Issuu on Google+

DYLAN SALMONS UNDERGRADUATE PORTFOLIO LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PENN STATE UNIVERSITY 2008 - 2010


A

s time progresses our communities must deal with a new paradigm of integrated systems, as too should design. Whether termed “hybrid” or “performance oriented designs” the spaces, landscapes and objects of everyday life benefit by being constructed with a site, structure, and meaning systems approach. As such, I propose that the future of design doesn’t exist within the confines of isolated specialties, but lives where these fields intersect. Immersing myself within this overlap has been the goal of my work as a designer.


Works

Table of Content

Year Semester

.11 -14 p.1 5-1 8

-10 p.8

ce rfa Su

tor rt ac t A

9 7-2 p.2

Mu se oA dri an o

p.5 -7

Ur ba nA rbo ricu ltur ep

p.1 -4

Pa rk An ac os tia

p.3 2

p.3 0-3 2

L

XL 2008

2009

personal

Project Location

ma Ro , ere ts ev Tra

-10 p.8

.21 -26

p.1 9-2 0

Hy bri ds Po tom ac Pa rk

M

a om R , ere v e st Tra

Sp rin gC ree k

The information below is presented through each page of the document. As the projects change, the information bar reflects the specific location, term, and advisor from the work.

S

Wo rki ng

The diagram to the right illustrates a collection of work that has been completed while at The Pennsylvania State University. These works have been selected for their investigation into varied opportunities of design solutions. The graphic is arranged in a progression from arriving at Penn State to current day. Each project is then organized according to scale: small, medium, large, and extra-large. It is this consistent drive for a multiplicity of scales, typologies, and performative functions that I feel best embodies my work as a designer. While Landscape Architecture has undoubtably provided a driving current behind each of these projects, a desire to connect to other variables of design has determined its individual success.

Ju mp Bo x

Insight:

YA La Ex um hib e it ier Lo v Pla Bu e C za an ffa a lo Inf l p.3 ill 4 p

p.3 3

p.3 3

What, When, Where?

Advisor Position

2010

group

professional

2011


ANACOSTIA WATERFRONT The Anacostia Riverfront provided an excellent example of a space in both ecological and communal disrepair. Once an industrial center, the now derelict brownfield site required a series of remediative systems to be integrated, as well as a clean face to foster diverse community relations. In order to jump-start ecological remediation of the site, storm water was gathered from new construction areas into a filtering central water feature. The water is used to provide fresh flushes to seeded wetlands along the riparian edge. The lack of relationship between this area of the waterfront and more favorable communities of the area can be attributed to the site’s lack of connective corridors. In seeking to provide easily accessible connections to the greater D.C. area, the design calls for the creation of a pedestrian bridge, as well as a series of confluence nodes. These nodes, such as the community agriculture and sculpture gardens, turn the waterfront into a destination to actively attract visitors. Combining these nodes with a multi-use downtown core, a pedestrian friendly environment, and a functioning treatment zone promises to bridge many of the gaps that dissuade the development of the Anacostia riverfront.

View From Bridge

01

Anacostia Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Spring 2009

Barry Kew Assistant Professor


Anacostia Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Spring 2009

Barry Kew Assistant Professor

02


West End Plan

LOFT LLO O OFFFTT SSTTTU UD U DIIO O APA PARRTTTM MEEEN M NTTSS N

E

L

LOFT

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

FOOD

FOOD

LOBBY

APARTMENT

APARTMENT

FOOD

LOFT LOFT

LOFT LOFT

FOOD

FOOD

LIGHT WELL HOUSED STREET TREE

West End Section

03

Anacostia Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Spring 2009

Barry Kew Assistant Professor


4’ 2’ 1’

6” OVERFRLOW DEPTH

RAIN SCUPPER COPPER BASIN FLANGE GABIAN FACE 1/4” RIM DRAIN 1/4” HOLE DRAIN COPPER BASIN RUBBER FILTER WRAP 3/4” SAND SETTING BED STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BASE

B1. 4” PRIMARY DEPTH

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE BASE MAX 1’ OF LOAM/SOIL FILTER FABRIC RAIN CORE SEPERATING DRAINAGE LAYER POLYFROM BASEBOARD BBA APPROVED SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE INNER GABION RIP-RAP STONE LA. SPECIFIED FIELD STONE POLISHED STAINLESS STEEL GABION CAGE

2” OUTFLOW TRENCH COVERED BY LA. SELECTED GRATES

1’

OVERFLOW DRAIN THROUGH STREET TRENCH BBA APPROVED SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE BBA APPROVED SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE GABION STONE LOAM/SOIL MIXTURE Riparian Planting Mix: Andropogon virginicus Carex stricta Carex lurida Eupatorium dubium Iris versicolor Lobelia cardinalis Verbena hastata

B2.

GABION PLAN 3/8”=1’ PRIMARY DRIANAGE THROUGH GABIAN

SECTION B2.

PERSPECTIVE SECTION THROUGH GABION

Gabion Planter Section

Anacostia Waterfront Anacostia, DC

Spring 2009

Barry Kew Assistant Professor

04


MUSEO ADRIANO Museo Adriano was a team submission for the Premio Piranesi Design Competition. Completed in the fall of 2009, the Piranesi is held annually between a series of European Universities in commemoration of the late Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Our team was composed of three architecture students and three landscape students. As leader for the landscape team, I designed and rendered the following imagery. Our submission “MAAAD,” was the amalgamation of a series of design facets: a physical museum, synthetic exhibition spaces, and identity and branded items. Museo Adriano acts as a connective tissue, linking the works of Emperor Hadrian between the Villa of Tivoli, and his works within the walls of Rome. The project accomplishes this task by focusing upon layers of historical design accretion, while drawing upon Hadrian’s desire for all things modern. Generating a contemporary museum functioning on the historic villa, traversing Rome via exhibitions, and throughout the world as a cultural emblem, Museo Adriano can be seen as a design for the future and the past.

Acronym Development

MAAAD: Identity, Installation, Museum Plan

05

Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor


View From Garden Towards Rocca Bruna Observatory

Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor

06


Pantheon Sunlight Installation

07

Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor


TRASTEVERE [EVOLVE] The development of an urban square, or piazza, was the final step within the Landscape Architecture of the 2009 study abroad semester. This phase of design, intended to build on the previous research programs, requires a strong understanding of both the historical significance of a space, as well as, its current responsibility to the urban community, in effort to create a functional, and meaningful piazza. Living day to day in Trastevere granted me a discriminate understanding of the community differences between this working class environment and the palatial esteem of historic Rome. Ultimately, when designing a piazza for Trastevere, this proud mentality of the local people is what guided the concept of “Urban Resilience,� or the ability for the spirit of a place to remain timeless, regardless of change. As a key aspect of my design I sought to make people aware of the pride at the heart of Trastevere. Aside from creating a functional and retrospective open space for inhabitants, this principal manifested itself through the development of signage, logos and graphic elements. Ultimately the vernacular created through the resiliency of Trastevere was implemented along the transportation spine, and piazza connecting lower Trastevere to the historic center of Rome.

Trastevere Logo and Identity Development

Museo Adriano Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor

08


Trastevere Evolution Map

09

Trastevere Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor


Proposed Piazza Aerial

Proposed Bus Terminal

Trastevere Rome, Italy

Fall 2009

Luca Peralta Assistant Professor

10


LOVE CANAL The love canal project was held within a collaborative studio between Penn State Landscape Architecture, and The University at Buffalo’s graduate Architecture program. Each team was asked to pose a design to not only respond as a memorial to of the event, but as an interpretive gateway for generations to come. “Perception of absence and the uncanny” was the concept which drove our team to create a powerful design for the site of Love Canal. Dividing the site down to the original areas of affected land, and programing the zones accordingly, we were able to communicate not only the past extent of the disaster, but the current chemical zoning as well. Within each of the flanking left and right zones, pathway elevations were manipulated to alter the visitor’s perception of interaction with the ground plane. Plantings were also carefully chosen to create a play between vast meadow and the tightly knit grid of the residual neighborhood. Ground zero rests between these zones, traversed by an elevated pedestrian bridge terminating on one end by the architects visitor center, and an interpretive assembly stairway on the other. Intermingled within these sites are trained “tortured” plant specimens providing living reminders of what lies at the root of the problem at Love Canal.

Love Canal Park Plan

11

Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor


zone 1 paving system see detail: XX

proposed grading

1’-6” above existing grade

bench spur

respite zones stemming from pathways

3’-6”

woodland meadow

maintianed grasses

maintianed grasses

woodland meadow

Pedestrian Walkway Section

Interpretive Bridge Terminus

Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

12


Angled Archway

Standard Archway

Double Back Archway

Codominant Archway

“Tortured Tree” Manipulation

13

Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor


Zone 1 Meadow View

Love Canal Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

14


BUFFALO INFILL

Eme rson Pla ce

Buffalo Infill was conducted in connection with Groundworks Buffalo, as a means of generating a set of possible infill projects for Buffalo’s increasing vacant urban land parcels. Drop Out, Pinch Point, and Dip Set represent three projects seeking to exemplify conditions intrinsic to Buffalo’s vacant land parcels. Drop Out is a quick and dirty site installation, that utilizes laser cut tarps, as a means to deploy patterns across vacant land. This design speaks to the monotony of turf existing within the abandoned parcels. Aside from displaying varied degrees of ornate geometry, the tarps serve a temporal role by slowly killing off underlying vegetation to present a secondary pattern once stripped off site Pinch Point speaks to pocked patterns of proximity between vacant and occupied parcels. The chosen site sits pinched between owned and vacant land, and is stitched together by a green fence, which is within itself, a collection of expanding and contracting elements.

Drop Out

LA UR EL ST RE ET

Pinch Point

Dip Set is posed as a thoughtful means of harnessing the rainwater run off from these flattened sites. In utilizing deconstruction debris Dip Set creates topographic forms that both raise and dip into the ground plane. The negative space created through these manipulations result in weather responsive blooms of water, further expanding the environmental palette to include wetland species. Dip Set

15

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

GleSean nwoBurkholder od Ave nue Assistant Professor


Pinch Point Street View

Pinch Point Section

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

16


Dip Set Water Bloom Section View

fill

1. Drop

25-30

cut

LAU REL STR EET

2. Push

3. Cut

fill

cut

25-30

fill

Dip Set Maintenance Logic

17

1. Drop

Dip Set Form Development

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

fill

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor


Dip Set Interior View

Dip Set Site Section

Buffalo Infill Buffalo, NY

Fall 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

18


METHANE ECOLOGIES Methane ecologies is the product of the three day “Working Hybrids ” workshop held at The Pennsylvania State University by Chris Reed and Jill Desimini of Stoss Landscape Urbanism, and Professor of Landscape Architecture, Timothy Baird. The scope of Working Hybrids aimed at revitalizing landscapes in a state of dis-use and decay as a result of dispersed settlement and abandoned urban structure. The goal of the workshop was to devise a framework strategy that emphasized a productive ecological environment that would additionally provide opportunity for social and cultural activity. Working as pairs with other Landscape Architecture students, each group had been delegated a specific “Hybrid Program. ” My pair was responsible for instituting a functional methane harvesting system for an adjacent landfill. Our solution, termed Methane ecologies, investigates both a park for urban tree growth, establishing a series of local micro climates powered by the secondary energy of methane refinement, as well as drawing on the local farming wastes to generate soil production as a viable by-product. The result of our inquiry was a productive landscape system. Functioning not only as a place for community integration, and sustainable practice awareness, but as a first look into productivity by means of natural site exhaust. Specifically, heat exchange to warm soil conditions of micro climates, as well as potent sources of soil production for use throughout the urban area.

19

Site

Diagrammatic Site Section

Methane Ecologies State College, PA

Spring 2008

Chris Reed, Jill Desimini Visiting Professors


Interior Site View

Typical Variations On Form

Methane Ecologies State College, PA

Monthly Firing Sequence Form Methane Generators

Spring 2008

Chris Reed, Jill Desimini Visiting Professors

20


URBAN ARBORICULTURE

URBAN ARBO

KEY PLAN

Over the past several years, the city of Philadelphia has worked to institute a series of “greening” programs. As a result of these plans, Fairmont Parks Authority has been granted $2.5 million to increase the canopy cover of the city to 30 percent by the year 2015. The Spring 2010 studio focused on the creation of supplemental urban nurseries to enable Fairmont Park’s goal.

Island Avenue Riparian Stormwater Catchment see detail d.3

Hornbeam Parades see section c.1

Meadow / Recreational Space see section c.1

Side Walk see section c.1

Urban Arboriculture surfaces as a response to the demand for green goods and placemaking within the urban environment. Divided into two parts, charrette and intensive studio, the design focuses on tree production while retaining useful open space. The charrette space is designed as a terminus of the intensive production of the studio, as well as a laboratory for storm water remediation. The focus site utilizes a variety of contemporary design programs. All material from this site is contained in parametrically designed planting trays able to accommodate any specimen. In addition to tree growth, the core of the focus site is a constructed wetland, treating point source runoff from site context, as well as providing a growing medium for riparian species to be used throughout city “green” projects.

Street Tree Envelope see section c.1

Central Pathway see section c.1

Active Recreation 1 see section c.2 Tree Trench see detail d.1 Wildflower Mixture see section c.2 Active Recreation 2 see section c.2

Recyclyed Benching see detail d.2

Repurposed Rail Tracking see section c.2 Chelwynde Avenue

Urban Arboriculture 1”=30’ KEY PLAN 0 15 30

60

120 FEET

Charrette Programmatic Site Plan

21

Urban Arboriculture Buffalo, NY

Spring 2010

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

Over the past Philadelphia has ins sustainable initiativ its urban fabric. A k these initiatives is P commitment to rec spaces through the revitalization. Urban responds to these n solution to the crea Philadelphia’s futur The initial pha Arboriculture Projec and design of hybri throughout the city urban parks functio stock production fo material required b serving as commun opportunities to cu awareness for gene Phase two of the design and dep materials to develo importantly, phase the community thro site selection, and in its development. In this task, the Island as a testing ground of design framewor strategies for site de program is to invite to realize a specific their community th these organizationa

ISLAND AVE

The 2600 Bloc an optimal example space within the cit While seated at the the site was held lit the railway, nor the chamfered geomet driving concept beh into establishing a s and identity with th to accomplish this, series of patches of recreation zones, to with a continuous w mosaic as a stitch th anchors both the so spaces. Additionally envelope framewor parking lot to the fa boundaries. The major org the site include full circulation, truck ac spine which infiltrat event of a high flow zone is equipped w directed to the stree


Throughway Perspective

Charrette Site Interior View

Throughway Study Model

Charrette Site Model

Urban Arboriculture Buffalo, NY

Spring 2010

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

22


7699 Elmwood Ave 93,500 Sq Ft

7635 Dickens Ave 16,500 Sq Ft

7512 Este Ave 16,500 Sq Ft

A 2600 Island Ave Charre rreette Site ite 42,00 Sq Ft

3 . Disseminate

2600 S. 76th Street F o c us S i t e

1 . Cultivate

273,300 Sq Ft

7616 Chelwynde Ave 13,600 Sq Ft

2600 DothanRd 7,455 Sq Ft

B

4 . Discharge 1 . Accept 2 . Filter

7812 Buist Ave 12,600 Sq Ft

3 . Cleanse

2 . Integrate

Urban Arboriculture Phase 2 Context

Urban Arboriculture Phase 2 Parti Diagram

Urban Arboriculture Intensive Site Aerial

23

Urban Arboriculture Philadelphia, PA

Spring 2010

Timothy Baird Associate Professor


ns

0

900 Plantings

5

10

S i t e S eTray c t i o Section n [ F ] Diagram Planting

WALKWAY / ACCESS

WALKWAY / ACCESS

Riparian Plants

ees

REMOVAL ACCESS

T rees

Pot in Pot Planting + Modular System

Scale: 3/16” = 1’

Black Tupelo

Red Maple

Tree Filbert

London Plane Tree

Trident Maple

American Hornbeam

Module Profile

PHASE 1

Initial Planting

+3yr

uct

PHASE 2 : Mid Cycle

f 20’ at y walway/ p a t h w a y.

Plot 1 Plot 7

0

5

PHASE 2 : Cultivation

PHASE

Ty p i c a l d eTertiary pth of 20’ Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f a t l e a s t 3 5 ’ i n o r d e r t o o f f s e t located at mid point of plot juvenile specimens. Cultivation phase occurs ~7yr Turn Over area. around the fringes of the site to enable v i s u a l p e r m i a b i l i t y, a n d d i s s o v l e n u r s e r y e d g e T u r n o v e r OTray p e r a t iPlanting o n s S c h e mStrategy a t i cb-oW T r a y Ty p o l o g i e s Phased u ni tdh ai nr y.

10

Plot 9

Urban Arboriculture Philadelphia, PA 25 Feet

Spring 2010

Plot 2

Plot 6

Ty p i c a l P o t I n P o t P l a n t i n g P r o g r e s s i o n

Plot 3

Plot 5

Plot 4

WALKWAY / ACCESS

Secondary

F

PHASE 3 : Final Product

PHASE 2 : Mid Cycle

Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f 2 0 ’ a t nearest primary walway/ t r a n s p o r t a t i o n p a t h w a y.

Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f 2 0 ’ Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f a t l e a s t 3 5 ’ i n o r d e r t o o f f s e t located at mid point of plot juvenile specimens. Cultivation phase occurs area. around the fringes of the site to enable v i s u a l p e r m i a b i l i t y, a n d d i s s o v l e n u r s e r y e d g e b o u n d a r y.

Site Section [D] Scale: 1/8” = 1’

0

5

10

PHASE 2 : Cultivation

25 Feet

WALKWAY / ACCESS

PHASE 2

WALKWAY / ACCESS

+2yr

Site Sect Scale: 3/

Ty p i c a l P o t I n P o t P l a n t i n g P r o g r e s s i o n

Wetland Tray Planting Section

S i t Key e Section Plan

0 5 [ E ] Planting Dimensions

Timothy Baird planting zone which draws Plot 2. = 5912 SQ FT upon organizational Plot 3. = 7582 SQ FT Associate Professor staregy of the design Plot 4. = 5696 SQ FT

SPlot c a# l e `Conventional : 3 / 1 6“pot ” in=pot 1 ’Plot 1. = 2817 SQ FT

Tray “X”

Parametric planting system designed to

Plot 5. = 76276 SQ FT Plot 6. = 4441 SQ FT Plot 7. = 817 SQ FT Plot 8. = 10208 SQ FT

10

Ty p i c a l W e t l a n d Tr a y P l a n t i n g P r o g r e s s i o n

24


Red Maple

Black Tupelo

Tree Filbert

London Plane Tree

Trident Maple

American Hornbeam

Module Profile

PHASE 1

Initial Planting

WALKWAY / ACCESS

Secondary

+3yr PHASE Tertiary

~7yr Turn Over

PHASE 3 : Final Product

PHASE 2 : Mid Cycle

Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f 2 0 ’ a t nearest primary walway/ t r a n s p o r t a t i o n p a t h w a y.

Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f 2 0 ’ Ty p i c a l d e p t h o f a t l e a s t 3 5 ’ i n o r d e r t o o f f s e t located at mid point of plot juvenile specimens. Cultivation phase occurs area. around the fringes of the site to enable v i s u a l p e r m i a b i l i t y, a n d d i s s o v l e n u r s e r y e d g e b o u n d a r y.

Site Section [D] Scale: 1/8” = 1’

0

5

10

PHASE 2 : Cultivation

25 Feet

WALKWAY / ACCESS

+2yr PHASE 2

Site Section [E] 0

5

10

Ty p i c a l W e t l a n d Tr a y P l a n t i n g P r o g r e s s i o n

Scale: 3/16” = 1’

Ty p i c a l P o t I n P o t P l a n t i n g P r o g r e s s i o n

T u r n o v e r O p e r a t i o n s S c h e m a t i c - W i t h i n T r a y Ty p o l o g i e s

Plot 2

Plot 7 Plot 6

Planting Dimensions `Conventional “pot in pot planting zone which draws upon organizational staregy of the design

Plot 3 Plot 5

Plot 4

Tray “X”

F

Tray C Tray A Tray A

Plot 8

Tray B

Plot #

Parametric planting system designed to stabilize soils structure and improve rootgrowth Mixture of conventional pot in pot system with a sequence of modular trays extending into the landscape Constructed wetlands

Plot 10

Plot 11 Plot 13

urban arboricultures

25

Tray A = 8829 SQ FT Tray B = 3372 SQ FT Tray C = 9697 SQ FT Total Area = 21898 SQ FT Estimated Yield* = 5400 Riparian Plants Plot 10. = 4086 Plot 11. = 3367 Plot 12. = 3474 Plot 13. = 4670

Permanent Site Trees

Estimated Total* = 9900 Plantings

Site Section [F] 0

5

10

Pot in Pot Planting + Modular System

Intensive Site Constructed Wetland Model

Scale: 3/16” = 1’

Scale: 1” = 60’

Intensive Site Section

Schematic Site Section [C] Scale: 1/16” = 1’

Total Area = 120056 SQ FT Estimated Yield* = 4000 Trees

Total Area = 15687 SQ FT Estimated Yield* = 500 Trees

Plot 12

Intensive Site Topography Studies Planting Convention Schematic

Circulation Network

Plot 1. = 2817 SQ FT Plot 2. = 5912 SQ FT Plot 3. = 7582 SQ FT Plot 4. = 5696 SQ FT Plot 5. = 76276 SQ FT Plot 6. = 4441 SQ FT Plot 7. = 817 SQ FT Plot 8. = 10208 SQ FT Plot 9. = 6307 SQ FT

WALKWAY / ACCESS

Plot #

REMOVAL ACCESS

Plot 9

WALKWAY / ACCESS

Plan Key Plot 1

0 5 10

20

50 Feet

LOCATION 2600 South 76th Street Philadelphia PA 273,300 Square Feet

Urban Arboriculture Philadelphia, PA

Spring 2010

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

SPRING 2010 LArch_414

Dylan Salmons Tim Baird, Matt Langan

04


ng Trays

1. Potting Mixture + Specimen

2. Self Pruning Sleeve

3. 15 Gallon Apeture

Intensive Site Planting Tray Schematic

Urban Arboriculture Philadelphia, PA

Spring 2010

Timothy Baird Associate Professor

26


SURFACE ATTRACTOR

o

During the spring semester of 2010 I took on an additional studio as an independent study. I developed the prospectus from the ground up, to investigate the use of parametric modeling to generate surface and subsurface attractors and retardants. The goal of this designed surface would then be geared to working landscapes, specifically those in transition to viable parkland. As such, I limited the investigation to three variations on three modules: soil retention, hydrologic percolation, and nutrient transportation. Informed by a variety of interpreted data sets, the accretion of these modules would form a “custom fit� surface. After creating the scripts necessary to propagate the custom surface, phase two of the project sought to realize a design for the dewatering dredge landscapes within Philadelphia. As an ever expanding landmass, and an inevitable product of securing navigable waterways, the site provided ample space for a test design. The product of this design was a series of surfaces which assisted on the dewatering process of the dredge field, as well as biosolid transportation for nutrient enrichment. Ultimately the surface became both a function and aesthetic fixture within the design, artfully revealing and concealing itself amidst the landscape.

Surface design treatment and added subgrade material. After the subform intervention is in place, the design can be created around it. These areas designated as module reveals will add to the overall identity of the site, responding as both preformative and aesthetic design elements

Selected site shows varied degrees of impaired soils, compacted beyond the ability to dewater. Porosity module is then applied to soil with corresponding apeture sizes. Note* module sizes have been exagerated for diagraming purposes

Exported geospatial data from Arc Map GIS via PASDA to rhino. To interperate impaired soils data with the controls of the digital elevation model.

Base level. Chosen site location with identified site boundaries, and chosen characteristic to remediate.

Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n M o d u l e

Porosity Module

Added layer of site soils Sub-structure intervention Existing Site Material

System Implementation Sequencing Diagrams

27

Surface/Subsurface Philadelphia, PA

Spring 2010

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor


TOP TRAY

16'-9"

2'-4 1/2"

2'-7"

FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE LAYER ABSORBTION MAT

2 L2

BOTTOM TRAY

C.I.P CONCRETE FOOTING AT VARIED DEPTH BASED ON SITE SETTLEMENT

A

3

SECTION THROUGH TERRAIN SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

3'-11"

2'-7 1/2"

19'-10 3/4"

3'-9 1/4"

TYPICAL SUBSURFACE MODULE SCALE: 4" = 1'

FLEXIBLE RUBBER LAYER ABSORBTION MAT STRUCTURAL PLASTIC SHELL FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE LAYER ABSORBTION MAT

1'-6 1/2"

5"

2"

1/2"

1 L2

3/4" 6 1/4" 8 1/2"

Future Site Scale: 1”=50’

4

SECTION THROUGH BOARDWALK SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

Design Context

System Morphology

TOP TRAY

16'-9"

FILTER FABRIC

3'-10"

DRAINAGE LAYER

BOTTOM TRAY

1'-6"

3"x3" STEEL FRAME BOLTED TO FOUNDATION 7"x7"x1/4" STEEL PLATE WELDED TO 3"x3" FRAME BOLTED TO C.I.P FOOTING 2-A MODIFIED DRAINAGE BASE DRAINAGE MAT 1"X8" T-REX COMPOSITE DECKING 2-2"X6" PRESSURE C.I.P CONCRETE FOOTING AT VARIED DEPTH BASED TREATED JOIST ATTATCHED TO BEAM WITH STEEL JOIST HANGERS ON SITE SETTLEMENT 2-2"X6" PRESSURE TREATED BOLTED TO FORM BEAM WHEN PRESENT 1/2" STEEL RETAINING BARRIER SCREWED TO BEAM FACE

3" 6 3/4" 4"

7" TYP.

3

SECTION THROUGH TERRAIN SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

2'-8 3/4"

1/8"

OXIDIZED STEEL EDGE RESTRAINT ATTATCHED TO REMEDIATION SYSTEM BY SCREW AND MOLLY ASSEMBLY ARTICULATING REMEDIATION UNITS FLEXIBLE GASKET FOR FLUID TRANSFER DREDGED SOIL

TYPICAL SUBSURFACE MODULE SCALE: 4" = 1'

SOIL REMEDIATION DE SIGN SEE DETAIL X 2" PERFORATED AND WRAPPED PVC DRAIN PIPE WITH FEED TO REMEDIATION SYSTEM 3'-11"

19'-10 3/4"

3'-9 1/4"

FLEXIBLE RUBBER LAYER ABSORBTION MAT STRUCTURAL PLASTIC SHELL FILTER FABRIC DRAINAGE LAYER ABSORBTION MAT

1'-6 1/2"

M A TE R I A L P A LE TTE SIZES

1”x 8” PLANKS CUSTOM CUT TO MATCH PATTERN

LIGH

1/2” THICK RETAINING SHEET

OXID

DEPTH AS REQUIRED

LIGH

2-A MODIFIED

GRAY

5"

2"

1/2"

6"

1 L2

3/4"

8" 6 1/4"

C.I.P CONCRETE FOOTING AT VARIED DEPTH BASED ON SITE SETTLEMENT

4

SECTION THROUGH BOARDWALK SCALE: 1/4" = 1'

Proposed System Typical Section

1'-6" "

7" TYP.

1/8"

3"x3" STEEL FRAME BOLTED TO FOUNDATION 7"x7"x1/4" STEEL PLATE WELDED TO 3"x3" FRAME BOLTED TO C.I.P FOOTING 2-A MODIFIED DRAINAGE BASE DRAINAGE MAT

28

2'-8 3/4"

OXIDIZED STEEL EDGE RESTRAINT ATTATCHED TO

1/2" = 1'

11.6.01

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor

Drawing Scale

OXIDIZED STEEL EDGE RESTRAINT CRUSED STONE PLANTING BED FILTER FABRIC PLANTING SOIL FILTER FABRIC 3"x2" COMPOSITE WOOD PLANKING

Date Issued

Spring 2010

3'-10"

Issued By:

Surface/Subsurface Philadelphia, PA

SB

Proposed Design Sections

TYPICAL SUBSURFACE MODULE SECTION SCALE: 4" = 1'

DS

B

2

HILL SECTION 8 1/2" SCALE: 1 1/4" = 1'

Drawn By

1

BENCH SECTION SCALE: 3/4" = 1'

Checked By

2'-7 1/2"

Landscape Architecture 331 Landscape Materiality Exercise 2 - Design in Detail Fall 2010 Burkholder & Baird

4'-0"

A

ABSORBTION MAT

OXIDIZED STEEL EDGE RESTRAINT CRUSED STONE PLANTING BED FILTER FABRIC PLANTING SOIL FILTER FABRIC 3"x2" COMPOSITE WOOD PLANKING

608 E. Foster Ave. State College, PA

2 L2

T: 732.299.7103 E: dylansalmons@gmail.com

2'-4 1/2"

2'-7"

TYPICAL SUBSURFACE MODULE SECTION SCALE: 4" = 1'

Dylan Salmons

B

C.I.P CONCRETE FOOTING AT VARIED DEPTH BASED ON SITE SETTLEMENT


Interior Design View

29

Surface/Subsurface Philadelphia, PA

Fall 2008

Sean Burkholder Assistant Professor


SPRING CREEK The Spring Creek regional analysis studio was the first opportunity to investigate the impact of both human and natural occurrences on a macro-scale. The course specifically examined how the impact of natural settlement ( i.e. geomorphology, glacial till, and ecological dynamics) and accelerated changes in human development gave rise to the canyon of today. The extensive research of this studio ultimately resulted in a thirty page document, charting the evolution of the canyon lands. It was only at the final stage of the project that a honed understanding of ecologic variables, stakeholders, and communities was used to develop a design focused on the management of site and a stainability sensitive solution. This project mirrors the layered functionality that shaped the valley, expressed programmatically as: conservation, education, and recreation.

Spring Creek Canyon Master Plan

Spring Creek Centre County, PA

Fall 2008

Dr. Timothy Murtha Associate Professor

30


Sample Book Pages

31

Spring Creek, Centre County, PA

Fall 2008

Dr. Timothy Murtha Associate Professor


Proposed Design View

Proposed Design Section

Proposed Design Section

Spring Creek Centre County, PA

Fall 2008

Dr. Timothy Murtha Associate Professor

32


JUMP BOX IDEAS COMPETITION Throughout the summer of 2009, I worked with assistant professor David Celento of the Pennsylvania State University Department of Architecture to create a package of informative graphic devices, and prototypical frameworks for a theoretical international design competition to be hosted by The Pennsylvania State University. The competition would seek to fuse together trends of sustainability, mobility, branding, manufacturing, and mass customization of modular housing units capable of being slotted into highrise structures, urban voids, or suburban backyards. *Images courtesy of The Pennsylvania State University School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture Sponsorship Brochure

Sponsorship Package

Sponsorship Brochure

33

Jump Box State College, PA

Summer 2009

David Celento Associate Professor. PSU Architecture


POTOMAC PARK In response to the disaster cause by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, FEMA called upon Olin Studio to develop a series of subtle designs to raise the elevations of the National Mall flood boundaries. As a team participant on the Potomac park project, I aided in the design and creation of over a dozen models to be presented to FEMA, the National Parks Service, and the Army Core of Engineers.

Potomac Park Potomac Park Levee Project // 17th Street Closure // Washington DC

*Images courtesy of The Olin Studio

Presentation Graphic

Detail Model Photographs

Potomac Park National Mall, DC

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

NCPC

Detail Model Photograph

Summer 2008

David A. Rubin Partner, The Olin Studio

34


YOUNG ARCHITECTS EXHIBITION While working with PEG following their win of the Architectural League of New York Prize for Young Architects + Designers; I worked on the design and fabrication of the exhibition in June at Parsons The New School of Design Aronson Gallery. *Work images courtesy of PEG office of landscape + architecture.

Exhibition Cabinet Installation

Primary Pattern

35

Secondary Illuminated Pattern

Young Architects Exhibition New York, NY

Summer 2010

Keith VanDerSys Partner, PEG


LAUMEIER SCULPTURE GARDEN In designing a new face for the St. Louis Sculpture Park, PEG presented a proposal for an intensive plaza and assembly space comprised of digitally designed, custom formed site elements. As a full-time intern on the project, I assisted in the design and production of these proposal graphics *Work images courtesy of PEG office of landscape + architecture.

View Across Plaza

SCALE: 1/16” = 1’-0”

Laumeier Plan

Laumeier Sculpture Park St. Louis, MO

View From Lower Level To Plaza

Summer 2010

Keith VanDerSys Partner, PEG

36



2008-2010 Undergrad Portfolio