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community & school events extracurricular activities community sports local shopping specials Send us your thoughts, ideas or suggestions today! Stay connected to 919 Magazine! Call (919) 747-2899 or email advertise@919Magazine.com 2

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The Cover

Making A Difference

Wake Forest City of the Year Heather Holding -- A Profile

5 6 7 7

22

An Eco-Friendly Lifestyle

Departments

16

10 Tips To A Better Life, And A Cleaner Environment

24

Atlas Family Chiropractic

26

More Than Just Books

Caring for the Whole Family In Wake Forest

Check Out What Wake Forest Library Offers Your Family

Features 10

A True Family Affair

919 SYLLABUS ‹‹‹

Planners

Community Events School Events Extracurricular Activities Community Sports

4 Publisher’s Notes 18 Yearbook 22 Home Work 31 Community 36 Spring Sports Previews 38 Field Trip 42 919 Region 43 Advertisers Index 43 Along the I-540 Corridor 43 Bulletin Board 46 919 Final Bell

Luysters Committed Scottish Highland Dance

On the Cover

12

Compassionate, Intelligent

Photo by Mehdi Mirian Photography

WF-S’s Hanna Moyles Already Serving Community

14

Age 87, and Still Teaching

Award-Winning Artist Helps Seniors Learn About Talents

23

A First for Rolesville Middle

35

38

26

10

Future Farmers Program First One in Wake County

New Forest Moon Theater

Community Group Plans First Production in March

Nearby Civil War History

Bennett Place Only Short Drive for Families in WF

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How to Avoid Backup Issues

Wake Forest Community Library’s Yvonne Allen

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Brad Waybright of Computer Troubleshooters Offers Advice

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››› 919 NOTES

Publisher

Suzy Beth Sarver

It’s Time to Put A Spring in Your Step

IT Operations Keith Bullington

Welcome to the March/April issue of 919 Magazine-Wake Forest! It’s Spring! Time for green eggs and ham, Easter bunnies and spring flings. We celebrate Earth Day, the start of baseball, and warmer weather. Spring is when everything comes alive: Things are starting to bloom, including my allergies. But that won’t stop me from getting out and having in fun in this wonderful community. I thought about calling this issue “The Good life” because it’s packed with people having a good time, or creating one for the rest of us. I love a good time. The parties with family, friends and, of course, my kids. Having a good time can mean different things to different people. With all there is to offer in the 919 we hope you find something that puts the spring in your step. Here’s what we have inside: • Meet our student, Hanna Moyles – a very special young person in our community. She’s compassionate, intelligent, and already serving her community (Page 12). • Check out our Wake Forest Family on Page 10: The Luysters have made Scottish Highland Dance a true family affair. • On Page 14, be sure to spend some time with John Duzs, an awardwinning artist who volunteers his time to provide instruction to senior citizens in Wake Forest and other areas in the Triangle. Oh, and he’s 87! • We also profile Heather Holding, the Wake Forest Citizen of the Year who is making a real difference for her family – and her community. Look for this enlightening article on Page 16. I’m certain that my love for books, which began at an early age, has set me on this journey where I find myself reading now more than ever. My personal goal this year is to read 30 hard covers, and I’m already off to a good start. Thankfully we have great libraries in the 919, including the Wake Forest Community Library. We recently sat down with the local librarian, Yvonne Allen. She shares with 919 Magazine readers all there is to go, see and do at the library – beginning on Page 26. Read up on this great facility, and plan to pay a visit soon! Finally, we celebrate Earth Day on April 22 with some tips on Page 22 to help cut down on the clutter and become a little more “Eco-Friendly” in the 919. This spring we are pleased to announce our new publication for the residents of Morrisville. Arriving in early April, that area will join our group of five distinct, local 919 publications – and we couldn’t be more thrilled. If you have friends or family in that area, please be sure to tell them about 919 Magazine. Maybe you are a loyal 919 Magazine reader, or this is your first time taking a closer look at this unique publication. Whatever the reason, we are glad you are here. If it’s important to you, it’s important to us – because it’s our town, too; it’s where we all Live. Work. Play.

Photography

Mehdi Mirian Photography

Art Director Ben Bipes

Graphics Sarah Carr Sandi Wood

Production Ame Deaton Tika Stuart

Contributors

Stephanie Friedl Virginia Reed

Marketing Debra Hurst

Advertising

advertise@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

Content

info@919Magazine.com 919-747-2899

Annual Subscriptions

$19.95 plus $6.00 Postage & Handling Call 919-747-2899 Email info@919Magazine.com 8801 Fast Park Drive, Suite 311 Raleigh, NC 27617 www.919Magazine.com

Volume 1, Number 2 © Copyright 2013 919 Magazine Reproduction without permission is prohibited. 919 Magazine is published locally six times a year by dreamLake Media. Information provided by advertisers – or other companies or individuals – does not represent an endorsement or verification of accuracy, and is entirely the responsibility of advertisers. 919 Magazine assumes no responsibility or liability for the content of advertising placed in the publication (or on 919Magazine.com website).

Sincerely, A dreamLake Media Publication

Scott McElhaney

SB Sarver Publisher 4

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919 PLANNER ‹‹‹

COMMUNITY EVENTS

COMMUNITY EVENTS

MARCH 3/1

Schmoozapalooza! Networking Event Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce Pre-registration Required 8:45-11:30 am The Factory (Mill Room) 1839 S. Main St www.wakeforestchamber.org

3/8, 4/12

Art After Hours Music, Art, Kids’ Activities, More 6-9 pm; 2nd Fri (Mar, Apr) South White St Downtown Wake Forest www.wakeforestdowntown.com

3/16

3/21-4/18

Celebration, Tree Seedling Giveaway 10 am E. Carroll Joyner Park 701 Harris RD 919-435-9565 eketo@wakeforestnc.gov

Ages 6-9; $48 fee 4:30-5:30 pm, Thu Flaherty Park Community Center 1226 N. White St. 919-554-6726 www.wakeforestnc.gov

Town of Wake Forest Arbor Day

3/16

WF Parks and Recreation Easter Egg Hunt 10 am (age 3-under) 11 am (age 4-6) 1 pm (age 7-9) 2 pm (age 10-12) E. Carroll Joyner Park 701 Harris Rd 919-435-9560

3/16

FUN-Raising Event The Shore Grief Center Benefit 7-10 pm Twisted Vine 156 South White St. 919-368-6286 carolyn@theshoregriefcenter.org

Kids Chefs

3/30

Community Easter Egg

Hunt in the Park 11 am-2 pm Sponsored by area churches Rolesville Main Street Park

www.rolesvillechamber.org

APRIL 4/1-5/20

Beginning Belly Dance Ages 16-up; $60 fee 8-9 pm, Mon Flaherty Park Community Center 1226 N. White St. 919-554-6726 www.wakeforestnc.gov

4/19-21, 4/26-28

Wake Forest Herbfest GJCAE Benefit 525 S. White St Downtown Wake Forest www.herbfest.net

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››› 919 PLANNER 3/9

WinterFest 8 pm-11 pm Wake Forest-Rolesville High 420 West Stadium Dr 919-554-8617 www.wfrhighschool.com

3/14

Heritage Choral Festival 7 pm-9 pm Heritage Middle School 3400 Rogers Road 919-562-6204 www.heritagems.wcpss.net

4/20

Husky Fun Run & Family Festival Heritage High School Band Fundraiser 8 am-3 pm Heritage High School 1150 Forestville Rd www.heritagehs.wcpss.net

4/25

Rolesville Chamber

Annual Golf Tournament All-day event Heritage Golf Club www.rolesvillechamber.org

4/27

Town of Wake Forest Great Grass Giveaway 7 am Public Works Operations Center 234 Friendship Chapel Rd 919-435-9570

ONGOING Mar/Apr

Wake Forest Farmers Market 10 am-12 noon (March) 8 am-12 noon (Apr-Nov) 150 N. White St. www.wakeforestfarmersmarket.org

SCHOOL EVENTS

MARCH 3/1

Guinness World Record Jumpers! 10 am Wake Forest Elementary 136 W. Sycamore Ave 919-554-8655 www.wfes.wcpss.net

UPCOMING

3/14-16

Spring Musical

5/4

‘You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown’ 7 pm-10 pm Wake Forest-Rolesville High 420 West Stadium D 919-554-8617 www.wfrhighschool.com

Meet in the Street South White St (10 am-6 pm) Brooks & Taylor Sts (10 am-4 pm) Downtown Wake Forest 919-556-1519 www.wakeforestchamber.org

3/14-17, 3/21-23

Musical Production ‘Titanic’ 7 pm-10 pm North Raleigh Christian Academy 7300 Perry Creek Rd 919-573-7900 www.nrcaknights.com

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919 PLANNER ‹‹‹ 3/19-20

Talent Show 7 pm-8 pm; $4 adm Heritage Middle School 3400 Rogers Rd 919-562-6204 www.heritagems.wcpss.net

3/20

Choral Performance 7 pm-9 pm Forest Pines Elementary Meymandi Concert Hall 2 East South St 919-996-8700 forestpineses.weebly.com

3/26

A Cappela Choral Concert ‘Sing for the Cure’ 7 pm-9:30 pm Wake Forest-Rolesville High 420 West Stadium Dr 919-554-8617 www.wfrhighschool.com

APRIL 4/9

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES NIGHTLIFE Mar/Apr

Mar/Apr

Gatehouse Tavern Trivia Tuesdays DJ Bingo Wednesdays Karaoke Fridays 960 Gateway Common Cir (WF) 919-569-671 www.gatehousetavernnc.com

White Street Brewing Company Brewery Tours 11 am-12 pm, Saturdays 218 S. White St., Wake Forest 919-647-9439 www.whitestreetbrewing.com

Campus Cook-Out 5 pm-7 pm Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary 120 S. Wingate St 919-761-2100 www.sebts.edu

4/19

Mar/Apr

Carolina Ale House Wednesdays Trivia Thursdays Karaoke 2nd, last Sat, Live DJ 11685 Northpark Dr (WF) 919-556-8666 www.carolinaalehouse.com

Drama Production

Mar/Apr

Bingo at The Factory 5-9 pm, Mondays 1839 South Main St 919-453-1839 www.eatshopplay.com

‘Pinocchio’ Wake Forest-Rolesville High 420 West Stadium Dr 919-554-8617 www.wfrhighschool.com

4/30

5th Grade Play 7 pm- 8:30 pm North Raleigh Christian Academy 7300 Perry Creek Rd 919-573-7900 www.nrcaknights.com

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››› 919 PLANNER ST. PATRICK’S DAY EVENTS

COMMUNITY SPORTS EVENTS

3/02 St Baldrick’s Benefit Event

Mar/Apr

10am The Factory 1839 Main St, Wake Forest 919-841-1801

Lace Up Ur Shoes and Run Fur Some Brews 3M, 5M runs; post-run social 7 pm, Tuesdays White Street Brewing Company 218 S. White St., Wake Forest 919-647-9439 www.whitestreetbrewing.com

3/16 The Wearin’ O the Green Festival 10am-dark Moore Square Downtown Raleigh

Mar/Apr

Bike Rides 8 am; Saturdays (40M), Sundays (60M) TLC for Bikes Lafayette Village 8480 Honeycutt Road, Suite 126 919-324-4966 www.tlc4bikes.com

3/17 The Wearin’ O the Green Festival Lafayette Village 8450 Honeycutt Rd www.lafayettevillageraleigh.com

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919 PLANNER ‹‹‹ 3/16 REGISTRATIONS, Jog Your Mind 5K Save A Life Benefit CAMPS, LESSONS 2 pm WALKS, RACES, GOLF WakeMed Soccer Park 3/16

201 Soccer Park Dr www.active.com

Wake Tech Road Scholars 5K Run, Walk

4/14

Wake Tech Foundation Benefit Northern Wake Tech Campus 6600 Louisburg Rd www.waketech.edu/community/ road-scholars

Benefits SPCA, SWOOP, Raleigh Police Memorial Foundation Cameron Village www.runraleighraces.com

RunRaleigh Half Marathon & 5K

4/27

5th Annual Run for Our Heroes 5K Raleigh Police Memorial Foundation Benefit 9 am Downtown Raleigh www.runforourheroes.org

5/12

Run Like a Mother 5K 8:30 am Kerr Family YMCA 2500 Wakefield Pines Dr www.runlikeamotherrace.com

5/17-18

Northern Wake Relay For Life American Cancer Society Benefit Wake Forest www.northernwakerelay.com

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››› 919 FAMILY PROFILE

A True Family Affair

Luysters Committed To Scottish Highland Dancing Effort By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

For the Luyster family of Saddle Run, Scottish Highland dancing is a family affair and keeps them grounded in their faith. “As with most families, our hobbies and interests have revolved around our daughters,” said mom Angela. “Scottish Highland dance, although the girls’ sport, requires a total family commitment.” Four and a half years ago, the Luyster family relocated from a small town in Ohio – selecting Wake Forest to call home for both its small town feel and close proximity to Raleigh. Bradley is vice president and general manager at ABB; and Angela, who is in charge of the household, is in the process of starting a small housekeeping business. The three Luyster girls include Sydney, age 17; Kelsey, age 15; and Paige, age 15, all of whom attend Franklin Academy and dance and compete year round. Interest in and passion for Scottish Highland dancing started early for Sydney, when at age six – while

watching her cousin dance and compete – decided she wanted to dance and have a kilt of her own. A few years later, Paige and then Kelsey followed in their sister’s footsteps, and now the girls train formally with their dance instructor, Jo Kalat, several times a week and attend competitions throughout the year. These

competitions provide the opportunity to travel the country from as far north as Michigan, to Washington state out west, and as far south as Florida. “This has definitely developed a love of travel in all of us,” said Angela. “We love to hang around a day or two wherever we go to experience the sights, sounds, and flavors of the area.”

This has definitely developed a love of travel in all of us. We love to hang around a day or two wherever we go to experience the sights, sounds, and flavors of the area. ANGELA LUYSTER

Luyster Family Profile

Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

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PARENTS: RESIDENCE: CHILDREN: PETS:

Bradley and Angela Luyster Saddle Run Sydney (17); Kelsey (15); Paige (15) Maddie (border collie); Annie Rose and Sadie (cats); and a gerbil

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Along with their demanding training and competition schedule, all three girls are honor students at Franklin Academy and serve at the Summit Church in Brier Creek on the student leadership team and with Summit Kids ministry. While challenging at times, the girls have

learned the importance of balance and setting priorities. “We have always tried to keep our faith in God at the center of everything we do,” said Angela. “The girls have always been taught that if you dance well, thank God for giving you the talent and strength to do it, and

if you don’t dance well, thank God for giving you the talent and strength to do it. He loves you either way.” For this family, Scottish Highland dance has never been just about dancing; it has been a vehicle for teaching their girls how to live out their faith.

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››› 919 STUDENT PROFILE

Compassionate and Intelligent Hanna Moyles Already Committed To Serving Her Community

By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Born with the gift of intelligence and a compassionate heart, Hanna Moyles is making a difference in her community – both big and small. “Through my charity efforts, my goal is to educate the public about the different needs in our community,” said Moyles, a senior student at Wake Forest-Rolesville High School. “My biggest lesson to share is that anyone can make a difference in the world, no matter how small.” Moyles, the daughter of Brian and Stephanie Moyles of Thornburg Ridge, devotes countless hours to her own charity, From Ewe to You (www. fromewetoyou.webs.com), which she created four years ago after seeing a homeless man on the side of the road. She makes, collects, and donates warm, handmade items such as hats, scarves, and blankets to local organizations, including The Healing Place, the SPCA of Wake County, the Murdoch Center, and WakeMed Hospital, from which she earned her 500 hour service pin this year. “We are most proud of what a respectful, caring, and compassionate young woman Hannah is,” said mom Stephanie.

…Anyone can make a difference in the world, no matter how small. HANNAH MOYLES

Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

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For her robust commitment to community service, Moyles is the recipient of numerous service awards, including Kohl’s Cares and JC Penney’s Care.Share.Win! scholarships. Just as impressively, Moyles has received www.919Magazine.com


recognition for her stellar academic achievements and has participated in the Duke University Talent Identification Program, as the lead 2012 junior marshal also representing WFRHS at the Governor’s School, and as a US Presidential Scholar candidate. In addition, Moyles was recently selected as a National Merit Scholarship finalist, one of only 250 Coca Cola Scholars (earning a $10,000 scholarship, and traveling to Georgia in April for the chance to receive an additional $20,000 scholarship), and is a scholarship finalist

for scholarships from AXA, Elks Club and Wake Forest Womans’ Club. With a school career of straight A’s and a perfect ACT score, Moyles applied for and was accepted to Duke University as an early decision student. “I visited Duke and talked with many of the professors there,” said Moyles. “I enjoy the whole atmosphere and am looking forward to the diversity I will experience attending Duke.” Moyles also enjoys singing, drawing, playing the flute, baking, and is an avid reader. She collects old books and has such a large collection that she

has her own library in her house. She is an animal lover with four dogs, two cats, and a bird of her own. As for her future, she plans to study business and hopes to one day own her own bakery.

Hannah Rose Moyles Profile AGE: 16 SCHOOL: Wake Forest-Rolesville High (senior) PARENTS: Stephanie and Brian Moyles RESIDENCE: Thornburg Ridge, Wake Forest PETS: Hildie (miniature pinscher); Wilbur, Charlotte, and Franklin (pugs); Shadow (Russian blue cat); Lizzy (Maine coon cat); Nikki (cockatiel) INTERESTS: Reading, drawing, singing, baking, spending time with family, playing with dogs

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››› 919 VOLUNTEER PROFILE By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Art has been the common thread throughout John Duzs’ life, from his youth in Hungary to his immigration to the U.S., his career in commercial art – and now, as a volunteer teaching acrylic painting classes at senior centers throughout the Triangle. An award-winning artist and Heritage Retirement Community resident, Duzs was born and raised in Hungary. Realizing he wanted to be an artist at the young age of eight, he studied privately in Hungary with successful artists; but, at the age of 18, he found himself in the military, where he eventually became a Soviet Union POW (and was assigned to work as a statistician, when what he really wanted to do was study art).

Award-Winning Artist Now Helps Seniors Learn More About Talents

I am teaching art for 80-plus students, in four cities, helping people develop their God-given talents. What can be better than that? JOHN DUZS After witnessing the destruction of Budapest by the Soviets in the mid1950s, Duzs and his girlfriend Eva – whom he would eventually marry – bravely escaped to freedom in Austria and then later migrated to the United States. Arriving in the U.S. speaking no English, Duzs quickly realized he could use his artistic talent to survive and began work within three weeks. 14

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Over the next several years, living in Cleveland, OH, Duzs earned his citizenship, married Eva, started a family, and owned a commercial art studio for 34 years. He continued his art studies by attending classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art, the Cooper School of Art, and through the Famous Artists School, as well as exhibiting and selling many paintings over the years. Duzs moved to the Raleigh area six years ago to be near one of his sons and twin grandchildren. He enjoys the area for its peacefulness

and proximity to nearby conveniences. Duzs stays busy teaching acrylic painting classes at Northern Wake Senior Center, Five Points Center for Active Adults, Eastern Wake Senior Center, and Garner Senior Center. Of his volunteer work, Duzs enjoys the creative process, sharing his knowledge, and seeing his students successful and fulfilled in their art. “Now, I am teaching art for 80-plus students, in four cities, helping people develop their God-given talents,” said Duzs. “What can be better than that? Life is good!”

John Duzs Profile AGE: 87 RESIDENCE: Wake Forest FAMILY: Two sons (Stephen, 53; John, 52) INTERESTS: Art, carving, reading

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››› 919 PERSONALITY PROFILE

Wake Forest Citizen of the Year

Heather Holding Makes A Difference For Her Family and Her Community By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Every year since 1965, the Wake Forest Community Council honors one community volunteer as its Wake Forest Citizen of the Year. Heather Holding is thrilled and honored to be the most recent recipient of this prestigious award as she is added to the long list of community servants to whom she looks for inspiration. “Looking at the list of past recipients,

I can’t believe that I’m included in that amazing list of people who have built Wake Forest over the long history of the award.” said Holding. A Wake Forest resident since 1986, Holding – along with her husband James Holding, president and owner of Holding Oil & Gas Company – have two daughters: Lauren, age 8; and Rachel, age 4. Originally from Tennessee, Holding is a Wake ForestRolesville High School graduate

and earned her degree in business administration from Wake Forest University. Currently, she works parttime at Holding Oil & Gas and also devotes many hours to being a soccer and dance mom and to volunteering. Among her many volunteer positions, Holding served on the board of directors for the Wake Forest College Birthplace Society, the Anthony J. Trentini Memorial Scholarship Foundation, and is serving a second term for the Koinonia Foundation as chair. Much of Holding’s community work revolves around the Wake Forest Area Chamber of Commerce. A graduate of the Chamber’s Leadership Program, Holding subsequently served several years on its steering committee and also helped to create and served on the steering committee for the Chamber’s youth leadership program. In addition, Holding served on the Chamber’s

Feeling like I’ve made a difference, whether it’s as a parent, a spouse, or as a community volunteer, brings me great joy. HEATHER HOLDING 16

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board of directors from 2003 to 2006, for which she was awarded director of the year in 2006. Currently, she chairs the Wake Forest Baptist Church wedding guild and co-chairs the WFBC stewardship committee. Holding loves to travel and, in recent years, has visited Peru to see Machu Picchu and also South Africa. This year, she is looking forward to her family’s first trip to Disney World. She is an avid theatergoer, enjoys reading, photography, and, of course, volunteering. “Feeling like I’ve made a difference, whether it’s as a parent, a spouse, or as a community volunteer, brings me great joy,” said Holding. Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

Heather Holding Profile RESIDENCE: FAMILY: PETS: INTERESTS:

Wake Forest Husband, James; daughters Lauren (8) and Rachel (4) Daisy (yellow Labrador mix) Travel, reading, theater, geneology, photography, volunteering

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››› 919 YEARBOOK

Photos by Ame Deaton

Among those attending the Rolesville Chamber of Commerce 2013 Annual Dinner and Awards event (see related article on Page 32) recently were Suzi Leasure of Geek RX, the “Ambassador of the Year” (left); 2013 Chamber President Jackie Wilson, Chamber Executive Director Jenny Rowe, and Scott McElhaney, President and CEO of dreamLake Media and 919 Magazine (upper right); Bill and Jo Smaltz, better known at Christmas as Santa and Mrs. Claus in Rolesville (bottom right)

Owner of Raffaldini Vineyards, Jay Raffaldini, and Wake Forest Mayor Vivian Jones enjoy wine tasting at the Wake Forest Rotary Club’s 2013 Wine Tasting Event

Photos courtesy of Kim Warren

Wake Forest Police Department creates a joyous holiday by taking under privileged children shoppers at the “Shop With A Cop” event 18

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919 YEARBOOK ‹‹‹

Photo courtesy of Wen-Ching Liu

Heritage High School’s Chinese Program held it’s first Chinese New Year Celebration where students’ introduced themselves and presented various projects

Chinese dance groups joined in on the Chinese New Year Celebration at Heritage High School

Photo courtesy of Steve Banfi

A tremendous production, The Little Mermaid Jr., performed by the Heritage High School theater department and directed by Bryan Phoebus

Photo courtesy of Heather Holding

Photo by Ame Deaton

Suzy Sarver and Scott McElhaney of 919 Magazine with the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors at a recent Table-Top Expo, where new members introduce themselves 919 Magazine WF

March | April 2013

Renee Shaw was presented the Russell Dew Community Service Award at The Koinonia Foundation’s Annual Auction www.919Magazine.com

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››› 919 YEARBOOK

Photo courtesy of Wen-Ching Liu

30 International students and their host families part took in the Heritage High School welcome gathering

International students, who visited Heritage High School in late January, toured Duke University

Photos by Ame Deaton

Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce sponsored a recent “Business After Hours” networking event, hosted by Doctors Vision Center at 12205 Capital Blvd. in Wake Forest. Shown are members of the Wake Forest Fire Department (upper left); Wake Forest Mayor Vivian Jones, with Chamber Board Member Louis Mullinger of Edward Jones, and Scott McElhaney, President and CEO of dreamLake Media and 919 Magazine (right); and members of the staff of Doctors Vision Center (lower left) 20

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919 YEARBOOK ‹‹‹

Band members from Wake Forest-Rolesville High School performed at Wake Forest Mardi Gras event A young Mardi Gras fan rides the Wake Forest streets in comfort on a cool February afternoon

Kids and adults alike enjoyed dancing in the streets during Wake Forest Mardi Gras celebration

Lots of headwear was evident in downtown Wake Forest for Mardi Gras celebration 919 Magazine WF

Street musicians roamed the streets of downtown Wake Forest during Mardi Gras celebration in February

Artists hard at work on sidewalk masterpiece during February’s downtown Wake Forest Mardi Gras celebration

Crowds roamed downtown Wake Forest streets during February Mardi Gras celebration March | April 2013

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››› 919 HOME WORK

Going Green Tips on How to Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Replenish, and Restore Earth Day – originally celebrated as the Spring Equinox – became an annual day on which events are held worldwide to increase awareness and appreciation of the Earth. Now Earth Day is coordinated globally and is celebrated in more than 175 countries every year. In 2009, the United Nations designated April 22 of each year as International Earth Day. There are five main components to becoming more aware and “Eco Friendly” in everyday living: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Replenish, Restore.

Reduce

Buy locally. Produce and goods that do not require travel/transportation can greatly reduce greenhouse emissions and help the environment. Another suggestion to cut down on greenhouse emissions is to ride a bike more often, and walk to neighborhood destinations.

Reuse

Many people already recycle glass bottles and cans, but what other uses can you have for left over jars, old pillows, and other household items? Glass jars filled a quarter way up with small pebbles and centered with a candle make excellent luminaries. Line your drive way, walk way or perimeter of your yard. Glass jars also keep cut lemons, onions and chopped produce fresh longer while taking up less space in your refrigerator. Before you trash them, put old bedroom pillows in the dryer at a high temp with a few fabric softener sheets. Spray with a

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disinfectant, cover with upholstery fabric and, voila’, “new” summer throw pillows for the outside couch or patio sitting area. Hold a garage sale or donate used items. Save your unwanted items from the landfill by helping someone in need and save the environment at the same time. For more eco-friendly tips for reusing instead of throwing away, visit a Facebook favorite of 919 staffers: Different Solutions.

Recycle

Cut down on waste by limiting use of paper and plastic cups. Return plastic grocery bags to the grocery store on each visit. Carry washable canvas bags and eco-friendly totes to eliminate the need for plastic shopping bags altogether. And review what is tossed in the garbage, checking the recycle codes on the bottom of your personal care products, food containers and other household items (one website that offers codes or all product containers is www.thedailygreen.com).

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Replenish

Buy and use energy-saving, compact fluorescent light bulbs and other energy efficient bulbs. Not only do these bulbs last up to 10 times as long as conventional incandescent lighting – over their lifetime – they use only a quarter of the energy. Plant trees and help fight climate change. Trees have a natural process of photosynthesis and to absorb CO2 and other pollutant particulates. Trees emit oxygen and also provide much needed shade, which helps cool yards, communities, and the planet. For more information on choosing and planting trees, try checking the Arbor Day Foundation at www.arborday.org.

Restore

Get outside more: Visiting nature centers and learning more about the environment can lead to activities and habits that make a difference on the future of our earth. Visit the local library: Libraries provide resources and guides on how to build a butterfly habitat, plant a garden, construct a bird house, or start a compost heap. Get involved: Local and national organizations need volunteers and welcome all interested in helping the planet and educating others on the effects of global warming, recycling benefits and more. A place to get started may be www.world.org/ weo/top1000, which lists a thousand websites of various environment-oriented groups, organizations and causes of all persuasions.

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Rolesville Middle’s FFA First Chapter in Wake County

The first middle school chapter of the Future Farmers of America in Wake County is going strong at Rolesville Middle School. “Any good agricultural education program first middle schooland chapter of the Education Future Farmers hasThe an active FFA Career Technical Student of America in Wake County is going strong at Rolesville Organization facilitating opportunities for students to deMiddle School. “Any good agricultural education program velop leadership, personal growth, and career success through has an active FFA Career and Technical Education Student classroom instruction, hands-on learning, and leadership Organization for County studentsPublic to develop development,”facilitating said Davidopportunities Wehbie, Wake leadership, personal growth, and catreer success through Schools Career and Technical Education Director. classroom instruction, hands-on learning, Biotechnology and leadership The Exploring Agriscience/Exploring development,” said David Wehbie, Wake County Public program at Rolesville Middle School offers students opSchools Career and Technical Education Director. portunities to explore and develop an understanding of the The Exploring Agriscience/Exploring Biotechnology educational and career pathways associated with agriculture, program at Rolesville Middle School offers studentsand future biotechnology, and biosciences for which current opportunities to explore and develop an understanding labor market indices indicate an increasing demand. of the educational and career pathways associated with agriculture, “Over the next few years, we hope to grow our student biotechnology, and biosciences for which current and FFA membership such that every student enrolled infuture the labor market indices indicate an increasing demand. course Exploring Agriscience or Exploring Biotechnology “Over thea next few years, to grow our student a wants to be member,” said we FFAhope advisor Scott Robison, FFA membership such that every student enrolled in the biotechnology teacher and Career and Technical Education Exploring Agriscience or Exploring Biotechnology course Department chair at RMS. “Our goal is to be the premier wants to be a member,” said FFA advisor Scott Robison, a biotechnology teacher and Career and Technical Education

Department chair at RMS. “Our goal is to be the premier organization at RMS.” With a dedicated group of parents and community members who have formed a booster group – the Rolesville FFA Alumni – the organization can provide much needed support to sponsor student memberships, provide scholarships for student leadership development, and support participation in competitions. As the recipient of an AgCarolina Farm Credit $1,500 grant, the RMS chapter can install and maintain raised vegetable beds on campus. And, through the National FFA Foundation's Food for All program, the organization at RMS.” RMS FFAa received to raise that memwill With dedicateda $2,500 group ofgrant parents andchickens community produce eggs for the Backpack Buddies program at school. bers who have formed a booster group – the Rolesville FFA While– FFA may mean Future Farmersmuch of America, Alumni the organization can provide neededthe supRMS student members have careerprovide aspirations ranging port toFFA sponsor student memberships, scholarships from doctorsleadership to lawyers,development, veterinarians,and andsupport researchers. With for student particiover 300 different career areas in the agricultural industry, the pation in competitions. As the recipient of an AgCarolina RMS chapter is prepared help chapter studentscan learn moreand Farm FFA Credit $1,500 grant, thetoRMS install about as many of them as possible. maintain raised vegetable beds on campus. And, through For information, visit www.rmsffa.theaet.com, call 919-570-2284. themore National FFA Foundation's Food for Allor program, the RMS FFA received a $2,500 grant to raise chickens that will produce eggs for the Backpack Buddies program at school. While FFA may mean Future Farmers of America, the RMS FFA student members have career aspirations ranging from doctors to lawyers, veterinarians, and researchers. With over 300 different career areas in the agricultural industry, the RMS FFA chapter is prepared to help students learn more about as many of them as possible. For more information, visit www.rmsffa.theaet.com, or call 919-570-2284.

Photos Courtesy of Angela Bendorf Jamison

Rolesville Middle School Future Farmers of America

ADVISOR: Scott Robison STUDENT PRESIDENT: Madison Gilbert ADDRESS: 4700 Burlington Mills Rd, Rolesville, NC 27571 PHONE: 919-570-2284 WEBSITE: www.rmsffa.theaet.com

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Rolesville Middle School FFA Student Officers PRESIDENT: VICE PRESIDENT: SECRETARY: REPORTER: TREASURER: SENTINEL: March | April 2013

Madison Gilbert Robert Robison Sally Matal Vinny Ponzio Camryn Jamison Keira Rhoden www.919Magazine.com

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››› 919 BUSINESS PROFILE

Gentle Adjustments for the Whole Family

Atlas Family Chiropractic Delivers Great Care in a Friendly, State of the Art Facility The professionals at Atlas Family Chiropractic of Wake Forest successfully collaborate to deliver the best in care for their patients and clients in a caring and friendly state of the art facility. With a dedication to promoting complete health and wellness, Dr. Julia Wilkins and her knowledgeable staff provide expert gentle adjustments for the whole family as well as massage therapy and esthetics. Dr. Wilkins grew up in rural Wisconsin and attended the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. After graduating from Palmer College of Chiropractic, Dr. Wilkins relocated to the Triangle and trained in the Atlas Orthogonal program with the program’s founder, Dr. Roy Sweat – earning Board Certification in 2005, as well as an Advanced Proficiency Rating for Activator Methods.

Utilizing her extensive Atlas Orthogonal training, Dr. Wilkins provides gentle instrument-based adjustments through Activator Methods and KST techniques to treat neck, back, and joint pain, migraines, TMJ, dizziness, bed wetting, ADHD, carpal tunnel syndrome, asthma and allergies, fibromyalgia, PMS, infertility, chronic tiredness, insomnia, nervousness,

high blood pressure, headaches and more. Her focus is on the atlas, the bone at the top of the spine, through which every nerve passes on the way to the rest of the body. “Once atlas is in place, we can address the rest of the body,” said Dr. Wilkins. In addition to Atlas Orthogonal chiropractic care, Atlas Family Chiropractic offers cold laser therapy,

My goal is to get patients out of pain as quickly as possible. DR. JULIA WILKINS Dr. Wilkins opened Atlas Family Chiropractic in 2008, now in its new expanded space, and is fully committed to providing individualized care for patients of all ages. “My goal is to get patients out of pain as quickly as possible,” said Dr. Wilkins. Her son was first adjusted when he was only three days old and continues to be checked on a regular basis. “Kids respond really well to adjustments and enjoy it,” said Dr. Wilkins. 24

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Atlas Family Chiropractic of Wake Forest OWNER/CHIROPRACTOR: YEAR OPENED: ADDRESS: WEBSITE: EMAIL: PHONE: FACEBOOK:

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Dr. Julia Wilkins 2008 152 Capcom Ave., Suite 104, Wake Forest www.atlasfamilychiro.com drbrahmer@yahoo.com 919-554-8989 Atlas Family Chiropractic of Wake Forest

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Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

far infrared sauna sessions, and ion cleanse footbaths. Martha Richardson of Essential Touch, with almost 10 years’ experience, offers therapeutic massage and body work specializing in acute and chronic pain. Diane Mack with Esthetics by Caris, offers skin care therapies, cupping therapy, and more through a holistic approach to skin care using products and modalities specific to the individual. Atlas Family Chiropractic of Wake Forest is located at 152 Capcom Ave., Suite 104, Wake Forest. To contact or for more information, call 919-554-8989, 919 Magazine WF

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CHECK IT OUT!

Wake Forest Community Library Offers Books – And So Much More Yvonne Allen Profile POSITION: Manager, Wake Forest Community Library AGE: 56 YEARS IN POSITION: 7 years CAREER: 14 years with Wake County Public Libraries: 7 years at North Regional Library in Youth Services; 7 years as Library Manager of the Wake Forest Community Library; previously spent more than 20 years as a Fashion Merchandise Buyer in Los Angeles EDUCATION: Bachelor of Science Degree in Food Sciences and Nutrition, San Diego State University, 1978; Masters in Library Science, North Carolina Central University, 1998 FAMILY: Married for 20 years to husband, Jim PET: 1 year old, 5 lb. Yorkshire terrier (Cocoa) INTERESTS: Reading about current clothing and home fashion trends; gardening, exercise, cycling, sewing


During 20 years working as a Fashion Merchandise Buyer in Los Angeles, Yvonne Allen had a longtime dream to be a librarian. After moving across the country and obtaining a Masters in Library Science from North Carolina Central University, her dream came true when she joined the Wake County Public Libraries 14 years ago. Then, in 2005, Allen became manager of the Wake Forest Community Library – a position she continues today. Allen recently answered questions about the local library for 919 Magazine readers.

A Conversation with Yvonne Allen, manager of the Wake Forest Community Library What is the history of the Wake Forest Community Library? In September 1961, Catharine Paschal, a member of the Olivia Raney Library Board, procured $3,000 in federal funds from the State Library to establish a public library in Wake Forest. This first grant was used for the librarian’s salary, books and furnishings. The Wake Forest Woman’s Club also campaigned door to door to raise additional funds for the establishment of a library. The Wake Forest Public Library’s first location was in the old W.W. Holding Company office and was donated by the Holding family for a public library. The book shelves were built by the agriculture students at Wake Forest High School. The grand opening of the library was on Nov. 15, 1961. The collection included 1,000 books, all of which had been donated by citizens. During the first month of operation, the library issued 81 cards and circulated 111 books during a 15-hoursper-week schedule. Cards for children were 25 cents and for adults were 50 cents. The out-of-county fee was $1. From the beginning, this library had a relationship with the Olivia Raney Library in downtown Raleigh, with many of the books made available to the public on loan from that facility. In 1973, the Wake Forest Library relocated to the old Central Carolina Bank building at 123 S. White St. The Library remained in this building until October 1996, when funds from a Wake County bond referendum were used to build a new 5,000 sq. ft. facility on Holding Avenue. Henry Miller, an original library board member, left $53,000 to the Wake Forest Public Library in his will to be used to assist with the building of the new library. On Nov. 17, 1996, the Wake Forest Community Library opened in its new location at 400 E. Holding Ave. with a collection of 45,000 volumes. 919 Magazine WF

Photos by Mehdi Mirian Photography

What are the biggest changes in the library today, compared to when it first opened? The biggest change is the size of the population we serve. The populations of Wake Forest and the surrounding communities of Rolesville and parts of North Raleigh have grown beyond most of our expectations. Our membership and circulation have seen significant increases over the years.

What is the structure of the Wake County library system – and how does the Wake Forest Community Library compare to the other facilities in the system? Wake County Public Libraries is a system of 20 libraries, including six Regional Libraries, five Large Community Libraries, seven Community Libraries and two Special Libraries. Wake Forest Community Library is one of the seven Community Libraries.

What specific area does the Wake Forest Community Library serve? The library serves Wake Forest, Rolesville and parts of North Raleigh. We also have many members who live in neighboring counties, including Franklin and Granville. But any Wake County resident may use the library, just by walking in the door.

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How many books and other items do Wake County libraries circulate on an annual basis? In 2012, Wake County Public Libraries circulated 12,169,122 items and of that total 274,661 were downloadable eBooks. In that same year, 8,092,763 members visited the county’s libraries. In 2012, librarians across the county presented more than 9,000 programs to an audience of 285,000 people. We are happy to be a part of such a well-loved county service. Can you describe some of the technological advancements the library has experienced? When the library opened in 1996, we did not have public Internet access. About two years after the library opened, two public Internet stations were added. Eventually, the number grew to include eight Internet stations. At that time, the addition of public Internet access was a significant advance for public libraries. Today, Wake County Public Libraries has an impressive digital presence. Library members can access a variety of services from our website and the library maintains more than 800 computers and offers areas for individual laptop use with WiFi access available in every location.

Besides books, can you describe the other items in the library’s collection? Wake County Public Libraries offers a downloadable library. Access to all downloadable materials is available from the library website. Library members can search the availability of eBooks, audio books and other digital materials from their personal computers. These materials are compatible with a variety of mobile devices, including the most popular devices.

Can you tell us about the various programs and services offered at the library? The Wake Forest Community Library offers programs for preschool children four days a week. This year we have increased the number of programs we offer for youth. We added a Family Storytime on Monday evenings at 6:30 p.m. We have also expanded our program for school age children in grades K- 5. We now offer a weekly school age program on Tuesday afternoons at 4:30 p.m.

What is the service philosophy or goals of the WFCL? Wake Forest Community Library believes in the mission of Wake County Public Libraries. We seek to instill the love of reading and to foster the pursuit of knowledge among the residents of the County. We attempt to offer friendly service at times that are the most convenient for our residents. Our first service priority is to young children as we prepare them to be ready to read and then to support them as they enter school and continue with reading and learning. 28

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WCPL History Timeline

What is the most unique aspect about the WFCL? The Wake Forest Community Library is the only library in our system that has its own Friends group. This group has been an ongoing since the beginning of library services in 1961. Over time, the Board Members have changed, but the work they do continues even today. The Friends of the Wake Forest Community Library is operated independently from the library by a group of volunteers within the community. The Friends group operates as a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization. Their purpose is to raise funds to support the library with special events and projects. They raise funds through membership drives, sales from tote bags and their annual book sale. During the last two years, the Friends group contributed funds to purchase new study tables and other furnishings for the library. They have framed literature-based posters for the library, supported library programming and even represented the library in the Wake Forest holiday parade.

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What is the one thing most local residents may not know about the WFCL? I think most residents will be surprised to know how many people visit the Wake Forest Community Library each year and the number of materials they borrow from this location. We are the “busiest” location per employee hour in the County.

How is the Wake Forest library funded? The Wake Forest Community Library is one of 20 libraries operated by Wake County Public Libraries, a division of Wake County Government’s Community Services Department. Wake County government provides the funding for all Wake County Public Libraries from property taxes collected locally. 919 Magazine WF

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The first public library in Wake County, the Olivia Raney Library, was chartered in downtown Raleigh and opened its doors to the public on January 24, 1901. The second library in the county opened by the Garner Women’s Club in the town of Garner. Mollie Huston Lee opens the Richard B. Harrison Library on Raleigh’s Hargett Street. It has relocated twice and is in current operation at 1313 New Bern Ave. Many other libraries opened during subsequent decades. Olivia Raney Library and the Richard B. Harrison Library merge, prompting discussions to develop a unified system of service for all residents of the county. Library Director William O’Shea established a countywide advisory board as library branches opened in the suburban areas of Raleigh (North Hills, Southgate and Cameron Village) as well as in the town of Knightdale. Wake County Commissioners Betty Ann Knudsen, Bob Heater, Stewart Adcock and Edmund Aycock agreed to merge many of the libraries in the county, and Wake County government agreed to assume full fiscal responsibility for library service. By 1985, all libraries, from Apex to Zebulon, were united as one system and were fully financed by property tax dollars collected by Wake County. Library Director Thomas L. Moore introduced the regional library concept, which placed large, full-service libraries in major geographic quadrants and/or population centers of the county, and he closed the system’s outdated “main” library. Moore also supervised the system’s first book inventory and employed the new idea of “popular reading” as a basis for the system’s collection development philosophy. Cameron Village branch library expanded to become the system’s first regional library. A $5 million bond issue passed, and the new North Regional Library opened to replace the North Hills branch library. Wendell and Fuquay-Varina libraries expanded in new facilities. The system’s third regional library, Southeast Regional, replaced the former Garner Library as the system’s first library with an automated catalog and circulation system. Every library in the system was fully automated by 1992. About the same time, a $10 million bond referendum passed, and several building projects expanded and modernized the system. Olivia Raney Local History Library opened in 1996, using the bond money and the remaining Olivia Raney Family Trust. In 1997, the Electronic Information Center opened downtown as the first library in the system to offer public Internet access. By 1999, public Internet access was available in every library in the county. Two new Bookmobiles were added to the system to serve preschool children in daycare settings around the county. The last of the bond money was used to replace the Knightdale Library with the system’s fifth regional library, East Regional, in December 1999. WCPL celebrated its centennial with its first written history by former librarian Roy Dicks and with the creation of a Public Library Trust Fund, held by the Triangle Community Foundation. WCPL hosts a “Libraries of the Future” symposium and creates a new Strategic Business Plan. A $35 million bond referendum passed with more than a 70% approval rate from county residents, resulting in the sixth and seventh regional libraries opening, expanded services in several facilities, renovations to several facilities, and new libraries to open in Holly Springs and Leesville over the next several years. Richard B. Raney and Mollie Huston Lee inducted in the inaugural class of the Raleigh Hall of Fame for their contributions as founders of the Wake County Public Library system.

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Does the library need volunteers, and how can local residents become involved? Volunteers are important partners for all Wake County Public Libraries. The Wake Forest Community Library has volunteers who serve weekly. Individuals interested in volunteering at the library can visit the library to obtain an application or go online to learn more about volunteer opportunities. We also offer volunteer opportunities for students, ages 13 to 16 years. Our student volunteer opportunities enable students in meeting their service hours for school assignments, honors clubs, etc.

How does a local resident get a library card? Library cards are free to all Wake County residents. Residents can apply for a library card by presenting a photo ID with their current Wake County address or by presenting a photo ID with an item that verifies their current Wake County address (bill, lease, checkbook, etc.). Children under the age of 13 need a parent or guardian to sign for a library card. Persons residing outside of Wake County can obtain a card for only $25 per year. With a card, one may borrow items, place items on hold and access computers.

How did you get involved in working at a library as a career? I was living in Pasadena, CA at the time. Pasadena is a beautiful city with many cultural resources, including the public library. I knew the librarians by name and I was always in awe of their ability to help me find the information I needed. I thought they were amazing. I envied them, because they were fortunate to work in that beautiful library and the work they performed provided a valuable service to the community. It took me 10 years and a move across the county to realize my dream of becoming a librarian.

Our first service priority is to young children as we prepare them to be ready to read and then to support them as they enter school and continue with reading and learning. YVONNE ALLEN

What is your favorite aspect of working at the WCFL? Without a doubt, the people in the community make this a very special place to work. I enjoy seeing our regular users each week and meeting the new families that move to our community. I know the staff will agree with me when I say that Wake Forest Community Library is a great place to work. We feel supported and appreciated.

What additional information do you want 919 Magazine readers to know about the WFCL? We will be making improvements in the library during the spring. In late March, the Wake Forest Community Library will close temporarily, while construction is done to renovate the interior of the library. The temporary closing will be widely publicized in the local media and throughout Wake County. Information will be available on the website. Library members will be given extended due dates on any materials checked in the last weeks, prior to the temporary closing. The library will be painted, new carpet will be installed, and additional study tables will be added. Access for laptop users will be improved and we will revise the floor plan of the library to make it more convenient for our library members. We expect to reopen early in the summer. During the weeks we are closed, we are encouraging our regular library members to explore the county by visiting other library locations. These can be found at www.wakegov.com/libraries.

Wake Forest Community Library ADDRESS: 400 E. Holding Ave. YEAR OPENED: 1996 (current location) FACILITY: 5,000 sq. ft. EMPLOYEES: 3 full-time; 2 part-time PHONE: 919-554-8498 WEBSITE: www.wakegov.com/libraries/Pages/default.aspx HOURS: Mon-Thu, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. (closed Sun)

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919 COMMUNITY ‹‹‹ Chamber Reverse Raffle & Auction Set at The Sutherland on March 22

WF Police Main Station Reopens to Public

Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce’s 2013 Reverse Raffle & Auction is at 6 p.m. on Friday, March 22 at The Sutherland. This popular, much-anticipated annual event allows individuals, businesses and organizations the opportunity to purchase a Reverse Raffle ticket for the chance to win up to $10,000. Reverse raffle tickets are $100 and sideboards are $20. Both can be purchased through any member of the Board of Directors member or at the Chamber office. Each ticket admits two to the March 22 Drawing Party event, which includes heavy hors d’oeuvres and beverages. A limited number of tickets is available. Unlike a typical raffle, in a Reverse Raffle the purchaser of the last ticket drawn wins the Grand Prize of $7,500. Each raffle ticket number is also entered into a special “side” jackpot called a side board. It costs an additional $20 to purchase your corresponding side board number. There are some individuals who choose not to purchase the side board number that matches their raffle ticket, and these remaining sideboard numbers can be purchased at the Chamber Office. If both a raffle ticket and side board is purchased, the total prize is $10,000. Additional prizes will be given throughout the event. The first ticket drawn wins $100, for example. This year’s event is at The Sutherland, a unique 18th century estate that boasts over six acres of ancient oaks, stately magnolias, and beautiful gardens, which provide an extraordinary setting.

Wake Forest Police Department’s Main Station, located at 225 S. Taylor St., has reopened to the public. The facility closed to undergo major renovations in mid-September. During the closure, the department temporarily relocated its public counter to the Brooks Street Substation. Live scan fingerprinting service, which the police department normally offers to the general public at the main station on Thursdays between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m., resumed in February. The $500,000 renovation project included an upgrade to the building’s heating, venting, and air conditioning system, an enlarged evidence room, new carpet, fresh paint, and an enclosed entrance.

Sarah Huggler Wins Downtown Wake Forest South White Streetscape Survival Challenge

or contact Beth Bollinger, Event Coordinator, at 419-217-0105

Sarah Huggler won prizes and gift certificates worth more than $1,000 in the South White Streetscape Survival Challenge. Sponsored by the Town of Wake Forest and the Wake Forest Downtown Revitalization Corp., the contest was part of the effort to encourage residents to shop downtown during last year’s street renovation project. Huggler’s name was drawn from among all entries in December. Originally from upstate New York, Huggler, 28, moved to Wake Forest in 2011. She expressed surprise about winning the prizes. “I was shocked and very grateful. I was only expecting to get the T-shirt for completing the challenge!” she said. “It meant a lot to me. I had my mother and grandmother visiting from New York in October when we learned about the challenge, and we had so much fun shopping and exploring all of the great dining and services that downtown Wake Forest has to offer.”

or by email at beth@louiseprod.com.

For more information, visit www.wakeforestdowntown.com.

All net proceeds are used to support Chamber services and programs. For more information, visit www.wakeforestchamber.org;

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››› 919 COMMUNITY

It’s Easter Hunt time in Wake Forest!

Expanded ‘Meet in the Street’ Readies for Crowds on May 4

Wake Forest Parks and Recreation Department plans to hide more than 3,000 Easter eggs for local youths to search out on Saturday, March 16. The event at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road, has staggered starting times by age group:

This year’s “Meet in the Street” event in downtown Wake Forest promises “more streets, more vendors, more activities, more stages, and more food.” The annual event is Saturday, May 4. South White Street will operate 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. South Taylor and Brooks streets will be open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. In addition to arts and crafts, live music and a food court, attendees can also expect a children’s village, an inflatable obstacle course, face painting, games, and more.

• • • •

Kids who discover the rare golden eggs will receive a special prize. In case of rain, the event will be held at the Flaherty Park Community Center, 1226 N. White St.

For more information, call the Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce at 919-556-1519 or visit www.wakeforestchamber.org.

Wake Forest Planning Arbor Day Event, Tree Seedling Distribution

For more information, call 919-435-9560.

Wake Forest is hosting its Arbor Day Celebration and Tree Seedling Giveaway at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, at E. Carroll Joyner Park, 701 Harris Road. As part of the Arbor Day celebration, the Urban Forestry Board, town staff, and volunteers will distribute 1,300 eastern redbud, 1,000 river birch, and 1,000 Southern catalpa seedlings to area residents while they last. Local organizations will also offer special activities, treats, and information related to trees, gardening, and related topics. Also during the event, the UFB will recognize this year’s Arbor Day Poster Contest winners and present Green Medal Awards to individuals, civic clubs, and businesses who worked during the past year to promote the town’s urban forest. In case of rain, the event will be moved inside the Wake Forest Town Hall, 301 S. Brooks St. According to the release from the Town of Wake Forest, Arbor Day is part of an annual nationwide campaign to promote the planting of trees. The event began in Nebraska in 1872 when newspaper journalist J. Sterling Morton proposed a tree-planting holiday to the State Board of Agriculture. Although National Arbor Day is celebrated on the last Friday in April, individual state commemorations are scheduled on dates better suited to their own treeplanting seasons. North Carolina officially celebrates Arbor Day on the first Friday following March 15. The Urban Forestry Board, formerly known as the Tree Board, was established in 1978 as an advisory committee to the Wake Forest Board of Commissioners. The nine-member committee oversees all planting in rights-of-way and on public property. For more information about this year’s Arbor Day festivities, contact Urban Forester Evan Keto at 919-435-9565 or eketo@wakeforestnc.gov.

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10 a.m. - Age 3 and younger 1 a.m. - Age 4-6 1 p.m. - Age 7-9 2 p.m. - Age 10-12

Frances Cheek is Rolesville Chamber Of Commerce Volunteer of the Year Frances Cheek of DDM Properties received the “Volunteer of the Year” Award at the Annual Rolesville Chamber of Commerce Awards Banquet in January. The annual event – held at Girasole Trattoria – also saw Upsell Mobile Marketing, owned by Rich Ponzio, pick up the “Business of the Year” honor, and Suzi Leasure of Geek RX receive the “Ambassador of the Year” Award. After a reception and silent auction, Chamber Executive director Jenny Rowe welcomed the attendees. Pastor Jeff Chappell of Word of Life Community Church gave the invocation. The group also heard remarks from Rolesville Mayor Frank Eagles, Past President Todd Allen and 2013 President Jackie Wilson. Special guest speaker for the occasion was Dan Scala with SCORE International, and teenage singer Kasey Tyndall provided entertainment. Rolesville Chamber officers and board of directors for 2013 include: Jackie Wilson, president (Granite Falls Swim & Athletic Club); Eddie McCabe, vice president (June-Neri Financial); Eugenia Pleasant, secretary (Restoration CDC); Michael Williard, treasurer (Michael Williard CPA); Todd Allen, past president (Wake Weekly); Mike Brown (Brown Insurance Group); Pam Burk (Sonic Drive-In); Frances Cheek, DDM Properties; Mitch Neal (Sonic Drive-In); and Rich Ponzio (Upcell Mobile Marketing); Sherwood Bobbitt (The Rolesville Buzz); Suzanne Cofer, StorageMax; and Mich McConchie, M&M Consultants.

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919 COMMUNITY ‹‹‹

Great Grass Giveaway Coming in April The Town of Wake Forest's 5th Annual "Great Grass Giveaway" begins at 7 a.m. on Saturday, April 27, at the Public Works Operations Center at 234 Friendship Chapel Road. The giveaway continues until the supply of Bermuda grass seed is exhausted. According to a release by event organizers, anyone wishing to take part in this popular event is strongly encouraged to arrive early because the supply of grass seed is limited (in 2012, the town distributed more than 1,200 lbs. of seed in less than two hours). The giveaway – for Wake Forest residents only – promotes the conversion to Bermuda lawns, because it requires less water than fescue (which many local lawns have in place), according to a release by town officials. Participants willing to convert from fescue to Bermuda will receive enough seed to cover up to an 8,000 sq. ft. area. No reservations are accepted for the event. For more information, contact Betty Pearce at 919-435-9570.

Police Officer Scott Graham Recognized by D.A.R.E Group Wake Forest Police Department Officer Scott Graham was named the “2012 North Carolina Ralph Robinson D.A.R.E. Officer of the Year.” The designation was made by the North Carolina D.A.R.E Officer's Association, following a nomination by the North Carolina D.A.R.E. Training Center Staff, according to a release from the Town of Wake Forest. Graham received the award at the 23rd Annual N.C. D.A.R.E Officers Association training conference in Wilmington earlier this year. “I am very thankful to work for a police department as well as a community full of parents, principals, teachers and businesses that all faithfully support our DARE Program,” said Graham. “It is a partnership and a true team effort that makes it work.” Graham has taught and graduated more than 1,000 elementary school students during his tenure as a D.A.R.E. instructor in Wake Forest-area schools. As a D.A.R.E. mentor, Graham also trains other police officers to become D.A.R.E. instructors. Since 2010, he has assisted in the training of more than 90 new D.A.R.E. officers in North Carolina.

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919 Magazine Planning All-Local, Glossy Publication Serving the Morrisville Area DreamLake Media, a Brier Creek-based media and communications company that publishes five local magazines in North Raleigh, plans to launch a new publication in April. 919 Magazine/Morrisville-RTP will be distributed six times a year to every residence and business in a specific geographic area in Northwest Wake County. Combined with the current 919 Magazine/Brier Creek, 919 Magazine/Wakefield Plantation-Falls Lake, 919 Magazine/Leesville-Creedmoor Road, 919 Magazine/ North Raleigh-Six Forks-Falls of Neuse and 919Magazine/ Wake Forest-Rolesville editions, the six publications circulate more than 107,000 issues along the I-540 Corridor and throughout the high-profile markets. Each edition of 919 Magazine includes informative features and articles, packaged in a vibrant, colorful, easyto-read glossy format. Saturation delivery of the new edition by the United States Postal Service will occur six times a year in the Morrisville-Research Triangle Park area – roughly south of I-540 to Cary Parkway and east of Highway 55 to I-40 (all of USPS Zip Code 27650). “In addition to the mail distribution to every single family home, condominium, apartment and business, additional copies of the new publication will be available on specialty racks placed in strategic locations throughout the high-demographic region,” said Publisher Suzy Beth Sarver, noting the expansion is the result of the overwhelmingly positive response to the first five editions of 919 Magazine that began distribution in May 2012 to the Brier Creek and Leesville areas. Deadline for advertising reservations and content submissions for the new edition is Monday, March 11. All six editions of 919 Magazine focus on people, events and activities in the specific area, featuring vibrant local photography, compelling articles by award-winning writers, and relevant information of vital interest to residents. For additional information on 919 Magazine’s six current editions, contact Sarver at 919-747-8785 or sbsarver@919Magazine.com.

March | April 2013

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››› 919 COMMUNITY Wake Forest HerbFest Features Organic Herbs, and Much More Wake Forest HerbFest is scheduled for two weekends in April in the downtown area. The event – a benefit for the Graham Johnson Cultural Arts Endowment, which provides money for arts programming in schools – will be April 19-21 and April 2628 at 525 S. White Street.

“It's probably the biggest outdoor herb sale in the southeast part of the country,” said Kathryn Spiegel, who is involved with the event. “The event features he largest selection of organically grown herb plants for sale. There are also organic vegetable plants, including numerous varieties of heirloom tomatoes available.”

Short Takes Tracie Sauers was promoted to principal at Harris Creek Elementary School, located in North Raleigh (south of Wake Crossroads at 3829 Forestville Road). Sauers was assistant principal at the school since 2010… Cory Lawrence, a serviceman with Wake Electric Membership Corp. in Wake Forest, finished 10th in the 12th Pole Top Rescue Competition last fall. Lawrence competed against 23 other electric cooperative line workers from across North Carolina. He is a Youngsville resident…Senior Code Enforcement Official Tim Edwards is the Town of Wake Forest Employee of the Year. An employee of the department since 2009, Edwards was nominated for the honor by his co-workers. Town Manager Mark Williams made the announcement at the city’s annual employee Christmas luncheon in December…Girl Scouts presented awards in January at Wake Forest Presbyterian Church. Bronze Awards went to Megan Rogers, Caitlyn Burkett, Savannah Blalock, Abbey Suzik, Anna Schulz and Nicole Rafferty of Troop 991; and Danielle Whitlock, Natalie Yehle, Jasmine Wilson-Johnson, and MacKenzie Bademian of Troop 596. Silver Awards were given to Lauren Epstein of Troop 894; Lauren Emer of Troop 981; Eliana Peters and Hannah Brown of Troop 1658; and Julianna Serpe of Troop 1335…Wake Forest Mayor Vivian Jones highlighted key 2012 accomplishments at her 2013 State of the Town Address in February at the Wake Forest Presbyterian Church. The event was presented by the Wake Forest Rotary Club…Members of the Wake Forest community celebrated the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in January at a special event at the Friendship Chapel Baptist Church. The event included a dinner and a performance by local students. Mayor Vivian Jones also spoke at the gathering.

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New Forest Moon Theater Plans First Production 2013 is a year of firsts for Forest Moon Theater. Incorporated in August 2012 by Bob Baird, executive director, and Cathy Gouge, artistic director, Forest Moon Theater is Wake Forest’s first community theater. This year, the theater will mark its first season as an active theater, first performance of the season in March, and first opening night. As theater professionals, Baird and Gouge felt it important to fill the void left by the absence of a local community theater in Wake Forest. “Students in our area have had few opportunities to act and assist with productions outside of the school environment, and adults who want to act or contribute in other ways had no opportunities in Wake Forest,” said Baird. Forest Moon Theater was established as a true community theater welcoming anyone with an interest to get involved, holding open auditions for every production, and inviting residents to enjoy an evening of live theater right here in Wake Forest. To make their dream a reality, Baird and Gouge, are working closely with the Wake Forest ARTS group – and plan to create an organizational structure that will survive and flourish and become a vital part of the performing arts scene in Wake Forest. Beginning with the staging of two productions this year, one in the spring and another in the fall, the founders strive to set the highest standards for the theater to ensure participants and attendees will come to expect great entertainment. Into the future, their plan is to expand the season to include four productions, one of them youth-oriented, and by the year 2015, to be operating a full-scale community theater with six productions or more, while offering educational workshops for students 919 Magazine WF

Colleen Ann Guest & Russell Gentry during a recent rehearsal and adults. Meanwhile, a major initiative for the group will be finding a permanent home for the theater, preferably in downtown Wake Forest. In order to achieve these goals, Forest Moon Theater, a non-profit entity, is actively seeking sponsorships from local businesses and donations from individuals who enjoy having a theater in Wake Forest. “Attending our productions, getting involved in our theater’s activities, and helping spread the word to friends and family will go a long way to helping us realize our

goal of establishing a vital community theater with a bright future,” said Baird. Academia Nuts opens on March 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Franklin Academy Middle School Theater (the school is not associated with Forest Moon Theater, which is renting the venue from the school for the production). Performances are March 21, 22, and 23 at 7:30 p.m. and March 24 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students and may be purchased online in advance at www.forestmoontheater. org or at the door prior to show time.

Betsy Richards & Russell Gentry practice their lines prior to a public performance

Forest Moon Theater Profile FOUNDERS: YEAR STARTED: WEBSITE: EMAIL: PHONE:

March | April 2013

Bob Baird and Cathy Gouge 2012 www.forestmoontheater.org bob@forestmoontheater.org 919-435-2022

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Wake Forest Rolesville High School

Spring Sports Preview Baseball HEAD COACH:

YEARS IN POSITION:

6

OTHER COACHES: N/A PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

FIRST GAME:

March 1, Keith Hills Golf Tournament

2012 RECORD:

5th Place in CAP 8

PLAYOFFS: N/A Kevin Lynch

HONORS:

Jake Britt (Graduated) finished tied for 7th place

YEARS IN POSITION: 7

in State Championship; Neville Burton

OTHER COACHES:

Steven Flowers, Robert Hoffman

(Junior) tied for 10th in State Championship

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

COACH’S OUTLOOK:

FIRST GAME:

Feb. 28 vs. vs. Durham Jordan

We are looking to compete this year in the CAP 8. Our goal is to advance

2012 RECORD:

13-9 overall; 7-7 conference (5th place)

to the regional tournament as a team. We are young, but ready.

PLAYOFFS:

Lost in 2nd round to Middle Creek

(eventual State Champs);

made playoffs for 2nd season in a row

HONORS:

4 players named to the All Conference team.

Softball HEAD COACH:

Doug Kinsman

YEARS IN POSITION: N/A OTHER COACHES: N/A

COACH’S OUTLOOK:

PRACTICE BEGINS: N/A

After graduating 11 from last season, I’m excited and a little nervous.

FIRST GAME: TBA

I have five returning starters, the rest will be newcomers to the varsity

2012 RECORD:

level. As a group they are very athletic, exciting to watch, and will continue

136-0 undefeated conference win streak since 2001

PLAYOFFS: N/A

the success that WFR baseball has had the last couple of seasons.

Men’s Track and Field

HONORS:

Co-conference player of the year,

Brittany Dahle

HEAD COACH:

Patrick Marshall

COACH’S OUTLOOK:

YEARS IN POSITION:

5 (Men’s team); First year (Women’s team)

We look for a great year. With seven returning starters and co-conference

OTHER COACHES:

Geoff Belcher, Rodney Ray,

player of the year, Brittany Dahle, returning to the mound, it ought to be another

Katie Quigley, Kristen Eure, Chris Love

spectacular year. We are still riding a 136-0 undefeated conference win streak

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

that dates back all the way to 2001 – 11 straight conference championships.

FIRST GAME:

March 6 vs. Heritage High

Players to watch are Delane Smith (Junior), a second basemen; Anna Wolfe

2012 RECORD:

7th place in CAP 8

(Sophomore), a right fielder; Ryan Kosatandin (Senior), a short stop; Katy Holt

PLAYOFFS: N/A

(Sophomore), a 1st basemen; and Allison Scarboro(Senior), a centerfielder.

HONORS:

County Champion in both 100m and 400m

(Bryce Love); 7th place, 100m dash at 4A State Meet

(Petey Williams); 2nd place at County championship

(Men’s 4x100m relay)

COACH’S OUTLOOK: We are returning a very strong sprint squad this year and have also improved in the other events. It is my expectation that we will be a strong competitor in the CAP 8 conference this season.

Men’s Tennis HEAD COACH:

Cyndi Keller

YEARS IN POSITION:

First year

Women’s Track and Field HEAD COACH:

Geoff Belcher

YEARS IN POSITION: 4 OTHER COACHES: N/A PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

FIRST GAME:

March 6 vs. Heritage High

2012 RECORD:

Won one dual meet. Because team is small

team and does not fill enough events ,

focus is on individual races

OTHER COACHES: N/A PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13/14 tryouts (practices begin Feb. 15)

FIRST GAME:

Feb. 27 vs. Heritage

2012 RECORD: N/A PLAYOFFS: N/A HONORS: N/A COACH’S OUTLOOK: I am really looking forward to building this program and working with the boys. Focus will be on team building through the individual sport, physicality through endurance, and mental perseverance.

Men’s Golf HEAD COACH:

36

919 Magazine WF

Justin Richards

March | April 2013

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Heritage High School

Spring Sports Preview Men’s Golf

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

FIRST GAME:

March 1 vs. East Wake

2012 RECORD:

9-10

PLAYOFFS:

0-1; made first round of playoffs

HONORS:

First playoff appearance; finished 4th

in CAP 8 Conference; Named four to All Conference team

HEAD COACH:

Herbert Nowak

COACH’S OUTLOOK:

YEARS IN POSITION:

4

As we enter our third year as a softball program, we are all excited about what

OTHER COACHES: N/A

is happening at Heritage. This will be our first year with a senior class, so we

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

are looking forward to having some senior leadership. We are looking for our

FIRST GAME:

CAP 8 Match, Heritage Golf Club; March 5

returning sophomores and some incoming freshmen to play key roles for us this

2012 RECORD:

Fifth place

year. Our goals are to have the first winning season for the program, be in the

PLAYOFFS: N/A

top of our conference standings, and advance to second round of playoffs.

HONORS:

Camden Todd selected

CAP 8 All Conference

COACH’S OUTLOOK: Our team will be very competitive in our conference this year. We hope to make the state playoffs as a team this year.

Men’s Lacrosse

Men’s Tennis HEAD COACH:

Greg Kasse

YEARS IN POSITION:

3

OTHER COACHES:

John Fisher

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

FIRST GAME:

Against Wake Forest (date N/A)

HEAD COACH:

James Riedel

YEARS IN POSITION:

3

PLAYOFFS: N/A

OTHER COACHES:

Ken Fitzsimmons, Kenny Batch, Jay Boriotti

HONORS: N/A

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

COACH’S OUTLOOK:

FIRST GAME:

Feb. 28 vs Holly Springs;

Looking for our best and first winning season.

2012 RECORD: N/A

2012 RECORD: 3-11

Track and Field

PLAYOFFS: N/A HONORS:

Chris Lockard 2nd team All Conference;

Cameron Secoura, Honorable Mention

All Conference; James Riedel,

NC Lacrosse Person of the Year

COACH’S OUTLOOK: We will continue to work on our fundamental development and improve our lacrosse IQ. Our team has a great work ethic and motivation to improve the quality of their game.

Baseball

HEAD COACH:

Wallace Clark

YEARS IN POSITION:

4

OTHER COACHES:

Billy Williams, Lessie Epps, Anisha Andrews-Williams,

Matt Goodwin, Michael Roth, Brian Addo

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 14

FIRST GAME:

East Wake (date N/A)

2012 RECORD: N/A PLAYOFFS: N/A HONORS: N/A COACH’S OUTLOOK:

HEAD COACH:

Tony Piercy

YEARS IN POSITION:

3 (10 years total)

instructions and be able to compete within our Conference (CAP 8). We also

OTHER COACHES:

Dave Cunningham,

want every athlete to reach their personal record (PR). Last year we had 2

Thomas Ferrara, Kenny Walters

relay teams make it to the 4A East Regionals, and this year we as a staff would

PRACTICE BEGINS:

Feb. 13

like to have all relays teams make it in, along with individuals events.

FIRST GAME:

Feb. 27 vs. W. Johnston

2012 RECORD: 9-15

Our outlook as a staff and track program is for our athletes to get the best

Women’s Lacrosse HEAD COACH:

PLAYOFFS: N/A HONORS:

All-Conference: Gage Novaria,

Jacob Quintal; Honorable Mention:

Hunter Davis, Kevin Kirkley;

CAP 8 Rookie of the Year: Jacob Quintal

Amy Farley

COACH’S OUTLOOK: Excited about having our first senior class. We are looking forward to seeing the results of three years worth of building a program from scratch. The sky is the limit for these young men.

Softball HEAD COACH:

Paige Brantley Quate

YEARS IN POSITION:

3

OTHER COACHES:

Katie Nock, Frank Brantley

Let’s Go Huskies! 919 Magazine WF

March | April 2013

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37


››› 919 FIELD TRIP

Civil War History, Only a Short Drive from Wake Forest It was a simple farmhouse, but it was situated precariously between Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s headquarters in Greensboro and Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s headquarters in Raleigh. And, in April 1865, the two commanders met at the Bennett Place, where they signed surrender papers for Southern armies in the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida. It was the largest troop surrender of the American Civil War. Today, the Bennett Place in Durham is fully reconstructed and restored to its 1865 condition, is free for visitors to tour, and is only about 40 minutes or less from most parts of Wake Forest. The Bennett home consists of three fully furnished rooms, including the parlor where the generals met to bring an end to the war. The kitchenhouse is fully furnished as it would have been in 1865 – and a smokehouse and gardens add to the 1865 appearance.

The Visitor Center contains a museum gallery of three rooms of exhibits, telling the story of the Bennett Family and the events encompassing the largest surrender of the war. Military weaponry, farm tools and other Civil War artifacts are part of the collection on display. In addition, the Everett-Thissen Research Library contains more than 1,000 books, periodicals, and documents relating to the Civil War and the Bennett Family. A theater shows a short orientation film. The Bennett Place Support Fund operates a gift shop inside the Visitor Center, with all proceeds going to funding the education programs, preservation and maintenance of the park. Visitors can shop for books, mugs, prints, puzzles, magnets, ornaments, flags, toys, pottery, soaps, candies and more. Also at the site: The Unity Monument, dedicated in 1923, is the premiere monument dedicated to peace and the reunification of the United States; the

Bennett Place Profile HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE: Site of the surrender of Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Union Gen. William T. Sherman, the largest and final surrender of the American Civil War. ADDRESS: 4409 Bennett Memorial Rd., Durham PHONE: 919-383-4345 EMAIL: bennett@ncdcr.gov WEBSITE: www.nchistoricsites.org/bennett/ ADMISSION: Free; donations accepted HOURS: 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday

Information Courtesy Bennett Place 38

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Morgan Bench Memorial, recognizing the contributions made by the Morgan family to preserve Bennett Place as a historic landmark; and the bandstand brought to the park in 1924 by the Durham Rotary Club. The site includes walking trails, where visitors can view plant life and wildlife. Benches and boardwalks built by Eagle Scouts and staff provide places to rest and cross remnants of the Ellerbe Creek. A picnic area provides visitors a respite to enjoy a meal or snack with friends and family. Throughout the year a variety of living history events take place, including the commemorative anniversary event recognizing the surrender. Other activities include Union Occupation, Road To Secession, Tarheels: Soldiers of the Old North State, Planting the Fields, and Christmas in the Carolinas During the Civil War. Visitors are welcome to join

guided tours for a stroll down the original Hillsborough Road and into the farm structures, listening to stories of the two great generals’ meeting. Tours are typically on the hour beginning at 10 a.m., Union Gen. William Sherman (left) with the last tour of & Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston the day beginning at 4 p.m. (except during daylight savings time, when the last tour begins at 3 p.m. Guided tours last between 30 minutes to one hour. Visitors are also provided a site brochure map, which they can tour the farm on their own if they have limited time with us. The site is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., TuesdaySaturday. No admission is charged. Bennett Place is located at 4409 Bennett Memorial Road in Durham.

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Visit Wake Audiology to learn and experience what the latest technology can mean for you and your family. We offer hearing aids from most leading manufacturers including: • Oticon • Phonak • Siemens • Resound • Widex • Unitron •

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Doctor of Audiology

1954 South Main Street ~ Wake Forest, NC

919-570-8311 ~ www.wakeaudiology.com Accepting Most Insurance Plans. Financing offered through Care Credit and CitiHealth.

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Record Crowd Enjoys HHS Performances; ‘Hairspray’ Set for May In a magical kingdom fathoms below sea level, the beautiful young mermaid Ariel longs to leave her ocean home to live in the world above. But first, she’ll have to defy her father King Triton, make a deal with the evil sea witch Ursula, and convince Prince Eric that she’s the girl with the enchanting voice. This timeless tale of The Little Mermaid Jr., produced and staged by the Heritage High School Theater Department and directed by Bryan Phoebus, was recently enjoyed by more than 1,500 people over the course of four performances – making it the mostattended production in the short history of HHS.

Over 30 talented cast members, crew, and volunteers overcame a number of obstacles to ensure the successful run. “The costumes were a tremendous challenge,” said Phoebus. “With a large cast and with multiple costumes, costuming was a major issue.” Phoebus credited parent volunteer, Jodi Craddock, and her daughters, Bailey and Lexi, for their invaluable contributions behind the scenes to support the show. And, if costuming weren’t challenging enough, Mother Nature decided to attend in full force a few days before the opening making the last tech rehearsals all that more important. Next up for this talented high school group is a tremendous production of the fun loving, crowdpleasing Hairspray to take to the stage at the Heritage High School Theater, with 7 p.m. show times on May 22, 23, 24, and 25, as well as a 2 p.m. matinee show on May 25. For more information, please visit www.heritagehstheater.com.

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How to Avoid Computer Backup Problems If you have important data stored on a computer, you probably already have a backup solution. These tips will help keep your backup system running smoothly.

Are all important files backed up?

Can you restore your data?

Backup programs intelligently scan for the files you need backed up. Great when it works; painful when it does not. The most common files missed are QuickBooks files since they are stored in an unusual place. Solution: Most software allows you to manually specify which files to back up. Know where your critical files are stored and make sure they are included.

Backups are no good if you can’t get your data back. Solution: Learn how to perform a restore with your software and test it on your most critical files at least once a quarter.

How long can you afford to be down?

Can you afford for your computer to be unavailable for days in the event of a disk failure? If you only backup your files and not the programs, then it will take time and money to rebuild the computer back to a point where you can even restore your files. Solution: Tools such as Acronis True Image (Windows) or Time Machine (Mac) can restore the entire computer and get you running quickly.

Are your backups successful?

It is not good enough to create a backup solution one time and assume it keeps working forever. Solution: Learn how your software reports success or failure and check it weekly.

About the Author Brad Waybright President

Computer Troubleshooters of Wake Forest/North Raleigh 3331 Heritage Trade Drive Suite 101, Wake Forest, NC 27587 919-229-8006 | www.CTWakeForest.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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››› 919 REGION Speeds Along I-540 in North Raleigh Increase to 70 mph Following a request from the Regional Transportation Alliance – a non-profit business group that lobbies for road and transit improvements – the North Carolina Department of Transportation is raising the speed limit on I-540 between Brier Creek and Knightdale. The 21-mile stretch of I-540 between U.S. Highway 70 and U.S. 64/264 will now have a 70 mph speed limit (compared to the previous 65 mph limit). DOT engineers evaluated current speeds on the freeway, crash data and road conditions in considering the change.

First African-American Woman Chief Named for Raleigh Police Cassandra Deck-Brown is the new chief of the Raleigh Police Department. The department’s first African-American woman in the senior position, Deck-Brown replaces Harry Patrick Dolan, who retired last fall. She was the RPD’s deputy chief since 2011, after attending the Raleigh Police Academy and joining the department in 1987. Deck-Brown was promoted to captain in 2003, and commanded what is now the North District extending along the Six Forks and Falls of Neuse corridors. She also directed the department’s Administrative Services Division. Deck-Brown, 49, is the sister-in-law of former RPD Chief Mitchell Brown. After growing up in Franklin County, NC, she graduated from East Carolina University with a degree in criminal justice.

911 Misdials Causing Significant Problems

Raleigh Police Memorial Foundation 5th Annual Run For Our Heroes April 27 Raleigh Police Memorial Foundation’s 5th Annual Run for Our Heroes 5K race begins at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 27 near the Raleigh Municipal Building downtown on Hargett Street. All proceeds from the race go to the foundation's fund to build a memorial to the eight Raleigh Police officers who lost their lives in the line of duty. A ceremonial wreath-laying to honor the sacrifice and lives of the fallen officers will be at 8:30 a.m. in Nash Square, across Hargett Street from the Avery C. Upchurch Government Complex and the former Raleigh Police Department's headquarters.

For 2012, the number of calls to 911 rose 18 percent, and the city of Raleigh blames the increase on an alarming rise in misdials and hangups caused by the new 10-digit dialing requirement. Instead of dialing the area code 919, a city release indicated that callers are mistakenly dialing 9-1-1 and hanging up. Misdials and hang-up calls divert resources away from actual emergencies since dispatchers must call back on hang-ups to assure that an emergency is not taking place. If no response is received from the call-back, dispatchers send a police officer to the source of the call to make certain that no assistance is needed. Total 911 calls to the Raleigh/Wake Emergency Communications Center in 2012 increased to 601,059 in 2012 – compared to 509,171 in 2011. Ten-digit dialing became mandatory in the area in late March. Hang-up calls requiring police dispatch have almost tripled from 2011 to 2012. In 2011, there were close to 17,500 hang-up calls. In 2012 that number soared to 52,160, which required more than 30,000 police officers dispatch calls.

The 5K race/walk follows a certified course in downtown Raleigh. After the Hargett Street start, the race proceeds up Salisbury Street to Lenoir Street, down Fayetteville Street around the State Capitol, to Franklin Street, up Blount Street, and then back into the downtown area where the race finishes in front of the City Employee Memorial on Hargett Street. At 10 a.m., the McGruff Crime Dog 100-Yard Kids' Dash begins at Nash Square. The dash is for children ages 10 and younger, and has a $5 entry fee. A free social for event participants will follow the race at Napper Tandy's Restaurant, 126 North West Street. The eight fallen police officers and the dates of there deaths are: Tom Crabtree, Sept. 1, 1922; Robert Sparks, March 8, 1968; James Lee, Dec. 5, 1968; James Allen, Dec. 5, 1968; D.D. Adams, Feb. 3, 1980; Denise Holden, Aug. 4, 1995; Paul Hale, July 11, 1997; and Charles Paul, Sept. 10, 2002. For more information or to register for the events, visit www.runforourheroes.org. For more information on the RPMF, visit www.rpdmemorial.wordpress.com

Audubon Conducts Annual Bird Count at 8 Raleigh Parks From December 14 through January 5, groups of dedicated Audubon volunteers ventured out in Raleigh to count and identify birds for Audubon Society’s 113th Annual Christmas Bird Count included local volunteers surveying at a number of Raleigh parks, including Anderson Point, Lake Johnson, Lake Wheeler, Shelley Lake, Durant Nature Park, Horseshoe Farm Park, Wilkerson, and Lake Benson. The Bird Count – conducted Dec. 14-Jan. 5 – also took place on greenway trails, including the Buckeye Trail and Walnut Creek Trail. The Christmas Bird Count is a wildlife census started on Christmas Day in 1900 by ornithologist Frank Chapman. The event, combined with other surveys, provides a picture of how the continent's bird populations have changed in time and space over the past hundred years. For a complete list of birds seen at each Raleigh park site, visit the Audubon website "Data and Research" section at www.birds.audubon.org/data-research. To learn more about the Wake Audubon Society, which has been a partner with Raleigh Parks and Recreation for more than

42 919 Magazine WF 10 years, visit their website at www.wakeaudubon.org/anderson_point_park.htm.

March | April 2013

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Index of Advertisers

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919 Magazine: Brier Creek Edition

• Brier Creek 4th Grader Kathie Galbo wins Spotlight Award • Vince Guaglione shares his personal journey in a new book • Kenneth Lesher making a difference at elementary school • Brier Creek’s Penn family finds a true home in North Raleigh

919 Magazine: Leesville Edition

Submit your favorite local photo of family, friends, events, pets or anything else for possible publication in Yearbook section. Email: info@919Magazine.com

• Sycamore Creek 4th Grader Josh Phillips Compassionate, Enthusiastic • Leesville Road Cheer coach credits dedication, leadership for winning ways • After a rewarding teaching career, Frankie Petty delighted with new roles • Kira Stewart helps build a healthier, more active Leesville community

Submit Events and Activities

919 Magazine: North Raleigh Edition

Submit Photos

• Ravenscroft Junior Jessica Kittelberger’s state golf championship is only part of her accomplishments. • KRAL television reporter Kevin Holmes calls North Raleigh home. • Blessed with a beautiful voice, 14-year-old KK Fritsch is already an accomplished performer. • Sanderson High School student Allison Kittinger wins Hopeline contest for new Teen TalkLine logo design.

Submit information about events and activities at your school, church, club or organization. Email: events@919Magazine.com

Recommend A Family, Student or Volunteer

919 Magazine: Wakefield/Falls Lake Edition

Nominate a local family, a student or a volunteer for a possible future feature article. Email: info@919Magazine.com

• A look at the Kerr Family YMCA, which serves Wakefield Plantation and Wake Forest • Former Wakefield High School football star Connor Mitch graduates early, heads to University of South Carolina • An intriguing profile of the Davenport Family in Wakefield Plantation. • Local volunteer Thomas Walter talks about why he devotes time to his community.

Submit a Recipe

Share your favorite family recipe for possible publication. Email: info@919Magazine.com

Lets Be Friends! Like 919 Magazine on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter and Foursquare.

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Jack and Jill of America Works to Develop Young Leaders

By STEPHANIE FRIEDL 919 Magazine Writer

Jack and Jill of America is an organization Tene Williams, of Wakefield Plantation, holds near and dear to her heart. Williams, wife and mother of two, currently serves on the executive board as corresponding secretary for the Capital City chapter of this nationwide organization. Founded in 1938 in Philadelphia by Marion Stubbs Thomas and Louise Truitt Drench, today, Jack and Jill of America is comprised of 220 chapters in 35 states and the District of Columbia, representing over 30,000 family members. The core of the Jack and Jill of America philosophy is that every child – if given the proper guidance

Tene Williams Profile

and opportunity – can be developed into a leader. Together, the mothers of Capital City plan and execute programs dedicated to encouraging cultural consciousness, raising test scores, and instilling moral and social responsibility in youth, all guided under the national theme, “Power and Potential; Parents Empowering Youth.” With an undergraduate degree in elementary education from Morgan State University and a M.Ed. from Loyola College in Balitmore, Williams is also a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., loves to scrapbook, is an amateur photographer, and spends the rest of her free time attending her sons’ swim meets, basketball tournaments, and football games. Her greatest joy comes from her husband, James, and sons Jaedon (12, Ravenscroft School)

AGE: 38 RESIDENCE: Glenstone at Wakefield Plantation PROFESSION: Mom/Educator FAMILY: Spouse, James; two sons, Jaedon (12, Ravenscroft School) Christopher (10, Ravenscroft School) INTERESTS: Swimming, scrapbooking, reading

and Christopher (10, Ravenscroft School), who she said bring her insurmountable joy. “My husband and two sons are the highlight of my day,” said Williams. “Their smiles, laughter, jokes and overall attitudes toward life keep me laughing at the dinner table and thanking God for them every day.” Fresh off the heels of their hugely successful Breakfast with Santa fundraiser in 2012, the Capital City chapter of Jack and Jill of America is already off to a successful 2013. Having just returned from celebrating the Inauguration of President Obama in Washington, D.C., mothers, fathers, teens, and children plan to continue making a difference in the community through events including Wake County’s MLK Day of Service, March of Dimes Walk for Babies, “On the Hill Legislative Summit” teen conference in D.C., and beautifying The Haven House for Women and Children, just to name a few. For more information on the Raleigh-Wake Chapter of Jack and Jill, visit www.jackandjillraleigh.org.

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››› 919 FINAL BELL Raleigh Ranks 7th Best Run City 24/7 Wall St. placed Raleigh seventh on its list of the 10 best run cities in America. The ranking looked at the cities’ credit rating, violent crime per 1,000 people and unemployment rate. Top spot on the list went to Dallas suburb, Plano, TX, followed by Madison, WI; Irvine, CA; Lincoln, NE; Fremont, CA; and Seattle, WA. After Raleigh in the rankings were Virginia Beach, VA; Austin, TX; and Scottsdale, AZ. SOURCE: 24/7 Wall St.

Triangle’s BEST?

3 Local Hotels Among The South’s Top Spots Conde Nast magazine’s list of 50 bet hotels in the South includes three properties in the Triangle, but only one in the top 10. Readers of the travel publication chose The Ferrington House in Pittsboro as No. 2 on the prestigious list, followed by the Umstead Hotel & Spa in Cary at No. 18, and the Washington Duke Inn & Golf Club in Durham at No. 44. 21c Hotel in Louisville, KY, topped the list. SOURCE: Conde Nast magazine

Raleigh Ranked Among Top Cities for IT Jobs Raleigh is tenth on CIO.com’s ranking of Best Cities for Information Technology Jobs in 2013. The rankings are based on internal data from Modis, a global provider of IT staffing and recruiting services, via its national regional branch network. The list factors in projected IT job opportunities based on the volume of job openings over the past six months as well as general assessment of the overall economic environment in each market. CIO.com stated the following as its reasoning for placing Raleigh on its top 10 list: “With the Research Triangle Park, Raleigh has become a major player in research and an epicenter of tech innovation inside the U.S. The tech-friendly community boasts opportunities with biotech, pharmaceuticals, software development, medical devices and insurance companies.” According to Modis, Raleigh is becoming a hub for tech companies and a model on “how to do things right in the tech space.” San Francisco topped the rankings. Charlotte took the sixth slot. SOURCE: CIO.com

America's Most Family-Friendly City?

RALEIGH!

Raleigh is the most family-friendly city in the U.S., according to the Human Life Project. Other cities in the top 10 included Oklahoma City, OK; Omaha, NE; Charlotte, NC; Fort Worth, TX; Colorado Springs, CO; Albuquerque, NM; Wichita, KS; Austin, TX; Seattle, WA. The Human Life Project promotes that cities work proactively on identifying and reversing negative trends before they become big problems and to build a lasting legacy by investing in families. SOURCE: Human Life Project

Raleigh 4th Fastest Growing City in 2012

Forbes magazine’s new listing for America’s Fastest Growing Cities in 2012 placed Raleigh in the fourth spot. Using several metrics from Moody’s Analytics data, Forbes referred to Raleigh as “the boomtown” on the list and cited the Research Triangle Park, the presence of major corporations, and numerous universities and colleges as factors stoking the city’s robust engine. Three Texas cities claimed the top three spots on the fastest growing list. Austin claimed the top spot for the third year in a row. Houston was second and Dallas third. SOURCE: Forbes magazine

120.7 MPH GUST A 120.7 mph wind gust was recorded atop North Carolina’s Grandfather Mountain during a December 2012 storm. The big blow broke the 114.7 mph state record set in 2011. 46 919 Magazine WF March | April 2013

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919 Magazine Zone 5, Issue 2