Issuu on Google+

ar·chi·tec·ture [är’kĭ-těk’chər] n. 1. The art and science of designing and erecting buildings. 2. A style and method of design and construction. lan·guage [lāng’gwĭj] n. 1. the suggestion by objects, actions, or conditions of associated ideas or feelings 2. any set or system of such symbols as used in a more or less uniform fashion by a number of people, who are thus enabled to communicate intelligibly with one another. 3. any system of formalized symbols, signs, sounds, gestures, or the like used or conceived as a means of communicating thought, emotion, etc. con·cept [kŏn’sěpt’] n. 1. A general idea derived or inferred from specific instances or occurrences. 2. Something formed in the mind; a thought or notion. 3. A scheme; a plan. de·sign [dĭ-zīn’] v. 1. To conceive or fashion in the mind; invent. 2. To formulate a plan for; devise. 3. To plan out in systematic, usually graphic form. ex·pe·ri·ence [ĭk-spîr’ē-əns] n. 1. The apprehension of an object, thought, or emotion through the senses or mind. 2. Active participation in events or activities, leading to the accumulation of knowledge or skill. 3. The knowledge or skill so derived. ab·stract [āb-strākt’] adj. 1. Having an intellectual and affective artistic content that depends solely on intrinsic form rather than on narrative content or pictorial representation. 2. Thought of or stated without reference to a specific instance. di·chot·o·my [dī-kŏt’ə-mē] n. 1. Division into two usually contradictory parts or opinions. 2. division into two mutually exclusive, opI have learned that architecture is anorintricate that without posed, or contradictory groups. space [spās] n. 1. An extent expanselanguage of a surface or three-dimensional area. form exploration through design is nothing more than a disjointed array [fôrm] n. 1. The shape and structure of an object. 2. The mode in which a thing exists, acts, or manifests itself; kind. My architectural education not onlyn.has revealed 3. Behavior accordingofto definitions. a fixed or accepted standard. func·tion [fŭngk’shən] 1. The action for which a person or to me the true2.power of duty that orlanguage but also glimpses a thing is particularly fitted or employed. Assigned activity. pub·lic [pŭb’lĭk] adj. 1.into Of, concerning, or affecting of inquiry tocommunity. exploring throughout the community or the personal people 2. line Maintained for orthat usedI look by theforward people or pri·vate [prī’vĭt] adj. 1. Secluded my career. The following is a documentation my first steps…. from the sight, presence, or intrusion of others. 2. Designed or intended forofone’s exclusive use. tex·ture [těks’chər] n. 1. A structure of interwoven fibers or other elements. 2. The appearance and feel of a surface. 3. Distinctive or iden“The architect who combines in his being the powers of vision, of imagination, of intellect, of tifying quality or character. [rĭ-lā’shən-shĭp’] n. 1. The or fact of being sympathyre·la·tion·ship with human need and the power to interpret them in acondition language vernacular and time---related; connection or is he who shall create poems stone.” - Louis Sullivan or facts that surround a particular event, situation, association. con·text [kŏn’těkst’] n. 1. the inset of circumstances etc. 2. The circumstances in which an event occurs; a setting. pas·sion [pāsh’ən] n . 1. A powerful emotion, such as love, joy, hatred, or anger. 2. Boundless enthusiasm. di·a·logue [dī’ə-lôg’, -lŏg’] n. 1. An exchange of ideas or opinions. con·nec·tion [kə-něk’shən] n. 1. A relation between things or events. 2. Association with or development of something observed, imagined, discussed, etc. cre·a·tiv·i·ty [krē-ā’tĭv-ĭ-tē] n. 1. Having the ability or power to create. 2. Characterized by originality and expressiveness; imaginative. proc·ess [prŏs’ěs’] n. 1. A series of actions, changes, or functions bringing about a result. 2. A series of operations performed in the making or treatment of a product. pro·voc·a·tive [prə-vŏk’ə-tĭv] adj. 1. Tending to provoke or stimulate. in·ter·ac·tion [ĭn’tər-āk’shən] n. 1. reciprocal action, effect, or influence. prec·e·dent [prěs’ĭ-dənt] n. 1. An act or instance that may be used as an example in dealing SELECTED WORKS with subsequent similar instances. 2. Convention or custom arising from long practice. pro·por·tion [prə-pôr’shən] n. 1. A part considered in relation to the whole. 2. A relationship between things or parts of things with respect to comparative magnitude, quantity, or degree. art [ahrt] n. 1. the quality, production, expression, or realm, according to aesthetic principles, of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance. mo·ment [mō’mənt] n. 1.

DEREK LARSEN


de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

D

I

S

C

O

V

E

R

E

U

M

Location: Chicago, IL Facility Type: Museum Project Size: 86,385 square feet Construction: Poured and reinforced concrete pier and slab system Building Height: 6 stories

In an age where meaningful moments are the product of something extraordinary and complex, this project attempts to readdress the experience of architecture through simplicity in physical presence and materiality.

Entry

Moments of the building’s physical presence experienced by the user are created by exploring the ideas of surface interaction and active human participation. The object is to lend the building as an instrument for human activity and emotion to create meaningful experiences through the idea of physical presence. By proposing a series of open-ended opportunities, there is no one finite engagement to the user. Architecture then becomes a catalyst of presence and experience based on human interaction. Atrium


Physical Model

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 2-3


Ground Morphology

Taking into account the “L�, the subway exit, local public transportation and pedestrian traffic, basic patterns of circulation were studied. From these patterns, a terrain was formed around main flows of circulation.

With the basic shape of the ground formed, the entrances of the museum are located on the site while being conscience of the circulation flows. A set of piloti are dropped onto the site to hover the building just above the topography.

The final product is an elevated building with an inviting public space underneath. Patrons are enticed to walk through this space and underneath the building toward the entrance. The morphed terrain directs traffic and creates slopes that bring patrons into the building.


Underside of building

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 4-5


The main form of the building is derived from the ground morphology. A set of piloti raise the building from the topography. The building begins as a generic box on top of the columns.

Then, the inside of the building is carved away. An atrium space springs from the entry to the skylight. On each floor the atrium carves its way into the main spaces to create an interesting relationship of protruding and recessed floors. The atrium utilizes convective air currents to exhaust heat during the summer and maintain comfort during the winter.


EARLY CHILDHOOD ARTABOUNDS

DIG ZONE PLAY IT SAFE

QUIET TIME

INVENTING LAB MY MUSEUM

URBAN GARDENS

SKYLINE

OFFICE

CLIMBING TOWNSQUARE

RESTAURANTRETAIL

TEMP EXHIBIT

Section growth

The building program is then placed inside this form. Each space is located in the building based on elevation, light, and views to the exterior. Some spaces have specific height requirements as well. The spaces push back and forth within the form to create a diagrammatic section. From this diagram, the circulation, section, and plan of the building were formed.

The exterior of the building is applied next. With the atrium and programmatic spaces placed inside of the building, lighting and visual expectations are accounted for. Boxes of varying sizes penetrate the skin to allow views to the exterior and natural light. Where more light or views are necessary, the boxes grow in size and frequency.

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 6-7


20

19 17

18 14

13

12

9

4

3

2

24

1


1- TOWNSQUARE 2- CAFE 3- RETAIL 4- RESTAURANT 5- MECHANICAL 6- TICKETS

7- CLIMBING WALL 8- MULTI-PURPOSE 9- PLAY IT SAFE 10- MY MUSEUM 11- MY GALLERY 12- OFFICE

13- CONSTRUCTION ZONE 14- DIG SITE 15-SCIENCE PLAYGROUND 16- TEMPORARY EXHIBIT 17- CHICAGO SKYLINE 18- QUIET TIME

19- ART ABOUNDS 20- EARLY CHILDHOOD 21- URBAN GARDENS 22- STORAGE 23- TOILETS 24- LOADING DOCK

21

17

12

16

23

22

1

24

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 8-9


4 5

4

10

23 9

6 3 7

11

2

23 8

1

0

1

22

1

22

2


14

20

22

15 13

19

7

18

16

16

12

3

1- TOWNSQUARE 2- CAFE 3- RETAIL 4- RESTAURANT 5- MECHANICAL 6- TICKETS

17

17

4

7- CLIMBING WALL 8- MULTI-PURPOSE 9- PLAY IT SAFE 10- MY MUSEUM 11- MY GALLERY 12- OFFICE

21

21

5

13- CONSTRUCTION ZONE 14- DIG SITE 15-SCIENCE PLAYGROUND 16- TEMPORARY EXHIBIT 17- CHICAGO SKYLINE 18- QUIET TIME

ROOF

19- ART ABOUNDS 20- EARLY CHILDHOOD 21- URBAN GARDENS 22- STORAGE 23- TOILETS 24- LOADING DOCK

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 10-11


OFFER VIEW

OCCUPY SPACE PROVIDE DISPLAY

Facade Detail

Section model

Human interaction plays a major role in the experience of the museum. The blocks that penetrate the facade vary in size and depth, depending on their intended use. The larger penetrations offer a space to occupy the skin of the building. Once in this space, the user leaves the building and is solely occupying the skin. The physical sense of the building is left behind. Other boxes offer views to the exterior and allow light to enter the building. The smaller boxes provide display cases and shelves to showcase artwork created by the children.

Model Detail


Play-It-Safe

Human interaction within the programmatic space is essential to the overall architectural experience of the museum. Throughout the museum there are opportunities for the user to direct interact with the architecture which surrounds them. For instance, the Play It Safe Zone is an area in which children and parents can take a break from the excitement of the exhibits. The austere

Artabounds

room is covered in memory foam, which dampens noise creating a calm space. The memory foam is also located on the floor so that children can run around and see their footprints interact with the floor. The Artabounds exhibit challenges creative minds to work on a media usually forbidden. The walls of this space are covered with a sheet of

Restaurant

paper dispensed on a roller, keeping the children continuously supplied with the means to create beautiful masterpieces. The museum restaurant is also an area that provokes feelings through surface interaction. The flooring of the restaurant mimics the pattern of a picnic blanket, bringing the family picnic indoors all year-round.

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 12-13


JAZZ CONCERT AND EDUCATION CENTER Location: Paris, France Facility Type: Music performance venue and community education Project Size: 3,600 square meters Construction: Reinforced concrete Building Height: 4 stories

Rue de Lyon Paris, France

Jazz music is a live and always changing music style. Many masters have come along through its history and each has given his own take and special twist on the music. Jazz has, from its early 20th century inception, spawned a variety of subgenres, from New Orleans Dixieland dating from the early 1910s, big bandstyle swing from the 1930s and 1940s, bebop from the mid-1940s, a variety of Latin-jazz fusions such as Afro-Cuban and Brazilian jazz from the 1950s and 1960s, jazz-rock fusion from the 1970s and later developments such as acid jazz.

With Jazz music being an ever-changing spirit taking on many different shades of blue, why should its venue not also be a lively spirit, changing and morphing into moods and moments in time? The building should be as adaptable as the music that houses it. This building is not a stagnant sentinel; on the contrary, it is an adaptable organism that is as flexible and diverse as the music it houses.

Physical model


MUSIC = Architecture

MELODY = PLAN The melody of music is the horizontal understanding of the notes. This is comparable to the floor plan of a building. The floor plan is the driving force to the horizontal relationships among spaces.

“I call architecture frozen music.” Wolfgang von Goethe

-Johann

Music, much like architecture, is based on mathematical proportions. When certain proportions between notes are achieved, a pleasing combination of notes create extraordinary masterpieces. There are number of known proportions that are agreed to be pleasing to the ear. The triad is this combination and to create jazz music it becomes the triad plus the seventh note in a major scale.

Plan diagram

Section model

Physical model de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 14-15


Exploded axonometric with proportions


de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 16-17


HARMONY = Section Harmony is the vertical stacking of notes. The right combination of notes will create a chord. This idea is closely related to the sectional proportions of a building. The section of the jazz club was based on the proportions of the triad plus the seventh.

C B

A D

Divided by 7 Divided by 7

C

B A

D

D

D

Divided by 5

Divided by 5

Divided by 3

Divided by 3


RHYTHM = Function Rhythm refers to the time and length of musical notes. It also plays a role in how a note is played, whether short or long. In reference to architecture, the function of a space is related to time. During the day, or throughout a year, a room can take on many different roles. The exhibition space, practice hall, and the cafeteria are spaces that have dynamic functions based on a variety of time frames. Exhibition space set up for a jazz exhibit

Exhibition space set up for a classical exhibit

TIMBRE = Materiality Timbre describes the way certain instruments sound when played. This is much like the properties of materials in a building. The use of wood in the music hall is for acoustics and aesthetics. Glass and metal allow for openness and the feeling of freedom. Materials also react to light differently, such as the metal screen which shields the hall from the street view.

Screen seen in daylight

Screen at night

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 18-19


BATH HOUSE Location: Paris, France Facility Type: Relaxation Spa Project Size: 2,500 square meters Construction: Reinforced concrete Building Height: 4 stories

Rue de l’Ourcq Paris, France

Intimacy in a public space, such as a bath house, is directly related to the relationship of spaces. It is the responsibility of the architect to take into account the necessity for privacy and also the need for social interaction among the building’s occupants. The bath house is a very inviting place for people to enjoy a relaxing day at the spa. Once away from the stresses of everyday life, patrons can easily find their way through the spaces to create a unique experience catered to their individual needs.


 Plan diagram

With a strange existing site geometry, the given program was forced to the east side of the building. In doing so, the most intimate spaces retain privacy while the more public spaces, such as the pool and sun deck, obtain more area. Roof garden detail

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 20-21


Atrium entry

The atrium space offers a lively area to shop or enjoy a coffee, while spa-goers maintain privacy behind the wooden screen.


Pool Deck/ Spa

The main pool deck is open to allow for users easy accessibility to all areas of the bath house. This creates an experience based primarily on an individual’s desires.

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 22-23


URBAN INFILL for TADAO ANDO Location: Urban Environment Facility Type: Studio/ Residence Project Size: 5,600 square feet Construction: Cast-in-place concrete Building Height: 4 stories

Given the client precedence, the urban infill for Tadao Ando reveals a play with light and motion. Users are enticed to explore the building by walking around corners and curved walls. The circulation paths weave and intersect from exterior terraces and interior spaces. Natural sunlight pours in from light wells and skylights throughout. The light constantly reacts to the cast-inplace concrete that is iconic of Tadao Ando. Precedent studies based on saturating light and movement.


1 - RECEPTION 2 - BATHROOM 3 - MECHANICAL 4 - LIBRARY 5 - CONFERENCE 6 - STAFF 7 - CLOSET 8 - KITCHEN 9 - PRIVATE STUDY 10 - LIVING 11 - BEDROOM 12 - TERRACE

5 6

12

10

4 3 2 1

8

8

2

7

3

7

6

0

11

9

1

2

3

The movement of people through the space is directed by a curved line of axis. The entry off the street pulls people into the reception area. A curved stairway also directs users up and around the curved wall.

Ando’s private rooms are reserved for the upper two floors including his personal studio. Line of axis

Circulation

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 24-25


Entry

Private residency


Exploded axonometric

de•sign [dĭ-zīn’]

pages 26-27


pro•fes•sion•al [prə-fěsh’ə-nəl]

The Larson & Darby Group is represented by the following: Larson & Darby, Inc.; LZT Associates, Inc. and LZT/Filliung Architects with a staff of 115 professionals. We are a full-service architectural and engineering firm with structural, mechanical, electrical and plumbing engineering in-house, as well as interior design and planning services. Clients served include corporate, industrial, municipal, education, institutional, commercial, religious and retail. The Larson & Darby Group has offices in Rockford, Chicago, Geneva, Glen Ellyn and Peoria, Illinois.

Epiphany Catholic Church Normal, Illinois


Duo Fast Corporation Huntley, Illinois

pro•fes•sion•al [prə-fěsh’ə-nəl]

pages 28-29


Rockford Water Reclamation District Headquarters Rockford, Illinois


Woodward Governor Rockford, Illinois

Northern Illinois Cancer Treatment Center Dixon, Illinois pro•fes•sion•al [prə-fěsh’ə-nəl]

pages 30-31


Telsmith, Inc. Mequon, Wisconsin


Northern Illinois Cancer Treatment Center Dixon, Illinois

Northern Illinois Cancer Treatment Center Dixon, Illinois pro•fes•sion•al [prə-fěsh’ə-nəl]

pages 32-33


Rockford Memorial Hospital Renovation Rockford, Illinois


UIC College of Medicine Renovation Rockford, Illinois pro•fes•sion•al [prə-fěsh’ə-nəl]

pages 34-35


sketch [skěch]

Landscape Santorini, Greece

Human study Ponte 25 de Abril Lisbon, Portugal


Puente del Alamillo Seville, Spain

Castello De Sao Jorge Lisbon, Portugal

Notre Dame du Haut Ronchamp, France sketch [skěch]

pages 36-37


Villa Savoye Poissy, France

Sony Center Berlin, Germany

Parthenon Athens, Greece

Stadelhofen Zurich, Switzerland


Landscape Santorini, Greece

Museum Moderner Kunst Vienna, Austria

Leopold Museum Vienna, Austria

sketch [skěch]

pages 38-39


Urban Analysis Santorini, Greece

Architectural Analysis Cordoba, Spain

Plaka Analysis Athens, Greece


Konrad-Adenauer Straße Berlin, Germany

Plaka Analysis Athens, Greece

Saint Stephen’s Basilica Budapest, Hungary sketch [skěch]

pages 40-41


pho•to [fō’tō]

The Vatican Rome, Italy

Pantheon Rome, Italy

Villa Savoye Poissy, France


The Louvre Paris, France

Sony Center Berlin, Germany

The Great Mosque Cordoba, Spain

pho•to [fō’tō]

pages 42-43


Ruins Athens, Greece

Saint Stephen’s Basilica Budapest, Hungary


Puente del Alamillo Seville, Spain

Ara Pacis Museum Rome, Italy

The Barcelona Pavilion Barcelona, Spain

pho•to [fō’tō]

pages 44-45


Derek Eugene Larsen 3290 Pheasant Lane Belvidere, Illinois 61008 Tel: 815.218.2441 Email: dlar422@gmail.com Website: http://dlar42.googlepages.com

Education 2005-2007, 2008-2009 • The University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign, Illinois) -Pursuing Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies. Anticipated graduation Spring of 2009. -Cumulative GPA 3.52 2007-2008 • l’Ecole Nationale Supèrieure d’Architecture de Versailles (Versailles, France) -Highest regarded architectural study abroad program offered through an American university. 2001-2005 • Belvidere High School -Summa Cum Laude with Highest Honors (cumulative GPA 4.0) Work Experience Summer of 2008 • Larson & Darby Group | Architects Engineers Planners (Rockford, Illinois) -Full-time Architectural Internship: schematic design, developmental design, construction documents, 3d rendering Summer of 2007 • United Technologies: Hamilton Sundstrand (Rockford, Illinois) -Full-time Internship: electromagnetic interference testing for the Boeing 787 Airliner Winter of 2005 and 2006 • Ollmann + Ernest Architects (Belvidere, Illinois) -Architectural Internship: residential and institutional design, working drawings, site inspections Computer Skills AutoCAD 2008/2009, 3D Studio Max, Autodesk Impression, Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator & InDesign CS3, Google SketchUP, Rhinoceros 4.0, Microsoft Office Suite, Autodesk Rev-IT, ArchiCAD Collegiate Extracurricular Alpha Rho Chi – National professional architecture fraternity American Institute of Architectural Students – National student-lead organization Fighting Illini Triathlon – Midwest Collegiate Triathlon Conference, 2008 Marching Illini – 1st part trumpet, 2005-2007 Illini Cycling – National Collegiate Cycling Association, 2006

Personal and Awards Charles Clemens Councell Memorial Architecture Scholarship – The University of Illinois, 2007 General Assembly Scholarship – Senator Brad Burzynski, 2005-2006 Mantle Award of Belvidere High School – awarded to most outstanding Junior voted on by faculty National Honors Society –Belvidere High School, 2005 Marathoner and Triathlete –Boston Marathon Qualifier, 2008


Portfolio