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Short courses for the love of learning! Winter/Spring

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2021

Enrichment Program


To Our Lifelong Learning Community If the past year has demonstrated anything, it’s that we as a society crave and need connection. Today, more than ever before, we understand the value of connection and how learning something new can create a sense of connection for us. Whether you’re deepening your knowledge on a topic you’re already enmeshed in, or exploring a new idea entirely, connection through learning is what keeps us inspired and satisfied. That’s why I’m pleased to welcome a new term of our Enrichment Program, which has been facilitating connections through the love of learning for nearly 20 years. The Enrichment Program offers an opportunity to challenge conventional thought, examine new topics, or stretch our imaginations through short, non-credit courses. To align with the needs of our community, we’re offering all of our courses online this winter/spring term. As we’ve heard from our students, the online format has been engaging, interactive and exciting. Plus, you can connect with people from across the country! Or bring along a friend who lives out of state. Dive deep into a topic area you love during a multi-session course or discover a new passion at a one-night lecture. We’re opening the doors to the University of Denver and giving you access to courses designed specifically for adult learners— all virtually, of course! It’s time to connect through lifelong learning. Ready to join us? Best,

Mathematician Peter Hilton once said, “Adaptability to change is itself a hallmark of successful education.” History is replete with examples. We’ve survived wars, famine, floods and of course, pandemics. We face what we need to face head on. Accept that it’s real, that it may be difficult, but then move forward into and through it. We learn, grow and gain momentum, and we’re better for it all. This is how it played out as we adapted here at the Enrichment Program: We accepted the circumstances and then moved forward. Our instructors pivoted, adjusted their curricula, and we assigned a trained Zoom co-host to every class to ensure the high-caliber quality you’ve come to expect. We’ve even added some lighter fare to balance these challenging times—courses on brewing beer, nature journaling and even a class on how our furry friends can help us navigate adversity. Something for everyone and for every mood. Today, it’s working thanks to you and your faith in us. Now—even though we remain apart—we’ve come together, and I believe we’re all better for it. As I look back on 2020, I see more clearly than ever the bond between learning and adapting. And I know you do, too—or else you wouldn’t be reading this or seeking to learn more through the Enrichment Program at the University of Denver. Thank you for coming on this journey with us and for being part of our lifelong learning community. Make every day a learning day,

Michael McGuire Dean, University College

Lynn Wells Director, Enrichment Program

Stimulate Your Mind … Reawaken Your Curiosity Simply for the love of learning!


Topic Course Title

Start Date Page

Faculty Showcase One-night Lectures Enrichment Lecture Series

Art Abstract Watermedia

Spring Nature Art Journaling

Art History Women Artists

Psychedelic Poster Art

Back-to-School Sampler of Enrichment Courses - Free Current Issues American Political Landscape

Democratic Decline & Authoritarian Populism THE DROP/Revolutionary Radio U.S. Foreign Policy

Economics Emerging Markets

1/21/21

5

2/6/21

23

3/20/21

23

3/24/21

25

4/19/21

24

Various

2

1/21/21

13

1/26/21

16

2/4/21

15

4/22/21

13

4/19/21

22

Finance Stocks, Bonds or Cash

1/25/21

22

History Genealogy

1/26/21

18

9/11, 20 Years Later

3/17/21

17

British Sports Cars

3/18/21

18

Aviation & Aerospace in CO

3/22/21

19

2/17/21

20

3/29/21

21

2/16/21

17

1/21/21

28

History & Culture Spain

Nordic Countries

Law U.S. Supreme Court from RGB to ACB Literature Fairy Tales

To the Lighthouse Music Classical Music of the 1920s & 1930s

4/20/21 28 1/20/21

11

California’s Laurel Canyon

2/16/21

10

Broadway Musicals

2/18/21

9

Bluegrass

3/16/21

Carmen Aerosmith’s 50th Anniversary

10

4/7/21 11 4/20/21

9

Nature/Science Climate Change

1/25/21

32

Spring Bird Migration

4/21/21

31

Various

33

1/26/21

12

1/20/21

27

Connecting to Cope

3/18/21

27

Religion Goddess Traditions

3/16/21

30

4/22/21

30

2/18/21

26

4/28/21

26

2/17/21

29

2/20/21

29

OLLI OLLI-Enrichment DAYTIME Performing Arts Resilience in the Arts Psychology Art & Madness

Islam 101

Social Sciences Human-Animal Connection

Intercultural Urbanism

Writing Playwriting

Memoir Writing

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Back-to-School Sampler

Our Gift to You

Join the University of Denver’s Enrichment Program as we kick-off the Winter/Spring 2021 term and enjoy any or all of these one-hour courses in music, investing, literature, birding and culture for free— all taught by hand-picked experts. Take part in stimulating discussions without exams, grades, admission requirements or fees. It’s all for the love of learning—on us!

• Dates: January 11–14, 2021; all courses held in Mountain Time (MT) • All live presentations offered via Zoom • Registration is required to receive the Zoom link • Invite a friend or relative to Zoom in with you! • Register today. Space is limited.

Mon., Jan. 11

7 pm – Winning Investor Mindset – JP Tremblay – ENRICH 0498

Investing can be a tricky business unless you develop the right mindset. Join financial analyst JP Tremblay as he shares the top five mental pitfalls that keep investors from reaching their goals. “Being mindful of these mental flaws is the first step in learning how to overcome them,” Tremblay says. “I’ll share specific examples from the current market environment.”

8 pm – Viennese Visions – Betsy Schwarm – ENRICH 0497

Beethoven symphonies, Strauss waltzes, Mozart serenades—all from Vienna. Why that city? Join classical music specialist Betsy Schwarm as she examines why, for centuries, Vienna served as the font of inspiration for musical Europe, and beyond its borders, as well. This class is where Viennese musical visions are brought to life in all their melodic glory!

Tue., Jan. 12

7 pm – New Historicism – April Chapman-Ludwig – ENRICH 0496

Films, literature, fairy tales and the like are products of their historical moment. That’s the premise of new historicism. Examples: Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein reflects class status, feminist ideologies, familial ties and enlightenment; and the movie Shrek parodies a fight between Disney and Dreamworks. Join writer and researcher April Chapman-Ludwig to learn how art reflects and makes history.

8 pm – Finland: The Happiest Place on Earth – Ann Mäkikalli – ENRICH 0495

Why has Finland become synonymous with happiness? Join former Finland resident Ann Mäkikalli as she offers a culture sampler of this little Nordic gem. Learn how the Finns use music for wellness. Discover how their commitment to sports plays out in their lives, and see how Finland’s language connects speakers to each other. Happy is as happy does!

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Back-to-School Sampler

Wed., Jan. 13

7 pm – Delta Blues to Rock and Roll Gold – Paul Turelli – ENRICH 0500

From Elvis Presley to the British Invasion, the Rolling Stones to Eric Clapton, discover the surprising connection between the Delta blues and rock and roll. Join music historian Paul Turelli as he explains why what you thought was Jim Morrison was actually Willie Dixon or Howlin’ Wolf, Mick Jagger was Mississippi Fred McDowell and Janis Joplin was Bessie Smith. You get the idea!

8 pm – The Winter Ecology of Birds Around Denver – Ted Floyd – ENRICH 0501

It’s said that birds fly south for the winter, but not all birds get the memo. Join noted birder Ted Floyd for a lively and illustrated tour to learn who these birds are and what they do. Plus, consider these questions: How do they find food? How do they stay warm? And how do they flourish? Answers are blowing in the cold winter wind!

Thur., Jan. 14

7 pm – Rebuilding a Civil Society – Tripp Baltz – ENRICH 0502

One look at any newscast and you’re asking yourself: “What will it take for Americans to get along?” Today, our discourse desperately needs a healthy shot of cooperation and common human decency, but can we achieve either as our nation tears itself apart? Join Journalist Tripp Baltz for a constructive dialogue on restoring civility, collegiality and a sense that “we’re all in this together.”

8 pm – Sinatra! ‘Nuff Said – Marc Shugold – ENRICH 0499

Ah yes, Old Blue Eyes and the Chairman of the Board. Beloved singing-and-acting matinee idol, Frank Sinatra was a powerful figure in the cutthroat world of show biz. But oh, what a voice. Join music expert Marc Shulgold as he traces Sinatra’s wild life, covering a near-tragic birth, the wives, movie stars—even a president. Plus, enjoy plenty of his classics and then eavesdrop on a recording session. Juicy stuff!

See full courses from all of our Back-to-School Sampler instructors throughout the catalog.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Zoom Reminders

Faculty Showcase

• Upon registration you will receive an email confirming your class choice(s).

Here at the Enrichment Program, we couldn’t agree more. And we would put them on a pedestal, but the fact is, we put them there a long time ago— at the very start when we began back in 2003.

All Enrichment winter/spring 2021 classes will be delivered online via Zoom. Here’s how to locate and attend your class:

• Approximately seven days prior to the start of class, you will receive an email containing the Zoom link to your class. THIS IS THE ONLY EMAIL WITH THE ZOOM LINK YOU WILL RECEIVE, SO PLEASE KEEP IT IN A SAFE LOCATION. • Use the same Zoom link to join the class each time it meets. If you already have Zoom on your device, simply click on the link provided for your class. If this is your first time using Zoom, you will need to download it before you can join a meeting or class. Go to zoom.us/freesignup You can Zoom into a class using a computer or other device with a camera (for video participation) or simply call any of the telephone numbers provided in the link on your phone (for audio-only participation). We recommend testing Zoom prior to your first class.

Inclement Weather Policy For the winter/spring 2021 term, all classes will proceed on Zoom as scheduled, even in the event of a snow day as designated by the University of Denver.

It’s been said that if you’re going to put folks on a pedestal, choose teachers—they’re heroes.

We knew then, and we know now, that’s exactly where they belong. Peruse instructor bios from any of our many past catalogs and you’ll see words and phrases like professor, expert, distinguished fellow, scientist, published author, professional, director, artist, creator, adventurer, executive, leader, on and on. And some of our favorite adjectives from student evaluations include powerful, caring, smart, skilled, insightful, down-to-earth and authentic. But as 2020 closes (thankfully), we have a couple more adjectives to add: resilient and inspirational. In short, their resilience inspired us and everyone who watched their response to all the changes the pandemic demanded of them. Today, our appreciation for their work, their poise, their skills and their character has reached new heights. And we believe when you choose any of our courses, you’ll come to admire and appreciate your instructor, too. Who knows, you might even end up putting them on pedestals. If you do, we wouldn’t be surprised!

See Aviation course on page 19.

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Enrichment Lecture Series Celebrate! The Secret to Winning in the New Abnormal

Yes, you read that word correctly—Celebrate! Even during this—the absolute craziest of times—it is entirely possible to celebrate. Not only that, it’s also possible to use the pandemic—or any hurdle—as an opportunity to reflect, reimagine and reinvent yourself. Join Scott Friedman, motivational humorist and certified virtual presenter, in this entertaining and inspiring session as he shares the tools and skills you can start using immediately to gain control over your well-being, your career and your life. And you bet, that is something to celebrate!

One Zoom session

Thur., Jan. 21, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0451 / $15

Tracked, Taxed and Tested: Understanding the State’s Role in Colorado Cannabis

In 2012, Colorado became the nation’s first state to legalize retail marijuana. Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED) licenses and regulates all legal marijuana businesses across the state. As MED representatives, Dominique Mendiola and Shannon Gray have advised states and nations across the globe about the successes Colorado has experienced creating a regulatory structure that protects public health and safety while supporting growth of responsible marijuana businesses. Come hear about lessons learned from regulating this burgeoning industry.

One Zoom session

Mon., Jan. 25, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0443 / $15

Save $50 by registering for all 14 lectures! ENRICH 0437 / $160

The Machines Are Taking Over: Securing the Internet of Connected Things

Our homes today are full of cool Internet of Things (IoT) smart devices that allow us to set the temperature, or see who is at the door from the convenience of our cell phones. But these IoT “connected” devices piggy back on our home wireless networks, the same network we use for email, banking and to check our investments. Join cybersecurity expert Richard Staynings as he unveils the scary truth about IoT, artificial intelligence, machine learning and more.

Ageism: New Ways to Defeat an Old Problem

One Zoom session

It was nothing short of deplorable: Calls on older adults to sacrifice themselves for the economy during the height of the pandemic. Sadly, ageist messages and policies that hurt older adults’ financial security along with their physical and mental health are all too common today. But there’s good news: We all have opportunities to address ageism. Join community activist Janine Vanderburg as she offers fresh insights into effective strategies for ending ageism, boosting age-friendly programs and becoming AGEnts for positive change.

ENRICH 0448 / $15

One Zoom session

Thur., Feb. 4, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

Wed., Feb. 10, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0444 / $15

Lectures continue on the following pages.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

5


Enrichment Lecture Series The Craft Brewing Industry … Through the Eyes of Peak View Brewing Company How do you succeed in one of Colorado’s most competitive industries? When you’re competing with over 400 breweries, it takes a lot more than just tasty suds, say craft beer experts Sean Peters and AJ Drozd. Join them for a behindthe-scenes view of what it took to start their own brewery, Peak View Brewing Company. Plus, learn how to taste beer properly, what really goes into popular beers, how they keep things fresh in an ever-changing industry and what the future of the industry looks like. Cheers!

One Zoom session

Why Identity Matters: Better Understanding Ourselves in a Time of Pandemic, Protest and Politics

No doubt, 2020 gave us all plenty to process, including the time for introspection to consider who we are as a country and as individuals. And that’s a good thing, says University of Denver Adjunct Professor Dr. Kristin Deal. “Identities help us frame our experiences, our current events, understand ourselves and how we interact with the world,” she says. Join Deal as she shares lessons from 2020 and how we can better explore our societal and personal identities as we move and grow into a new year.

One Zoom session

Mon., Feb. 22, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0446 / $15

Mon., Feb. 15, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0440 / $15

Save $50 by registering for all 14 lectures! ENRICH 0437 / $160

Power Play: How Athletes Achieve Excellence—and How You Can, Too!

Ever wonder how athletes reach the pinnacle of performance and achieve the seemingly unachievable? Join Melissa Kutcher-Rinehart, DU women’s gymnastics head coach, who has led DU to 21 consecutive NCAA postseason appearances, not only for athletes’ secrets, but also how athletic skills and principles can be transferred into everyday life. Get the latest on motivation, goal-setting, nutrition, growth mindsets, high-performance resources, process versus outcome, creating vision, peaking at the right time and finally, developing that allimportant championship mentality. Sign up and score one for yourself!

One Zoom session

Tue., Mar. 2, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0447 / $15

6

The Future of Denver’s Restaurant Scene

At the start of 2020, Denver was home to one of the hottest restaurant scenes in the country—especially for independent eateries, as opposed to chains. In fact, the city had so many options, some said Denver was “over-restauranted.” Of course, the pandemic has changed that. What’s the future hold for restaurants? Can Denver recover? If so, how? Join David Corsun, director of the Fritz Knoebel School of Hospitality Management at the University of Denver, as he serves up answers and the inside scoop.

One Zoom session

Wed., Mar. 10, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0439 / $15


Enrichment Lecture Series International Trade: Mile High and Worldwide

Even though trade policy decisions are made in Washington, and a pandemic and a recession turned trade upside down in 2020, opportunities still abound locally. Join international business expert Karen Gerwitz as she shares a sweeping overview of international trade in Colorado and our state’s impact on the world. Plus, get the facts on how the state can be even more globally connected, where we thrive, where we can do better and the best prospects trending for Colorado companies—even during COVID. There are real reasons to be optimistic!

One Zoom session

Tiny Homes: Is This Big Trend Right for You?

Remember the American Dream: A big house in the suburbs? Oh, how times change. Today, some say it’s the polar opposite: A tiny home anywhere it’s allowed. What’s this all about? Why the change? What are the types of houses? How tiny are they? What’s their impact on the environment and our lives? Where can you put a tiny house? Join tiny home expert Ryan McCue for a wall-to-wall tour of this sizable new trend to see if you might feel at home in a tiny house!

One Zoom session

Mon., Mar. 22, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

Mon., Mar. 15, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

ENRICH 0450 / $15

ENRICH 0445 / $15

Save $50 by registering for all 14 lectures! ENRICH 0437 / $160

Media Today

Americans used to get their news from a handful of networks, newspapers and maybe a radio station. The internet changed all that with a 24/7 news cycle, a beast fed by countless reporters, TV stations, blogs and social media. Join journalist Ana Campbell as she covers how our media habits and appetites have changed amid globalization. She says knowing what happens in our neighborhoods and city halls is more important than ever. But what role does local media play in our lives? Is it even still relevant?

One Zoom session

Tue., Mar. 30, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0438 / $15

Connecting Weather and Water: Adding Precision to Prediction to Save Lives It was a frightening and muchtoo-common sight this summer and fall: Hurricanes and storms barreling toward the Gulf Coast as forecasters shared spot-on predictions of landfall. How do they do it? Where does that precision in prediction come from? Join scientist Molly McAllister from the National Center for Atmospheric Research for a revealing look at a new forecasting model that lets scientists understand these storms in unprecedented and unimaginable ways—ways that can direct where first responders should go. It’s as fascinating as it is amazing.

One Zoom session

Thur., Apr. 8, 2021, 7–9 pm MT ENRICH 0449 / $15

Lectures continue on the following page.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Enrichment Lecture Series Food Insecurity and Organizational Transformation in the Age of COVID-19

Ranchland Conservation in Colorado and the West

One Zoom session

One Zoom session

ENRICH 0442 / $15

ENRICH 0441 / $15

Today, because of COVID-19, one in seven Coloradans and one in five Colorado kids are now considered food insecure. In response, Food Bank of the Rockies, which was in the middle of transforming its operations when the pandemic hit, increased food distribution by up to double previous volumes. Join Food Bank of the Rockies CEO Erin Pulling in a candid conversation about food insecurity, food systems solutions, organizational transformation and an ambitious plan to increase food security throughout Colorado and Wyoming—even amid unprecedented crises. Thur., Apr. 15, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

Think of this as the three Cs: Conservation in Colorado is Critical. How critical? Find out when you join Erik Glenn, who heads the Colorado Cattlemen’s Agricultural Land Trust and the Partnership of Rangeland Trusts, as he shares the full and unflinching story of conservation in Colorado and the West. Discover how conservation serves as an economic recovery tool, supports rural and statewide economies and benefits Coloradans directly. Explore the future of conservation along with how statewide policies support, and sometimes challenge, conservation outcomes. Thur., Apr. 29, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

Save $50 by registering for all 14 lectures! ENRICH 0437 / $160

Credit: Colorado Cattleman’s Agricultural Land Trust

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Music Aerosmith: The 50th Anniversary

Give Our Regards to Broadway! A History of America’s Musical Theatre

Three Zoom sessions

Thur., Feb. 18, 25, Mar. 4, 2021, 7–9 pm MT

Source: commons.wikimedia.org

Through most of the past century, audiences have been thrilled by the energy, spectacle, laughs, tears and catchy tunes of Broadway musicals. Yet, as you’ll discover in this fast-moving course, the roots of our beloved American art form actually stretch back three centuries to Europe. Popular Enrichment instructor Marc Shulgold will trace the unbroken line of entertainment born in the comic operas of the Baroque Era, which evolved into 19th-century operettas. Finally landing in New York, those operettas competed with vaudeville’s stream of sentimental ballads and naughty ditties, which provided a training ground for busy songwriting teams—later to become masters of Broadway musicals. The world was changing in the early 20th century: The Jazz Age, the Depression, the popularity of movies—all influenced lavish shows that offered memorable songs tailored to shifting tastes. Those productions glowed with a greatness as bright as the marquees along Broadway’s “Great White Way” (a reference to thousands of white light bulbs). Dive into the Broadway hits of the ’30s, ’40s and ’50s, and travel back to the 1800s, when extravaganzas such as The Black Crook packed them in. The theatrical geniuses still among us will be honored, too, including Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Lin-Manuel Miranda and others. So, come and meet those dancing feet, along with those beloved songs.

It sounds like the start of a joke: So this vocalist walks into a burger joint and bumps into a guitarist. Yet, the band that resulted was anything but a joke: Aerosmith, one of the most iconic rock and roll acts ever to grace a stage. It was the summer of 1970 when Steven Tyler walked into a small eatery where Joe Perry worked in New Hampshire. The next five decades they served up gritty, hard rock in sold-out arenas around the globe that defied clueless critics. “The Bad Boys from Boston” embodied the in-your-face rebellious band that swept the music scene with 15-plus albums, five Grammys and 32 world tours. “Aerosmith’s impact on music has been nothing short of legendary,” says music authority and life-long devoted fan Alex Meier, who, in this 50th anniversary course, offers an intimate look at the group with a fairy tale story—a band that had it all, lost it all and then got it all back. Explore the band’s highest of highs and the lowest of lows as they weathered fame, drug addiction and heart-breaking loss—all while staying true to their rhythm and blues roots. Discover the history, the musical stylings, the cultural impact, the fights, the reunions and the lives behind the stage that lived through it all.

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Apr. 20, 27, May 4, 11, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT

ENRICH 0474 / $105

ENRICH 0472 / $140

Marc Shulgold is a music journalist, concert lecturer and teacher. After working at the Los Angeles Times for 12 years, Marc became the first—and the last—music and dance writer at the Rocky Mountain News, covering the cultural scene throughout the region for nearly 22 years.

Alex Meier is the general manager of the Littleton School of Rock and has pursued and studied music all of his life, playing in bands since age 13. He has directed over 30 shows and programs and taught hundreds of students.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

9


Music Rock and Roll Revolution: California’s Laurel Canyon

Here’s the setting: 1950 Kentucky—you’re in a lush meadow surrounded by high hills. It’s quiet at first, then you hear it: A distinct resonance echoing softly. It enters your ears but darts quickly to your heart, instantly stirring your soul. That is the magic of bluegrass music—as much felt as it is heard. A physical entity that gets inside of you and moves you in new and unexpected ways. It’s no wonder bluegrass took root from its first notes and continues to grow with its driving beat, highenergy songs, soaring vocal harmonies and rural authenticity. But what is it about this particular genre that rattles our emotions with such verve? Julianne G. Macie ©2011

History has it that a spring-fed stream attracted early settlers to the area known as Laurel Canyon, a Los Angelesarea neighborhood. Today, considering all the music that came from the canyon in the late 1960s and early 1970s, we have to wonder: What exactly was in that water? The list of residents reads like a who’s who of rock and roll stardom: The Beach Boys, The Byrds, Linda Ronstadt, The Mamas and the Papas, The Monkeys, The Doors, Buffalo Springfield, Frank Zappa, Joni Mitchell, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, The Eagles and many more. Indeed, something is up, down in the canyon. Find out what when you join music historian Paul Turelli for a musical tour of this narrow yet magical stretch that runs from Sunset Strip through Hollywood Hills. In the span of just a few years, this veritable pit stop of inspiration gave birth to a great West Coast vibe filled with vocal harmony, social consciousness, personal lyrical composition and studio sophistication. All of it would become the hallmarks of this vigorous new sound. Revisit these performers’ lives as they settled down to live in their Canyon of Dreams. And relive this extraordinary time of cultural change, captured by the prophets and poets of the era in a special place where geography and sound blended in mystical ways. Along the way, enjoy the Stories on Stage (SOS) virtual performance of Linda and Me: Raised on Ronstadt. 10% discount to SOS subscribers.

Bluegrass Music: Its Roots, Its Energy and Its Magic

For the answer and much more, join professional bluegrass musician and educator Martin Gilmore as he takes you on a journey that spans the music’s earliest origins to its latest offerings. Travel back in time to explore the Scots-Irish ballads and fiddle tunes, shape-note gospel singing and the blues. Examine the influential artists who shaped the music from Bill Monroe to Flatt and Scruggs and The Stanley Brothers to the contemporaries like David Grisman, Hot Rize, Béla Fleck and Chris Thile. Plus, consider the influence of bluegrass on other styles of music, as well as the sub-genres and regional cultures. A course that’s literally music to your ears!

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Mar. 16, 23, 30, Apr. 6, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT

Five Zoom sessions

ENRICH 0473 / $140

ENRICH 0475 / $155

Martin Gilmore teaches folk and bluegrass music at the University of Northern Colorado and at Swallow Hill Music Association. He is the singer and guitarist in the award-winning bluegrass band Long Road Home and has toured the globe as a solo performer.

Tue., Feb. 16, 23, Mar. 2, 9, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT SOS performance, Fri., Mar. 5, 7 pm MT Paul Turelli holds a master’s degree in history and has taught several courses on Laurel Canyon and popular music, along with general history, film and literature.

10


Music Between the Wars: Classical Music of the 1920s and 1930s

Three Zoom sessions

Wed., Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT Enrich 0477 / $105

Composer Georges Bizet (1838–1875) was French but that didn’t stop him from writing Carmen, one of the most beloved of all operas set in Spain, but sung in French. In this class, join music historian and author Betsy Schwarm as she explores the opera, investigating its musical accent, comparing it to the novella of the same name by Prosper Mérimée (1803–1870, also a Frenchman) that had inspired Bizet, and considering how later composers were influenced by Bizet’s masterpiece. Spanish composers will have a place, as well, especially some of the prominent figures who helped to give Spanishflavored music an international following. Among others, the spotlight will fall on Isaac Albéniz (1860–1909) and Joaquín Rodrigo (1901–1999). “Many will be Spanish, but not all: after all, fandangos and boléros influenced actual Spanish composers, as well as those from other lands,” explains Schwarm. Even Rimsky-Korsakov wrote a fandango, and as most listeners will recall, there’s a rather famous boléro by Ravel. Schwarm, who’s known for her user-friendly approach to opera, has been browsing listings with medici.tv online (recommended course resource, just $12.99 per month), and has discovered many marvelous options sure to please even the most discerning ear. Classical works of large scale and small, all with a Spanish accent: It’s Carmen and so much more!

Credit: Library of Congress

Three words history has given all too often: “Between the wars.” For many, the words usually refer to the period between World War I and II, and that’s how they’re being used for this course on classical music in the 1920s and 1930s, which was a fruitful period filled with the Jazz Era, flappers, individual national voices, and a new freedom and mobility for many. What was happening in classical music during this turbulent period? Why all the change? Join music historian and author Betsy Schwarm as she explores these questions with special emphasis on composers from Puccini, Ravel and Gershwin to Erich Korngold and Carlos Chávez. Discover how their music offered something new that hadn’t been previously explored. Rhapsody in Blue, The Pines of Rome, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini and Alexander Nevsky all belong to this time, along with the sensuality of Paris, the electricity of New York City and the energy of the American West, and Mexico, too. Thanks to the abundant resources of medici.tv online (recommended course resource, just $12.99 per month), enjoy several performances at your leisure and then discuss as a group. No music reading required, though sources will be available if you want them. Whether you read music or not, it will be a vibrant tapestry of listening and learning!

Carmen and So Much More: Classical Music of and Inspired by Spain

Three Zoom sessions

Wed., Apr. 7, 14, 21, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0476 / $105

Betsy Schwarm writes program notes that have appeared internationally and gives talks for Opera Colorado and the Colorado Symphony. She has contributed over 200 articles to Encyclopedia Britannica, published nine books on classical music and spent 12 years on the air with KVOD, “The Classical Voice of Denver.” See Spain class on page 20.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Performing Arts Performing Arts in the Time of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic shut down in-person performances overnight. But not all is lost. One year later, Newman Center Executive Director Aisha Ahmad-Post shares how the performing arts have adapted to the pandemic, how performers are meeting the moment and how the industry expects to change for the future. This class also features three enchanting virtual performances: 1. Paul Taylor Dance Company (Feb. 6) – As a unique, multipart performance, Paul Taylor Dance Company presents Esplanade—a signature Taylor work brimming with youthful exuberance. The performance is preceded by commentary with Artistic Director Michael Novak and the dancers. Plus, enjoy a live question-and-answer session after the Feb. 6 debut. 2. Boston Brass (Feb. 18) – For 31 years, Boston Brass’s lively repartee, touched with humor and personality, has bridged the ocean of classical formality to delight audiences in an evening of great music and boisterous fun. Art Across America: Community, Together is a compilation of some of Boston Brass’s most beloved music, a something-for-everyone digital program featuring familiar classical works and popular jazz standards, all delivered with the ensemble’s signature audience interaction and charming rapport. 3. Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Septet with Wynton Marsalis (Mar. 5) – The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Septet features seven of the finest jazz soloists and ensemble players today, led by legendary jazz icon Wynton Marsalis. A swinging and stimulating rumination on current issues, the evening features the premiere of The Democracy! Suite, a new Marsalis composition written during the COVID-19 pandemic as a response to the political, social and economic struggles facing our nation and the beauty that could emerge from a collective effort to create a better future. Each performance will be available for viewing for a week beginning with the date listed. The class concludes with a talkback and a question-and-answer session with Ahmad-Post. And please note, the Newman Center for the Performing Arts expects to have additional virtual performances throughout 2021. Please visit newmancenter.du.edu for more information.

Two Zoom sessions, plus three Zoom performances Tue., Jan. 26, Mar. 9, 2021, 6:30-8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0480 / $85 Aisha Ahmad-Post is the executive director of the Robert and Judi Newman Center for the Performing Arts at the University of Denver. Previously, she was the inaugural director of the Ent Center for the Arts at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs and producer of public programs for The New York Public Library. She has also held positions at Columbia Artists Management and Barrett Vantage Artists. Ahmad-Post was a member of Cohort IV of the Association of Performing Arts Professionals Leadership Fellows Program and the 2018 Jacob’s Pillow Presenters Forum.

See course on Connecting during a Pandemic on page 27.

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Current Issues The American Political Landscape: What’s Next?

The November 2020 presidential election has come and gone. Bruising debates focused on the administration’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, protest and tension over racial divides, socialism, safety and crime, law and order, in addition to the perennial issues of taxes, the economy, healthcare and jobs. Now that the election is over, it’s important to consider what’s next for the country’s political posture and to focus on healing. Have we become too divided, too partisan, to negotiate the compromises that are necessary to legislate and govern? Have major media personalities and cable TV talk show formats poisoned the well? Why do so many people fall prey to fake news and foreign trolls? Can we look at those we disagree with as our opponents, or are we stuck seeing them only as our enemies? After a bitter, divisive campaign, how can we come together as a country again—if not unified, at least in a spirit of detente—so that we can address the coronavirus and other pressing issues of the day? Join Tripp Baltz, journalist and political scientist, in a compelling course to take up these questions and more as we consider the ever-evolving political landscape, making predictions about what’s to come for the nation in the short, middle and long run.

30 Years of Change: U.S. Foreign Policy, 1991 to 2021

You might be surprised to learn that it wasn’t the Trump administration that started the tectonic shift in U.S. foreign policy. That change, says former U.S. diplomat Gary Grappo, began with the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, and it became even more pronounced when the George W. Bush administration invaded Iraq. The shift continued under Barack Obama, who attempted to alter priorities from areas like the Middle East, Europe, Asia and the Pacific to global issues such as climate change. “The notion that America can return to an era when it was the world’s dominant power, circa 1945 or 1990, must be dismissed,” Grappo says. “The world has changed so much that the U.S. can no longer act in isolation without extraordinary costs.” So, what should America’s foreign policy be? Beyond national security, are there enduring American values—market-based economies, democracy, human rights and rule of law—that should underpin our foreign policy?

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4, 11, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0457 / $140 Tripp Baltz is an author and reporter for Bloomberg Industry Group and teaches history, law, politics, media, technology, philosophy and anthropology.

And if the U.S. can no longer act alone, what should its role be in the world? Beyond sheer military might, what levers of power can we still wield? Join Grappo for a journey around the globe and a look at how the U.S. might approach the world’s hot spots and these weighty issues in 2021 and beyond.

Two Zoom sessions

Thur., Apr. 22, 29, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0459 / $80 Gary Grappo is a distinguished fellow at The Center for Middle East Studies at the Korbel School of International Studies with nearly 40 years of diplomatic and public policy experience. At the U.S. State Department, he served in Jerusalem, Baghdad, Oman and Saudi Arabia.

See Democratic Decline course on page 16 and Supreme Court course on page 17.

Ambassador Grappo used real life examples of sanctions against various countries to illustrate the point he was making. His real life experiences are invaluable. ~Enrichment Program Student

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Current Issues

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Current Issues Revolutionary Radio: How Denver’s Newest Radio Station Is Making Waves for the Future of Public Media in Colorado

Something special is happening in Colorado media. A new radio station is making waves—and not just sound waves—by changing how media serves the community. Meet THE DROP, a new public media radio station from Rocky Mountain Public Media and sister station to KUVO Jazz. Recently named the best new station in 2020 by Denver’s Westword magazine, THE DROP features staffers who are using the potent power of media to boost diversity and equality by giving voice to those who haven’t had one. The Enrichment Program has never held a course quite like this. But then again, we’ve never seen times quite like these. Change is afoot, and we’re proud to be a part of it. To that end, we offer this class as one way to help grow the conversation about community storytelling through music and culture, open dialogue and the possibility of a brighter future for us all. Join THE DROP’s General Manager and Program Director, Nikki Swarn, on-air personalities and other change agents as they serve up a safe space for discourse on difficult subjects facing Denver and Colorado via four inspiring classes: • Music – Hear from award-winning host Rodney Franks and Arturo Gómez from KUVO Jazz as they lead you on a journey through Colorado’s musical past of jazz, R&B and hip-hop as it unfolded in Denver’s famed Five Points neighborhood. Plus, examine music’s power in strengthening and reshaping communities in surprising ways. • Sustainability – Join international performer and hip-hop ecologist, DJ Cavem, as he shares how he’s tapping urban farming and environmental sustainability to improve children’s personal health and wellness. • Youth – Learn how Miss Black Colorado, Emma Dickson, and on-air host, Maleman, are helping young people use their voices for change and to fuel their movements through the lens of social media. • Mental health – Discover how THE DROP is supporting and improving access to mental health resources through mindfulness, broadened perspectives and programming that promotes community healing. Come curious, leave with a fresh new view of—and hope for—Denver’s future!

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0466 / $85 Nikki Swarn is the general manager and program director of THE DROP, “The People’s Station for R&B and Hip Hop.” As a radio veteran, she has a wealth of experience in both commercial and public media stations. Rodney Franks has been a DJ and host at KUVO since 1995. His weekday afternoon drive-time shift begins at 4 pm on KUVO Jazz, heard at 89.3 FM and streaming online at KUVO.org. Arturo Gómez is an historian of jazz, Latin music, soul/R&B and Hip Hop. In fact, Arturo is a retired Zulu Nation elder and former chapter leader. As music director and host at KUVO Jazz, his expertise is showcased as he discusses the history of music and how various formats are intertwined. DJ Cavem is an ecologist, award-winning activist, chef and founder of Going Green Living Bling. He teaches urban farming and environmental sustainability. Maleman is an independent musician and an on-air host/production coordinator at THE DROP. Emma Dickson, Miss Black Colorado 2020, is pursuing an MBA and plans to open a wellness spa. She holds a degree in speech communication and Africana studies.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Current Issues Global Democratic Decline and Authoritarian Populism

The trend is both clear and well-documented: Global democracy is declining and authoritarian populism is rising. “What’s most intriguing and begs explanation is that this is occurring in liberal societies where democracy has long been established and consolidated,” says Political Science Associate Professor Nader Hashemi, who adds Europe, Latin America and Asia are all witnessing similar trends. What is happening to democracy? How can we explain this development? What social conditions are behind this? What are the implications for world order and the study of international affairs? And perhaps most importantly, can the slide toward authoritarian populism be reversed? If so, how? Join Hashemi for a sobering look at a vexing movement as he examines these and many other questions through theoretical, historical and comparative lenses with a focus on the case of the United States. Hashemi cites the 2018 Democracy Index, published by the Economist Intelligence Unit, which asserts that the U.S. in the era of Donald Trump is better described as a “flawed democracy” rather than a “full democracy.” Hashemi asks that before the course, students read How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt.

Two Zoom sessions

Tue., Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0458 / $70 Nader Hashemi is an associate professor of Middle East and Islamic Politics and director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. His writings have appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Al Jazeera Online and CNN.com.

What Our Students Are Saying For the Love of Learning! I can still enjoy learning and stay safe during this time of the virus. Also this class was fun and I learned a lot about a composer that I have enjoyed for years. Coming to it on Zoom in the time of COVID-19 was both magical and doable. He’s got the perfect combination of knowledge and enthusiasm. It was really engaging! My first experience with Zoom and it was a totally positive experience. I appreciated the expertise, skill in presentation and integration of multi-media resources in the session. The experience was outstanding. This experience encourages me to continue with new online courses. I totally enjoyed this one night lecture with no driving to Denver involved. Many thanks for the offering. Love the Enrichment classes. Well organized and clearly lots of work went into presentation. Best lecture I’ve attended at DU. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you! For expanding my knowledge on this topic in a very environmentally friendly way. I appreciate the classes being offered during this difficult time. Thank you!! Upbeat presentation; breakout groups for discussion; slides; she answered questions. With all the challenges of conducting class using Zoom, the instructor went out of her way to ensure we had thought-provoking homework assignments, excellent resources we could research on our own, and opportunity to provide written feedback for further discussion. She also used excellent slides which helped keep the class focused. This was excellent ... I love the Enrichment courses—especially now that they are online.

See Political Landscape and Foreign Policy courses on page 13.

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The online Enrichment Program is a brilliant idea from DU. My wife and I are hooked.


Law

History

From the Notorious RBG to the Conservative Judicial Revolution: How Politics Changed the U.S. Supreme Court

9/11: Twenty Years Later

The confirmation of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has the potential to produce the most ideologically conservative U.S. Supreme Court in modern times and to mark a large payoff of decades of work by the conservative legal movement. “For many Americans, Barrett’s nomination is cause for celebration and evidence that Ginsburg’s legal advocacy for equality of the sexes was a success,” says Political Science Professor Courtenay Daum. “Yet for others, the replacement of a liberal feminist and popular icon with a conservative judge whose views are antithetical to her predecessor’s is a form of contempt.” At the same time, President Trump’s nomination of Justice Barrett is about more than a single Supreme Court seat because it reflects the successful culmination of the Republican Party and Federalist Society’s conservative judicial revolution. Join Daum and her colleague Joshua Wilson as they explore the increased politicization of the Supreme Court and the changes to the nomination, confirmation and judicial processes. Discover Justice Ginsburg’s legacy from a liberal feminist to the Notorious RBG. Learn how the secular and religious conservative legal movements took form and rose to power concurrently with Justice Ginsburg’s career as a federal judge and then Supreme Court Justice.

In just a few months, the world will revisit September 11, 2001—the date that gave us a bolt from the blue and shook the U.S. to its very core. We then witnessed years of response: Two long and costly wars with festering political burdens. But now, after two decades, we’ve gained some clarity. “Important lessons have come to light—hard lessons we must heed if we are to heal and honor those we lost,” says Michael Moran, a foreign policy journalist who viewed the attacks in New York in person and lost family and friends that day. Join Moran as he examines many thought-provoking and unexpected aftershocks: How the attacks fueled a culture of conspiracy; why China benefited more than the U.S. from our response; and how decisions after the attacks weakened U.S. power and credibility. “These decisions caused the U.S. to turn inward at precisely the wrong time in history,” Moran says. What are the long-term consequences of those choices? And more importantly, can the U.S. regain its strength? How strong was the U.S.—really—before 9/11? Or was our strength and position in the world just an illusion? Beware: This class may linger with you. Why? Because it stands to change the way you see September 11, 2001, war, politics and the world.

Four Zoom sessions Two Zoom sessions

Tue., Feb. 16, 23, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0469 / $70 Courtenay W. Daum is a professor of political science and affiliate faculty with the Center for Women’s Studies and Gender Research at Colorado State University, as well as the co-author of The Constitutional and Legal Rights of Women. Joshua Wilson is a political science professor at DU and has authored three books: The Street Politics of Abortion, The New States of Abortion Politics and Separate but Faithful: The Christian Right’s Struggle to Transform Law & Legal Culture.

Wed., Mar. 17, 24, 31, Apr. 7, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0464 / $140 Michael Moran has held senior positions at a host of media, financial services and consulting organizations. A foreign policy journalist and former partner at the global consultancy Control Risks, he is author of The Reckoning: Debt, Democracy and the Future of American Power.

See Foreign Policy course on page 13.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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History Your History at Your Fingertips: Getting Started With Genealogy and Family History

We all do it—we wonder who we are and where we came from. It’s in our nature because it’s our story, right? Sometimes people will even ask you point-blank: “What’s your story?” Now—thanks to advancements in genealogy—you can offer a full and unflinching answer with plenty of facts. Genealogy today is so much more than just learning who begat whom—it can breathe life into your own history and help you build your family’s unique story. Sure, you know your parents and grandparents—maybe even your great-grandparents. After them, though, things can get murky fast. Why not let pro genealogist Rebecca Hunt clear the murk and lead you into the deeper recesses of your family’s history? Learn if they were famous, exciting, dull or, worse, wanted by authorities—oh, the possibilities!

Start by exploring what genealogy actually is, what it’s good for and how to get started. Uncover new sources: repositories, collections, the Library of Congress, the National Archives, Ellis Island, the Census and much more. Discover free and subscription online sites such as Ancestry and Family Search. Explore specific techniques of research and standards for proving that what you find is factual. And finally, develop a comprehensive and practical plan for future research. Your place in history awaits!

Three Zoom sessions

Tue., Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0468 / $105 Rebecca Hunt is a retired history professor who has taught classes in oral history and has used family histories as a tool to get students interested in their own stories. She’s been an ardent genealogist since the 1970s.

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British Cars: Driving Excitement

Can you imagine it? Maneuvering the 3.7-mile straightaway and white-knuckle, hairpin turns in a roaring supercharged Bentley at the Le Mans 24-hour race—silk scarf whipping in the wind? Or maybe doing your best James Bond, suave and sophisticated in a stylish, silver Aston Martin? If so, your heart is likely beating a little faster right now, and you likely appreciate that British sports cars paved the way for many iconic manufacturers to dominate the world of automotive design— from the showroom to the race track and all roads in between. British sports cars have elicited unparalleled passion around the globe with their fascinating history, their exacting engineering and their famed drivers. There’s so much to admire, so much to know—especially about the connection they have right here in Colorado. Join auto enthusiasts William Taylor and Shawn Bowman as they take you on a spin through a four-week, adrenaline-charged tour of British cars. Take a dive into some of the most influential companies in the industry to grasp not only their full contribution, but also what made their vehicles so unique. Enjoy photo-rich exhibitions, stirring videos, revealing interviews and instructive tours, as well as some car ‘auto-biographies’ from host locations, including the Forney Museum of Transportation. Buckle up because we guarantee it’s pedal to the metal the whole trip! 10% discount to Forney members.

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Mar. 18, 25, Apr. 1, 8, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0467 / $140 William Taylor, who has been publishing books about cars since 1997, founded the nonprofit, Auto-Archives Automotive Library and Research Center with more than 100,000 magazines and 8,000 books. Shawn Bowman grew up trackside at the races and is a co-owner of acclaimed automotive shop Ax and Allies, which specializes in vintage British and French car repair.


History Aviation and Aerospace: Colorado’s Leadership in a Global Industry

What Our Students Are Saying For the Love of Learning! The lecturer’s approach and manner of presentation and connecting science to everyday, practical understanding and application. And, her ability to interact with the viewers/participants. Presentations were clear, on point and riveting. If you are going to take one class on the Arab Spring, this is the one class to take.

It makes sense that so many aviation and aerospace companies have landed in Colorado— they feel right at home in higher altitudes. But the thing is, not many people know just how prevalent, important and cutting edge these industries are here. The fact is, several world-class and pioneering aviation and aerospace companies are creating and revolutionizing the future right here in Colorado. Join lifelong flight enthusiast Ken Eiken for a birds-eye view of the roles each are playing in that revolution. Hear from Eiken and a host of other top-notch industry pros as they share not only the latest, ground-breaking aviation and aerospace news, but also an absorbing history of the industry’s impact in the Centennial State. Explore the important military and civilian aircraft that led to today’s modern equipment. Understand the effects of both the public and private aviation operations on Colorado’s economy. Discover the finer points of aviation management, chartering aircraft and fractional ownership—all explained by those who handle the business every day from companies such as Jeppesen (a Boeing Company), NetJets (a Berkshire Hathaway Company) and Frontier Airlines. Meet the people who are creating the next generation of innovative products, including electrically powered personal aircraft and supersonic transport. Now boarding— don’t miss this flight!

Four Zoom sessions

Mon., Mar. 22, 29, Apr. 5, 12, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0465 / $140 Ken Eiken flew the F-16 as an instructor pilot in Asia, the U.S. and Europe. After his service in the Air Force, he built a successful career in sales leadership in leading business aviation companies such as Jeppesen, MedAire and Gogo Business Aviation.

They treated the audience as knowledgeable, well-read adults, and did not condescend in any way. I thoroughly enjoyed the class and am sorry that it is over. Everyone involved in the Enrichment Program is wonderful. Always very nice and easy to deal with by phone. Always helpful. Always efficient. Thank you! Thank you for providing so many wonderful opportunities of interesting classes to take. I am very grateful for the DU Enrichment Program and plan to continue to take advantage of its offerings. The quality of the instructors and instruction, and the content, is high. Both professors were well-prepared with tons of information but a personal delivery that made the facts come alive. I love taking classes again. I even share interesting concepts with my friends. Real world events are so mechanical and mind numbing ... education feeds our soul! The intelligence—even wisdom—of the instructors and many of the students. Stimulating class and important and timely topic!! Knowledgeable, very articulate and fascinating. He was GREAT! I would definitely take another course from him! I was able to read the stories he sent out, and found them much more interesting now as an adult than I did when I was in school! The instructor’s humor and wit kept my interest going. Another great class, DU. Thanks.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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History & Culture Spain: Exploring the Histories and Cultures of Iberia

Bull fighters, world-class wine, luminous landscapes, paella and tortilla española, Flamenco music, Moorish architecture, Don Quixote. ¡Olé! The kind of exoticism on display here was perhaps best captured by the Franco regime’s tourism slogan: “Spain is Different!” But as splendid and iconic as that “difference” may be, this picture of Spain falls far short of capturing the multifaceted country’s many complexities and contradictions. Join Chad Leahy, assistant professor of Spanish at the University of Denver, as he unravels those complexities and contradictions in illuminating fashion, offering an in-depth view of Spain’s profound diversity and antiquity. Leahy, known for his unbridled zeal and energy on all things Spain, describes his approach to this course as both broad and chronological—from prehistoric Iberia to the present day. Throughout that span, he offers a sweeping overview of the linguistic, cultural, ethnoracial, religious and political currents that have molded the Iberian Peninsula. Consider how ideas of nation and nationalism relate to Spain’s past in interesting and often problematic ways. Explore the many communities that have shaped the peninsula’s culture over the centuries. Discover the politics of language, identity, territory and belief to better understand the delicate relationship between the region’s religions, languages and cultures. Examine Spain’s regional cultures and their contemporary languages, including Galician, Catalan, Valencià, Castilian and Euskera. Survey the impact of the Spanish Civil War and of Franco’s 20th-century dictatorship. Probe the migration, displacement and expulsion of people to and from the peninsula. Survey Spain’s challenging legacy as a global colonial/imperial power. And finally, inspect objects Leahy shares from Spain’s visual and material culture: sculptures, paintings, textiles and photographs. Plus, delve into the country’s most famous works of art and literature along with its contemporary music, film, dance, dress and, of course, superb wine and food. Indeed, Spain is different. This course explores how and why that is.

Four Zoom sessions

Wed., Feb. 17, 24, Mar. 3, 10, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0463 / $140 Chad Leahy, PhD, is an assistant professor of Spanish at the University of Denver and teaches courses on the literatures and cultures of early modern and medieval Iberia. He has published widely on the work of Miguel de Cervantes and the role of Jerusalem in the history of Spain.

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History & Culture The Nordic Utopia: Beyond Vikings and Angry Birds

The Nordic countries rank consistently high on global comparisons of wellness, satisfaction and happiness. Among them, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland boast exemplary educational systems, the most gender-equal societies in the world, sustainable environmental policies, influential design and flourishing economies. It would seem these countries have nearly achieved a utopian society! But have they? Join DU Assistant Professor Ann Mäkikalli, who lived and taught in Finland for nearly 10 years, for an historical and cultural tour of each of these five countries, exploring the symbiotic relationship between the physical environmental features of the region and the history, economics and culturally expressive forms. Norway is in many ways defined by its industry—especially North Sea oil. Learn about Denmark’s emphasis on hygge and its welfare system, which provides education and healthcare to all. What are the trade-offs of what many consider a welfare state? Iceland, an increasingly popular tourist destination, boasts one of the world’s most gender-equitable cultures, as well as stunning landscapes. Discover why saunas are essential to Finns, and why Finland’s education system is continuously ranked among the best in the world. Finally, examine the home of ABBA—Sweden—where citizens are intent on creating a sustainable, emissions-free society. Along the way, guest speakers from several of the countries share stories, as well as travel tips. Enjoy readings each week from Michael Booth’s humorous travelogue, The Almost Nearly Perfect People: Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia. Come away with a deeper appreciation for these fascinating and progressive countries and with new destinations for your bucket list. Are the Nordic countries utopias? No. Are they fascinating? Yes!

Five Zoom sessions

Mon., Mar. 29, Apr. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0462 / $155 Ann Mäkikalli, PhD candidate, is an assistant professor at DU’s English Language Center. She lived in Finland for 10 years and taught English and U.S. culture at the University of Turku, Finland. Ann has traveled extensively in all five of the Nordic countries, as well as their neighboring countries.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Finance

Economics

Stocks, Bonds or Cash: Investing in a Post-Pandemic World!

How Emerging Markets Develop: A Comparative Analysis of Brazil, Russia, India and China

Here’s an interesting fact: Only a small percentage of investors, both professional and individual, consistently beat the market. What do the few know that the many don’t? They understand what drives financial markets. That, says financial analyst JP Tremblay, is the critical difference. Join Tremblay as he demystifies not only what drives markets and corporate performance, but also the world of investing to make you, no matter your experience, a more knowledgeable and confident investor. Begin with a primer on the financial markets, investment styles and characteristics that drive the markets, and how to distinguish noise from information to better decide if and when to act. Then, learn time-tested strategies to choose stocks and gain access to special resources for better research so you can build a diversified and sustainable portfolio that matches you and your unique goals and tolerance for risk. Consider these key questions: Should you pick stocks yourself? Should you hire a money manager? How might you avoid both and just buy an index fund? Finish with a complete individual investment plan and a look to the future with tips you can use regardless of market conditions. Leave with a fresh, robust and useful understanding of financial markets. Please note: Participants need a computer with Microsoft Excel version 2010 or higher.

Four Zoom sessions

Mon., Jan. 25, Feb. 1, 8, 15, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0461 / $140 JP Tremblay is a teaching professor in the Reiman School of Finance at the Daniels College of Business. He is a CFA charter holder and actively researches financial concepts in portfolio management, business cycle and equity valuation. He is also an active portfolio manager.

Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC), four countries smart investors know they need to understand to make wise investments. Why? “For starters, they hold a combined population of 3.1 billion people, or 40% of the world total,” says seasoned markets analyst Brian Friedman. “All four of these countries are aspiring world powers,” says Friedman. “And people who want to make sense of the international economy often find it confusing and chaotic—until they recognize how underlying systems of power, law and finance can influence any country’s economic performance.” Join Friedman on a revealing tour of these four lands to examine those systems along with the economic potential of each country. Which ones might reach world-power status? Is China really a rising superpower, or will it eventually succumb to serious obstacles? What about the others? How does India’s economy measure up? What about Russia and its vast natural resources? And what should we make of Brazil, a country that’s had more than its share of political turbulence? Follow along as Friedman converts each country into an instructive and useful case study to help you gain a better grasp of international markets and how they develop—or fold. Then compare and contrast BRIC and their future prospects. Four countries, four Zoom sessions. How convenient! How educational!

Four Zoom sessions

Mon., Apr. 19, 26, May 3, 10, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0460 / $140 Brian Friedman, CFA, CBE, is president, cofounder and chief investment officer of GHP Investment Advisors, Inc. where he has grown client assets from $10 million in 1999 to $1.4 billion today. He’s a former analyst at the Brookings Institution and an adjunct lecturer in economics at the University of Colorado at Denver.

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Art Flow: An Abstract Approach to Watermedia

Great news! You can take the drab out of winter. Even better—there’s a fun way to do it! It’s called watermedia, an exciting and creative way to add dazzling color to your winter. Let the good times flow by joining artist and author Judith CasselMamet for this virtual art workshop brimming with ways to dive into your own artistic bliss. Follow along as Cassel-Mamet shows you how to spray water on inks, splash pigments on paper and make marks with cool and unusual tools.

Before you know it, you’ll have abstract art powerful enough to wow yourself, as well as your friends and family. Cassel-Mamet keeps it simple and easy with materials you likely already have on hand: watercolors, pens, sticks and ink—along with a few more items you’re sure to enjoy exploring. Turn your winter into a true wonderland of flowing colors and amazing art.

Nature Journaling: Sketching the Spring Season

Is anything more soothing to your soul than wandering around nature? Possibly. How about wandering around nature while journaling? You could reach a whole new level of relaxation. Aptly named, nature journaling is a time-honored pursuit that encourages small sketches and recordings of moments—think of it as your very own poetry of place. The goal? To capture the transforming experience of communing with nature with zero pressure to create a perfect, scientific representation of objects—this is not botanic illustration. Join artist and author Judith Cassel-Mamet as she helps you explore ways to record your playful and pleasing moments in nature. Learn how to fill your pages via the “be, see, then sketch” approach. Discover how to draw complicated shapes, work with contour lines and add color. As soon as you register, you’ll get a suggested list of materials such as an art journal, a small watercolor kit, pens and a few other fun items. Cassel-Mamet says no experience in sketching or painting is required. Enroll, journal and enjoy!

Two Zoom sessions

Sat., Mar. 20, 27, 2021, 10 am–12 pm MT ENRICH 0456 / $120

One Zoom session

Sat., Feb. 6, 2021, 10 am–12 pm MT ENRICH 0455 / $60

Watermedia and Art Journaling Package Enroll in both courses and save $30! ENRICH 0454 / $150

Judith Cassel-Mamet is a mixed-media artist and instructor who teaches at the Art Students League of Denver, online at Craftsy and The Great Courses and leads art journal groups to magical spots in the U.S. and Europe. She’s the author of two books: Joyful Pages: Adventures in Art Journaling and Joyful Pages Playground and the co-creator of Sketching Spain, a virtual culture and travel journal class.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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What Our Students Are Saying For the Love of Learning! This professor is simply wonderful. He’s so well-versed on this subject and full of fun stories to fill the background of the topic. Well-organized and presented by an experienced professor. Even though this could not be an in-person class, the instructor made it seem like we were all together. Her presentation was very personable, interesting, fun, easy to follow and very well-thought out. I have taken many Zoom classes since March and this one was my favorite. Because of COVID-19 I think it is very hard to have a class that includes discussion, but we are able to ask questions via the chat mode, which I think works very well. This class was very professional and I’d sign up for another one just like it. Keep up the great work at the Enrichment Program. The depth, thoroughness and clarity of instruction, along with the quality of the writing assignments. I deeply appreciate all that DU has done to continue to offer outstanding opportunities for adult learners. I liked that there was an assignment to set the stage beforehand (recommended book), and time to process and share during class, as well as time to ponder between the two sessions. Provocative topic with a rich variety of evidence.

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Art History The Dawning of the Psychedelic Poster (1965–69)

It’s the medium that marked a movement: posters. They may lack the high-tech traits we’ve grown accustomed to, but that doesn’t make them any less effective. In fact, psychedelic art posters proved potent enough to define an era that began in 1965 as American troops landed in Vietnam. That’s when artist Wes Wilson superimposed a swastika and the words “Are We Next? Be Aware” on a U.S. flag. Join Art History Professor Scott B. Montgomery as he takes you back to a time that redefined the word rebellion to capture the origin, development and proliferation of psychedelic posters: From The Seed, the first artistic rock poster in 1965 to the Summer of Love, and then on to Woodstock—a period when the psychedelic counterculture developed its own distinct visual language. This expression manifests itself most vividly in San Francisco, the city that Montgomery says served as the center of the movement, exemplified in 1967’s groundbreaking poster exhibit, Joint Show. Montgomery also examines Denver’s own contribution to the scene through a screening of the film The Tale of the Dog, the previously untold story of the beginnings of Denver’s transformation to its modern identity as a hip city. The filmmakers will answer your questions afterwards. Be prepared: You’ll never see art, posters or Denver in the same light.

Three Zoom sessions

Mon., Apr. 19, 26, May 3, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0452 / $105 Scott B. Montgomery is associate professor of Art History at the University of Denver who has curated several exhibitions of posters and recently completed a book on psychedelic poster artist, Lee Conklin.


Art History Beyond the Old Masters: Four Centuries of Women Artists For the last five years each March during Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women in the Arts has been posing a simple question on social media. Using the hashtag #5WomenArtists, the campaign asks readers if they can name five women artists as a way to call attention to the fact that women have not been treated equally in the art world and remain dramatically underrepresented and undervalued in museums, galleries and auction houses. For many of us, when we think of artists, old masters like Michelangelo and Rembrandt come to mind almost instantly—much quicker than names like Sofonisba Anguissola and Adélaïde LabilleGuiard. Why is that? And more interesting, who were the professional female artists who practiced alongside their more famous male counterparts? Join art historian and Denver Art Museum educator Molly Medakovich on a journey from the Renaissance through the Impressionist era to explore four centuries of female artists in European Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting, 1638–39 , Artemisia Gentileschi and American art history. First, step into Renaissance Italy to learn how Lavinia Fontana and Anguissola made names for themselves during a period that defined creative genius as distinctly male. Next, revel in Artemisia Gentileschi’s powerful paintings from the Baroque era, their bold chiaroscuro exhibiting the era’s penchant for dramatic storytelling. Then, during the Age of Enlightenment, meet Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, premier portrait painter for Queen Marie Antoinette, and Rosalba Carriera, a successful portraitist working in Venice and known for her striking use of pastels. Finally, in the 1800s, as nascent feminist movements began to percolate on both sides of the Atlantic, see how artist Berthe Morisot navigated professional pursuits alongside family life and what it was like for Edmonia Lewis, a biracial American artist, to work as a Neoclassical sculptor in Rome. Discover how these and other artists faced their challenges and triumphs. Consider what has changed since their times and what remains the same for women artists today. Plus, learn how 20th-century feminism and activism in the art world contributed to a better understanding and greater appreciation of women artists from the past. Come away with a richer appreciation of women artists and their valuable contributions to the world of art.

Four Zoom sessions

Wed., Mar. 24, 31, Apr. 7, 14, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0453 /$140 Molly Medakovich is a teaching specialist for adult programs at the Denver Art Museum, an affiliate faculty member at the University of Denver and an art historian. She holds a PhD in 18th- and 19th-century European art history with a focus on French painting and sculpture.

Le Berceau (The Cradle), 1872, Berthe Morisot

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Social Sciences The Intercultural City: Past and Present

American cities are changing and growing more diverse. Two factors that have always brought that change and diversity are immigration and natural demographic growth. But now cities are facing new forces of change. The murder of George Floyd has produced soul searching about how urban land use fosters racial injustice and economic inequality. What’s more, natural disasters and COVID-19 are causing us to rethink planning for urban resilience and adaptability. This dynamic context delivers vital questions: How do we create more inclusive and sustainable cities? How can we accommodate social and cultural diversity in ways that offer a shared civic identity and broader prosperity? What would housing, public space, green space and other elements of the urban-built environment look like? Join Dean Saitta, professor and director of DU’s Urban Studies program, to examine the challenges of the “Intercultural City.” Examine the tough decisions awaiting urban planners and civic leaders and what they can learn from ancient cities, a virtually untapped source of knowledge. Understand how the earliest cities were planned, built and experienced by citizens. Then join in collective brainstorming about how we can move toward more equitable, prosperous and sustainable cities. Come away with fresh insight into the world of cities and a new view of how cities of the future may appear.

Animals in Our Lives: Human-Animal Connection in Family, Community and Beyond

Could animals be the answer to more fulfilling lives? Could they improve our lives? Our families? Our communities? Our world? “Animals offer some of our most reliable and consistent forms of social support,” says Philip Tedeschi, who heads the Institute for Human-Animal Connection, which studies the interrelationship and health of people, animals and the environment. “Animals are important in all cultures and across the entire human lifespan.” Join Tedeschi as he expands on those statements and explores how deepening our relationship with animals can indeed make our lives and the world better. He says this year, poverty, isolation and loneliness—all worsened by the pandemic— are “significant risk factors” for human health. But research shows that humans’ connections with animals help us by offering experiences that inform our social, emotional, cognitive, physical, spiritual and psychological well-being. Discover companion animals’ power to heal and the therapeutic relationship between people and animals. Examine ways to deepen our relationship with non-human animals, especially our dogs and cats, but other animals, too. Conclude this personal and transformative learning experience with a virtual field trip that takes you around the globe to see the important and inspiring ways animals enrich us and our world.

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Feb. 18, 25, Mar. 4, 11, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0486 / $140

Three Zoom sessions

Wed., Apr. 28, May 5, 12, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0485 / $105 Dean Saitta is professor of Anthropology and director of DU’s Urban Studies program and researches ancient city planning and design, comparative architectural and urban form, and North American archaeology. He authored Intercultural Urbanism: City Planning from the Ancient World to the Modern Day, and blogs for Planetizen, an urban planning website. See Revolutionary Radio course on page 15.

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Philip Tedeschi is the executive director of the Institute for Human-Animal Connection and a clinical professor at the Graduate School of Social Work at the University of Denver. He is recognized globally for expertise in the clinical methods of animal-assisted interventions and supervises the school’s animal-assisted social work certificate program.


Psychology Art and Madness: Exploring the Psyche of Artists

The two words seem to be inextricably linked: art and madness. Intertwined in a complex yet prolific dance. Why is that? What role does mental illness play, if any, in the minds and works of the greats? Would great art exist without madness? And what do we really know about the interchange between the internal and external influences that shaped artists’ personalities and their works? Join Clinical and Forensic Psychologist Sheila Porter, PhD, for a riveting look at surprising answers. In three illuminating sessions, Porter delves deep into the psychological makeup of painter Frida Kahlo, architect Antoni Gaudí and sculptress Camille Claudel to uncover the connections among their personas, the times in which they lived and their art to better understand why each produced a particular work in a particular way at a particular time. Probe the interplay between their temperaments and their environments—how their lives impacted their art and how their art impacted their lives. Did Kahlo’s health shape her personality, which in turn, guided her art? Why did those who knew Gaudí ask if he was a mad man or a genius? And did Camille Claudel’s affair with fellow sculptor Auguste Rodin destroy both her life and her art? The lives behind their work are as fascinating and captivating as their remarkable creations. Prepare to see art in a revealing new light.

Surviving and Thriving Through a Pandemic: Connecting, Coping and Communicating

COVID-19 upended our daily lives and long-term plans in unexpected, profound and challenging ways. We have been coping with fear, uncertainty, stress and loneliness for months on end. Living through the strain of prolonged trauma influences our mental health. More specifically, what are the emotional and developmental challenges for each generation: Children, adolescents, our parents and our grandparents? How can we discover creative ways of coping and even anticipate the pandemic’s effects on the future? How can we make up for losses and add more meaning to our lives? How can we develop greater resilience? Join Psychologist Shana Adler as we explore and discuss these questions and much more in this timely and practical course. Consider how those in the 1918 pandemic responded. Examine individual and collective responses to other violent traumas and life-threatening natural disasters in recent history. Explore the inspiring examples of families who have reconnected despite being apart. See how individuals have found hope amid loss. Sign up quickly, as this class is limited to 15 students to encourage small-group discussions.

Three Zoom sessions

Four Zoom Sessions

ENRICH 0481 / $105

ENRICH 0482 /$140

Sheila Porter, PhD, is a retired clinical and forensic psychologist and international volunteer who has conducted psychological assessments of asylum-seekers, consulted with an international war crimes tribunal and taught courses ranging from art’s kinship with madness, African leaders’ corrupt regimes, international aid, genocide and the psychology of hatred.

Shoshana Shapiro Adler, PhD, is a Denver-based child and adult analyst and psychologist who has taught at the Denver Institute for Psychoanalysis, the School of Professional Psychology at the University of Denver, the University of Colorado School of Medicine and training programs in China.

Wed. Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT

Thur., Mar. 18, 25, Apr. 1, 8, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT

See course on Resilience in the Arts on page 12.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Literature Dusting Off the Classics: Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

We all yearn to sail to the quintessential “lighthouse” of our hopes and dreams. But how do we envision in our mind’s eye such a profound and potentially life-changing journey, what is necessary to then actually embark upon it, what is needed to sustain us along the way, and is it ever possible to truly arrive at our desired destination? Such are some of the essential questions posed by one of the most dazzling and virtuosic artistic creations of the 20th century, Virginia Woolf’s 1927 novel To the Lighthouse, written amidst the turbulent societal and cultural changes sweeping through the British Isles and beyond in the years following the “Great War.” Join Dr. Richard Sacks, who spent four decades at Columbia University teaching its core great books course— which began in the ancient Mediterranean world and regularly culminated with To the Lighthouse—in a close reading of the wondrous landscapes, seascapes and mindscapes in Woolf’s astonishing masterpiece. To the Lighthouse is at once an elegiac remembrance of Woolf’s parents and family, especially her mother, and at the same time a post-impressionistic journey challenging us all to sail beyond the normal temporal and spatial boundaries governing how we see things, how we remember things, and how we try to process the never-ending streams of consciousness flowing through our daily lives.

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Apr. 20, 27, May 4, 11, 2021, 6:30–8:30pm MT ENRICH 0471 / $140 Richard Sacks taught literature, mythology and linguistics at Columbia University for 40 years. He also regularly participated in Columbia’s well-known Core Curriculum, teaching its great books course and giving lectures to faculty on the challenges of teaching texts ranging from the Iliad and Odyssey to biblical narratives such as Genesis and the Gospels. Richard Sacks’ analyses are always imaginative, deeply informed and touched with humor. He knows so much. ~ Enrichment Program student

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True Tales of Taboo: The Dark Side of Fairy Tales

Did you know that The Little Mermaid was written without a happy ending to emphasize torture and selfsacrifice? Or, that Bluebeard was intended to warn married women to be obedient to their husbands? Fairy tales are magical but also store ingrained social paradigms. They have a hold on us—we return to their narratives despite being unsettling. Join April ChapmanLudwig, assistant professor in the University of Denver’s writing program, as she strips away the Disney whitewash and dives into Sleeping Beauty, Hansel and Gretel, Bluebeard and The Little Mermaid, addressing each story’s historical and cultural meanings. Many seemingly benign tales descended from darker stories with themes of adultery, incest, cannibalism, rape, murder and mutilation. These darker tropes reflect cultural messages about survival, morality, growing up and how humans ought to make meaning in an uncertain world. In each class, Chapman-Ludwig begins by sharing the origin story of a popular fairy tale. For example, Hansel and Gretel has its roots in the 1314 European Famine. What was the intended moral of that story? Then, she examines the adaptations to each story across time. What does each change reveal about society and also the author’s own life? Join class discussions about why these stories still resonate today, which adaptations seem antiquated and which hit too close to home.

Four Zoom sessions

Thurs., Jan. 21, 28, Feb. 4, 11, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0470 / $140 April Chapman-Ludwig has taught in the Writing Program at DU for over 14 years. Her writing and research focus on visual rhetoric, 18th-century women’s literature, the history of fairy tales, documentary film, transfer student persistence and the social sciences.


Writing Jumpstart Your Memoir!

You’ve lived through an amazing experience and know you have a story to tell, but you’re having trouble getting started. Where do you begin? How should the story be structured? Why would anybody care? Get to the bottom of those questions in this day-long writing workshop led by long-time Enrichment Program instructor Shari Caudron, writer and author. In preparation, read The Yellow House by Sarah Broom, winner of the 2019 National Book Award and a New York Times bestseller. The book has been described as “a brilliant, haunting and unforgettable memoir from a stunning new talent about the inexorable pull of home and family, set in a shotgun house in New Orleans East.” After reading, come to class prepared to reflect on the book and write about your own life experiences. Once in the virtual classroom, Shari guides you through a series of writing exercises designed to help you understand your own unique story, find its universal relevance and—most importantly—start writing. Whether you’re interested in writing a book-length memoir or a memoir-essay, you’re guaranteed to end the workshop with a stack of freshly written pages, as well as new insight into what an experience meant!

Two Zoom sessions

Sat., Feb. 20, 27, 2021, 9 am–12 pm MT ENRICH 0487 / $155 Shari Caudron is a long-time member of the Enrichment Program faculty, as well as the creative writing faculty at Lighthouse Writers. She is the author of two narrative nonfiction books, including Who Are You People?, winner of the Colorado Book Award. Shari is especially passionate about memoir writing and she works one-onone as a memoir coach with aspiring authors.

Playwriting: From Page to Stage

Are you a theatre lover who’s always dreamed of trying your hand at writing a play? Maybe you have a germ of an idea but just aren’t sure how to start. Award-winning playwright Carrie Printz will teach specific tools and tips to help launch you on your playwriting path. Learn the key elements of drama. Complete exercises that help hone your

playwriting chops as you develop your idea, plot, characters and dialogue. Read, view and discuss two very different contemporary plays to better understand the full range of theatrical genres and styles at your disposal. Compare and contrast a more traditionally plotted play and characters with one that breaks some of those rules. Finally, write your own scenes and cast your classmates in roles so you can actually hear your work read aloud—a key part of the playwriting process. Printz says that while the class can’t take the place of the live theatre you’ve likely missed so much during the pandemic, it can offer “a little taste of the real thing.” If you’ve ever wanted to discover the key steps and theatrical elements involved with playwriting, this workshop offers a thorough and practical overview. Your blank page and empty stage await!

Three Zoom sessions

Wed., Feb. 17, 24, Mar. 3, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0488 / $105 Carrie Printz is an award-winning playwright whose plays have won both national and regional competitions and have been performed in many theaters. Her full-length play, Fractured Moonlight, was scheduled to be performed last April but was canceled due to the pandemic.

See Genealogy course on page 18.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Religion Islam 101: Understanding the World’s Second Most-Popular Religion

Goddess Traditions: The Goddess in Every Woman (and Man!)

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Mar. 16, 23, 30, Apr. 6, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0483 / $140 Sharon L. Coggan, PhD, is a retired associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver where she founded and directed the religious studies program. Her areas of study include history of religions and the psychology of religion.

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Credit: Library of Congress

It’s a question you’ve certainly heard before: Do you believe in God? Now, a couple of questions you probably haven’t heard: Do you believe in Goddess? Do you believe in the Gods? Why is it automatically assumed there is one, masculine God? Why not a Goddess? Why not many Gods? And who has decided this and what makes that person right? “The idea that there is one masculine father in heaven comes from certain Western religions, but the world is home to many religions,” says Sharon L. Coggan, a retired religious studies professor, who also asks, “Who determines which is right, if any are in fact ‘right?’” Join Coggan as she addresses all of these queries along with many lesser-known religions, both current and past, to examine Goddess traditions around the globe. Discover the Paleolithic and Neolithic great mother and her heiresses in the ancient Mediterranean cultures: Isis, Ishtar, Demeter, Persephone, Hecate, Aphrodite, Athena and Artemis; and their parallels in India: Uma, Parvati, Durga and Kali. Goddess traditions have encompassed a full spectrum from virgins to seductresses, great mothers to death dealers. Explore the Triple Goddess and the Goddesses in every woman (and man). Learn if you’re a virgin type, an Amazon or a Venusian woman, or maybe you’re a wise old crone, or perhaps a blend of them all.

Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world: By 2050, the number of Muslims around the world will almost equal the number of Christians. Search for “Islam in the news” and more than 400 million results appear. Yet, the majority of Americans don’t know anyone Muslim, and many feel they know little about Islam. Gain clarity into the world’s second most-popular religion under the guidance of Andrea Stanton, associate professor of Islamic Studies. Examine the basic beliefs and practices of Islam, discuss how the Qur’an relates to the Torah and the Bible, outline the history of Islam in the U.S., and connect these issues to the present day. By course’s end, you’ll be able to answer questions such as: Who is Muhammad? What does Islam say about Jesus? What is shari`a and how does it relate to politics and society? What is the difference between Sunni and Shiite? What is Sufism? How do extremists justify their views? How do Muslims interpret the Qur’an today? Come away with a new understanding of the interaction between theology and politics, belief and culture within the Islamic faith.

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Apr. 22, 29, May 6, 13, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0484 / $140 Andrea Stanton is an associate professor of Islamic Studies and chair of DU’s Department of Religious Studies. She is an expert on contemporary Islam and an instructor who teaches on Islam and politics, Muslim fundamentalisms, the Qur’an and hadith, Islam and gender, and Islam in the United States.


Nature & Science Nature’s Grandest Spectacle: The Spring Migration of Birds

Prairies, forests and wetlands of our latitude come alive in April and May with a rich diversity of birds that only weeks earlier were wintering in habitats ranging from the southern U.S. and Mexico to Central America and northern South America. Who are they? Join Colorado birding expert Ted Floyd for four evening lectures with structured discussion. The course will cover the whys and wherefores of one of nature’s grandest spectacles: The spring migration of birds. Using multimedia, real-time examples drawn from the field, Ted will discuss the questions we’ve all asked since childhood: Why do birds migrate in the first place? How do they know where to go? He’ll also explore birds’ amazing physical feat of flying hundreds or even thousands of miles in a relatively short time and give a short primer on evolutionary biology, especially as it pertains to understanding relationships among groups of migratory birds found in Colorado. Discover modern resources for enjoying bird migration that contribute to basic science about avian biology, including digital recorders and cameras, smartphones, apps and software such as eBird and iNaturalist. Even though you will not be outdoors together, learn how to record your sightings and upload your data to global databases used by scientists to monitor and protect bird populations. Come away with a new understanding of one of nature’s most spectacular and mind-boggling annual routines.

Four Zoom sessions

Wed., Apr. 21, 28, May 5, 12, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0479 / $140 Ted Floyd is the long-time editor of Birding, the flagship publication of the American Birding Association, and the author of many articles and books, including the Field Guide to Birds of Colorado (2nd ed., 2018) and How to Know the Birds (2019). He has taught college courses in ecology, evolution, entomology, conservation biology and other topics.

Ted Floyd is a nationally important ornithologist, knowledgeable about all kinds of science, covers a lot of ground and makes you excited about learning. Managed Zoom “field” class well, is generous and available with his knowledge and had block of time for questions. ~ Enrichment Program student Credit: All images by Ted Floyd

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Nature & Science Climate Change: Basic Necessities and Nagging Questions

Is it hyperbolic to say climate change is literally a life and death issue? Many scientists say absolutely not and add that it stands as humanity’s single biggest challenge. But what should we know about climate change? What do we know already? And how did we learn it? Thankfully, the University of Denver is home to someone who has researched and taught this material for many years. You can join Dr. J.C. Wilson (Chuck) as he answers those questions and many others in accessible, easy-to-grasp terms through four revealing sessions: 1) Energy balance: Why it’s fundamental to our livable environment? What happens when the climate is out of balance? What roles do the first law of thermodynamics and thermal radiation play? 2) Future climates: What do we know about them? How are they predicted? How good were our past predictions? What uncertainties accompany current predictions? How do humans impact climate and process information about climate? 3) Tradeoffs: What are the tradeoffs between risks of action and inaction? What are the likely consequences of continued global warming? 4) Warranted actions: Who needs to act and how we get the buy-in from the necessary actors? Wilson likes questions and discussions and adds with a warm smile, “All viewpoints are welcome.”

What Our Students Are Saying For the Love of Learning! Thought the design of the course was very good—well-sequenced and paced. Was very pleased with the templates or class exercises as well. I will refer back to them again. Professional delivery of course content, a welcoming group that invited participation and deep learning, presentation of new, novel content that is refreshing and encouraging. Got me reading and thinking again about what matters in my life and the need to clear the clutter. The instructor is a treasure for DU. He is internationally recognized as an expert in international law. He has worked tirelessly to advance human rights for everyone. These classes have been a wonderful way to escape from the COVID-19 confines. Different perspectives of a difficult topic. The ability of the instructor to clearly and in a concise way describe a vast amount of complex subject matter. I have taken several courses in adult learning programs. I have generally rated the other programs above average to excellent depending on the individual instructors. This Enrichment course is my first experience with your program. It raised the bar to a new high for excellence. Well done. This course was a fire hose of history and culture. I have considered myself knowledgeable in religion, but I was blown away with this information.

Four Zoom sessions

Mon., Jan. 25, Feb. 1, 8, 15, 2021, 6:30–8:30 pm MT ENRICH 0478 / $140 James “Chuck” Wilson, PhD, taught 34 years at the University of Denver, primarily engineering lab courses and design. He also offered general education classes dealing with ozone depletion and climate change. His research involves measuring airborne particulate matter, a critical component of air pollution that damages health, reduces visibility, increases ozone depletion and impacts climate.

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GOOD WORK DU!!!! Thank you all for finding ways to continue the Enrichment program in times of COVID-19. It is so nice to have something other than politics and COVID-19 to enjoy! The entire program with other classes has opened new fields to learn new things and ideas to think about. Grateful for this series. Fabulous experience. I cried when it was over. I liked it that much.


OLLI-Enrichment DAYTIME In collaboration with the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at DU, we are pleased to offer the following online OLLI at DU courses to all Enrichment Program students. If you are already an OLLI member or are interested in becoming one, please enroll here: http://portfolio.du.edu/ollioncampus

What Goes Around Comes Around: Karma and Ethics from Ancient India to the Enlightenment

Why should you be good? Two common answers: Because it makes you better and because it’s your duty. Join Religious Studies Professor Dr. Steven M. Vose as he compares three theories of karma in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism to the ethics of ancient Greece. He then compares the yoga of the Bhagavad Gita to the ethics of duty in the thought of Immanuel Kant. Could taking this course make you a better person? Maybe!

History of Yoga in Theory and Practice

You know about yoga, and if you’re reading this, you’ve probably tried it. Maybe you’re a regular. But did you know a key component of yoga is all about detaching from the mundane world to attain supernatural powers. And that’s just for starters. Join scholar of performance, ritual and digital culture Dr. Dheepa Sundaram as she explores yoga from its earliest beginnings to its development, its relationship to tantra and what made it an international phenomenon.

Four Zoom sessions

Four Zoom sessions

Thur., Jan. 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4, 2021, 9:30–11:30 am MT

ENRICH 0493 / $130

ENRICH 0491 / $130

The Gut-Brain Connection

The 101 Fantastic Photographs You’ll Want to Take in Your Lifetime

Mon., Jan. 11, 25, Feb. 1, 8, 2021, 1–3 pm MT

The old saying, “You are what you eat,” is getting a new twist: “Your emotions are what you eat.” Many new studies on the gut-brain connection are revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain. Join neuroscientists Drs. Aurélie Ledreux and Daniel Paredes as they highlight new theories underlying stress, emotions and the immune system, and how these studies are opening new approaches to treat Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Jan. 12, 19, 26, Feb. 2, 2021, 1–3 pm MT ENRICH 0490 / $130

Finally, a simple class that shows you how to take the photographs you always wanted: Spiraling fireworks, dramatic lightening, striking portraits and much more. Join pro photographer Mark A. Payler in this interactive course loaded with eyecatching examples, suggested locations, hands-on tips and assignments that let you put to use what you learn. What’s more, Payler adds lessons based directly on your input. Getting the right shots from now on will be a snap!

Four Zoom sessions

Tue., Feb. 9, 16, 23, Mar. 2, 2021, 1–3 pm MT ENRICH 0489 / $130

Mastering Digital Photography: Getting to Know Your Camera

The Irish in Early Colorado

Four Zoom sessions

Four Zoom sessions

ENRICH 0494 / $130

ENRICH 0492 / $130

You love photography and you have a digital camera—but are you really getting the most from it? Let pro photographer Mark A. Payler help you uncover and tap all those hidden bells and whistles to give your photos that extra zip in this online, interactive workshop. Explore exposure, metering, focusing, light, color, composition, file formats and other key elements. All photographers— regardless of experience—are welcome and any digital camera (except phone cameras) is fine. Tue., Jan. 12, 19, 26, Feb. 2, 2021, 1–3 pm MT

Want to know where the largest Irish community in the history of Colorado was in the 1880s? Hint: It was also the most heavily-concentrated Irish spot in North America. Join Professor Dr. James Walsh for the answer and the full, fascinating story of the Irish immigrants who settled here as part of the silver rush. Explore other Irish communities in Silverplume, Nevadaville, Cripple Creek/Victor and Gunnison along with their lives as railroad gangs, soldiers and domestic servants. Thur., Feb. 11, 18, 25, Mar. 4, 2021, 1–3 pm MT

For more information on these offerings, please contact Barbe Ratcliffe at barbara.ratcliffe@du.edu, or see the course listings at http://portfolio.du.edu/ollioncampus.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Cultural Connections You’ve seen those stories in the news when hurricanes, tornados, fires or floods hit and everyone pitches in to help each other out. It’s a very common and very real phenomenon. There’s something about adversity that always brings out the best in us. In difficult times, it’s not only human resilience that’s on full display—it’s also human goodness. That’s the best way we can explain how our relationship has worked with our cultural partners around the state—really for much of our existence—but especially in 2020. Back in 2003 when we started the Enrichment Program, we reached beyond our campus to connect with cultural partners across many fields: music, dance, theatre, painting, photography, writing, food and drink, history and much more. We did this as a way to strengthen our courses—to add texture and depth to our students’ experiences. And it has remained a vital part of the Enrichment Program ever since. So, yes, our partners have come through for us so many times and in so many special ways over the years. But it was during this year—this particular rough patch of the pandemic—that we came to appreciate our partners even more. Of course, much of our offerings are about gathering people together—mostly in classrooms or lecture halls—and with our cultural partners, those settings expand to theaters, music halls, labs, studios and field trips to many fun and unusual places. Without question, the pandemic put a serious damper on all of that. But the Enrichment Program, like all other organizations, adjusted. We were fortunate to have creative partners who made all that adjusting easier and much more innovative. And in the spirit of innovation and of resilience, our allies have found creative ways to emerge, some in person, most virtually, to keep our courses fresh, lively, entertaining and certainly educational as we move forward through these vexing times. Here are a few examples of what some of our partners are doing and offering with the Enrichment Program for the winter and spring of 2021. We encourage you to visit their websites so that you continue to meet your quota of culture! • Newman Center for the Performing Arts (newmancenter.du.edu) is offering a class that ties into three performances and focuses on resilience in the arts. • Forney Museum of Transportation (forneymuseum.org) is partnering with the Enrichment Program as a host location for the British Cars: Driving Excitement class. • School of Rock/Littleton (locations.schoolofrock.com/littleton) is teaming with us to offer a course that celebrates 50 years of the rock band, Aerosmith. The School of Rock general manager is teaching the class. • Swallow Hill (swallowhillmusic.org) instructor and professional guitarist Martin Gilmore will teach a bluegrass course. Students will be encouraged to attend a virtual concert and if conditions permit, an optional in-person concert. • THE DROP, Rocky Mountain Public Media’s (rmpbs.org) newest outlet promoting peaceful change through community, will be the focal point of a discussion-based course delivered through the lens of music, sustainability, youth/social media and mental illness.

See Laurel Canyon music course on page 10.

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Cultural Connections To our partners in culture: Thank you for joining us in our cause of lifelong learning and for all you do to continue to bring culture to Colorado in meaningful and amazing ways.

Short non-credit courses, no exams or grades

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Registration Registration opens December 7, 2020. Web:

universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

Phone:

Course Discounts Discounts are available to partner subscribers, OLLI members and DU faculty, staff and alumni. Check with registration staff to see if you qualify.

303-871-2291

Upon registration, you will receive an email with all class details, including Zoom links. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all classes take place via Zoom. Visit the Enrichment Program website for the most up-to-date information.

Disability Services Program (DSP):

DSP provides reasonable accommodations as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act to students with documented disabilities. Accommodations afford students equal opportunity to participate in the University’s programs, courses, and activities.

CERTIFICATE OF LIFELONG LEARNING Current & Global Issues You’ve taken more courses about current issues than you can count. Isn’t it time you started getting acknowledged for your commitment to staying abreast of what’s happening in the world? Be recognized for your achievements, build your credibility, even enhance your resume with a Certificate of Lifelong Learning from the Enrichment Program at University College, University of Denver. Criteria: 30 hours of participation within a three-year period in Enrichment Program classes pertaining to current issues and events. To receive your Certificate, email ucolsupport@du.edu and include a list a courses taken. Upon verification, you will receive one Certificate.

*An example of the many possible course combinations.

The course content in this document is the property of University of Denver Enrichment Program.

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More Educational Opportunities at University College at the University of Denver University College Is Your Lifelong Learning Partner The Enrichment Program is housed within University College, the college of continuing and professional studies at the University of Denver. As you consider your learning needs, you may find a course or credential that’s right for you in one of our other academic programs. Bachelor of Arts Completion Program Need a fresh academic start? If you’ve made advancements in your career without a bachelor’s degree, but now find it essential to finish the one you started years ago, consider the Bachelor of Arts Completion Program through University College. Designed and delivered for busy adults who have completed at least one year of undergraduate credit, this is a personalized program that will challenge and inspire you. Transfer up to three years of previous college credit directly toward a DU degree! universitycollege.du.edu/bachelors. Graduate Certificates Quickly gain a new credential and learn a whole new set of skills by earning a graduate certificate from University College. A certificate is more than a line on your resume, it’s an opportunity to expand your network and your knowledge. There are dozens of academic areas to choose from for a four-course Specialized Graduate Certificate or a six-course Graduate Certificate. Learn more at universitycollege.du.edu/certificate. Master’s Degrees Nearly 25 years ago, University College launched online programming at the University of Denver. Since then, technology and education have evolved. What remains the same is our commitment to delivering a personalized student experience through small class sizes and dedicated academic advisors. Here, you’re not just a number and we’re not just another online program. From Professional Creative Writing to Marketing Communication, Strategic Innovation and Change to Energy and Sustainability, find the right fit and get started when you’re ready (four start dates per year and no GRE required for admission). Discover what more than two decades of leading in online education gets you at universitycollege.du.edu.

Center for Professional Development The University of Denver’s Center for Professional Development (CPD) offers accredited, accessible and affordable certificates, short courses and workshops for clinicians, teachers, business leaders, non-profit professionals and others. Update skills or cultivate new ones, enhance your knowledge and maintain your credentials. Continuing education credit available. See the schedule of upcoming professional development courses at du.edu/professional. Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Denver Are you age 50 or “better?” Do you crave intellectual stimulation and the pursuit of new ideas and experiences with like-minded peers? Then check out OLLI at DU— celebrating 25 years of lifelong learning at the University of Denver! Participants from diverse backgrounds and professions come together to learn through small engaging online classroom lectures and larger online Webinar Series programs and all sizes in between. Class styles include multi-media presentations, books, magazines and shared documents, as well as informal discussions and social interaction. Maximum enjoyment of learning can be expected. Due to the current pandemic, OLLI at DU has moved to the Zoom online learning platform. With several months of online learning experience, OLLI at DU has adjusted to this new normal. Curious? Contact OLLI Assistant Debra Loftin at debra.loftin@du.edu for more information or visit OLLI online at www.universitycollege.du.edu/olli or https://portfolio.du.edu/ollionline.

Call 303-871-2291 or visit universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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In Appreciation University College at the University of Denver Thanks to the Entire Enrichment Team:

Michael McGuire, Dean, Lynn Wells, Enrichment Program Director, Charles Stillwagon, Enrichment Program Coordinator, Lynn Price, Rosalie Goldman, Curriculum Developers, Doug McPherson, Writer, David Sikora, Graphic Designer, Michele Long, Assistant Dean of Admissions & Student Services, Monica Gray, Associate Director of Admissions, Student Services & Systems, Alecia Harris, Ashley Johnson, Audrey Lebel, Rachel Vardeman, Morgan Welty, Student Support Team, Victoria O’Malley, Senior Director of Marketing & Communications, Becky Talley, Assistant Director of Marketing & Communications, Ray Lam, Director of Web & IT Services, Megan Brogdon, Marketing & Communications Coordinator, Teri Markle, Assistant Dean of Business & Operations, Anita Boettcher, Manager of Business & Operations

We would like to hear from you! Send program suggestions, course recommendations and feedback to us by mail or email.

facebook.com/DUenrichment

Certificate of Completion

University of Denver Enrichment Program 2211 S. Josephine Street Denver, CO 80208 ucolsupport@du.edu

The Enrichment Program will provide a Certificate of Completion or other evidence of course attendance, upon request. Please contact us in advance at 303-871-3801 to request the appropriate documentation.

Enrichment Program e-Newsletter

Enrichment Scholarship Fund

Get special discount offers, the inside scoop on your favorite instructors and cultural organizations, insight on upcoming courses, and much more.

We are pleased to offer a limited number of partial scholarships toward the cost of one Enrichment course.

If you are a current or former student and do not receive our newsletter, subscribe now at universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

Limited to one course per qualifying student per calendar year. Scholarships no greater than 50% off course price for qualifying courses. To apply, visit our website: universitycollege.du.edu/enrichment

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Enrichment Program Winter/Spring 2021  

Short courses for the love of learning!

Enrichment Program Winter/Spring 2021  

Short courses for the love of learning!

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