Workshop with Kevin Coval, a four-time HBO Def Poet, will be focused on empowering youth through voice. Coval also is the co-founder of “Louder Than a Bomb,” the largest youth poetry festival in the world. On Tuesday, Sept. 28 at 6:30 p.m. in the SU Ballroom, Coval and Idris Goodwin, who is also an award winning HBO Def Poet, will be presenting UNCENSORED: An Evening of Hip-Hop Poetics, a concert of innovative

lyricism. Coval will address issues ranging from the Israel/Palestine situation to youth culture while Goodwin will be addressing censorship and problems of the representation and illegality of the black body in America. On Thursday, Sept. 29 at 5 p.m. in Griffin 109, the film “Writers on the Boarders” will be featured, which will address the issues of writing in a politically repressive climate. It was commissioned by the International Parliament of Writers. “This film should provide a concrete example of the issues Cities of Refuge is trying to address,” Fisher said. Fisher also hopes Banned Books Week “will help raise awareness concerning censorship around the world,” and is also hoping to stimulate community interest in the project. The Cities of Refuge Project is open to all FGCU students

along with members of the community.

If you go What: Cities of Refuge Project When: Meets at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 23 Where: Reed 163 To Learn More: citiesofrefuge@ eagle.fgcu.edu or “Southwest Florida Cities of Refuge Project” on Facebook

“These first few weeks have been hard,” he admits. His high school sweetheart, Alexis, attends UF in Gainesville. “We went from seeing each other every day to not knowing when we would be able to see each other next. Both my girlfriend and I talk on the phone as often as possible and trust each other, so we’re going to do our best to make it work.” Both Lindsey and Dan, and many others in long distance relationships, can relate to the hardships faced by the main characters in the movie The climax of the movie deals with the question: “Is it worth it?” Being in a long-distance relationship is a lot different than normal ones. Dealing with time differences, hardly seeing each other, being lonely, missing out on everyday things are all problems that someone may face when in a long-distance relationship. “Going the Distance” does a fantastic job at keeping the audience entertained as well as keeping the characters real. This is a romantic comedy that, as cheesy as this sounds, has a little something for everyone. For those currently in a long distance relationship, there are no clichéd fights or misunderstandings. Even those of us not currently in a long distance relationship can relate to being separated from a best friend, sibling or parent. This is a movie just about anyone could get something out of.

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6

Campus News

eagle news • September 22, 2010 • www.eaglenews.org

This year’s lineup at Bird Bash If you go: Top hits:

What: Bird Bash When: 7 to 11 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22 Where: Germain Arena

n Just Got Started

Lovin’ You n For You nThese Are The Good Ole Days n Ain’t Gonna Stop

Ticket information:

n Tickets are on sale this week nFree for FGCU Students with a valid Student ID n$15 for General Public Bowl Seats n $25 for General Public Floor Seats

Top hits:

nLove Like Crazy nShe Ain’t Right nHappy Endings nAin’t Gonna Stop nUpper Middle Class

Gamers smash their way to top By Amarin Cannon Media editor

EN Log on to watch the story This past Saturday, Sept. 18, the FGCU Video Game Club hosted one of its bi-annual tournaments in the Student Union Ballroom. Participants started arriving around 2 p.m. but the tournament did not kick off until 3 p.m. Gamers competed on and off for a total of six hours. The game selected for this semesters’ competition was “Super Smash Brothers Brawl.” Many competitors showed up, making this year’s turnout the biggest ever. To see highlights of the tournament check out www.eaglenews.or visit us on Facebook.

SG continued from page 1

White Trash

Top hits:

n Pray for You n Dressed in the Dark n That’s Beautiful to Me nIt’s a Good Thing n Beat Back Love

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“A lot of people expect the president to be very professional, but I’m a very quirky person and very awkward at times. With my friends, I’m always the one people are laughing at. I have a very weird laugh — it’s very boisterous. I’m really just a big goofball,” Diaz says. Graziani, on the other hand, claims to be more subdued outside of the realm of university politics. “I’m actually very shy and pretty quiet … I’m actually kind of a homebody. Deep down, I’m a big introvert,” he said. Diaz and Graziani share similar sentiments on what is the key to making the most out of being a student at FGCU. “Get started early in your freshman year,” Graziani said. “If you wait, you’re missing out on so much. Get out there and enjoy this awesome campus and community that we have!” Diaz agreed that getting involved is the key to accomplishment.


Your Tunes

Arts & Lifestyle

What are you listening to?

owntown jammin’

Emily Colston Psychology Junior 1. “Nightmare” by Avenged Sevenfold 2. “Love the Way you Lie” by Eminem featuring Rihanna 3. “Catalyst” by Linkin Park 4. “Bad Company” by Five Finger Death Punch 5. “Forever and Always” by Bullet for My Valentine

To me, music is ... “stress-relief.”

YOUTUBE:

Featured video of the week

Search ”OK GO - White Knuckles”

n OK Go makes music video history with the help of their canine friends.

Top 5

Fort Myers music walk brings revelers out for a night of music, food and fun By Kayla Stirzel

I

Staff writer

n Fort Myers, the newest tradition every third Saturday of the month is attending the Downtown Music Walk. It’s an open venue for more than 18 different local music artists to show their talent and please listeners’ ears. The variety of music pleases all different tastes. Walking down the brick streets, the sounds from a solo saxophone musician are playing. On another corner only one block down, there is a live rock band jamming out. The musicians range in age from college students to mid-lifers. All have different stories as to how they made it to play for the music walk. Jimmi Melton, a native of Virginia who has been singing and playing acoustic guitar for the past 38 years, says he’s “not a guitar player. I’m a singer who just plays guitar.” Melton has been playing acoustic music in the Fort Myers area for the past six months; mostly 1970s and 1980s classic rock, but also more mainstream rock such as Alice in Chains and Fuel. Melton comes from a family rooted in bluegrass, but claims, “I came from a dad who played saxophone, but that ain’t for me.” He is inspired to write his own music from personal life experiences, but still enjoys playing tunes to which everyone can sing along. The Downtown Music Walk opens your horizon to hearing music that is so unique. Whitey Alabastard, an experimental, noise improv master, stood on the corner making random noises with his accordion in hand. With his noise machine, he created a beat that had some heads nodding and other heads twisting to the sounds. Anthony Wayne, another acoustic guitar player and singer, has been playing in Fort Myers for the past four years. Originally from the Indiana area, Wayne described his view of music. “There are so many bands playing the same old same music in bars, and sometimes I get caught up in that, too, when I perform. It’s why I like to play at open venues to get a feel for what people want to hear, but sometimes still play some of my original stuff.” Music from talented artists such as these guys needs to be discovered and appreciated. The talents that are offered at this event are unbelievable. In front of the French Connection restaurant, a steel drummer played sweet sounds that made you feel like you were on a tropic island lying in the sun. Inside Red Rock Saloon, the Cornbread Brothers, known for playing their classic rock’n’roll and blues, had the crowd not only rocking but dancing up front along the stage during the night’s performance. This is the second time the Downtown Music Walk has been put on, and this return engagement drew a greater turnout than the first. Mark

Local musician Whitey Alabastard rocking out at the Downtown Music Walk.

your calendar for the third Saturday every month to come out and check the undiscovered-but-amazing talent these musicians have and want to share. It’s a treat to be able to walk from block to block to each bar and restaurant and have a choice of what type of music you want to listen to. The talent, location, and atmosphere of the Downtown Music Walk combine to create a night to remember.

Movies of the Weekend Anthony Wayne’s tip jar. EN photos/ Kayla Stirzel

1. ”The Town” $23.8 million

Venues that participate in the Downtown Music Walk

2. “Easy A” $17.7 million 3. ”Devil” $12.3 million 4. “Resident Evil: Afterlife” $10 million

5. “Alpha and Omega” $9.1 million

These figures are courtesy of boxofficemojo.com.

Anthony Wayne pleases the crowd in downtown Fort Myers.

Red Rock Saloon Spirits of Bacchus Sidney & Berne Davis Art Center HOWL Gallery Space 39 daas Gallery Cafe Matisse French Connection Cafe Enjewel

Hotel Indigo Twisted Vine Bistro Coloring The World Gallery City Tavern World Famous Cigar Bar Hideaway Sports Bar Morgan House Veranda Indigo Room


Arts & Lifestyle

www.eaglenews.org • September 22, 2010 • eagle news 9

Everglades photographer’s exhibition at local museum Clyde Butcher showcases black-and-white artistry at SW Florida Museum of History By Jamie Gillhespy

E

Staff writer

ach of Clyde Butcher’s photographs in the Southwest Florida Museum of History’s “Big Cypress Swamp and the Western Everglades” exhibition come with a mini-narrative by Butcher about his experiences capturing that photograph. Next to Clam Shell Orchid 2, for example, Butcher explains that as he trekked through the Everglades with the film crew for CBS Sunday Morning, a gator bellowing nearby suddenly made the crew nervous. Butcher writes that “it is always so much fun to take people from New York City into the swamps of Florida and get them in touch with the REAL Florida.” That statement is what this exhibit and almost all of Butcher’s Everglades photography is about. Butcher’s photographs take the viewer deep into the swamps and marshes of South Florida, where few people have ventured, in the hope of inspiring the type of appreciation that Butcher feels for the area that he has called home for almost two decades. Almost 20 years since Butcher turned his focus from architecture to landscape photography of the Everglades, Butcher’s images still have the power to move viewers. Zach Gaither, a senior majoring in environmental studies, explains that Butch-

er’s photographs are an “inspiration to people like me who want to fight to keep that land pristine, and help regular people think twice about what they do.” Butcher’s landscapes find their beauty despite photographic techniques that are not “over extravagant,” according to Gaither, who further describes Butcher’s photographs as “naturalistic and simple.” Butcher is notorious for black-andwhite photographs that capture his landscapes and subjects in intricate detail. This is due, in part, to his use of large format cameras. These cameras are reminiscent of a bygone era in which the photographer must stand below a darkened sheet to shoot the photograph and require a long time to set, load and shoot. As a result, each of Butcher’s photographs is the product of hours of hunting for the perfect location, waiting for the ideal conditions and finally preparing the camera for a single shot. This labor of love highlights Butcher’s determination to encapsulate the region and the unique beauty of these untouched areas in South Florida. There are 26 images in the SWFL Museum of History’s exhibit, each with names as simple as the photograph itself; titles such as “Alligator Alley 8,” “Loop Road 2,” “Thompson Pine Island Road 6” and “Tamiami Trail 3.” But, contained within the simplistic names of the photographs are breathtaking views of Guzmania bromeliads, which Butcher describes as “decorating the trees,” or of entire landscapes “reaching

Cayo Costa Island by Clyde Butcher. Photo courtesty of Clydebutcher.com

toward the sky in search of rain.” Ultimately, Butcher’s descriptions, use of black and white and simplistic titles allow his photographs to highlight what’s truly important in each of Butcher’s images: the breathtaking beauty of the region that is quickly becoming lost to the area’s rapid development.

If you go: n The “Big Cypress Swamp and

Western Everglades” exhibition will be at the Southwest Florida Museum of History in Fort Myers until Oct. 2.

Newest TV shows show off during debut of fall lineup ‘The Event’ and ‘Boardwalk Empire’ aim to please ‘Lost’ and ‘Sopranos’ fans By Joe Gianone

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Contributing writer

eekend was overwhelming with the anticipation about whether the fall of 2010 will have good television programming or not. Spending many hours contemplating these revelations, viewers should be delightfully surprised with two new shows — “The Event” and “Boardwalk Empire. “ On Sunday night, “The Sopranos” knock-off “Boardwalk Empire” premiered. “The Sopranos” creator and head writer Terrence Winter is on board again as creator and head writer of the show. The pilot was directed by the auteur filmmaker Martin Scorcese. So, right off the credits, it’s apparent that you’re going to see some exciting television. Coming in with very high expectations, the audience was delightfully surprised by the intense show Boardwalk Empire. For anybody who is a fan of gangster dramas like The Sopranos, you are in for a treat with this new HBO series. The show features blood, sex, and alcohol to an unflinching degree. Except for a few dull moments, “Boardwalk Empire” delivers in every way possible, and definitely has the chance to win next year’s Emmy for best new series.

“Boardwalk Empire,” if it stays on its course, could be television’s next great gangster drama, supplying all us fan boys with unsuspecting violence ... and some crazy jazz. Secondly, the new NBC series “Event” premiered. With the show’s promise of being the next “Lost,” it leaves the audience wondering, and keeps them on the edges of their seats for the entire hour it’s on. “The Event” leaves the audience with burning questions about the unflinching mysteries that are probably still plaguing their minds. “The Event” is supposed to be “Lost’s” new protégé, with its unique spin on character driven Sci-Fi, and the crazy mysteries that unfold by the end of each episode. Many people are very excited to see where this show can take us. As “Lost” had some crazy mysteries, the writers promised that each episode will provide much-wanted answers to each of these mysteries. Pretty much, they won’t leave us hanging. The audience should be very happy about this, because after “Lost’s” disappointing finale, followers can’t take another series letdown. Overall, viewers had to be pleased with this week’s programming. Let’s just hope these shows get progressively better with every episode.

The Event logo. Photo courtesy of screenrant.com

I’m already very excited to see what happens in “The Event.” Many Sci-Fi geeks like myself will be very excited to see the direction this show takes. It definitely left its audience with some very big questions, and it’s exciting to see how all these characters will be involved in the actual Event. “Boardwalk Empire,” meanwhile, is on its way to being HBO’s next big series,

and is definitely a well-written show with some exciting characters and action. The show left me wanting more from the characters, and finding out what will happen next to these crazy gangsters. You can catch “The Event” at 9 p.m. Mondays and “Boardwalk Empire” at 9 p.m. Sunday.


10

Arts & Lifestyle

eagle news • September 22, 2010• WWW.EAGLENEWS.ORG

New gym equipment technology comes to campus fitness center By Jon Galamay Contributing writer

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A student using the new Matrix technology. EN Photo/Jon Galamay

atrix Fitness is showcasing its new exercise technology at Florida Gulf Coast University’s new fitness center. This means the start of your morning cardio workout could consist of a warmup jog through the Hollywood Walk of Fame in California, an intense bike ride down the trails of Yosemite National Park, or a cooldown stretch routine in front of those brand new LCD TVs inside FGCU’s newly equipped fitness center. “Matrix was at the forefront in performing a lot of research on exercise technique, ergonomics, materials, and aesthetics in the last 13 years” says Jason Davis, FGCU’s fitness coordinator, “So we knew by going with them, we were getting equipment that had been proven successful in a lot of different settings.” According to Davis, FGCU is the first university fitness center in the state of Florida to go with Matrix. However, according to Davis, there are rumors that the University of Florida, Central Florida and South Florida have decided to go with the Matrix equipment also. “I was surprised by the new equip-

ment in the gym here,” said Hannah Rawls, a transfer student from the University of South Florida, “USF has without a doubt an amazing gym full of state-of-the-art equipment, however, the small gym here offers more individuality and independence.” That’s not the only thing that caught Rawls’ attention at the gym. Now, all treadmills, stair climbers and fitness bicycles contain iPod docks to listen to music through a touchscreen LCD interface. “The iPod docks are amazing because they have the ability to multitask like listen to my music and watch any sporting event at that time simultaneously” Rawls said. “Compared to USF, where you can only watch MTVU or ESPNU playing 24/7.” Along with the new cardio equipment, there has been a technology upgrade on all resistance exercise machines. The new Matrix equipment has oval-shaped grips, opposed to the old equipment which all had circle grips. “This may not seem important, (but) if you touch your middle finger and your thumb together to form an O, look at the hole that it makes. It’s actually an oval — that is the hand’s normal shape while pressing on something like a hand grip,” Davis said. The new Matrix assisted weight machines also come with a repetition

counter that helps you focus more on your breathing and intensity during each set. Breathing is probably the most common mistake during a working out. Most amateur workouts consists of weightlifters using the Valsalva technique, which is when a person holds their breath and stabilizes his/her diaphragm muscle in order to lift a load. A more effective method is to exhale through the sticking point of the concentric phase, which is the most strenuous part of lifting the weight, then to inhale during the eccentric phase. The timer found next to the rep counter allows you to time your rest appropriately, according to your fitness goals. A resting time of 30 seconds or less is used for muscular endurance or fat loss, 30 seconds to 1½ minutes for muscular growth, or 2 to 5 minutes resting period for strength and power. These new features help to supplement your workout by properly implementing the levels of intensity. If there is any motivation to start exercising for a healthy lifestyle, bulk up, lose weight, or even to avoid “The Freshman Fifteen,” with the new equipment in place, now would be the best time to start.

FGCU Ink Name: Vanessa Gould Year: Senior Major: Business management and marketing Location: Right side Meaning: “I grew up on the beach and it’s a part of my everyday life. I also wanted something different. Most people don’t have a tattoo covering their whole side.”

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Name: Penny Pike Year: Senior Major: Accounting Location: Left leg Meaning: “I always wanted a tattoo of a penny, and because we must always have faith in ourselves and our own abilities above everything else.”

E-mail pictures of your tattoos to entertainment@eaglenews.org.


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Opinion

Eagle news editorial BOARD

Early stress has to be kicked By Chel Freeman

Contributing writer

I

s it December yet? What is it about this semester that has us so frazzled?

I’ve expressed to friends how drained I am and they look back at me, mirroring my own dark circles, to emphatically express the same sentiment.

I chalk my stress up to my 12-hour school days, the pressure I feel to make in impact during my internship, the copious amounts of reading I have, not to mention my non-school-related obligations. Mommy needs a martini something fierce. If I hear one more thing about how tired someone is due to their sorority, I’ll be forced to hand them my jam-packed calendar and stack of very real bills. There will come a time, sooner than you think, when the minute hand will be so insanely valuable. The idea of being caught up on my homework and having a clean house, it seems, is just a distant fantasy. Let’s call it my goal by the Thanksgiving break. For now, the tumbleweeds of cat hair go with the décor. Apparently, I’m not alone drowning in quizzes and dreaming of lecture notes. I’ll benevolently let you in on what I’ve been explaining to myself: if I get sick from stress, it will set me back even further. It’s just not worth it. I’m on a quest for ways to decompress without checking out all together. It’s quite possible that I’ll charge a plane ticket to some spa in the mountains and drop the entire semester at any given moment.

Write to us Eagle News respects the opinion of its readers and welcomes responses of up to 300 words. We reserve the right to reject letters or edit for clarity, brevity and accuracy, and to prevent libel. Please

To stave off this hunger, I have to find joy in the turtles in the pond by parking garage 3 or in the purple orchids that just bloomed outside my kitchen window. They beat the odds and came back to life after some rich person tossed them in the trash, by the way. There’s a movieof-the-week message in there, I’m sure. Today, I went for a deep tissue massage because I’d already found myself with daily headaches only a month into my classes. Though the aromatherapy was intoxicating, I’m currently feeling more beat up than blissful. I do, however, feel motivated and optimistic for the first time since school began. Did it get the academic endorphins flowing? My lesson is that we need a little break, sometimes mental, sometimes physical, and we have to be the ones to allow it. Despite my admittedly jaded perception of most areas of college life, I am an optimistic person. I try to utilize all of the great tools we had reinforced to us, or for some, introduced to us, in courses like Civic Engagement and Interracial & Intercultural Communications. I unplug from media sources that encourage harmful thoughts and when all else fails, remember how fortunate I am to have been born here and not in Sudan, for example. This puts things into perspective immensely. Chel Freeman is a senior majoring in communication. She is passionate about art, culture, women’s issues, human rights and the truth. Chel understands that to keep the peace, we must disturb it once in a while, which has gotten her into trouble a few times.

Staff Writer

E

very morning I stumble out of bed to start another jammed packed day of whatever. It starts with getting two kids ready for school, three animals ready to be independent all day, and getting my own things ready.

The kids have to be dropped at school no later than 7:40 a.m. or my fifthgrader can’t particMandie ipate in the school television news proRainwater duction. Then I start my long, coffeeless drive to campus. Traffic, accidents and disturbing stories on WGCU about the state of the world’s affairs bombard me and it’s not even 8:30 yet! Then I sit at the main entrance stoplight and I find myself cheering up. No, my phone didn’t just beep indicating an e-mail saying that class has been canceled, something I find more irritating than gratifying; it’s in anticipation of my morning greeting. Each day I am greeted, like all the others who pass by the information booth on their way onto campus, by Officer Robert Green, FGCU UPD Employee of the Year for 2009. Green joined UPD in 2005 with extensive Air Force experience. Before he was assigned to the information booth, many of you may have met

10501 FGCU Blvd. South, Fort Myers, Florida 33965

Online: www.eaglenews.org editorinchief@eaglenews.org

him when you went into the parking services office to get your permits. You remember the happy-go-lucky guy behind the counter that tells you “You know you’re my friend!” Even when shrouded by Plexiglas, his personality couldn’t help but make you smile, forget whatever troubles were bothering you, and walk away a bit less worse for wear. In a school of 12,000, Green attempts to make everyone he comes in contact with feel as though they are the only one that matters. This level of attention, to me, comes at the right time every morning and sets my mood for the day. The fact that I know he will be standing outside the booth with his hand waving, salutes flying, and a smile on his face lets me know that it’s the little things that make a person’s day, not just the grandiose gestures we read about in novels. I hope that the next time you come on campus, you might drive in through the main entrance and wave back. Show him that his role in your day is important. Thank you, Officer Green, for making my days a bit easier. I salute you. Mandie Rainwater is a sophomore. She is majoring in secondary education with a focus in social sciences. She is married with two children and is an active volunteer for C.A.R.E.S. Suicide Prevention. She is a contributing author to “UnspOILed: Writers speak for Florida’s Coast” and has been featured in the Southeast Online Review.

Sara Gottwalles Opinion Editor opinion@eaglenews.org

www.eaglenews.org

(239) 590-7945

Safety concerns for north access road By Collin Llewellyn Staff writer

T

he north access road into FGCU is a dark and scary road at night. Most commonly referred to by students as “rape road” because of its macabre feeling once the sun goes down. It’s almost as if once you pass the side entrance to North Lake Village you fall from a welllit and safe campus into a dark and frightening strip of road. I am relieved to hear that student senate has passed a bill to properly light and secure the roadway. Hopefully their anticipated measures will be enacted Collin soon. There have been a numLlewellyn ber of police-beat reports and e-mails sent out about assaults around Lee and neighboring counties, so why have we put students in danger for so long? Obviously, we can choose not to go jogging down ‘Rape Road’ after dark, but the unfortunate reality is, people still do. Until the area becomes safely light, I suggest students find another jogging route. As it is now, if someone’s car broke down in the middle of the night, they would be in complete darkness. Sure, cellular phones are now more popular to have than not to have, but we can’t assume that we shouldn’t put emergency call boxes down that road, or at least a few streetlights to make the area a little more secure. It doesn’t take more than a few seconds or short minutes before something

include a phone number and valid e-mail address, and be sure to sign your letter with your full name, year and major.

Smile: You know you’re my friend By Mandie Rainwater

Allison Gagliardi Editor-in-Chief editorinchief@eaglenews.org

can go wrong, and it’s wrong to assume that because a car can potentially drive by to help that we shouldn’t do a better job of protecting students. Not only are deviant humans lurking in the darkness a threat, but what about all the wildlife roaming around campus at night? FGCU had done a great job taking care of its students, but there is a lot of room to do a better job. We students need to keep on senate to make sure proper lighting isinstalled. The north access road has been a dark and scary place for a long time, but it’s only a matter of time before something goes wrong, something a few lights and an emergency call box could prevent. Student Senate, please be assured that we want the safety measures outlined in the bill as soon as possible. We would like to be able to drive and exercise in a secure environment. Until safety precautions are in place, drive with caution and jog in a different location. We have a gym on campus that is free to all students. Or you could get your evening run in around Student housing. Run a few laps on the sidewalks in the parking lots. Those are well light, and if anything were to happen you would be where people could hear and help you. We’re not invincible, but on the dark access road, we are invisible.

Collin Llewellyn is a sophomore. He is majoring in English. He is an RA in North Lake Village. Collin is passionate about living life fully and not wasting opportunities, especially chances to learn.

Can you draw? Send Eagle News your cartoons or illustrations for publication. We will give you a free movie ticket if we publish it. Submit art to the opinion editor directly at: opinion@eaglenews.org

Religious campus RSOs provide worship outlets By Jeffrey Haut Staff Writer

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t is a safe bet that many FGCU students have a belief in some form of the Divine Spirit, whether it is God, Allah, Buddha, Adonai or the Holy Trinity. However, once students reach college, no matter how devout they may be, it is hard to balance organized off-campus prayer and the rigors of higher education. If this model fits you, perhaps it is time to look into the various religious RSOs (Registered Student Organizations) that are present on our campus to keep up with our worship practices. For those students who define themselves as Evangelical or “Born Again” Christians, the group Ignite may be for you. I have personally attended numerous Ignite services. However, I will say that I am not an Evangelical Christian. Nonetheless, the upbeat atmosphere and smiling faces make this group one to look out for if you are in need of a spiritual “lift.” For those who are Catholic, the Catholic Newman Club is an up-and-coming student organization with regular Masses on Sunday nights in the Student Union. For Jewish students, there are two options: Hillel of Southwest Florida, which in my opinion is more socially based; or Chabad of Bonita Springs, which is more faith-based. Both organizations are very well run and have “mensches” for rabbis. Chabad’s website can be found at http://www.jewishbonita.com/, or you can just look for Rabbi Greenberg around campus. FGCU also has a gospel-centered group called Voices of Inspriation and Praise; Core Student Leadership is set up to “explore and discuss the leadership of Jesus Christ”; and Restless, a group that defines itself as “unafraid to pose challenging questions and have intellectual discussion” about any and all religious and societal issues. InterVarsity Christian Fellowship is a his-

toric Christian group dating back to 1877 from University of Cambridge in England. They have had a chapter at FGCU since 2000, and are in place to “advance the word of Jesus Christ.” Last, but not least, Christians from all protestant dominations can get involved in Chi Alpha, a campus ministry, which was founded in 1953 at Missouri State University. Chi Alpha currently has chapters at more than 300 campuses nationwide and around the world, and its purpose is to “help people go through the awkward to get to the comfortable” through the teachings of the Bible. Remember, if none of these organizations fit your bill, it is always possible for someone to start a religious RSO. The deadline for new RSO registrations has already passed. However, you can always swing by the office in the Student Union 215 to get more information for the future. All that is needed to start an RSO is a form, four members willing to be officers, a constitution and a staff adviser. The First Amendment is a very powerful tool. It is the right to practice religion freely, without any interference from the government. It is the ability to form student organizations and meet without hindrances. I believe that all students who define themselves as religious or spiritual should take advantage of these RSOs. At a minimum, they can confirm and strengthen already-held beliefs. Or, they can lead to a truly life-changing decision. Either way, the groups on campus are available to guide us through all of our spiritual journeys, no matter what faith we practice. For a full list of RSOs visit: http://studentservices.fgcu.edu/StudentInvolvement/rso.html Jeffrey Haut is a freshmen majoring in political science. He plans to attain his law degree from a Florida university after he graduates. He is a member of Kappa Sigma and feels that leadership is the truest test of one’s character.


Opinion

www.eaglenews.org • SEptember 22, 2010 • eagle news 13

Relationship quests ruin friendships Tuned into the wrong value channels By Taryn Kerber Staff writer

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irls, if you’re like me, you love to hang out with guys. I always have. Don’t get me wrong, I have a ton of girl friends; however, the majority of my friends and best friends are male. I’ve always felt more comfortable playing “Call of Duty: Nazi Zombies,” mudding on ATVs and in general hanging out and talking with my guy friends.

In high school there were never any strings attached or a sense of tension. I was “one of the guys.” They had my back and would do anything for me. That’s what a true friend is about, right? Being there for each other no matter what the gender or situation? Lately I’ve noticed it’s harder to make guy friends. You get to college and they all seem to want to be your friend until they find out you are in a relationship. “Boyfriend” is the forbidden “B” word that sends guys running and suddenly cutting off all communication.

Taryn Kerber

I wish the guys I’m surrounded by had more compassion. Most seem to just have one thing on their minds, and once they figure out that the girl’s situation is unfavorable to them, they move to their next target. What happened to the guys who are there because they care and not because they expect something from you? What happened to the Gentlemen? Chivalry seems to have died with the dinosaurs. I’m not saying all guys are like this, I have met a few good ones, but it’s too bad all can’t appreciate girls for who they are rather than for what is in their pants. Just because a guy may have a certain vision doesn’t mean the girl is sharing that same desire. Grow up and get to know the girls. You never know; if the girl and her boyfriend break up, maybe you’ll get lucky. But don’t let the “B” word ruin a potential friendship. Taryn Kerber is a freshman majoring in communication and plans on becoming an event planner. She has a creative and outspoken mind. Taryn is also an environmentalist and is out to save the world, one good deed at a time. She believes, deep down, everyone is good. If only they saw more with their hearts.

We create our own relationship misery By Sara Gottwalles

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Opinion editor

o play devil’s advocate, I would like to show some love for the fellas on campus — to an extent. The first thing I’d like to hit on is the “chivalry is dead” dilemma. For the most part, yes, it is — because we ladies have stabbed it with our tampons and set it ablaze with our bras. More than once I have been on my way into the library when a guy held the door for me and the girl in front Sara of me. The other girl Gottwalles insists that he go inside first or let go of the door because she is independent. I’m sure you’re capable of pulling the door open for yourself. This is not about your rights as a woman, but more about being courteous. If another girl were to hold the door for you, would that be OK? What if she were a lesbian? Would that create a problem? Or is this just an anti-testosterone campaign. If you’re one of these girls, think for a moment how you would feel if you were the guy. I bet if a male professor held the door you’d be all right with it. Loosen up and let someone do something nice for you regardless of their genitals and preference of what they do with said genitals. I feel that a lot of the differences in men and their actions is (of course) maturity and generational. It’s like the expectations for girls have changed and broadened with the times, but those for guys have stayed the same. They’re all supposed to be athletic, charming, good-looking and protective. But what if you’re a geek with acne, self-esteem issues, socially disinclined and carry an inhaler? Maybe we’ve set the bar too high for our boys. Perhaps they’re nervous being on a college campus around a bunch of smart and attractive girls because they feel inadequate in some way. Maybe they don’t lift weights or know any good jokes to break the ice.

Somehow, guys and girls alike have forgotten about the being friends part and have been swinging for the fences of romance. Isn’t half the fun supposed to be the base work? Listen guys, I don’t blame you. Some of us are stuck-up or are intimidating. Others seem too beautiful or too smart. Chances are we’re thinking the same thing about you — minus the beautiful part. We are encouraged to do everything quickly in this culture, including getting into a relationship. You’ve known them for a week now and you like them. Now you must ask them out, go on a great vacation, move in together, get engaged, get married, have children and then try to get to know one another. I’ve been taking my “relationship” slowly for over a year now. There is no commitment, and we get along great and have a lot of fun. Why the rush? And moreover, why the rush for a simple title? If you know you’re good friends and perhaps even more than friends, just enjoy the ride. Don’t get sucked in to feeling like your relationship status somehow is a measure of you as a person. I agree with Taryn that a guy or girl who only wants you for sex, though it may seem fun at first, will only burn you — and may possibly leave behind another burning sensation. Everybody, just chill out, and whether you are in a relationship or just have friends of the opposite sex, realize that love comes in different forms. Just because your lips aren’t locked in passion doesn’t mean that you should bail out on what could be one of the best friendships of your life. After all, if you don’t have that opposite sex friend, who are you going to call at night to ask “so what do you suppose he/she is thinking?” Sara Gottwalles is a senior. She is majoring in history with a minor in education and philosophy and holds a BA in communication. She likes to look into different philosophies of life and gives more credit to the unorthodox than “the norm.” As a Buddhist, she strongly believes in the 4 noble truths.

By Chelsea Seeley Staff writer

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n this day and age, it doesn’t matter what is going on in world news or politics. It is all about which Kardashian sister is having a baby, or what “Mad Mel” Gibson has ranted about. Celebrity life has taken over the world! There is no escape. It is just another way to promote gossip and hurtful rumors. Of course, as humans, we have the naivety to believe almost everything we hear. We allowed the celebriChelsea have ties we see on TV into our lives, and they really Seeley aren’t ready to leave. When we watch shows such as “Kendra” or “Kate Plus 8,” we are able to see that our lives aren’t the only ones caught in chaos. We get a good laugh out of seeing celebrities do some really strange stuff, but also living somewhat normal lives. It is an escape, and also a way to relate. Some people may have families like the Kardashians, or may be searching for love as Bret Michaels was on “Rock of Love.” We see things that tie into our lives, and it makes us feel there is a bond. Yet, we can’t take the time to look at our own lives and issues that truly matter, because “E! News” or “Dancing with the Stars” is on. When someone gets wrapped up into something they find interesting on TV, it can be hard to break them away. They refuse to focus and don’t take an

interest in reality. We have thousands of people going hungry in the streets, more people dying in Third World countries, and are having a mess of a war between our two political parties, but no one wants to take the time to let another piece of culture soak into their brain. I will not lie; I watch all the celebrity issues on the E! channel, and I am an avid fan of “Dancing with the Stars,” but I also make sure I am paying attention to something relevant in my life, not in the life of a famous actor. I have found a balance in my life where I will watch the news for a half hour, and then watch a celebrity-related show for another half hour. If everyone would be able to do this, we may be able to maintain our intelligence. We would have kids who could tell you who the vice president of our country is, and be able to talk to other students about what is going on in their own community. Instead, we can tell you what Kate Hudson was wearing to some razzle-dazzle event and who she was with. There is a song that represents my feelings, and others, very well. As singer Ferras says, Hollywood is NOT America. Let’s take advice from him, and refuse to let our country turn into the celebrity gossip capital of the world. Chelsea Seeley is a freshman majoring in elementary education. Her goal is to eventually receive her master’s in special education. Chelsea has been writing for public audiences for more than four years. She loves how writing can be a true expression of your personality.

Technology size and abilities changing By Andrew Friedgen

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Contributing writer

y favorite period of recent history is the 1950s.

Sporting classy cars and beaming optimism, it’s easy to look at it as an era of stability. Just as Ford wanted to design a nuclear fission-powered car, no one probably thought that computer technology would evolve from the housesized behemoths that definitely couldn’t play “The Sims.” Then along came a little miracle of technology called the microprocessor and the rest, as they say, is history. I found myself surprised walking through CompUSA a few months ago when I saw these nifty compact desktop computers packing all the necessary components for basic desktop specs along with basic inputs into a case I could probably fit in my backpack. I was a bit alarmed; I knew that these types of computers existed, my own high school library had them, but it was new to see them being commercialized for public use. I wasn’t expecting it. Along the same vein, we have all seen the small notebook computers known as netbooks which are inexpensive, small, and perfect for the college life. With monitors that can be as small as 5 inches diagonally, they offer an extremely compacted platform for taking notes, working on projects, or browsing the internet. In fact, some are putting a lot of hope into the practicality of netbooks; Greece provided all 13-year-old students and their teachers with netbooks in 2009 and Australia is providing year nine students with netbooks for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years. “Heck, why not combine smart phones and netbooks?” the company Qualcomm said in early 2009. Named the smartbook, these devices are exactly what you would expect them to be: properties of smartphones such as GPS, all-day

battery life, and wireless connectivity molded into the netbook form. While in current smartbooks, calls can’t be made, with wireless internet capability, that means that video/audio communication programs such as Skype have the potential to erase that problem. The smartbook actually serves as a poster child for a recent trend: cell phones have gotten slightly larger. I’m sure everyone remembers the hysterics over Motorola’s Razr, and now we have the equally-obsessed-over iPhone series that is ... bigger? We tend to think of technology progressing in terms of “getting smaller,” but in this case, it’s the opposite. My standard Verizon LG flip phone with a bent antennae and no reception on 90 percent of FGCU’s campus is smaller than the newest technology that can be stuck into a phone. Go figure. And the confusingly simple feature that many smart phones tout, “3G,” is the third generation of wireless cellphone capability. 1G was first developed in 1981, 2G in 1992 and 3G in 2002. 4G, the upcoming fourth generation, is just on the horizon. Major U.S. cities such as New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Richmond, Va., in addition to 30-plus other densely populated areas, have 4G networks on the Sprint brand. Besides that, 4G isn’t widespread enough for a 4G-capable phone to have access anywhere on the globe. We can always count on computers and cell phones to stay large enough for our fingers to navigate the keyboard or screen. With technology expanding by leaps and bounds in the 21st century, the prospects are endless and strike a chord of curiosity in me for future developments. Andrew Friedgen is a freshman majoring in psychology. He has written dozens of short stories and is currently working on a novel. He feels that writing is an organic, dynamic beast that can be as much a teacher as a talent.

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EN Cartoon David Tiegen and Edward Droney


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Sports

Men’s soccer upsets No. 5 Ohio State 1-0 Freshman Ryan Price scored in the 64th minute of play to break a scoreless tie and give FGCU a 1-0 win over No. 5 Ohio State on Saturday in front of a recordbreaking crowd of 1,322 fans at at the FGCU Soccer Complex. Price and fellow freshman Donovan Henry connected on the goal that gave the Eagles their second win over a ranked opponent this season. Price dove after Henry’s pass for a header.

Top, FGCU goalie Adam Glick comes out after a save; at right, an Eagle eludes an Ohio State defender. EN Photos/ Taryn Kerber

Women’s soccer looks to rebound in conference By Zach Gibbons

Contributing writer

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GCU’s women’s soccer team has gotten off to a bit of a rough start, but has recovered in its past two games with a 0-0 tie at Jacksonville and a 2-1 win against North Florida. Now, the Eagles enter the heart of their Atlantic Sun Conference schedule. Those last two results give the Eagles a record of 4-4-1. Coach Jim Blankenship points to the weather as part of the reason for the rocky start to the season. “The beginning of it’s a little frustrating, because we had so many rainouts in training, and games delayed by lightning, and losing ball games,” Blankenship said. “I kind of feel like we could never get a pattern going, or a game going. Now that we’ve been able to get past that the last couple weeks, I feel like were playing a lot better soccer. “We’ve been very good,” Blankenship said. Part of the challenge in getting the season headed in a consistently winning direction will be in maintaining focus, according to the coach. “Well, I think it’s something our group has talked about quite a bit,” Blankenship said. “The season’s a little bit of a grind. It’s a lot of games. You play Friday and Sunday, and it can be a little taxing. “Dealing with the grind of the schedule was kind of our Achilles heel last year. We would kind of hit that stall in the middle where we struggled a bit, regrouped, and we got focused and made a run at the end,” Blankenship said. The Eagles will definitely have to focus in the beginning of October when they face Mercer and Kennesaw State — teams they beat last year,

but who now sit atop the A-Sun standings. “Well, you know one thing about our conference is that there’s quite a bit of parity,” Blankenship said. “Kennesaw and Mercer could end up in the top of the league.” Kathleen Hunter, a redshirt junior who has played for the FGCU Eagles the past three seasons, agreed that those two aforementioned teams could present a challenge. “We will be playing them at home, so I would say that is a benefit,” Hunter said. “Mercer is a team that has nine out of their 11 girls above 5-foot-8, so they’re a very tall, very physical team.” Eight of the players on the women’s soccer team are seniors, and it’s that experienced nucleus that Blankenship looks toward the most for leadership. “We’ve got an older group; we’ve got eight or nine kids that are going to be graduating,” Blankenship said. “So they’ve kind of started the program, they’ve kind of invested in it, and they’ve been good examples for the younger kids that come to the program. “We’ve been blessed with some pretty good kids that get it, that have been good examples and good role models for all the younger kids.” Hunter would also like to see the seniors end on a high note. “Personally, I would like to see the rest of the seniors go out well, and just know that we really did what we came here to accomplish,” Hunter said. “I’m a redshirt junior myself, but I came in with this senior class, and we really do have a strong bond, and to go out winning conference would really mean a lot to me, and I know it would mean a lot to the girls,” Hunter said. If this team can remain focused, like it has been of late, there should be no problem sending the seniors out on a high note.

Kathleen Hunter dribbles the ball up the field. Photo courtesy of FGCU athletics


Sports ENSports weekly recap

Men’s soccer

Goalie Adam Glick won his fourth career Atlantic Sun Defensive Player of the Week honor.

Women’s cross country Barrie Cohen and Kelly Perzanowski broke the 5K school record in leading their team to a seventh-place finish at the Mountain Dew Invitational at the University of Florida this past Saturday.

Volleyball

Begins conference play when Belmont comes to Alico Arena on Sept. 25.

Men’s cross country

Women’s basketball

Volunteered with LeeTran’s second annual Food Drive to benefit the Harry Chapin Food Bank.

September 22, 2010 • www.eaglenews.org

Season preview: Men’s golf

Eagles shoot for top-50 ranking By Eric Dellaratta Contributing writer

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fter a runner-up finish at the Atlantic Sun Championships last year, the men’s golf team is hungrier than ever for a conference championship. In the final round of the A-Sun Championship, the Eagles shot a four-man score of 6-under par 282. But the Eagles won’t settle for second place this year. “Our number one goal each year is to win the conference championship,” said Coach Brent Jensen. “We were pleased to finish second, but at the same time we’re going to fight and work hard to bring home the conference championship.” Jensen enters his first year as the head coach of the FGCU men’s golf team. He was previously an assistant to former head coach Jim Suttie. Jensen has a plan in place for this season, and he is determined to follow it through with the Eagles. “My goal on a daily basis is to make sure that we improve,” Jensen said. “I want all of our guys to be better players and better people. I’m going to do my best to do those things. We ended the year ranked 90th, I think, in the nation by Golfweek’s rankings, Another goal I have this year is to get us into the top 50.” Coach Jensen and the rest of the Eagles will surely be looking to have a record-breaking year in 2010. The team has lots

of experience, which includes nine upperclassmen. Players to watch: • Brandon Pena: Pena came out firing last season as a sophomore. Pena shot a 7-under 65 in the final round of the A-Sun championships, where he went on to place second individually. Pena finished last season with a scoring average of 74.55. • Matt Cote: Ready to start the next chapter of his golfing career, freshman Matt Cote is just another bright spot that has been added to Jensen’s roster. “Matt [Cote] has a lot of talent,” Jensen said. “He has a great swing, he’s fundamentally sound, and I’m looking forward to him making an impact on the team this year.” Cote had a very good high school career headlined by a 36 average, Senior Daniel Mazziotta hits an iron . Photo courtesy of FGCU athletics which earned him first team all-conference honors. The team expects a very solid 73.9 average. championship. “I think the entire Cote to be an instant con- His low round last year was a 6-under 66 in the team is really looking tributor as a freshman. • Daniel Mazziotta: second round of the Bet- forward to our tournaThe senior had the best hune-Cookman Fall invi- ment out in California. “We’re heading out scoring average of any tational. Jensen and the rest of to the Monterrey area, to FGCU golfer with an average of 73.1. He also had the Eagles golf team will play a tournament hostseven under-par rounds surely be counting on ed by St. Mary’s. I think Medinis to play at a high it’s going to be one of the last season. strongest fields we play Mazziotta won the in- level. in the fall.” dividual title at the MisThe Eagles begin sion Inn Fall Intercolle- Matchup to watch: • SMC Invitational, their season Saturday at giate with a three -round the John Dallio Memoscore of 4-under par (209). Monterrey, Calif.: “It’s always fun to rial. The tournament enMazziotta will surely be a major contributor this play in tournaments with compasses 36 holes over teams that are in our two days. season for the Eagles. After that event, the • Alex Medinis: Last conference,” Jensen said. season, Medinis finished “It always gives us a good Eagles play at the Renaissecond on the team in idea of where we stand sance Invitational on scoring average, posting going into the conference Oct. 3-4.

Spero takes over women’s golf; looks to cut across boundaries

By Addison Hicks Contributing writer

Finished in sixth place at the Mountain Dew Invitational at the University of Florida this past Saturday behind record-breaking times from Argeo Cruz and Jonathan Lanning.

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GCU has seen many changes to its sports programs the past few years, and one of the most recent changes is the hiring of Meghan Spero as head coach of the women’s golf team. Spero grew a passion for the sport of golf w h i l e growing Spero up in Illinois. She went on to develop an understanding and lifelong love of the game at University of Iowa, were she was a member of the women’s golf team for four years. After college, Speroe found a home in Southwest Florida, where she has become a well- known

and respected golf pro. She takes over at FGCU for Brittany Bertilson. After working as a golf pro went stale, Spero jumped at the opportunity to teach college students after seeing how her game improved at the University of Iowa. “I have been watching the growth and recognition that has been taking place here at FGCU over the past few years,” Spero said. “When I played college golf over at Iowa, I learned so much. It was a great learning experience for me and I wanted to do the same for the girls over here. It was a perfect opportunity to help these girls grow and sharpen their skills, just as I did when I was their age.” She relishes the challenge of working with players whose games are foreign to her. “I went in with an open mindset; I wanted to

give them the opportunity to go with what they already had,” Spero said. “I took the time to observe them on and off the course. It is important to watch their swing and attitude during the game to get a better understanding of the type of player I have, and to see what they could use coaching on.” After working with player of all ages at country clubs, Spero now must adjust to teaching college students. “It’s like night and day. These girls are already advanced players who have a strong foundation in the sport,” Spero said. “Of course there are pros and cons, but one of the most rewarding aspects is that I get to simplify the way I teach the game. Golf is already hard enough, and my goal is simply to simplify.” Every new coach comes into a program with a vision, and Spero is no different. Her goals are grand

and large-scale, spanning many sectors. “My vision is broad; I have a lot of goals, and there’s a lot I want to accomplish,” Spero said. “There has been a team here for a while, and mainly I want to create a nationally recognized golf program. “Becoming known, building a strong foundation and winning conference is definitely a top priority. We have such great players and I want to help them accomplish their own goals,” she said. Spero looks to erase any preconceived inferiorites about her team. “Everybody is an individual with their own strengths and weaknesses, and it’s my job to help them perfect their skills as young women competing in a male-dominated sport. We are not to be taken lightly.” With such a bold mentality, the possibilities are endless.

We rightfully rejected Heat

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ecently, FGCU turned down a chance to host the Miami Heat’s October training camp at Alico Arena. The force of a circus led by NBA ringleader LeBron James and headliners Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh would bring glamour and power to a school still finding its niche. But using the instant g rati fication of an outside party to attain those things would mean our higherups have their sights set on the wrong place, especially Josh Siegel at the expense ON SPORTS of the student body. In an e-mail, William Blood, FGCU assistant athletic director of facilities and operations, described the Heat’s request and what it would require. “They requested exclusive access to the entire facility for a week in October. This would require us to shut down the fitness center, displace women’s volleyball, women’s basketball, men’s basketball, training room staff and campus recreation intramurals,” Blood wrote. Changing the infrastructure of students’ daily routines during midterms contradicts the student-oriented vision of FGCU. University officials supported that thinking by turning down significant compensation by the Heat. According to Blood, had FGCU been able to accommodate the Heat’s facility needs, cost for rental would have been $2,500 per day plus any labor costs associated with facility and event operations. But that doesn’t mean FGCU didn’t deliberate over the Heat’s offer, and it doesn’t mean they’re satisfied with a small-school, humble stature. If the timing were different, FGCU would have probably accepted the Heat’s offer. “It would have brought exposure for FGCU,” Blood said. “If the impact was less detrimental to the student body, we would have actively pursued hosting their (Heat) camp.” This would have represented the wrong kind of exposure. As the media flock in, the image of FGCU is distorted, as it becomes a clownish sideshow. Down the line, FGCU wouldn’t be remembered as an underdog that boldly hosted a national act, but rather as a school greedy enough to conform to an outsider’s needs. When an entity does something significant, they naturally seek recognition. That is understandable. FGCU is gaining a reputation as an evolving university. That extends to FGCU athletics, which has produced nine league championships in three years of Division 1 and has watched recent alumni such as Chris Sale, Casey Coleman and Derek Lamely go pro in their respective sports. These exploits have evaded the notice of audiences both on and off campus, and FGCU athletics knows this. They held “Eagle Revolution” early this year to promote a product that deserves notoriety. I can’t condemn FGCU for wanting to awaken the nation’s consciousness to our presence. But do it with the people who supply the ammunition to strive for those things. If FGCU athletics maintains its pace, recognition will come. The process will be slow and intricate, but FGCU will eventually acquire the revenue and resources required to attain the status it desires by the strength of the student body. A quick fix from the outside is a desperate, reckless way to do that, and would detract from FGCU’s core. Thankfully FGCU’s braintrust was able to stand up to the mythical “King” LeBron James, indirectly or not.


Volume 9 Issue 4