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ANNUAL

2013

Signs of a Stroke: What to Look For

5 Best Foods for Your Heart

Six Healthy Lunch Ideas

Achieving Balance:

Are You Depressed?

Breast Cancer:

The Signs and How to Prevent It

A One-Two Punch to Cancer

5 Natural Ways to Boost Your Mood

10 Vegetables You Should Be Eating

Boost Your Immune System:

6 Supplements for Your Immune System 10 Foods with Vitamin C


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Dear Reader, I am happy to welcome you to this 2013 Annual Edition of Balanced Living, in which you’ll find 12 issues of my exclusive monthly newsletter filled with everyday healthy living information. Balanced Living explores health and healthy living from the perspective of integrative medicine, a healing-oriented medical philosophy that encompasses the whole person: body, mind and spirit. The articles in these newsletters cover the best, evidence-based therapies from both conventional and alternative practitioners. My aim is simple: to help you achieve and maintain optimum health throughout your life. Within this 2013 Annual Edition of Balanced Living, we’ll examine the Anti-Inflammatory Diet and some of the delicious foods that make up this diet. We’ll explore the outdoors and ways to enjoy and protect yourself from common outdoor dangers. We’ll also look at healthy aging and ways to embrace and enjoy the process of getting older. And we’ll tackle stress and anxiety with natural mood boosters and ways to release tension. I look forward to the healing journey that we are about to take together! Yours in Health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

2013 ANNUAL EDITION


CONTENTS

Balanced Living Annual - Andrew Weil, M.D., Editor; Brad Lemley, Editorial Director; Kara Gonos-Collins, Managing Editor; Brian Greenwald, Editorial Associate; David Hart, Designer Copyright 2014Š Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

2013 ANNUAL EDITION

JANUARY 2013

JULY 2013

Healthy Resolutions

Enjoying the Outdoors

8

A Whole Body Diet: Eating Anti-Inflammatory Stress Management Tips 9 Quick Tip 1: Healthy Brain Tip 10 Quick Tip 2: Get In a Daily Walk 10 An Updated Supplement Routine 11 Recipe: Salmon Kasu

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8

36

FEBRUARY 2013

AUGUST 2013

Cardiovascular Health

Achieving Balance

12

Stroke: What to Look For 5 Best Foods for Your Heart 13 Quick Tip 1: Hypertension Worrying You? 14 Quick Tip 2: Stop Smoking 14 Meditating for Heart Health 15 Recipe: Creamy Tomato Soup

40

12

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MARCH 2013

SEPTEMBER 2013

Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Curbing Cancer

16

Best and Worst Fish Choices The Anti-Inflammatory Diet: Getting Started 17 Quick Tip 1: A Healthy Nut Choice 18 Quick Tip 2: Healthy Pantry Staples in a Flash 18 Six Healthy Lunch Ideas 19 Recipe: Lentil Soup

44

16

44

APRIL 2013

OCTOBER 2013

Common Beauty Issues

Stress and Anxiety

22

Getting Your Feet Ready for Sandals Tips for Healthy Skin 23 Quick Tip 1: Treating Wrinkles 24 Quick Tip 2: Coconut Oil as a Moisturizer 24 4 Natural Ways to Whiter Teeth 25 Recipe: Chocolate Flourless Cake w/Compote

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MAY 2013

NOVEMBER 2013

Healthy Aging

Healthy Diet and Cooking

26

Promoting a Healthy Brain 6 Foods for Healthy Aging 27 Quick Tip 1: The Importance of Fitness 28 Quick Tip 2: Keeping a Medical Journal 28 Selenium for Aging Gracefully 29 Recipe: Curried Greens

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JUNE 2013

DECEMBER 2013

Supplements and Herbs

Boosting Your Immune System

30

4 Supplements to Avoid Tonic Herbs for Energy 31 Quick Tip 1: Should You Take Antioxidants? 32 Quick Tip 2: Feeling Anxious? Try Kava 32 When to Take Supplements 33 Recipe: Tofu Fajitas

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Poison Ivy: Treating the Itch Sunscreen Tips 37 Quick Tip 1: Get Relief with Aloe Vera 38 Quick Tip 2: Tea Tree Oil for Summertime Health 38 Preventing Lyme Disease 39 Recipe: Tomato, Corn, and Basil Soup

Omega-3s for Optimal Health Are You Depressed? 41 Quick Tip 1: Promoting Optimism 42 Quick Tip 2: Giving Thanks 42 Four Common Stressors to Avoid 43 Recipe: Garlic-Walnut Dip

Six Cancer-Fighting Mushrooms Breast Cancer: The Signs & How to Prevent It 45 Quick Tip 1: A One-Two Punch to Cancer 46 Quick Tip 2: Tomatoes and Prostate Cancer 46 A Cancer-Protective Diet 47 Recipe: Stuffed Mushroom Caps w/Couscous

5 Natural Ways to Boost Your Mood Suffering From Anxiety? 49 Quick Tip 1: Want to Release Tension? 50 Quick Tip 2: The Benefits of Deep Breathing 50 Rolfing for Chronic Stress 51 Recipe: Eggs Florentine, Orange-Dill Sauce

10 Vegetables You Should Be Eating Healthy and Unhealthy Cooking Methods 53 Quick Tip 1: Dark Chocolate: Healthy Chocolate 54 Quick Tip 2: Best Way to Cook Pasta 54 Six Ways to Prevent Overeating 55 Recipe: Squash Pie

Preventing and Treating the Flu 6 Supplements to Support Immune Health 57 Quick Tip 1: A Daily Walk For Immune Health 58 Quick Tip 2: Fall for Seasonal Foods! 58 10 Foods with Vitamin C 59 Recipe: Spaghetti Squash Casserole


Supporting the advancement of integrative medicine through training, research, the education of the public, and policy reform.

The Weil Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that receives tax-deductible donations which it uses to make grants to advance integrative medicine. Since its inception in 2005, the Weil Foundation has given out over $4 million in grants and gifts to over 30 medical centers and other nonprofit organizations nationwide. Consumers who buy products licensed by Andrew Weil, M.D., help to fund the Weil Foundation. Dr. Weil contributes all of his after-tax profits from royalties from the sale of these licensed products directly to the Foundation. The Weil Foundation would like to thank all of its partners, and their loyal consumers purchasing these products, for helping to support integrative medicine.

For a complete list of grant recipients, partners, or to make a donation visit: www.weilfoundation.org


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JAN

2013

For many, a new year is an opportunity to embark on a healthier life. From losing weight and stopping smoking or adopting other healthy habits, making resolutions is a noble gesture. But sometimes, taking on too much change at once can be overwhelming, leading to those resolutions being abandoned. This issue of Balanced Living focuses on healthy resolutions that you can – and should – introduce over time. Making one small change and sticking with it can create a track record of success which can bolster confidence and help the next change to be implemented. From managing stress to adopting a diet that optimizes your body’s health and resilience, all of these suggestions are healthy ones that we encourage you to try!

Stress Management Tips Unhealthy stress can negatively impact your physical health, mood and social interactions. The good news is simple steps can make a difference in your levels of stress. Consider these four tactics to help manage your stress in 2013.

Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

A Whole Body Diet: Eating Anti-Inflammatory

1

Want to prevent inappropriate inflammation, reduce the risk of age-related diseases, and promote optimum health at any age? Then try the Dr. Weil-recommended anti-inflammatory diet. By aiming for variety, including as much fresh food as possible, minimizing processed and fast foods, and making vegetables and fruits the foundation of your meals, you will be well on your way. Here are some simple steps to get you started on this eating plan for life:

Breathing Exercises. A natural and effective way to reduce stress, breathing can help you maintain focus and feel energized. Exhaling completely is a useful practice that is especially easy to learn - it can promote deeper breathing and better health. Give it a try: Simply take a deep breath, let it out effortlessly and then squeeze out a little more. Doing this regularly will help build up the muscles between your ribs, and your exhalations will soon become deeper and longer. Start by performing this exhalation exercise consciously, and before long it will become a healthy, unconscious habit.

continued on p.2

continued on p.2

1

Stress Management Tips

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Quick Tip 1: Healthy Brain Tip

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An Updated Supplement Routine

1

A Whole Body Diet

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Quick Tip 2: Daily Walk

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Recipe: Salmon Kasu


1

Healthy Brain Tip Keeping your brain healthy should be on everyone’s resolution list: the greatest known risk factor of Alzheimer’s is increasing age. As we are all getting older, start helping to prevent Alzheimer’s by challenging yourself. A growing body of medical evidence suggests that lifelong stimulation is the key to building and maintaining brain cells, staving off memory loss and maybe even preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Pursue interesting work and hobbies, engage in an active social life, and take music or language lessons.

Stress Management Tips

A Whole Body Diet

continued from p.1

continued from p.1

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Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata). The dried above-ground parts of the passionflower plant can be used for stress reduction, calming without sedation and relief from insomnia (when combined with sedative herbs). Available in tincture and extract form, look for standardized whole-plant extracts or capsules containing no less than 0.8 percent flavonoids or isovitexin. One dropperful of the tincture in a little warm water, or two capsules of extract, up to four times a day as needed is the adult dosage; children should take half that amount. Use caution if you’re also taking MAO-inhibiting antidepressant drugs, and do not take passionflower when pregnant - active compounds may be uterine stimulants.

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Rethink your carbs. The majority of carbohydrates in your diet should be in the form of less-refined, less-processed foods with a low glycemic load. You can do this by replacing your snack foods (typically made with wheat flour and sugar) with whole grains. Replace your cooking oil. Instead of safflower, soy, sunflower, corn, cottonseed or mixed vegetable oils, or margarine, use extra-virgin olive oil as your main cooking oil. For neutral-tasting oil, use cold-expeller-pressed, organic canola oil. Decrease your consumption of animal protein. Except for fish (such as omega-3 rich wild salmon) and organic dairy products, animal-derived protein should be limited. You can easily replace meat with vegetable protein sources such as beans, legumes and whole soy foods.

Reconnect with Yourself. Time constraints, packed schedules and too many commitments make it easy to become overwhelmed and stressed out. To stay balanced, relaxed and calm, it’s necessary every so often to regroup, decompress and focus on yourself. If you find that the demands on your time are overwhelming, don’t be afraid to politely say “no” when someone asks you to do something. No one person can do it all, so learn your limits and be satisfied with them. Create a Relaxing Home. Your home - whether big, small or somewhere in between should be your sanctuary, a place where stress is left at the door and your soul is nurtured. For a more comforting environment, simple changes made gradually to your home can have an impact. Consider setting aside a room or area for peace and calm. A place for spiritual reflection and meditation can provide shelter from noise and distraction.

4

Eat more fiber. Start slowly and build gradually to eat 40 grams of fiber a day, simple to do if you increase your consumption of fruit, especially berries, vegetables and whole grains.

Visit www.DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for more information on the anti-inflammatory diet, including recipes, shopping guides and more.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: An Updated Supplement Routine When is the last time you checked your medicine cabinet? A new year is an ideal time to go through all your medications, supplements and vitamins, to ensure that nothing is past its expiration date. While you are at it, create a list of what you take; in case of emergency it can be useful for a hospital to have. You may also want to take time to make sure you are getting the basic supplements Dr. Weil recommends for everyone – visit VitaminAdvisor.com to update or get your free recommendation. Consider taking the following: Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

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Multivitamin. Contains the essential vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D3 and iodine. Antioxidant. Designed to complement the multivitamin, our powerhouse antioxidant delivers an array of vitamins and phytonutrients to support healthy cells. Coenzyme Q10. A natural occurring antioxidant that is necessary for healthy cell function and energy metabolism. Alpha Lipoic Acid. Essential nutrient for carbohydrate metabolism and maintaining healthy blood sugar. Omega-3 fatty acids. Essential fatty acids that help support healthy eyes, nerves, brain and heart.

Get In a Daily Walk Walking is one of the best exercises you can do it strengthens almost every major organ in the body, promotes bone density, and boosts the immune system. It requires no special equipment, and just about anyone can do it. A brisk walk (covering about one mile in 15 minutes) can lower the risk of heart disease by as much as 30 percent according to some research. Set aside 30 minutes to an hour most days a week – dress for the weather and enjoy the scenery! 3


RECIPE

Salmon Kasu A True Food Kitchen exclusive! Kasu, the lees (residue) from brewing vats of Japanese rice wine (sake), comes packaged in soft, beige cakes, available at Japanese and some Asian groceries and online sites. It has a tantalizing, yeasty aroma and adds a deep, intriguing flavor to marinades and pickles. To avoid overcooking salmon or any fish, take it off the heat before you think it’s done. Food as Medicine The heart healthy omega-3 fatty acids in salmon get most of the attention, but this delicious fish is also one of the best dietary sources of vitamin D. A four-ounce portion contains 247 percent of the Daily Value for this vital nutrient. That’s important, as vitamin D deficiency is widespread in the developed world. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Heat the sake in a saucepan over low heat for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and put the sake, kasu, miso, water, sugar, and soy sauce in a food processor. Blend until the mixture has the consistency of wet sand. Spread one-third of the paste over the bottom of a baking pan large enough to hold the salmon in a single layer. Arrange the salmon on top of the paste and spread the rest on top of the salmon. Cover and refrigerate for 12 to 48 hours. Preheat the oven to broil or preheat the grill to medium-high. Scrape the kasu paste from the salmon and pat the fish dry with paper towels. Lightly brush the fish with the oil and broil or grill the fish until just done, 10 to 12 minutes. Serve immediately.

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup sake 1/3 cup kasu (sake lees) 1/4 cup white (shiro) miso 1/4 cup water 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce 4 6-ounce salmon fillets 1 teaspoon expeller pressed canola oil

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories 361.6 Fat 11.7 grams Saturated Fat 1.6 grams Protein 40.8 grams Carbohydrate 13 grams Cholesterol 90.1 mgs Fiber 0.9 grams

Serves 4.

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


FEB

2013

5 Best Foods For Your Heart

As the leading cause of death in both men and women, heart disease is not something to take lightly. If you have a family history of heart disease, you may be at a higher risk for heart-related illnesses, but healthy diet and lifestyle habits can help to improve your cardiovascular fitness and resistance to heart disease. Even those with no family history of heart disease can benefit from preventive steps.

Adopting prudent lifestyle habits and eating a healthy diet are the best ways to achieve optimal heart health. You can help minimize risks of heart disease and promote a strong cardiovascular system by adding these anti-inflammatory foods to your diet: 1

February is American Heart Month, and this issue of Balanced Living focuses on cardiovascular health: from the best foods for heart health and the benefits of meditation to the symptoms of a stroke, all the information here can help you and your loved ones. Remember – small steps can lead to big improvements in heart health, so do what you can!

2

Yours in health,

3

Nuts. Almonds, walnuts, cashews and macadamias are especially rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated fat. Eat a moderate portion every day. Whole soy protein. If you substitute sources of whole soy protein, such as edamame or tofu, for animal protein each day, you can lower levels of homocysteine, a toxic amino acid linked to increased risk of heart disease. Fresh garlic. This medicinal herb may help lower cholesterol levels. Use one or two raw or lightly cooked cloves a day.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

continued on p.2

Stroke: What to Look For and How to Respond Knowing the signs of stroke is crucial, as prompt treatment is necessary to help reduce the damage that can be caused by a disturbance of blood supply to the brain. Be aware of these classic stroke symptoms: 1

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Sudden loss of vision in one or both eyes. Weakness or numbness on one side of the body, including the face. Difficulty speaking. Sudden disorientation, confusion or memory loss. continued on p.2

1 1

Stroke: What To Look For 5 Best Foods For Your Heart

2

Quick Tip 1: Hypertension Worrying You?

3

Meditating For Heart Health?

3

Quick Tip 2: Stop Smoking

4

Recipe: Creamy Tomato Soup


1

Stroke: What to Look For and How to Respond

continued from p.1 5

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Hypertension Worrying You? Prehypertension - systolic pressure between 120 and 139 mmHg over diastolic pressure of 80 to 89 mmHg (hypertension is 140/90 mmHg or higher) – can double the risk of heart disease and stroke. Help prevent and manage your risk of prehypertension by maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and diet, following a diet rich in produce and low in sodium, practicing relaxing mind-body techniques, getting regular checkups, and following your physician’s advice. 5 Best Foods For Your Heart

continued from p.1 4

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Green tea. It provides EGCG, a polyphenol than may help to moderate inflammation and lower cholesterol. Substitute a cup of hearthealthy green tea for your morning coffee or afternoon soda. Soluble fiber. It has a powerful cholesterol-lowering effect. Beans, legumes and whole grains are good sources to add to your diet aim for one or two servings per day.

Dizziness, loss of balance or loss of coordination. Severe headache that comes on suddenly with no apparent cause.

The American Stroke Association suggests that anyone can identify a person having a stroke by checking for the signs of facial weakness, arm weakness and speech problems. As a bystander, you can help to determine if someone is having a stroke by asking them to perform three simple actions: 1

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Ask the person to smile. Ask the person to raise both arms above his or her head. Ask the person to speak a simple sentence.

If the person has any problems completing these steps, call 911 immediately and describe the symptoms.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide:

Meditating For Heart Health Meditation is simply directed concentration, and involves learning to focus your awareness and direct it onto an object: your breath, a phrase or word repeated silently, a memorized inspirational passage, or an image in the mind’s eye. The benefits of meditation are numerous, and aren’t just limited to cardiovascular health. Meditating is not a panacea, but research indicates it may help to: 1

Lower blood pressure

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Decrease heart and respiratory rates

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Increase blood flow

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Enhance immune function

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Relieve chronic pain due to arthritis and other disorders Maintain level mood

A simple form of meditation that can be practiced by anyone is to walk or sit quietly in a natural setting and allow your thoughts and sensations to occur, observing them without judgment. To learn more, visit the SpontaneousHappiness.com website, which provides an eight-week program of mind-body therapies, including meditation.

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

2

Stop Smoking A simple way to reduce your risk of cardiovascular-related illnesses is to stop smoking. Exposure to tobacco smoke raises the risks of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and increases the odds of developing many kinds of cancer. There are plenty of resources to help you kick the habit – if going cold turkey isn’t for you, consider therapies such as acupuncture, hypnotherapy and nicotine patches or gum. 3


RECIPE

Creamy Tomato Soup Tomato soup is a comfort food for many people. It is comforting as well to know how nutritious and wholesome it is, particularly when prepared with soymilk. The lycopene in tomatoes has gotten attention recently for its ability to protect against prostate cancer and other diseases. If you can’t find juicy, ripe Italian or Roma tomatoes use a highquality organic tomato (in jars) instead. Food as Medicine A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition revealed that a high dietary intake of tomato products reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels.

INGREDIENTS

8 sun-dried tomatoes (not oil-packed) 1 large onion, chopped

INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Cover sun-dried tomatoes with boiling water. Let soak for at least 15 minutes.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 3 pounds fresh, ripe Italian tomatoes, chopped 1 cup soy milk Salt and black and red pepper to taste

In a large pot, sauté the onion in the olive oil until soft. Add the chopped tomatoes. Continue to cook over medium heat, stirring, until the mixture boils.

3 tablespoons fresh parsley, basil, or dill, chopped

Remove the dried tomatoes from their soaking water and chop them coarsely. Add them and their soaking water to the pot and cook, stirring to prevent sticking.

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes. Add the soy milk and season to taste with salt and black and red pepper. Serve in bowls with the chopped green herbs as garnish.

Serves 4.

Calories: 147.6 Protein: 5.5 grams Fat: 5.9 grams Saturated Fat: 0.8 grams Monounsat Fat: 2.9 grams Polyunsat Fat: 1.4 grams Carbohydrate: 22.7 grams Fiber: 5.9 grams Cholesterol: 0.0 mg Vitamin A: 2,622.3 IU Vitamin E: 2.0 mg/IU Vitamin C: 81.4 mg Calcium: 32.8 mg

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


MAR 2013

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet is a careful combination of two of the world’s healthiest cuisines – Mediterranean and Asian – to yield a collection of foods and recipes that almost anyone will enjoy. But its advantages go beyond wonderful flavors and textures. Eating this way can help counteract chronic inflammation, which is a root cause of many serious diseases, including several forms of cancer, heart disease, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

this issue of Balanced Living to learn more about how to implement the Anti-Inflammatory Diet, including tips on getting started and healthy lunch suggestions. For more information, join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com, my online plan that focuses on the Anti-Inflammatory Diet.

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet also promotes a healthy body - it provides steady energy, offers ample vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids and dietary fiber, and can lead to weight loss and maintenance of a healthy, stable weight. Use the information in

Yours in health, Andrew Weil, M.D.

Best and Worst Fish Choices

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet: Getting Started Want to prevent inappropriate inflammation, reduce the risk of age-related diseases, and promote optimum health at any age? Then try the Anti-Inflammatory Diet. By aiming for variety, including as much fresh food as possible, minimizing processed and fast foods, and making fruits and vegetables the foundation of your meals, you will be well on your way.

Dr. Weil has long recommended fish as part of his healthy AntiInflammatory Diet. However, not all fish provide the same benefits, and some species should be limited or avoided altogether. When choosing fish, opt for species rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are necessary for optimal physical and mental health. Research indicates that the omega-3 fatty acids found in cold-water fish may help reduce the risk and symptoms of a variety of disorders, and can lower triglyceride levels, increase HDL cholesterol, help minimize inflammation and inappropriate blood clotting, and keep blood vessels healthy.

Dr. Weil’s Anti-Inflammatory Diet Food Pyramid

The best fish sources of omega3s are wild-caught Alaskan salmon, canned sockeye salmon, sardines, herring and black cod. Aim for two to six servings per week of fish that are high in omega-3s. continued on p.2

continued on p.2

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Best and Worst Fish Choices

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Quick Tip 1: A Healthy Nut Choice

3

Six Healthy Lunch Ideas

1

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet

3

Quick Tip 2: Pantry Staples

4

Recipe: Lentil Soup


1

Best and Worst Fish Choices

continued from p.1

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white (albacore) tuna may have high levels of mercury. Pregnant women and children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of contaminants, and should avoid these species. 2

Farm-raised tilapia is one of the most highly 3s and very high levels of potentially detrimental omega-6 fatty acids. cause damage to blood vessels, the heart, lung and joint tissues, skin and the digestive tract.

A Healthy Nut Choice Walnuts are a Dr. Weil favorite, and not just for their taste and versatility. They are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, protective fats that may tone healthy monounsaturated fats and ellagic acid, an antioxidant compound that helps support a healthy immune system; and provide l-arginine, an essential amino acid that promotes healthy blood pressure.

continued from p.1

For more getting-started steps, try the following: 1

Step One: Look at your carbs. The majority of carbohydrates in your diet should foods with a low glycemic load. You can do this by replacing your snack foods (typically made with wheat flour and sugar) with vegetables, fruits or whole grains.

2

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Step Two: Replace your cooking oil. cottonseed and mixed vegetable oils - as well as butter and margarine - for extra virgin olive oil. Use it as your main cooking oil (for a neutral tasting oil, use expeller-pressed, organic canola oil). Step Three: Decrease your consumption of animal protein. Except for and dairy products, animal-derived protein should be limited. You can easily replace meat with vegetable protein such as beans, legumes and whole soy foods.

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Try to eat , simple to do if you increase your consumption of fruit, especially berries, vegetables and whole grains.

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Farmed salmon. Also called Atlantic salmon, this is what you expensive than wild salmon, farmed salmon has a less favorable ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats and may contain residues of antibiotics and s more, levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) and other contaminants in some farmed salmon have been found to be much higher than those found in wild salmon.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: Six Healthy Lunch Ideas

A homemade lunchtime meal will cost less, taste better and promote your health more effectively than most dining-out options. Try the following each is easy to make and will fill you up without emptying your wallet. (For the chili and soup options, invest in a wide-mouth vacuum container, preferably lined with stainless steel.)

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune

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Vegetarian chili. Beans and fresh vegetables provide protein and fiber. Top with natural cheese for an extra serving of calcium. Salmon salad and whole grain crackers. Using canned salmon is a cost-effective way to get omega-3 fatty acids into your diet: simply mix with some lemon juice, pepper and fresh herbs and spread on fiber-rich crackers. Hummus and vegetables. Easy to pack, and the chickpeas in the hummus provide protein and fiber, while the vegetables offer up antioxidants. Bring a variety of organic, colorful vegetables for interesting taste and texture.

Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

Miso soup and edamame. Miso is full of isoflavones, antioxidants and protective fatty acids, and edamame contains isoflavones that have antioxidant activity and may help lower cancer risk. Barley salad. Barley is a satisfying, nutty, low-glycemic-load grain. Start with barley and add whatever you prefer - grilled vegetables, tofu, beans - for a customized salad that can be eaten warm or cold. Lentil soup. A good source of fiber and magnesium, lentils cook quickly and are filling and satisfying year-round. Try the Lentil Soup recipe on page four!

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Healthy Pantry Staples in a Flash Want to quickly upgrade the nutritional value of your pantry’s stock? Simply toss out any cereals and breads that are refined, presweetened or made with white flour. Then replace them with organic, high-fiber cereals, steel-cut oats or organic, natural instant varieties of hot cereals, and whole-grain breads. 3


RECIPE

Lentil Soup Lentils are a staple in Middle Eastern and Indian cooking and make a thick, rich and delicious soup. They’re also a good source of fiber and magnesium and the quickest legume to cook. With bread and a salad, this soup makes a whole meal. On a cold night, a filling soup like this is perfect nourishment for warming body and soul. Food as Medicine Soluble fiber, found in such high quantities in lentils, forms a gel in the digestive tract that traps cholesterol-containing bile and escorts it out of the body; while insoluble fiber, also plentiful in lentils, provides stool bulk and helps prevent constipation. Just one cup of cooked lentils - less than the amount found in one serving of this soup - contains over 15 grams of dietary fiber, all for only 230 calories. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Pick over lentils to remove any stones, dirt, or other foreign objects. Rinse them well in cold water and place in a large pot with enough cold water to cover lentils by 6 inches. Add the bay leaf. Bring to a boil, skim off foam, lower heat, and boil gently, partially covered, until lentils are just tooth-tender, 20-30 minutes. Add carrots, celery, and onion to the lentils. Cook partially covered till carrots are tender, about 20-30 minutes. Add crushed tomatoes, olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer, partially covered, until lentils become very creamy and soft. Stir occasionally and add boiling water if necessary to prevent sticking. Remove bay leaf before serving. If you like, stir in a little vinegar just before serving.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound lentils 1 bay leaf 3 large carrots, peeled and sliced 2 stalks celery, chopped 1 large onion, chopped 2 cups crushed tomatoes (fresh or canned) 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Salt and pepper to taste Vinegar (red wine, cider or balsamic, optional)

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 175.9 Protein: 8.1 grams Fat: 5.8 grams Saturated Fat: 0.8 grams Monounsat Fat: 3.8 grams Polyunsat Fat: 0.8 grams Carbohydrate: 25.2 grams Fiber: 8.7 grams Cholesterol: 0.0 mg

Makes 6 servings. Copyright 2013Š Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


Orthaheel is now

VIONIC

® WITH

ORTHAHEEL® TECHNOLOGY While Vionic is a fresh new look on the outside, its most prominent feature is the tried and true technology on the inside. This breakthrough Orthaheel technology is based on more than 30 years of podiatric medical success and innovative collaboration from renowned experts in biomechanics and foot health.

© 2014 Vionic Group LLC

The first of its kind, our iconic Tide sandal features Orthaheel technology built right into the footbed to help realign the feet and provide natural relief from the ground up.

NATURAL RELIEF Orthaheel technology helps reduce over-pronation, which can relieve associated common pains. Andrew Weil, M.D., donates all of his after-tax profits from royalties from sales of Vionic Footwear products directly to the Weil Foundation, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to supporting integrative medicine through training, education and research. For more information, visit www.weilfoundation.org.


APR

2013

Tips For Healthy Skin

While it’s true that beauty shines from within, caring for the appearance of your body from the outside in has its benefits - especially if, as a result, you feel happier and more confident. For healthy, beautiful skin and hair, I suggest following my Anti-Inflammatory Diet. It offers a balance of nutrients, fats and proteins that can not only help to keep your body running smoothly, its anti-inflammatory properties may calm red and inflamed skin, and assist in keeping your hair and nails vibrant and healthy. Add some gentle, consistent fitness activities such as yoga and walking, and your natural beauty routine will be on its way!

Skin concerns can range from the mild (dry or oily skin) to the severe (skin cancer). When it comes to issues such as eczema or acne, address them with dietary and topical solutions. Eczema. Also known as atopic dermatitis, eczema appears as red, scaly, dry patches of skin that are extremely itchy. Luckily, simple measures can often help to minimize symptoms and provide relief – try these suggestions: Nutrition: Eliminate cows’ milk and all cows’ milk products from your diet, as well as foods that contain partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and trans fats. Also try taking 500 milligrams of black currant oil or evening primrose oil twice a day (half that dose for children younger than 12). Positive changes should occur in six to eight weeks.

This issue of Balanced Living covers some other ways to address common beauty issues. From getting your feet ready for warmer weather to natural ways to keep your teeth white, use the suggestions to enhance both your inner and outer beauty.

Topical: Apply aloe vera gel (from a fresh plant or buy lotions or moisturizers containing aloe) or calendula cream to the affected areas of your skin; experiment with lotions and salves containing chaparral (Larrea divaricata), a desert plant used topically in Mexican folk medicine for skin conditions; and bathe or shower as quickly as possible, with non-perfumed moisturizing soap. Apply a thick moisturizing cream immediately after patting yourself dry - don’t rub your skin when you towel-dry your body.

Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Getting Your Feet Ready For Sandals Summer is approaching – make sure you put your best foot forward by addressing foot concerns such as cracked heels and corns. Cold, dry winter weather (as well as prolonged standing and walking) can cause fissures on your heels. Some simple, protective steps can help prevent further damage and promote healing: continued on p.2

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Tips For Healthy Skin

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Quick Tip 1: Treating Wrinkles

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4 Natural Ways to Whiter Teeth

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Getting Your Feet Ready

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Quick Tip 2: Coconut Oil

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Recipe: Chocolate Flourless Cake


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Treating Wrinkles

A natural part of the aging process, wrinkles can nonetheless be vexing, especially if they appear earlier than they should. Help prevent premature wrinkles by not smoking, avoiding sun damage and keeping your skin well-moisturized. Eating berries is a good way to address wrinkles through your diet - ellagic acid, an antioxidant found in numerous fruits, especially raspberries, strawberries and cranberries, may help slow wrinkle formation by forestalling collagen destruction to your diet: try the recipe on page 4! Tips For Healthy Skin

continued from p.1

Acne. A common problem among teenagers as well as adults, acne can be caused by heredity, in breakouts. Try these suggestions: Nutrition: Increase your consumption of antioxidant-rich foods, including fruits and vegetables; include omega-3 fatty acids from foods like wild Alaskan salmon or freshly skin hydrated and healthy; and limit processed

Getting Your Feet Ready For Sandals

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Exfoliate. Use a wet pumice stone in the shower and gently rub your heels and calluses. This will help reduce the thickness of the calluses and allow lotions to better penetrate these areas. Moisturize. If you have serious cracks, look for a product designed for feet and heels that has glycolic and/or salicylic acids, which may provide deeper penetration of the skin. Slather it on before bed, and then cover your feet with a pair of cotton socks. Choose appropriate footwear. Open-backed shoes such as pt for closed-back shoes at least until your feet heal.

Topical: Cleanse the face with a mild glycerin soap and apply topical treatments such as tea tree oil or benzoyl peroxide.

If you have corns – the painful, calloused growths often caused by wearing shoes that feet too tightly. To deal with the irritation that corns can cause, soak your feet and use a pumice stone to reduce the thickness of a corn; use moleskin or other non-medicated pads to reduce the pressure and pain; and consider using an over-the-counter corn-removal solution (apply with caution, as they often contain acids, and never use these solutions if you’re diabetic or have any problem with circulation in the feet).

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Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: 4 Natural Ways to Whiter Teeth Drinking cola, coffee, tea or red wine can lead to discolored teeth, as can any food or drink capable of staining clothes or carpets (think fruit juices, blueberries, soy sauce, curry).

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy

While the best way to get rid of persistent stains is with professional teeth cleaning, you can help prevent stains - new or recurring - with the following: 1

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Rinse your mouth with plain water after you drink or eat staining foods and beverages. Brush your teeth twice a day with whitening toothpaste; many natural-ingredient-based toothpaste lines such as Tom’s of Maine now have whitening varieties.

Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

Floss daily (stains around the edges of your teeth can occur when plaque accumulates at the gum line and absorbs color from food and drink). Sip temperate fluids through a straw, which minimizes contact with teeth.

Be cautious about over-the-counter teeth whitening kits, and talk with your dentist about professional options. You should be aware that any method of tooth bleaching may, over time, break down the integrity of the teeth. That can leave them more susceptible to future stains. Tooth sensitivity is a common side effect of teeth whitening but usually decreases over time.

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Coconut Oil as a Moisturizer Looking for a natural moisturizer? Consider coconut oil - the lauric acid found in coconut oil is available in a wide variety of skin and hair care products, including body and facial cleansers, soap and sunscreens. Clinical research supports the safety of these products in general, and the utility of coconut oil to help moisturize skin in particular. 3


RECIPE

Chocolate Flourless Cake with Fresh Berry Compote A True Food Kitchen restaurant exclusive! Made with high-quality, unadulterated dark chocolate, and luscious almond butter, this cake is rich, yet more healthful than its flour-filled counterparts. Topped with fresh berry compote, this flourless cake is a non-guilty pleasure. Food as Medicine Chocolate, made from seeds of the cacao tree, is a rich source of polyphenols that may help reduce chronic inflammation. It also appears to make blood cells less likely to clump into clots that can block arteries. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Over a double boiler, melt chocolate, butter and almond butter. Let cool. Separate the egg and place the yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer. Add 3 Tbs sugar and beat until a light, pale yellow color, about 6 minutes. Slowly pour in the melted chocolate and mix until combined. In a clean mixing bowl, add the eggs whites. Whisk until frothy. Slowly pour in 3 Tbs sugar and mix until soft peaks form. Fold the whites into the chocolate/egg mixture. Carefully fold until combined. Spray 4 oz ramekin or muffin cups with pan spray. Pour the batter into the molds, almost to the top. Bake at 325 degrees for 12 minutes. Let cool before unmolding. To serve: reheat at 300 degrees for 4 minutes. Spoon the fruit compote on top.

Serves 4-6.

INGREDIENTS

6 ounces dark chocolate, at least 70% 3 ounces butter 3 ounces almond butter 3 eggs, separated 6 tablespoons natural cane sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

FRESH BERRY COMPOTE

1 cup frozen raspberries, defrosted 2 tablespoons pure cane sugar 1/4 cup water 3 cups fresh berries - blueberries, raspberries, blackberries

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 482 Fat: 31g Saturated Fat: 13g Protein: 10g Carbohydrate: 41g Cholesterol: 136mg Fiber: 9g

Copyright 2013Š Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


MAY

2013

6 Foods for Healthy Aging

Aging gracefully – as opposed to pursuing fruitless efforts to halt or reverse aging – should be a goal for everyone. Luckily, being informed and making small adjustments to your diet and lifestyle can help you to adapt to the changes that time brings, allowing you to arrive at old age with minimal deficits and discomforts. Ideally, old age can bring perspective, wisdom, and its own unique power.

Your diet is a good place to start your graceful aging endeavors, as certain foods offer health benefits that can promote healthy aging. Add these foods to your plate - no matter what your age! 1

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In this edition of Balanced Living, we address simple ways to keep your health on track as you age: foods that promote graceful aging, a supplement that may help to preserve vitality, and more. If you are interested in learning how to savor life in its latter years, and to manifest, enjoy, and share with others the genuine rewards that aging can bestow, consider joining me at DrWeilonHealthyAging.com!

3

Yours in health,

Vegetables. An excellent source of antioxidants, vegetables help counter oxidative stress, a process which can damage cells and may accelerate aging. Choose an array of vegetables covering all the colors of the spectrum. Make sure to include dark leafy greens such as spinach and kale, which help promote eye health. Try the recipe on page 4, which features leafy greens! Blueberries. Their active components are the anthocyanin pigments, the protective compounds that make the berries blue and are responsible for their antioxidant potency. Blueberries may improve motor skills and reverse age-related short-term memory loss, and may also protect the brain from stroke damage. Soy. Studies indicate that women in Japan who eat soy regularly don’t suffer from hot flashes the way many western women do. The isoflavones in soy foods help balance hormone levels and have some mild estrogenic activity. Try tofu, soymilk, roasted soy nuts, tempeh, edamame or miso.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

continued on p.2

Promoting a Healthy Brain While the exact cause of Alzheimer’s remains unclear, the greatest known risk factor is increasing age: the chance of developing Alzheimer’s seems to double every five years after age 65. After age 85, the risk of developing Alzheimer’s is about 50 percent. While you can’t do anything about getting older, there are some simple measures that can help: continued on p.2

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6 Food for Healthy Aging Promoting a Healthy Brain

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Quick Tip 1: Fitness

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Selenium and Aging

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Quick Tip 2: Medical Journal

4

Recipe: Curried Greens


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6 Food for Healthy Aging

continued from p.1 4

The Importance of Fitness Regular exercise is an important step in the right direction to healthy aging: along with a sound diet, activities that stimulate your mind, and social connections, exercise completes an optimum approach to aging well. Make sure that whatever type of exercise (or exercises) you decide to engage in, your body receives a workout for the heart as well as for bones and muscles. Walking, strength training, yoga and tai chi are some good choices; talk with your physician about options that are best for you. Promoting a Healthy Brain

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Challenge yourself. A growing body of medical evidence suggests that lifelong stimulation is the key to building and maintaining brain cells, staving off memory loss and maybe even preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Try doing interesting work (paid or volunteer), pursuing hobbies, engaging in an active social life, taking music or language lessons, or learning a new computer program. Take a daily low-dose aspirin. Some studies link the use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) with reduced risk of Alzheimer’s. Use healing spices in your cooking. Turmeric, ginger and red pepper can add zing to meals and are all natural anti-inflammatories. Eat a diet rich in omega-3s, including wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, freshly ground flaxseed and walnuts. Incorporate plenty of fresh, organic fruits and vegetables in your meals. Reduce your intake of polyunsaturated vegetable oils (such as sunflower, corn and safflower oils), replacing them with extra virgin olive oil.

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Salmon. Wild-caught Alaskan salmon and canned sockeye salmon are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids, the anti-inflammatory, essential fats our bodies need for optimum health, and are a highquality source of protein.

Turmeric and Ginger. Research suggests that turmeric, the major ingredient in American mustard and Indian curry, can reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, and ginger is a natural anti-inflammatory agent that has also been linked to a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s. Dark Chocolate. Chocolate provides polyphenols with high antioxidant activity, and the fat it contains is mostly stearic acid, which doesn’t raise cholesterol levels. It also contains compounds that are good for the heart: they reduce the stickiness of platelets, inhibiting blood clotting and reducing the danger of coronary artery blockages. When buying, choose products with 70 percent or higher pure cocoa solids.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: Selenium for Aging Gracefully

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

2

Can a deficiency of selenium hinder graceful aging? According to Bruce Ames, Ph.D., of the University of California, Berkeley, the short answer is yes. When certain vital micronutrients are in short supply, the body undergoes slow, insidious changes that undermine health and increase the risk of chronic disease. One such crucial micronutrient is selenium. Dr. Ames and his fellow researchers analyzed 25 studies to judge the activity of immune-system components called selenoproteins - which, as the name indicates, contain selenium as an essential component. His conclusion was that even “modest” selenium deficiency appears to be associated with age-related diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease and immune dysfunction. An excellent dietary source of selenium is Brazil nuts, but they should be eaten only occasionally, as their unusually high levels of selenium could lead to an overdose, according to the National Institutes of Health. Instead opt for other food sources such as brewer’s yeast, wheat germ, garlic, grains, sunflower seeds, walnuts, raisins, shellfish, and both fresh and saltwater fish. In supplement form, Dr. Weil recommends an organic form such as yeast-bound selenium or selenomethionine. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults is 80-200 micrograms.

Keeping a Medical Journal Want to help prevent or lessen the risk of common age-related conditions? Consider keeping a medical journal. Include a record of past illnesses, injuries, treatments, tests and screenings, hospitalizations, current medications and family history. A medical journal will be beneficial when you visit a new physician or are hospitalized. It can also help you keep track of the categories of agerelated disease for which you may be at highest risk, and use preventive lifestyle strategies to help keep these at bay. 3


RECIPE

Curried Greens When some people hear the word “greens,” they immediately conjure up childhood memories of overcooked canned spinach they were forced to eat and hated. But the vegetable section of the grocery is a different world today, brimming with a variety of greens such as chard, kale, mustard, collards and bok choy that are tasty as well as excellent sources of vitamins and minerals. Iron, calcium and folic acid (an important B vitamin that helps prevent birth defects and offers protection from heart disease) are abundant in these leafy veggies. Greens can have strong tastes, but we encourage you to experiment with varieties you’ve never tried or haven’t had in a while. You’ll be in for a pleasant surprise. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Wash and drain greens, removing any coarse stems and midribs. Cut into half-inch strips. In a small bowl, mix together the garlic, curry powder, tomatoes, tomato paste and sugar. Heat the canola oil in a skillet and sauté onion over medium-high heat until it begins to brown. Add the spice-and-tomato mixture, mix well, and cook for a few minutes. Add the potatoes and 2 cups water. Mix well, bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. Add greens and cook for 10 minutes more, or until potatoes are done. Correct seasoning to taste. Garnish with the chopped fresh cilantro if desired.

INGREDIENTS

1 pound spinach, kale, collards or beet greens (or mixture of all) 2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced 2-3 tablespoons curry powder 1 cup finely chopped tomatoes (fresh or canned) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 tablespoon dark-brown sugar 1 tablespoon expeller-pressed canola oil 1 cup onion, finely diced 3/4 pound brown potatoes, peeled and cubed 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro (optional)

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories 102.8 Fat 2.6 grams Saturated Fat 0.2 grams Protein 3.5 grams Carbohydrate 18.6 grams Cholesterol 0 mgs Fiber 4.1 grams

Serves 6. Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


JUNE

2013

“Vitamins Don’t Work” articles seem to reappear in national news outlets every couple of years or so. These stories usually state that although more than half of Americans take supplements, there is little or no evidence that they actually improve health or help to lower the risk of chronic disease. But the fact is, the studies on which these articles are based are often flawed: they may

use inferior vitamins, get cut short before benefits can manifest, use poor screening methods to find the right study subjects, or be plagued by complicating factors such as members of the placebo group beginning to take vitamins independently. In my view, the value of antioxidant vitamins has been scientifically demonstrated beyond any reasonable doubt. A proper supplement routine – in addition to a healthy diet and regular exercise – can indeed help promote optimal health. Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

4 Supplements to Avoid

Tonic Herbs for Energy Feeling run-down and stressed-out? You may want to consider taking a daily tonic. Also known as adaptogens, these nontoxic, plant-based substances help to bolster your body’s natural defenses and increase its ability to cope with normal daily stress. When taken long term, tonics may help support energy and maintain normal, healthy immunity. Popular tonics include:

Not all supplements are good for everyone - some, in fact, can be downright dangerous, especially if taken by the wrong person or in the wrong dosage. Dr. Weil doesn’t recommend any of the following supplements, many of which are relentlessly hyped on the Internet: 1

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Colloidal silver is a solution of silver particles suspended in liquid. It has been promoted as an alternative to antibiotics, a cancer preventive, and a treatment for everything from ear infections to AIDS. These claims are not only unproven, the human body has absolutely no need for silver - when taken, it can accumulate in the body and lead to a skin condition called argyria, which causes bluish-gray skin pigmentation that cannot be reversed. Long-term use of oral silver products has also led to neurological problems, kidney damage, stomach distress, headaches, fatigue and skin irritation. 2

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Yohimbe (Pausinystalia yohimbe) is an herbal remedy that comes from the bark of an African tree. Before Viagra, drugs containing yohimbine hydrochloride, the active ingredient in yohimbe bark extract, were used to treat

Ashwagandha. This traditional herb (Withania somnifera) from India is used in ayurvedic medicine, where it is valued as a general tonic and adaptogen.

Eleuthero. Formerly called Siberian ginseng, eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is a distant relative of true ginseng. It can be useful for alleviating exhaustion, fatigue from heavy workloads and lack of energy. Look for products that are standardized for eleutheroside content.

continued on p.2

continued on p.2

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4 Supplements to Avoid

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Quick Tip 1: Antioxidants

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When to Take Supplements

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Tonic Herbs for Energy

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Quick Tip 2: Kava for Anxiety

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Recipe: Tofu Fajitas


1

4 Supplements to Avoid

continued from p.1

erectile dysfunction (ED). However, levels of yohimbine in yohimbe bark extract vary considerably and are often very low. Yohimbe can also have serious side effects including paralysis, fatigue, stomach disorders and even death. Also, harvesting of its bark is driving the yohimbe species to extinction. 3

Country mallow (Sida cordifolia) contains ephedrine, a potentially dangerous stimulant. For this reason, in 2004, the FDA banned the sale of country mallow as well as ephedra (herb) and all products containing ephedrine. Risks include increased blood pressure and stress on the heart, which the FDA concluded would negate any benefits of losing weight. Dr. Weil agrees with the FDA and does not recommend it.

Should You Take Antioxidants? Eating right, getting regular exercise and managing stress are all vital to achieving optimum health, but sometimes these just aren’t enough. While vitamins and supplements shouldn’t be taken as substitutes for a healthy diet, they can be beneficial by filling in any gaps. A high-quality antioxidant can help address the damage caused by free radicals, boost immunity, help reduce stressrelated fatigue, and increase musculoskeletal and skin integrity. In short, antioxidants can provide an extra layer of protection for your health. Tonic Herbs for Energy

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Reishi. This distinctive, woody mushroom (Ganoderma lucidum) is too bitter to be eaten as food, but can be taken in supplement form. Reishi is recommended in traditional Chinese medicine for increasing resistance and extending life, and has been studied for its ability to support normal immune health. Rhodiola. Also known as arctic root, rhodiola (Rhodiola rosea) contains a group of distinctive compounds that are at least partially responsible for the plant’s remarkable properties - including anti-fatigue, anti-stress, antioxidant and immunesupporting effects. It is useful for acute stress, and to support optimal mood and memory.

You should be able to find all these herbal products in health food stores - choose the one that best meets your needs, follow package directions, and give it about six to eight weeks to see how it helps. You can take tonics indefinitely, but some herbalists suggest taking a two-week-long break every three months to help maintain the tonic’s effectiveness. If you have hypertension or diabetes, talk with your physican before adding these herbs to your routine. 2

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Greater Celadine (Chelidonium majus) is used as a mild sedative, for prevention of gallstones, and to treat ailments as diverse as intestinal and digestive problems, liver disease, and eye irritation. Alkaloids from celandine have been promoted for cancer treatment, but Dr. Weil has seen no scientific evidence that demonstrates its effectiveness. Celandine has been reported to cause hepatitis and may be to blame for unexplained cases of the disease. It also can cause rashes, itching, and serious allergic reactions in some people. Avoid it.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: When to Take Supplements Do you know how to get the most benefit out of your supplement and vitamin routine? If you take daily supplements, vitamins or herbs, the following guidelines can help to lessen or prevent any side effects - and help to promote the full benefits of supplements: 1

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Take your supplements during or right after a meal, unless directed otherwise, and drink plenty of fluids as well. Antioxidant. Designed to complement the multivitamin, antioxidants deliver an array of vitamins and phytonutrients to support healthy cells. Take consistently to achieve maximum health benefits. It usually takes two to three months before you feel the full positive effects of adding nutritional supplements. Take as indicated. Your supplements may be recommended or packaged for morning, noon or evening dosages, based on your individual health needs. For maximum benefit, take your supplements at the time of day indicated on the package.

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

In addition, keep your physician informed about your supplement usage, to help prevent any possible side effects and interactions with medications you may be taking. Visit VitaminAdvisor.com for more supplement tips and information.

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Feeling Anxious? Try Kava From a tropical plant (Piper methysticum), kava is an excellent anti-anxiety remedy - it works quickly, often with one or two doses, and has been shown in controlled human trials to be as effective as benzodiazepine drugs. No one with a history of liver disease should use kava, and it may have an additive effect with alcohol and other depressant drugs, and may interfere with the metabolism of a large number of medications - ask your doctor before taking kava. 3


RECIPE

Tofu Fajitas For a quick and exciting meal, this healthful version of a popular Mexican dish is hard to beat. The baked tofu neatly replaces beef and, along with olive oil, provides a healthy twist. Whole-wheat tortillas work great with this fajita filling. They have none of the hydrogenated fat of conventional white-flour tortillas and provide some fiber. The freshness of the ingredients makes these fajitas both visually appealing and delicious. Food as Medicine Like fish, whole soy foods like tofu contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, which improve cholesterol issues (regular consumption of soy can lower cholesterol by up to 30 percent), reduce blood clotting, and protect against heart arrhythmia. Tofu is also a highprotein food; just four ounces of this nutritious bean curd contains almost 10 grams of protein, but only 86 calories.

INSTRUCTIONS

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Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat, then add the onions. Sauté, stirring, until the onions are translucent. Stir in the peppers and mushrooms and sauté until the vegetables begin to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the tofu and stir-fry for 5 minutes more. Season with salt to taste and serve in the tortillas. Top the fajitas with sour cream, salsa, chopped fresh tomatoes, avocado, scallions, or a combination of these.

Serves 4.

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion, sliced 1 red bell pepper, seeded and julienned 1 green pepper, such as ancho, Anaheim or bell, seeded and julienned 1 hot pepper, such as jalapeno or Serrano, seeded and minced 1 cup sliced mushrooms, such as cremini or portobello 2 cups sliced, baked pressed tofu (preferably savory or hickory-smoked flavor) 6 whole-wheat tortillas, warmed GARNISH

Low-fat* sour cream, salsa, chopped fresh tomatoes, avocado and scallions NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories 303 Fat 10.5 grams Saturated Fat 1 gram (31% of calories from fat) Protein 23 grams Carbohydrate 32 grams Cholesterol 0 mgs Fiber 8 grams

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.

*In light of recent research, Dr. Weil no longer recommends reduced-fat dairy products unless you happen to prefer the taste.


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Science for Cellular Health

SUPPORT FOR HEALTH AND AGING Juvenon™ is the first supplement to contain acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) and alpha lipoic acid (ALA). The patented Juvenon™ Cellular Health Supplement formula provides a balanced ratio of these nutrients, which have been shown to boost mitochondrial levels and slow cellular aging. Weil Juvenon offers a full 60-day money-back guarantee. If you decide to return an order for any reason, your credit card account will be fully credited for the amount of the purchase (excluding shipping). Order by Phone or Online Call toll free 1-866-263-3903. Please have your credit card information available when calling. Or visit:

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“I tested it for 30 days because I figured what did I have to lose?I was feeling kind of slow and icky and I thought—you know—if it doesn’t work, it doesn’t work. But if it does, how much better will I feel? Lo and behold I feel better. And since I’m feeling better, I don’t feel as 47 as I did six weeks ago. But the most important and hugest thing to me is falling asleep is really easy and I stay asleep. It’s been great and I’m gonna’ keep taking it.” Julie Ross, age 47

www.WeilJuvenon.com These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any diseases.


JUL

2013

Sunscreen Tips

Summertime brings warm weather and outdoor enjoyment. Whether you plan on dining al fresco, camping in the woods or mountains, or simply spending more time in your garden, connecting with nature is important for overall well-being. However, for all of the serenity and inspiration that the outdoors can bring, nature can also offer up poison ivy rashes, bug bites and sunburn. The good news is a little preparation can go a long way in keeping you safe and healthy when enjoying the outdoors. Use the information in this Balanced Living to learn how to prevent and treat poison ivy, how to choose sunscreen, uses for a soothing plant, a seasonal recipe for a tasty summer soup, and more.

If you want protection from the sun, avoid its rays (particularly from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. standard time from April through September in the Northern Hemisphere); wear a wide-brim hat and sunglasses (make sure your sunglasses block at least 99 percent of UVA and UVB radiation); and use sunscreen. When it comes to the latter, consider these six guidelines for getting the most out of your sunscreen: 1

Use it liberally. You need at least an ounce (the amount that would fill a shot glass) to cover your entire body. 2

Yours in health,

Apply sunscreen 15 to 30 minutes before going outdoors so that it can be absorbed into the skin.

Andrew Weil, M.D. 3

Poison Ivy: Treating the Itch If you enjoy camping out in the summer, you should be aware of poison ivy. Along with poison oak and sumac, this non-flowering plant can cause severe allergic reactions, resulting in an intensely itchy, red rash with bumps or blisters. If you make contact with poison ivy, try the following to minimize symptoms: 1

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Avoid touching other parts of your body. This is especially important immediately after exposure, since the irritating oils can be transferred to other areas. 5

Rinse affected areas with plenty of cold water immediately after exposure to flush out oils, or wash with rubbing alcohol.

Be sure to reapply sunscreen every two hours and after every swim. No matter what the label says, one application of sunscreen won’t last you all day and won’t stay on if you’re in and out of the water.

Choose sunscreens that offer ”broad spectrum” protection - that means it will block UVB rays and some UVA. Look for zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and Parsol 1789 among the ingredients, but do not use “micronized” or “nano” formulations.

Buy sunscreen with a minimum SPF of 15. This will block about 93 percent of UVB rays. Higher SPF numbers won’t necessarily give you that much greater protection, but tend to remain effective longer.

continued on p.2

continued on p.2

1

Poison Ivy: Treating the Itch

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Quick Tip 1: Aloe Vera

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Preventing Lyme Disease

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Sunscreen Tips

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Quick Tip 2: Tea Tree Oil

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Recipe: Tomato, Corn and Basil Soup


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Get Relief with Aloe Vera Aloe (Aloe vera) is the gel from fresh aloe leaves – it is useful for relief from sunburn, mosquito bites, and rashes from poison ivy, oak or sumac. It is also a superior home remedy for burns. To use aloe, cut off a lower leaf near the central stalk, remove the spines along the edge, split the leaf lengthwise, score the gel with the point of your knife, and apply it directly to the burn. It will soon soak into the skin and provide immediate, soothing relief. Sunscreen Tips

continued from p.1

Poison Ivy: Treating the Itch

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Remember that solar exposure is the best way to maintain optimum vitamin D levels, so don’t entirely avoid sunlight on your bare skin.

Use an over-the-counter product known as Tecnu lotion, which works well to remove oils up to 24 hours after contact. If the itching has begun to develop, run hot water as hot as you can stand - on the affected areas. The itching will briefly become intense, but then will stop for several hours, as the nerves that convey the sensory information to the brain become overloaded and quit. Repeat the hot water treatment as necessary - but be cautious to avoid burning. Relieve itching with calamine lotion and aloe vera gel. Try witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) to treat poison ivy blisters. Available in liquid distillation, it can be found at any drug store and can be safely used by both adults and children.

Keep in mind that serious cases of poison ivy require medical supervision and prescription treatment - contact your physician if you run a fever of 101 degrees or higher, if blisters ooze pus, or if the rash is widespread or near sensitive areas such as eyes, mouth or genitals.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: Preventing Lyme Disease

If you enjoy hiking, camping or simply spending time outdoors in wooded areas, you should be aware of Lyme disease, an infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a bacterium that is often found in deer ticks.

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy

Since deer ticks tend to be prevalent in woodlands, help prevent them by: 1

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Wearing protective clothing such as light-colored, long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your pants into your socks when in wooded areas. Performing a “tick check” and immediately washing your body after spending time in the woods or tall grass. Keeping an eye out for anything unusual on your skin, especially a rash made up of concentric rings.

Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

If you have any symptoms such as rashes, fever or joint pain, consult a doctor who is knowledgeable about diagnosing and treating Lyme disease. The typical treatment is with antibiotics. Left untreated, about two thirds of people with Lyme disease develop recurring bouts of arthritis, sometimes years after the infection.

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Tea Tree Oil for Summertime Health Warm, moist weather and outdoor activity can lead to an increased risk of insect stings as well as fungal infections of the skin. Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) can help address these issues – it is a germicidal and antibacterial agent extracted from the Australian tea tree. Apply a light coating of full strength tea tree oil to insect stings and fungal infections such as athlete’s foot. Look for pure 100% tea tree oil, and discontinue use if irritation occurs. 3


RECIPE

Tomato, Corn, and Basil Soup Normally, this is a soup for summer, when you can get wonderful fresh corn and tomatoes. But the quality of the new frozen supersweet corn, both yellow and white, is very good, and canned, organic tomatoes are very flavorful and convenient. So as long as you can get fresh basil, you can make this satisfying soup any time of year. It is very easy to do. Food as Medicine Basil has long been prized for its therapeutic qualities. Essential oil of basil, which is extracted from its leaves, has been shown to inhibit several species of pathogenic bacteria. Remarkably, it is even effective against bacteria that have become resistant to common antibiotics. High consumption of lycopene, the most potent antioxidant found in tomatoes, has repeatedly been shown to provide cardiovascular benefits. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Sauté the onions in the olive oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat until they just begin to brown. Add the garlic and sauté for a minute, stirring constantly. Pour in the tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, until they give up their juice. Cover and continue cooking about 5 minutes more. Add the water and corn to the soup and cook until the corn is soft and the kernels lose their raw taste, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in the basil, mix well, remove from heat, and serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings. This recipe is from “The Healthy Kitchen - Recipes for a Better Body, Life, and Spirit” by Andrew Weil, M.D. and Rosie Daley (Knopf)

INGREDIENTS

1 cup finely chopped onion 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 3-4 cloves garlic, minced 28 ounces canned, crushed tomatoes, preferably organic 1 cup purified water 3 cups fresh corn kernels cut from the cob, or 1 pound frozen sweet corn, preferably organic Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1 cup finely chopped fresh basil

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 191 Protein: 5 grams Fat: 8 grams Saturated Fat: 1 grams Carbohydrate: 31 grams Fiber: 4 grams

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


AUG

2013

Are You Depressed?

There’s more to health than good cholesterol numbers – it’s achieving and maintaining a healthy body, mind and spirit that allows us to flourish. It is not as difficult to find this balance as some may think – setting a few small goals can help. First try to achieve what I like to call “emotional sea level,” or the calm, secure, contented place from which you can think, feel and act appropriately as circumstances arise. Next, make sure you are nutritionally supporting your brain with a healthful diet: it is a physical organ that needs a vigorous blood flow and the right mix of nutrients to work optimally. Finally, learn to manage negative thoughts so you can naturally lean towards an elevated mood.

Depression affects over 350 million people worldwide. Situational depression - typical and normal reaction to events, such as a recent loss - is simply part of the human experience and can be worked through with help from psychotherapists or counselors.

Use the information in this Balanced Living newsletter to help you achieve balance. Specifically, you’ll learn why you need omega-3s, common stressors to avoid and some tips on promoting an optimistic outlook. To further your progress, join my website SpontaneousHappiness.com, which can help you create a durably positive outlook in just eight weeks.

Clinical depression, a more serious medical diagnosis, can also be triggered by a sad event, but it grows out of proportion to the situation and persists longer than appropriate, affecting emotional health and interfering with day-to-day activities. Clinical depression often requires other forms of treatment in addition to counseling and therapy. Common symptoms of depression include a sullen mood; feelings of hopelessness, guilt and anxiety; loss of interest in things that used to be pleasurable; change in appetite; change in sleeping patterns; inability to concentrate; and a lack of energy or feeling run-down. In addition to following your doctor’s recommendations, talking with a therapist and following a well-balanced diet, I suggest:

Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

continued on p.2

Omega-3s for Optimal Health Most Americans are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids - the anti-inflammatory, essential fats found naturally in cold-water, oily fish. Omega-3s are necessary for optimum health, and their activity in the body can help address mental and emotional problems, as well as cardiovascular disease, cancer and inflammatory disorders. I recommend eating several servings of oily fish, such as wild Alaskan salmon, per week, but if fresh or frozen wild Alaskan salmon is not in your budget, try these economical choices: continued on p.2

1

Are You Depressed?

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Quick Tip 1: Promoting Optimism

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4 Common Stressors to Avoid

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Omega-3s For Health

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Quick Tip 2: Giving Thanks

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Recipe: Garlic-Walnut Dip


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Omega-3s for Optimal Health

continued from p.1 1

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Canned salmon and sardines. Sockeye salmon is always wild-caught, costs less than fresh or frozen salmon, and has the added them an edible source of calcium; both salmon and sardines are good sources of omega-3s. Walnuts. A good vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids that promote n ellagic acid, an antioxidant compound that helps support a healthy immune system and that may help protect against cancer.

Promoting Optimism Being pessimistic can be more than just an emotional drain on yourself and those around you - pessimism has been linked to a higher risk of dying before age 65, while expressing positive emotions is associated with a variety of health hormone cortisol, better immune function and reduced risk of chronic diseases. Learn to express your feelings honestly so you can effectively deal with what’s bothering you,

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positive side of each situation. Are You Depressed?

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contains both omega-3s and soluble for this purpose) and sprinkle one to two tablespoons a day on salads or cereals.

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Regular aerobic exercise: For rapid relief from depression, there is no better method. Get 30 minutes of continuous physical activity

Chia seeds. An important part of the diet of ancient Aztecs and Mayans, chia seed is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, as well as vital minerals including calcium, phosphorus and magnesium.

A medication check: Make sure you are not taking any medications that may contribute to depression. Examples include barbiturates, statins and beta-blockers. Cutting out caffeine: Addiction to coffee and other forms of caffeine often interferes with normal moods and can aggravate depression. Acupuncture: This traditional Chinese therapy has proven itself to be very useful in treating several mood disorders, including depression. Meditating: This eastern tradition requires long-term commitment and does not produce immediate results, but can help get to the root of depression.

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High quality omega-3 supplement. Available in liquid or capsule ish the nervous system and promote optimal outlook. Look for products that are , building up to the recommended amount.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: Four Common Stressors to Avoid

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint

Stress is often a matter of how we frame a situation, rather than the situation itself, and how we react to potential stressors is greatly influenced by our internal reaction to external stimuli. Although the components that make up stress can be complex, simple steps can help reduce stress. Try avoiding the following common stressors and see how you feel after a week or two: 1

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Caffeine and other stimulant drugs. Often these make us more jumpy, anxious and fearful, and interfere with relaxation, rest and sleep. Sound. With a penetrating influence on the nervous system, it is not surprising that some types of sound increase our level of arousal and can make us tense or anxious. Avoid agitating sounds, and instead make an effort to surround yourself with soothing, calming music. You may also with to use “nature sounds” recordings, such as the sounds of gentle rain, wind or a waterfall.

News. News reports can profoundly affect your mental state, increasing anxiety and possibilities for worry. Try a “news fast”- turn off the television and avoid internet news for one week, and see how you feel afterwards. Agitated minds. Being around others who are agitated can easily affect your level of agitation. Whenever possible, stick to interacting with those who are centered and calm.

Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

2

Giving Thanks Study after study has shown that social connections and being grateful for what you have are associated with both physical and emotional health, including positively impacting the immune system and less risk of illness and susceptibility to heart attacks. Take time each day to consider those who have had a positive impact in your life, and give thanks to them, either mentally or physically, through a letter, email, phone call or even an unexpected bouquet of flowers! 3


RECIPE

Garlic-Walnut Dip This unusual dip or sauce uses whole-wheat toast crumbs and walnuts for body. The flavor comes from our favorites - garlic, lemon juice and olive oil. It can be used as a sauce for fish or spooned over slices of fresh mozzarella and tomatoes. Serve it in a small bowl surrounded by red pepper and zucchini strips. Then imagine you are in Greece! Food as Medicine Garlic is a potent medicinal food, the effects of which are enhanced by allowing it to sit for at least ten minutes after being chopped or crushed, and before combining it with an acidic ingredient such as lemon juice, in order to activate the allicin (garlic’s primary health-promoting compound). One-quarter cup of walnuts contains 95 percent of the Daily Value for omega-3 fatty acids. INSTRUCTIONS

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Place the toast in a food processor and process into fine crumbs. With the motor running, add the walnuts and garlic and process until they are ground fine. Add the remaining ingredients with the motor running and process until smooth, adding more water if the mixture seems too thick. Scrape the mixture into a bowl, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

INGREDIENTS

3 slices whole-wheat toast 1/4 cup walnuts 4 cloves garlic, chopped 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 3/4 cup water 2 tablespoons fresh parsley leaves Salt and pepper to taste

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 64 Fat: 3.8g Saturated Fat: 0.5g Protein: 1.7g Carbohydrate: 6.9g Cholesterol: 0.0mg Fiber: 1g

Serves 8.

Copyright 2013Š Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


SEPT

2013

Use the information in this issue of Balanced Living to learn more. Read about the signs of breast cancer and ways to minimize risk, mushrooms that offer cancer-protective nutrients, simple dietary changes that can lower risk, and try out the appetizer recipe featuring some of the cancer-protective foods highlighted in this issue.

An estimated 25 percent of North Americans will develop cancer in the course of their lives. While that seems frightening, the good news is that there is much each person can do to lower his or her risk. Many cancers are due to unhealthy habits - for example, an estimated 30 percent of avoidable cancer in the developed world is related to tobacco use and another 40 percent is related to nutrition factors.

Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Six Cancer-Fighting Mushrooms Beneath their humble exteriors, mushrooms are packed with healthy benefits. Many edible species contain polysaccharides, powerful anticancer compounds which appear to boost both the activity and number of the body’s anticancer “natural-killer” cells. The fungi listed below are good sources of polysaccharides: 1

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Breast Cancer:

The Signs and How to Prevent It

Enoki (Flammulina veluptipes). Japanese farmers who grow (and regularly eat) this mushroom have unusually low rates of cancer, perhaps because enoki contains a compound called flammulin that has significant antitumor properties.

According to the American Cancer Society, every three minutes, on average, another woman learns she has breast cancer. While personal and family histories of breast cancer and lifestyle habits (including diet, exercise and how you handle stress) can all affect breast cancer risk, knowing the signs of breast cancer may save your life - early diagnosis is key to treatment and recovery.

Maitake (Grifola frondosa). According to Japanese research, this mushroom shows strong anticancer activity.

Common indicators of breast cancer include a lump or thickening in or near the breast or in the underarm area; a change in the size or shape of the breast; nipple discharge or tenderness; an inverted nipple; ridges or pitting on the breast (resembling an orange peel); and a change in the look or feel of the breast, areola or nipple (such as warmth, swelling, redness or a scaly feel). If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, see your doctor for evaluation. continued on p.2

continued on p.2

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Six Cancer-Fighting Mushrooms

Breast Cancer Signs

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Quick Tip 1: One-Two Punch to Cancer

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A Cancer-Protective Diet

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Quick Tip 2: Tomatoes and Cancer

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Recipe: Stuffed Mushroom Caps


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Six Cancer-Fighting Mushrooms

continued from p.1 3

Reishi (Ganoderma lucidum). This mushroom appears to inhibit the growth of cancerous tumors and boost immune function; the Chinese and Japanese consider it a longevity food.

A One-Two Punch to Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, almost 80 percent of all cancer cases are diagnosed at the age of 55 and older. Following a healthy diet, coupled with not smoking (and avoiding secondhand smoke) has the potential to reduce cancer risk by 60 to 70 percent. Make it a goal to kick the habit and eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day (this alone may reduce cancer rates by more than 20 percent).

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Breast Cancer

continued from p.1

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To help reduce your risk of breast cancer, incorporate the following lifestyle changes: 1

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Royal sun agaricus (Agaricus blazei). Oncologists in both Japan and Brazil use this mushroom in treatment protocols. It may have significant antitumor action. Shiitake (Lentinula edodes). This fungi appears to have the ability to fight cancerous tumors.

Get 30 minutes of exercise most days - it has been shown to help lower the risk of breast cancer. Maintain your health care - perform monthly self examinations, and talk with your doctor about yearly examinations and mammograms. Supplement wisely - folic acid, vitamin D and antioxidants all may help decrease risk. Reduce exposure to xenoestrogens chemicals with estrogen-like activity found in common pesticides and industrial pollutants, and as hormone residues in meat, poultry and dairy products. Avoid exposure to radiation - limiting the number of chest X-rays you receive, especially at a young age, may decrease the risk of breast cancer.

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Zhu ling (Polyporus umbellatus). This mushroom may be particularly useful in the fight against lung cancer, and it may also help counteract the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: A Cancer-Protective Diet

A healthy diet can help the body in its efforts to heal itself, and in some cases, particular foods can lessen the risks of serious illness. In addition to the mushrooms suggested on page 1, begin adopting the following dietary habits to help reduce your risk of some types of cancer:

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Avoid polyunsaturated vegetable oils, margarine, vegetable shortening, all partially hydrogenated oils and all foods that might contain trans-fatty acids (such as deep-fried foods). Minimize or eliminate consumption of foods with added sugar. Increase healthy monounsaturated fat consumption by eating more high-quality extra virgin olive oil, as well as getting more omega-3 lnuts are good sources).

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

Reduce consumption of animal foods and try replacing them with plantbased proteins such as whole soy foods, which contain many cancer-protective substances,

Use hormone-free, organically produced products whenever possible. Eat plenty of fresh vegetables and fruit. Cruciferous vegetables are especially good, as they contain many different cancerprotective phytonutrients. Drink green tea daily.

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Tomatoes and Prostate Cancer

Want to help prevent prostate cancer? Eat more tomatoes! They contain lycopene, a carotenoid linked to a lower risk of prostate cancer. Consume tomatoes cooked in sauces with a bit of oil - this makes the nutrient more bioavailable than it is in raw, whole sources. 3


RECIPE

Stuffed Mushroom Caps with Couscous Couscous is a pasta shaped like tiny spheres that comes from North Africa. It makes a great stuffing, especially for a small cavity like a mushroom, because it’s so moist. When the stuffed mushrooms are baked, the full flavor of the couscous and the mushrooms really come through. These will go fast! Food as Medicine Walnuts and olive oil are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids, recommended to help prevent cancer. INSTRUCTIONS 1

Preheat the oven to 350° F. Spread the walnuts on a baking sheet and

roast them for 5 minutes, just until they turn slightly more brown. Pour them into a small bowl.

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Set a large sauce pan with the olive oil over low heat for less than 1 minute. Drop in the garlic and the shallots. Add the soy sauce, wine, and mushrooms and simmer covered until the mushrooms are tender, about 10 minutes.

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Use a slotted spoon to shake the mushrooms so that the cooking liquid falls back into the pan, then transfer the drained mushrooms to a baking dish, arranging them hollow side up. Reserve the liquid in the pan.

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Cook the couscous by bringing the vegetable stock or water to a boil in a separate pot.

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Pour in the couscous, lower the heat, and simmer covered for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes. All the liquid should be absorbed. Now, dump the couscous into the saucepan with the reserved liquid, cover, and cook over low heat until all the liquid is absorbed.

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Lightly salt and pepper the mushroom caps. Finish the stuffing by mixing the nuts, herbs and Parmesan cheese into the cooked couscous. Using a tablespoon, pile a small mound of filling inside the cap of each mushroom. Bake for 10 minutes or until the stuffing is lightly browned on top.

Makes 12 mushroom caps - 2 per person. This recipe is from THE HEALTHY KITCHEN - Recipes for a Better Body, Life, and Spirit by Andrew Weil, M.D and Rosie Daley (Knopf).

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup chopped walnuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, minced 3 shallots, chopped 1 1/2 tablespoons natural soy sauce (such as tamari) 1 cup white wine 12 medium small-capped mushrooms, washed and stems removed 1/2 cup vegetable stock or purified water 1/4 cup couscous Salt Freshly ground pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil 1 bunch fresh parsley, chopped 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories 106.9 Fat 5.7 grams Saturated Fat 0.9 grams Protein 2.6 grams Carbohydrate 9.6 grams Cholesterol 1 mgs Fiber 1 gram

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


OCT

2013

Suffering From Anxiety?

We all experience stress and anxiety at some point in our lives – these are normal reactions to certain situations. For some, the trigger is speaking in front of a large group; for others it is life changes such as moving, taking a new job or gaining (or losing) a new romantic partner. The physiological response of a rapidly beating heart and racing mind can actually help prepare you to react to a threatening situation, and can get you charged up to perform well on a test. It’s when anxiety and stress become chronic that your physical and mental health can be impaired, leaving you both less happy and less effective.

“Anxiety disorder” is a term that includes panic disorders, phobias, post traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders. This is the most common form of mental disorder. Anxiety disorders are true illnesses, stemming from a combination of life experiences and biological factors. People may feel anxious all of the time without any apparent reason, have such extreme feelings of anxiety that they have to avoid certain everyday activities, or may become completely immobilized from an intense feeling of terror. A common anxiety disorder is generalized anxiety disorder, or GAD. It is characterized by chronic, unrealistic and exaggerated feelings of worry and tension. It is more common among women than men, tends to run in families, and usually starts to affect people in their childhood or adolescence. People with GAD tend to fret excessively about certain people or situations, such as family members, their health or their job, and to overreact to situations, although the source of worry is not always evident. They have a hard time relaxing and falling or staying asleep.

This issue of Balanced Living focuses on stress and anxiety, and some simple, natural ways to alleviate each. From understanding common anxiety disorders to addressing chronic stress and boosting your mood, find out how small steps can make a big difference. For more information, consider joining my 8-week online plan at SpontaneousHappiness.com, which addresses emotional wellbeing through simple, gradual steps. Yours in health,

Anxiety can manifest as physical symptoms including muscle tension, headaches, trembling, restlessness, sweating, abdominal upsets, dizziness and irritability. Luckily, these problems usually disappear after treatment of the underlying anxiety. A diagnosis is confirmed when a person experiences excessive worrying about everyday situations for at least six months. Treatments include

Andrew Weil, M.D.

5 Natural Ways to Boost Your Mood Mild to moderate depression can happen to all of us. It is the counterpoint to the highs we experience in life, and is a natural part of the emotional spectrum. If you experience mild to moderate depression, in addition to following your doctor’s recommendations and talking with a therapist, Dr. Weil suggests the following to help get to the middle of the emotional spectrum, or what he calls “emotional sea level.” continued on p.2

continued on p.2

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5 Ways to Boost Your Mood

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Quick Tip 1: Release Tension

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Rolfing for Chronic Stress

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Suffering From Anxiety?

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Quick Tip 2: Benefits of Breathing

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Recipe: Eggs Florentine


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Want To Release Tension? Try progressive muscle relaxation. Lie on your back in a comfortable position, and take a series of deep slow breaths, focusing your awareness on different parts of the body, being aware of any muscular tension. Start by tensing and relaxing the muscles of the upper face, then moving slowly down, starting with the front then moving to the back of the body. When done, lie still with your eyes closed, concentrate on your breath and enjoy the feeling of peace and freedom from tension! Suffering From Anxiety?

continued from p.1

anti-anxiety medication, cognitive-behavioral therapy, relaxation techniques and biofeedback. If you or a loved one experiences anxiety whether chronic or temporary - some ways to counteract the effects include breathing exercises, meditation, journaling and daily exercise. You may also want to consider taking a “media break” – avoiding news on the television, internet and via the paper and magazines. B vitamins, especially folic acid and vitamin B6, and magnesium can also be helpful in dealing with the symptoms of anxiety, as can passionflower derivatives - they are as effective as mild tranquilizers.

5 Natural Ways To Boost Your Mood

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Get regular exercise. For rapid benefits in alleviating depression, there is no better method than regular aerobic exercise. Dr. Weil recommends 30 minutes of continuous physical activity, at least five days a week for best results. Check your meds. Make sure you are not taking any over-thecounter or prescription medications that may contribute to depression.

Cut out caffeine. Addiction to coffee and other forms of caffeine often interferes with normal moods and can aggravate depression. Try acupuncture. This modality has proven itself to be very useful in treating several mood disorders, including depression. Meditate. This eastern tradition requires long-term commitment and does not produce immediate results, but can help get to the root of depression.

In addition, follow a well-balanced diet such as the Dr. Weil-recommended Anti-Inflammatory Diet; include an antioxidant multi-vitamin/mineral supplement to ensure you are meeting your nutritional needs for all the essential nutrients; and consider taking fish oil - try 1,000 - 2,000 mg of EPA plus DHA per day. All can be helpful in supporting optimal mood. 2


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: Rolfing for Chronic Stress

Do you suffer from chronic stress, pain or bad posture? You may want to consider Rolfing. Named after Dr. Ida P. Rolf, an American biochemist who invented the therapy in the 1920s, it is a form of bodywork that goes far beyond typical massage. This system of deep manipulation aims to restructure the fascia – the envelope of tissue that surrounds each muscle - and relieve physical misalignment.

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

2

Basic Rolfing consists of a series of 10 sessions, each focusing on a different part of the body. The practitioner applies firm, and sometimes even painful, pressure via fingers and elbows. The result? You may become more in touch with your body, experience less pain and stress, improve your posture and even release repressed emotions and diminish habitual muscle tension. People who have experienced Rolfing often find an improvement in their professional and daily activities. To find a trained Rolfer, contact the Rolf Institute at www.Rolf.org. The Rolf Institute also provides ongoing education, and promotes research in and educates the public on Rolfing.

The Benefits of Slow, Deep Breathing Whether you want to address health problems or just relax and reduce stress, simple breathing techniques offer a drug-free way to help lower your blood pressure, calm a racing heart or settle an upset digestive system. Proper breathing has direct influence on emotional states and moods. When you’re upset, you breathe rapidly, shallowly and irregularly, but you can’t be upset if your breathing is slow, deep, quiet and regular. At first, the effects are subtle, but they will gain power the more you repeat them. 3


RECIPE

Eggs Florentine, Orange-Dill Sauce The orange-dill sauce drizzled over the poached eggs has a faint fruit flavor due to the orange juice, a spiciness from the balsamic vinegar, and a hint of the exotic, penetrating flavor of turmeric - a spice relative of ginger. This dish makes a vibrant breakfast - colorful, easy, and healthy. Food as Medicine Spinach is an extremely nutrient-rich vegetable, and a good source of vitamin B6 and folic acid, both recommended for optimal mental health. INGREDIENTS INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Fill a medium pot with water and bring it to a boil. Drop in the washed spinach and cook for 3 minutes, stirring several times. Drain the spinach in a colander. Put a bowl or plate directly on top of the spinach, inside the colander, and press down to squeeze all excess water from the leaves. Cover and set aside. Fill the bottom of a double boiler halfway with water and place over medium heat. Set the top pot over the water and drop in the egg yolk. Add the orange juice and stir until blended. Stir in the balsamic vinegar and the lemon juice, then the turmeric, salt, and butter. Add 1 teaspoon of the dill and whisk until all the ingredients are thoroughly blended and the sauce has a thick creamy consistency (approximately 2 minutes). Remove the top part of the double boiler and set aside. Pour the white vinegar into the water in the bottom pot and heat it just to the boiling point. Gently crack the eggs one by one into the simmering water, and poach for 3 minutes. Remove the eggs with a slotted spoon and let the water drip from the spoon so they aren’t watery. Transfer the eggs to a warm platter and cover. Toast the English muffins on the middle rack under the broiler. Remove them from the oven and put them on plates. Place 1 tomato slice on each muffin half and spoon 1⁄4 cup of the cooked spinach on top. Arrange 1 poached egg on top of that and drizzle a spoonful or so of the orange-dill sauce over everything. Sprinkle some of the remaining 1 teaspoon of chopped dill and black pepper (optional) over the sauce as garnish. Serve immediately.

1 pound washed spinach, stems removed 1 egg yolk 1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons butter at room temperature 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill 1 teaspoon white vinegar 6 eggs 3 English muffins, split in half 2 beefsteak tomatoes, sliced Fresh cracked black pepper (optional)

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 236.2 Protein: 11.6 grams Fat: 12.5 grams Saturated Fat: 5.5 grams Carbohydrate: 20.7 grams Fiber: 2.6 grams Cholesterol: 266 mg Serves 6

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


NOV

2013

Healthy and Unhealthy Cooking Methods

With the holiday season drawing near, food is likely to be a focus for the next few months. From discovering new tastes and textures to sharing conversation and memories with your dining partners, enjoying food is a wonderful way to connect with yourself and others. This holiday season, make what you eat as healthful as possible. A well-rounded, healthy diet that focuses on whole foods will provide you with the nutrients, vitamins and minerals that can help to promote a healthy immune system and provide you with muchneeded energy during the hectic holiday season.

To get the most out of your meals, it’s not just the ingredients you choose, but the way you prepare them that matters. Use the following tips to maximize the nutritional benefits of foods, and minimize the potential harm from improper cooking methods. 1

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This issue of Balanced Living provides information on healthy vegetables, ways to prevent overeating, healthy (and unhealthy) cooking techniques and more. If you are interested in eating a healthier diet, consider joining my website, Dr. Weil on Healthy Aging, which features recipes that are healthy and delicious.

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Yours in health,

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Use a steamer. It can retain nutrients better than other methods, such as boiling. Use marinades. Marinating meats (particularly chicken) may reduce the formation of heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which evidence shows may be carcinogenic. Garlic, rosemary, ginger and turmeric are all healthful spices to include in marinades. Use a slow cooker. What you put in - fresh vegetables, lean proteins - is a big part of what makes a healthful meal, but the lower temperatures slow cookers use may help preserve nutrients that are otherwise lost when food is cooked rapidly at high heat. When grilling, pre-cook meats on the stove or in the oven, and finish them off on the grill. Less time on the grill means fewer carcinogens in your meats.

Andrew Weil, M.D.

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10 Vegetables You Should Be Eating Vegetables (and fruits) are the foundation of Dr. Weil’s AntiInflammatory Food Pyramid, and for good reason - fresh produce is the best source of natural nutrients that can help keep your entire body running smoothly. Keep the following on hand for your health and taste buds! 1

Onions. Their sulfur compounds may help lower cholesterol and blood pressure. continued on p.2

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Healthy and Unhealthy Ways to Cook

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Quick Tip 1: Dark Chocolate

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6 Ways to Prevent Overeating

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10 Vegetables You Should Be Eating

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Quick Tip 2: Cooking Pasta

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Recipe: Squash Pie


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10 Vegetables You Should Be Eating

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Dark Chocolate: The Healthy Chocolate Dark chocolate provides antioxidants that may offer protection against heart disease; cocoa butter that may have a beneficial effect on cholesterol levels; and chemically active compounds that can improve mood and pleasure by boosting serotonin and endorphin levels in the brain. Eat an ounce of dark chocolate with at least 70 percent pure cocoa a few times a week, and enjoy!

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Garlic. It contains antibiotic and antiviral compounds that may help boost the immune system, prevent colds, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and fight fungal infections. Spinach. It provides lutein and zeaxanthin, antioxidant carotenoids that may help prevent cataracts and macular degeneration, and is a good source of calcium and folate. Cabbage. This highly nutritious cruciferous vegetable contains nutrients called indoles, which may help protect against both breast and prostate cancer, while providing significant amounts of fiber and vitamin C. Sweet potatoes. Rich in beta carotene, these vegetables may help boost the immune system while delivering vitamin C and folate. Beets. These root vegetables contain anthocyanins, phytonutrients that protect against damage from carcinogens and may help prevent heart disease.

Healthy and Unhealthy Ways to Cook

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Avoid deep-frying. Deep-frying - especially with re-used cooking oils, as is common in fast-food restaurants - can create large amounts of oxidized fats. These are highly inflammatory, and have been associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, various liver disorders, and cancer. Do not microwave in plastic. Heating or cooking foods in plastic containers or covered by plastic wrap in the microwave can drive plastic molecules into your food. Use only glass or ceramic containers, and cover foods with waxed paper or a paper towel. Minimize grilling with charcoal. Potentially hazardous and carcinogenic smoke is produced when you grill meat or fish over charcoal. Instead, use a gas or electric grill to eliminate the smoke hazard, and avoid overcooking or charring. If you do use charcoal, avoid using lighting fluid or self-lighting packages of charcoal briquettes, which add residues from toxic chemicals to food.

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Squash. It provides beta-carotene and potassium, nutrients that are necessary for good overall health. Tomatoes. They contain lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that helps fight heart disease and possibly some types of cancer, particularly prostate cancer. Broccoli. This cruciferous vegetable may offer cancer-protective benefits and is a good source of vitamin K and calcium - both of which help keep bones strong. Mushrooms. Prized for their tonic effects, mushrooms can help address a host of illnesses, and may have anti-cancer, anti-viral and immune-enhancing properties.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide:

Six Ways to Prevent Overeating

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart

When stressed out or anxious, some people turn to food as a way to comfort themselves. However, what may be soothing at the time can make you feel worse - and weigh more - in the end. If you tend to turn to food as a way to cope with a stressful situation, consider the following six tips: 1

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Drink plenty of water throughout the day. This can help quell the pangs of an empty stomach and promote a healthy digestive system. Keep your blood sugar levels stable by eating several small, nutritious meals rather than three large ones. Make sure your meals or snacks incorporate omega-3 fatty acids. Include walnuts, wild Alaskan salmon and freshly ground flaxseed in your diet. When eating snacks, take out one portion size and then close and put away the package. Leaving it open on the counter leads to continued munching.

Lung Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

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Incorporate foods rich in magnesium, which helps relax muscles, into your diet. Whole grains, legumes, vegetables, nuts and seeds are good sources. Above all, be aware of your eating habits. If you find yourself eating to combat stress, limit yourself to small portions, enough so you can savor the taste or texture.

Best Way to Cook Pasta Quality carbohydrates are an essential part of a balanced, healthful diet. If pasta is your go-to carb, take advantage of this low-cost food by making it even healthier – cook it only until it is al dente (barely tender). When pasta is cooked this way, it achieves a lower glycemic index than fully cooked pasta because the pulverized grain comes apart slowly in the stomach. 3


RECIPE

Squash Pie The earthy colors and the creamy texture of cooked winter squash evoke winter feasts, home and the holidays. These sturdy gourds have been around since long before the Pilgrims shared their first Thanksgiving with Native Americans. Anthropologists believe human beings ate squash as long ago as 5,500 BC. The winter squash family boasts a bewildering number of varieties, from acorn to Hubbard, the most recognizable of which is probably the pumpkin. But despite great differences in shape, size and the external color of their hard skins, most can be treated the same in the kitchen baked, pureed, or as a component of soups and stews. Perhaps best of all is the rich nutritional value they have in common. Betacarotene, potassium and fiber are just some of their most notable assets. With a nutty and often sweet taste and a smooth texture, winter squash is good and good for you. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Preheat oven to 400° F. In a blender, grind the cashew pieces until very fine. Add the water and blend on high speed for 2 minutes. Add the cornstarch or arrowroot powder and blend on low speed for 30 seconds. In a large mixing bowl, combine the squash purée, sugars, brandy and spices. Add the cashew mixture to the squash and mix well. Divide the pie filling equally between the two pie crusts. Top with the chopped walnuts. Bake the pies for 50-60 minutes until lightly browned, cracked, and well-set. Remove the pies from the oven, cool, then refrigerate overnight to allow filling to firm up. Serve cool or at room temperature.

Makes 2 pies (8 servings each)

INGREDIENTS

1 recipe for Easy Pie Crust (visit drweil.com for recipe, or substitute two 9-inch crusts) 1/2 cup raw cashew pieces 1 cup water 4 1/2 tablespoons cornstarch or arrowroot powder 6 cups cooked puréed winter squash (buttercup, banana or Hubbard) 1/2 cup white sugar 1/2 cup light brown sugar, packed 4 tablespoons brandy 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 3/4 teaspoon powdered ginger 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves 3/4 cup walnuts, chopped

NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories 200.1 Fat 6 grams Saturated Fat 1 gram Protein 2.8 grams Carbohydrate 34.1 grams Cholesterol 0 mgs Fiber 3.1 grams

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


DEC

2013

A healthy immune system is the cornerstone of good health. It should be strong, allowing you to interact with germs and not get infections. Yet it should also discriminate, avoiding allergic reactions in response to harmless substances such as dust and pollen. During the colder fall and winter months, supporting your immune system is important: it is cold and flu season, and people may be indoors more often, where it is easier to spread germs. It’s a good time to be aware of the basics of boosting your

immune system, including getting moderate exercise, eating right, getting enough rest, practicing stress reduction and cultivating healthy emotional states. Use the information in this Balanced Living to learn more about how to lower your risk (and reduce symptoms) of the flu, natural food sources of vitamin C, supplements that may support immune health and more. And don’t miss the Spaghetti Squash Casserole recipe – it’s healthy and seasonal! Yours in health,

Andrew Weil, M.D.

Preventing and Treating the Flu

6 Supplements to Support Immune Health

Taking steps that may lower your risk of infection is your best defense against the fever, body aches and cough that the flu virus can bring on. Learn how to lower your risk and treat the symptoms of flu.

The immune system is your body’s natural defense network when it is weakened or compromised, you are more susceptible to disease and infection. You can support your body’s natural healing response by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, managing your stress levels, and with the prudent use of supplements, including:

To lower your risk: 1

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Wash your hands, especially when you’re out in public places, with hot water and soap. When you travel, it’s a good idea to carry alcohol towelettes with you.

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Get a flu shot. This is especially important for those over 65 years old, as well as anyone with a weakened immune or respiratory system, nursing

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A daily antioxidant. A quality antioxidant supplement can help fill nutritional gaps (even in a healthy diet) and help support overall immune function. Astragalus. This root of a plant in the pea family has been well studied for its immune-supportive properties. Echinacea. The dried root and leaves of the purple

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6 Supplements for Immune Health

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Quick Tip 1: Daily Walk for Health

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10 Foods with Vitamin C

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Preventing and Treating the Flu

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Quick Tip 2: Seasonal Foods

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Recipe: Spaghetti Squash Casserole


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Preventing and Treating the Flu

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home residents, and health care workers who have regular contact with patients. Pregnant women whose last two trimesters fall during flu season (generally November to April) might consider getting the shot as well. 3

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Avoid contact with people who have respiratory illnesses. Airborne droplets from sneezes and coughs are what spread the influenza virus from person to person. Minimize the spread of germs by avoiding touching your hands to your face or your eyes. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after using it, and wash your hands.

A Daily Walk For Your Immune Health Chronic overstimulation of the sympathetic nervous system can be the consequence of our reaction to daily challenges. The result is similar to chronic inflammation, in that stress can contribute to diseases and disorders including immune suppression. Regular physical activity, such as a daily brisk walk, is undoubtedly the best way to help maintain balance of the nervous system and overall health. Mind-body therapies such as breath work, meditation and yoga may also help – give them a try! 6 Supplements to Support Immune Health

continued from p.1

coneflower can help maintain natural immune activity. 4

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Traditional mushrooms. Maitake, reishi, agaricus, and enoki all provide immune support. Combination products are often more effective than individual species. Arctic root or rhodiola. Also known as “golden root” or “roseroot,” this is traditionally used in Eastern Europe as a general tonic and may help reduce the harmful effects of stress on the immune system.

elderberries

To reduce flu symptoms: 1

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Zinc. This mineral plays an important role in cell production, and may help support your immune system. How much you take is important - moderate doses of zinc can enhance immunity, while high doses can actually depress it and should be avoided. In general, Dr. Weil recommends supplementing with 15 mg of zinc daily, or up to 30 mg daily if you follow a vegetarian diet or simply don’t eat many foods of animal origin (vegetables and fruits provide very little zinc).

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Go to (or call) your physician. He or she can prescribe medication if the problem is indeed the flu. It is important to start taking this within the first 48 hours of symptoms - its effectiveness declines as the illness builds. Try elderberry extract. This may help to lessen the symptoms and speed up recovery. Eat garlic. Raw garlic is best - try at least two cloves per day, chopped up in a sandwich or in soup. Get rest. Lack of sleep and too much stress can make the body weak - if you get the flu, rest as much as possible while your symptoms are resolving. Drink fluids. Staying hydrated helps to eliminate toxins and metabolic wastes from your body.


Dr. Weil’s Head-toToe Wellness Guide: 10 Foods with Vitamin C

Dr. Weil’s Head-To-Toe Wellness Guide

Brain Vision Heart Lung

If you want to support a healthy immune system this season, make sure your diet includes plenty of natural vitamin C. This powerful antioxidant plays a central role in the repair and regeneration of tissues, helps protect cells throughout the body, and may support healthy immune function. Good food sources of vitamin C that are abundant and can be enjoyed all year long include: 1

Broccoli

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Cantaloupe

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Papaya

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Kale

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Kiwi

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Cauliflower

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Red Bell Peppers

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Pineapple

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Pink Grapefruit

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Bone & Joint Digestion Energy Immune Stress

Dr. Weil’s Head-to-Toe Wellness Guide covers nutrition, lifestyle and supplement information for nine different health categories. Learn more by visiting DrWeil.com or join DrWeilonHealthyAging.com for access to an enhanced version that includes links to related recipes!

Strawberries

Although supplemental vitamin C is available in many forms, Dr. Weil suggests using an inexpensive vitamin C supplement derived from d-glucose, taken with a meal to prevent stomach upset.

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Fall for Seasonal Foods! Foods that are associated with fall and winter in North America – such as pumpkins, sweet potatoes and butternut squash – are more than delicious: they are excellent sources for vitamin A, which supports immune system health. Add these and other natural food sources of vitamin A, including carrots, spinach, kale, cantaloupe and mangoes. 3


RECIPE

Spaghetti Squash Casserole Spaghetti squash may look funny, but it’s chock full of vitamins and minerals, especially carotenes - so don’t be afraid to try it. This vegetarian casserole is low in calories and fat, and very satisfying as a main dish. Add a mixed green salad and some whole grain bread and you’ve got a great meal. INSTRUCTIONS 1

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Place the spaghetti squash in a large pot of water (it should float) and bring to a boil. Lower heat, cover and boil gently for 50 minutes. (Another option is to bake the squash first. Cut it lengthwise and place the halves skinside down in a baking dish with an inch of water. Cover the dish with foil and bake at 350º F for about 45 minutes, or until meat is tender.) While squash is cooking, peel and slice the carrots, celery, onion and bell pepper. Heat olive oil in a skillet and add the onion and carrot, with some water to prevent sticking. Sauté over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add remaining vegetables with some red pepper flakes and a dash of salt, if desired. Sauté, stirring frequently, until vegetables are barely tender, about 10 minutes. Add crushed tomatoes, basil and oregano to taste, and a sprinkle of ground allspice. Squeeze in 2-5 cloves of garlic. Simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, grate the mozzarella and Parmesan. Remove squash from pot or oven and allow to cool until you can handle it. If it is whole, cut it in half lengthwise, then remove seeds with a spoon and squeeze any excess water out of meat. Remove meat and break it up into strands with a fork or potato masher. Mix squash well with vegetables and put half in the bottom of a large baking dish. Top with half the cheeses, the rest of the squash, and then the rest of the cheeses. Bake for 30 minutes or until cheese is bubbly and slightly browned. Let cool 15-20 minutes before serving.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS

1 spaghetti squash 2 large carrots, diced 2 stalks celery, diced 1 large yellow onion, diced 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 large can (28 ounces) crushed tomatoes Red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon dried basil 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano Pinch of ground allspice 3 cloves garlic, chopped 3/4 pound part-skim mozzarella 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese NUTRIENTS PER SERVING

Calories: 266.6 Protein: 16.9 grams Fat: 13.1 grams Saturated Fat: 6.4 grams Monounsat Fat: 5.2 grams Polyunsat Fat: 0.8 grams Carbohydrate: 22.4 grams Fiber: 4.9 grams Cholesterol: 27.9 mg Vitamin C: 81.4 mg Calcium: 32.8 mg

Copyright 2013© Weil Lifestyle, LLC Information within is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for the advice provided by your physician or other healthcare professional. You should not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing any medication or other treatment.


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Balanced Living Annual 2013