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IMPORTANT INFORMATION In case of inclement weather, if the college campus is closed, our classes will be canceled. Announcements for Washington College closings will be broadcast on WBAL-AM radio (1090) and WBAL-TV (channel 11). Closings are also noted on the college website (www.washcoll.edu). Handicapped and elevator access is available in all classroom buildings used by WC-ALL.

Washington College Phone Numbers Washington College switchboard

410-778-2800

The Academy of Lifelong Learning Office

410-778-7221

Campus Security

410-778-7810

College Bookstore

410-778-7749

Casey Swim Center

410-778-7241

Registrar

410-778-7299

The Academy’s e-mail address: wc_all@washcoll.edu The Academy’s Home Page: wc-all.washcoll.edu

Auditing Washington College Courses If you are interested in auditing courses at the college, please contact the registrar's office (410-778-7299) for a list of courses. You may then contact the instructor to see if the course may be audited. There is a charge for auditing college courses.

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A MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR What better way can there be to avoid the winter blues than to slide into a warm Washington College classroom and soak up some additional learning. To assist you in this we present a rich range of courses over our two winter/spring sessions. Courses include subjects such as Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care, the Second World War, Modern Theater Styles and the United States in Foreign Affairs, along with movies, poetry and group discussions. Our Learn-At-Lunch series continues with a terrific roster of speakers: Tom Timberman on Afghanistan, Adam Goodheart on the Civil War, Mike Auth on blue water sailing and Fred Rasmussen of the Baltimore Sun on obituaries. As the weather warms up and we begin to think of spring and gardens, we will also feature a trip to the Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens in Washington, D.C., the grand twenty-five acre estate of Post Cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post. WC-ALL is directed by a Council of its members. Instructors and speakers are, for the most part, from our membership. All are volunteers, and we are constantly looking for others who will join us in expanding the variety and number of academic offerings. If you might be in that category, or know of someone, please let us know. WC-ALL COUNCIL Officers John Christie, Chair Trish Harwood, Vice Chair Damon Bradley, Treasurer William Low, Ass’t Treasurer Peggy Kelly Frances Miller David Newell

Committee Chairs Jack Stenger, Curriculum Trish Harwood, Publicity Ginny Barker, Special Events Members Lucia Rather Dr. Kathryn Sack, College Liaison Joan Wise

Mentor Program Chair, Barbara Parker Webpage Design and Technical Support, Dick Lance Administrator, Susan McRae 1


SPRING 2012 SPECIAL EVENTS SHOWCASE – Tuesday, January 17, 4:00pm Hotchkiss Recital Hall, Gibson Center for the Arts Refreshments following the presentations.  Meet instructors and learn more about offerings  Share experiences with fellow and potential members  Register for courses LEARN-AT-LUNCH LECTURES 12 Noon at Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall Thursday, January 19

What Lessons should America Learn from Afghanistan (and Iraq)? Tom Timberman

Wednesday, February 8

1861: The Civil War Awakening Adam Goodheart

Room Assignments New to this catalog is the inclusion of room assignments with the course description. We will no longer need to send room assignments separately. Please retain your catalog for reference throughout the semester. You will receive confirmation of your enrollment via e-mail or US mail. If you have questions, please call 410-778-7221 or email “wc_all@washcoll.edu.”

Tuition Assistance Tuition aid in the form of an ALLship (membership subsidy) is available. Please contact the Academy office at 410-778-7221 to request information.

WC-ALL Mentors WC-ALL administers a mentor program to give support and attention to Washington College international students when such assistance is requested. If you are interested in participating in the program, please call our office at 410-778-7221.

Wednesday, March 7

North to the Bergs: An Adventure into the Arctic Mike Auth

PARKING INFORMATION Please Read Carefully

Wednesday, April 11

The Last Word, and Other Tales from the Crypt

Wednesday, March 21 The Islamic Center & the Franciscan Monastery, Washington, D.C.

Faculty/Staff parking spots on campus are available for use after 3 PM. There are plenty of these spots in the parking areas by Goldstein, near the Fitness Center at the lower end of campus, behind Gibson, and near the Kirby Stadium. Parking is permitted behind Bunting Hall only in designated spots (not along the curb in this area). There are several handicapped spaces here as well as some visitor spots. Parking is NEVER allowed in the alley behind William Smith Hall, as this blocks traffic from reaching the handicapped spaces in the very small lot at the end of the alley. Please follow these guidelines carefully.

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Fred Rasmussen

ANNUAL MEETING Thursday, May 17, 5:30-7:00pm SPECIAL TRIPS Thursday, April 26 Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, Washington, D.C.


MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

A SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY FOR WC-ALL MEMBERS

Annual membership begins in the fall of each year and includes registration for courses in any of our four sessions: Early Fall, Late Fall, Early Spring and Late Spring. Semester membership is also available. Memberships are available for individuals or couples, a couple being two residents of the same household. Members enjoy reduced costs for luncheons and special events.

Dr. Robert Siudzinski of the Washington College faculty has offered WC-ALL members the opportunity to participate with College students in his course Innovative

Friends of WC-ALL membership does not include course attendance, but entitles Friends to receive all mailings and to pay the reduced member rate for special events and luncheons.

This opportunity is limited to six WC-ALL members.

Most courses meet in the late afternoon or early evening. Learn -at-Lunches are held in Hynson Lounge, Hodson Hall, on Campus. All sites have handicapped and elevator access. Visitors and prospective members are welcome to attend one WC-ALL class by arrangement with the office, 410-778-7221. All members are encouraged to participate in the affairs of the Academy. Management consists of a Council, elected annually by the membership. Members are strongly urged to become involved as Council candidates, voters, and instructors. WC-ALL welcomes both member and non-member volunteer instructors and new course ideas. Visit our web site at http://wc-all.washcoll.edu/courseproposalform.php. A newsletter is sent to members each semester with announcements and previews. For some courses, handouts will be provided as a reference. Books to be purchased for a class will be available as noted in the course description. The WC-ALL office is located at 510 Washington Avenue, and is open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 8:30-11:30am. 38

Leadership in Education meeting on campus Mondays and Wednesdays, January 23-March 3, from 8:30-9:20am.

Course Description: This course is open to interested students from all disciplines, from human development and education to the arts, economics, business and science. Learners will examine the integrated systems within which communities, organizations, schools and teams create functional ideas, processes and products. Through activities involving discussion, collaborative writing and independent projects, this course will prepare current and future leaders to develop in others the ability to see challenges in new ways, to overcome perceived obstacles and to generate and cultivate useful ideas. This course has no prerequisite and is designed for Washington College undergraduates, graduate students and WC-ALL members interested in participating together in this unique learning environment. If you are interested in participating, please contact the WCALL office at 410-778-7221 or wc_all@washcoll.edu. Deadline for consideration is January 16. Participants will be selected by lottery and notified by telephone.

Robert Siudzinski, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Educa-

tion at Washington College where he oversees the secondary teacher certification program, directs a learning laboratory, and coordinates international student teaching experiences. He holds degrees from Clemson University and the College of Charleston, as well as a doctorate in Educational Psychology/Learning Sciences from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University. 3


SESSION I COURSES

COURSE REGISTRATION Page

FINE & PERFORMING ARTS Digital SLR: Beyond the Basics Universal Studios III HUMANITIES Architecture in the Victorian Era .. Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care Myths of the Greeks and Romans Pakistan Reflections and Observations on Maryland’s Eastern Shore Vital Ideas: Sex SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Basics of Digital Photography

15 06 07 16 14 10 17 11 12

New Members: Please include full contact information, along with a check (payable to WC-ALL) for semester membership level desired: Couple: $135. Individual: $95. Friend: $30 Members are invited to register for as many courses as they wish. Class size may be limited at the request of the instructor or by classroom size. If you must withdraw before a class begins, PLEASE notify the office so that another member may take your place. Couples should fill out one form per person. After January 20, registration is on a space available basis. Name___________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________ _________________________________________ZIP____________ Phone_________________ Email_____________________________

RELIGION Children of Abraham, Part 1 First Light, Part 1

13 09

SOCIAL SCIENCE Failing Your Way to Success

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Current Members: Please enter your name and indicate which courses you wish to take this semester. It is not necessary to fill out contact information unless it has changed.

Session 1

Session 2

Architecture in the Victorian Era Basics of Digital Photography Children of Abraham, I Digital SLR: Beyond the Basics The Eastern Shore Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care Failing Your Way to Success First Light, I Myths of the Greeks & Romans Pakistan Universal Studios III Vital Ideas: Sex

The American Century Children of Abraham, II First Light, II Four WWII Battles Great Decisions 2012 Great Illustrators Memoir Writing Modern Theatre Styles The “P.R.B.” Poetry: Form & Expression Universal Studios IV

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COURSE REGISTRATION

SESSION II COURSES

Current Members: Please enter your name and indicate which courses you wish to take this semester. It is not necessary to fill out contact information unless it has changed. New Members: Please include full contact information, along with a check (payable to WC-ALL) for semester membership level desired: Couple: $135. Individual: $95. Friend: $30 Members are invited to register for as many courses as they wish. Class size may be limited at the request of the instructor or by classroom size. If you must withdraw before a class begins, PLEASE notify the office so that another member may take your place. Couples should fill out one form per person. After January 20, registration is on a space available basis. Name___________________________________________________ Address_________________________________________________ _________________________________________ZIP____________ Phone_________________ Email_____________________________ Session 1

Session 2

Architecture in the Victorian Era Basics of Digital Photography Children of Abraham, I Digital SLR: Beyond the Basics The Eastern Shore Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care Failing Your Way to Success First Light, I Myths of the Greeks & Romans Pakistan Universal Studios III Vital Ideas: Sex

The American Century Children of Abraham, II First Light, II Four WWII Battles Great Decisions 2012 Great Illustrators Memoir Writing Modern Theatre Styles The “P.R.B.” Poetry: Form & Expression Universal Studios IV

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Page FINE & PERFORMING ARTS Great Illustrators Universal Studios IV

29 24

HUMANITIES Memoir Writing Modern Theatre Styles Poetry: Form and Expression Poetical Artists/Artistic Poets: “The P.R.B.” Four WW II Battles that Made a Difference

31 34 32 26 25

RELIGION Children of Abraham, Part 2 First Light, Part 2

30 27

SOCIAL SCIENCE The American Century: The United States in Foreign Affairs Great Decisions 2012

33 28

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SESSION I TITLE: Universal Studios III AREA: Fine & Performing Arts COURSE LEADER: Patricia Molloy DAY AND TIME: Sundays, January 29-March 4 1:30-4:45pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Goldstein 100 and 117 FORMAT: Lecture/Film/Moderated Discussion Continuing a year-long study of Universal, one of Hollywood’s minor studios, Session III will look at films from the fifties. The class will follow three very different James Stewart films: HARVEY, WINCHESTER ‘73 and THE GLENN MILLER STORY along with the Douglas Sirk melodrama WRITTEN ON THE WIND and the restored masterpiece TOUCH OF EVIL. It will conclude with the soufflé PILLOW TALK.

Patricia Molloy is a former public relations executive with a

B.A. from Skidmore College and an M.A. from Georgetown University. She considers herself fortunate to be able to find joy, meaning and sustenance in classic movies.

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INDEX BY INSTRUCTOR Page Batcheller, David Benjamin, Wayne DeJong, John Finn, Terence Hall, Fletcher Hawes, Charlotte Staelin Hawkins, Dick Hukill, Jane Janson-LaPalme, Bayly Lance, Dick Mahaffey, Redge McIntyre, Howard Miller, Bob Molloy, Patricia Newell, David Phaneuf, Frances Rather, Lucia Robinson, Connie Robinson, David Sirna, Anne Thornton, Ralph

34 16 14 25 17 10 11 11, 28 07 12 08 32 15 06, 24 16 29 33 09, 27 13, 30 31 26

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SESSION II TITLE: Modern Theatre Styles AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: David Batcheller DAY AND TIME: Fridays, March 23 - April 13 4:00-5:00pm Four Weeks LOCATION: Smith 332 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion The styles of the modern theatre include naturalism, realism, symbolism, expressionism, theatricalism and existentialism. The nature of each “ism� will be reviewed as well as its playwrights, its practitioners and the staging of plays. Primary playwrights include Zola, Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Brecht, Sartre and Beckett. Among the practitioners included are Antoine, Appia, Belasco, Craig, Reinhardt and Stanislavski.

David R. Batcheller holds degrees from the College of Wooster (B.A.), University of Illinois (M.A.) and Ohio State University (Ph.D). He is retired from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where he served for 28 years in the Department of Communication and Theatre, first as Director of Theatre and then as Director of Broadcasting/Cinema.

SESSION I TITLE: Architecture in the Victorian Era AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Bayly Janson-La Palme, Ph.D. DAY AND TIME: Mondays, January 30-March 5 4:00-5:30pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Daly 107 FORMAT: Lecture with Images The Victorian Era lasted from the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837 to her death in 1901. This long period gave rise to many new styles in England and in America. It was a period in which styles spread rapidly, and clients could choose between hiring an architect or selecting up-to-date plans from magazines or from design books. The period is known for its romanticism as design inspirations came from the Middle Ages, Renaissance Italy, Romanesque France or, late in the era, our own Colonial past. Moreover, inventive architects created uniquely American styles such as Stick, Queen Anne and Shingle. This course will highlight the work of nationally known architects such as Alexander Davis, Richard Upjohn, Henry H. Richardson and Stanford White, as well as some with regional practices. Topics Covered: Italianate Gothic Revival Second Empire Richardson Romanesque Stick, Queen Anne & Shingle

Bayly Janson-La Palme, PhD, a veteran WC-ALL faculty

member, is Professor Emerita of Catonsville Community College. She has advanced degrees from the University of Virginia and the University of Maryland, and is a specialist in Maryland history and American architecture. 34

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SESSION I TITLE: Failing Your Way to Success AREA: Social Science COURSE LEADER: Redge Mahaffey, Ph.D. DAY AND TIME: Mondays, January 30-March 5 4:00-500pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Smith 332 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion Mark Twain wrote, “Show me a man who has never failed, and I will show you a failure.” The best results often come only after failure. Topics in this course will include failure to success in science; business; politics; sports; technology; games; and interpersonal relationships. If you are not failing often, then the problems you are trying to solve are not difficult enough, and that in itself is a failure.

Redge Mahaffey received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. He is an award-winning scientist, novelist, poet and movie director. He has built several successful businesses, and presently manages a portfolio of investment properties.

SESSION II TITLE: The American Century: The United States in Foreign Affairs AREA: Social Science COURSE LEADER: Lucia Rather DAY AND TIME: Thursdays, March 22 - April 19 4:00-5:15pm Five Weeks LOCATION: Goldstein 100 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion The United States in 1900 was a newly powerful young nation, emerging from a century of focusing on its own affairs, and ready to take its rightful place on the world stage. After playing a crucial role in the success of the Allies in the First World War, the country suddenly withdrew from its position of leadership during the 1920s and 1930s. Would War II caused another dramatic change in its approach to foreign affairs. With the successful conclusion of the war, the country anticipated a new era of good feeling, an expectation quickly dashed by the clash with the Soviet Union and the beginnings of the Cold War. The course will focus on the period 1900 to 1963 from the end of the Spanish American War to the conclusion of the Cuban Missile Crisis, highlighting the leaders whose personal strengths, quirks and foibles contributed to dynamic changes in America’s approach to the world, Questions discussed will include: (1) Did President Roosevelt know of the Japanese plan to bomb Pearl Harbor? (2) Was the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki militarily justifiable? And (3) Which side was responsible for starting the Cold War? The course will consist primarily of lectures, leaving time for discussion at the end, illustrated by pictures and maps as appropriate.

Lucia Rather is a former Director of Cataloging at the Library

of Congress. She has a doctorate in History from George Washington University, focusing on American diplomatic history. 8

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SESSION II

SESSION I

TITLE: Poetry: Form and Expression, Part I AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Howard McIntyre DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, March 21 - April 25 4:00pm-5:15pm Six Weeks

TITLE: First Light, Part I AREA: Religion COURSE LEADER: Connie Robinson DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, January 31-March 6 4:00-5:15pm Six Weeks

LOCATION: Smith 336

LOCATION: Smith 222 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion/DVD

FORMAT: Moderated Discussion Session One: Session Two: Session Three: Session Four: Session Five: Session Six:

Introductions, Overview and Sestina The Villanelle The Sonnet The Ballad The Ode Blank Verse

Guided by The Making of a Poem (Strand and Boland), we’ll look closely at the above six poetry forms. The instructor will facilitate discussion by the participants of poems read from the text and supplemental readings provided by instructor. In reading the poems we will consider the following questions: Why was the poem written? What is the form of the poem? Why did the poet use this form? Is this an effective form for the poem? What elements of poetry were used? (Metaphor, allusion, alliteration, phrasing, rhyme, rhythm, etc.) This class is limited to 12 students.

Howard McIntyre started writing poetry in 2004 as a result of a WC-

ALL course on poetry. Since that time he had presented an eight hour program on Dante’s Divine Comedy to a local men’s discussion group. He has read his poetry at many events, published a book of poetry, Sunrise to Sunset, and All That Lies Between in 2008 and for the past three years coordinated the Ann Hennessy Live Poetry Society’s annual reading at The Mainstay in Rock Hall, MD. McIntyre has taken several WC-ALL poetry courses and has done extensive reading and research on poetics. Textbook: The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms edited by Mark Strand and Eavan Boland (ISBN 0-393-32178 - 9 pbk). 32

Why did Jesus happen when he happened? Why the confluence of the Baptism movement of John and the Kingdom movement of Jesus? Why among the tiny villages around the Lake? Why the confrontations in Jerusalem? Why then? Why there? Why were the titles of Caesar Augustus – Divine, Son of God, God from God, Lord, Redeemer, Liberator, and Savior of the World – taken from a Roman emperor on the Palatine hill and given to a Jewish peasant on the Palestine plain? What were the priorities of Jesus’ proclamation of the Kingdom? How was the status quo of the Roman imperial theology subverted by the obscure Galilean whose message continues to indict empire today? This two-part course includes DVD presentations by two leading Jesus scholars, John Dominic Crossan and Marcus Borg, on location in Galilee and Jerusalem. A written text and summary notes are provided for each student. Participation in Part 1 is encouraged but not required for participation in Part 2. Connie Robinson is a graduate of West Chester University (B.S., M.Ed.) and Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.). She worked as a math teacher at Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School in Michigan where she also coached field hockey, lacrosse and crew, lived and worked in the junior-senior boys dormitory, built a wooden boat in the basement of faculty housing, took up long distance running, and survived faculty meetings by knitting sweaters. Since relocating to Maryland she has taught several courses for WC-ALL in the area of contemporary Biblical and theological scholarship. 9


SESSION I

SESSION II

TITLE: Pakistan AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Charlotte Staelin Hawes DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, January 31-March 6 4:00-5:00pm Six Weeks

TITLE: Memoir Writing AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Anne Sirna DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, March 21 - April 25 4:00-5:30pm Six Weeks

LOCATION: Smith 332 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

LOCATION: Smith 110 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

Pakistan is indeed in the “eye of the storm” as Owen Bennett Jones suggests in his book which is helpful reading for this course. Class will be lecture and discussion covering the following topics: Pakistan’s geography and ethnic diversity; its independence struggle and founding principles; rivalry with India and split with Bangladesh; nuclear capability and its relationship with the Taliban; as well as recent events and U.S./Pakistani relations.

The most exciting journey of your life will be sharing your life story with your family. The Memoir Workshop will help you get started and learn the difference between memoir and autobiography.

Suggested reading: Pakistan: Eye of the Storm by Owen Bennett Jones, 3rd Edition, Yale University Press, 2002. (Available at Amazon.com and elsewhere.)

Charlotte Staelin Hawes received her Ph.D. in South Asian

History from the University of Michigan in 1977. In 2003 and 2004, she served as Coordinator for the Institute for American Studies Program at Washington College which hosted 20 South Asian Muslim students, and she was Director of Global Studies for Semester at Sea at the University of Pittsburgh in 1999 and 2004.

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It provides a supportive environment is which to have your work critiqued by teacher and class, to critique the work of others and to learn by listening. Critique sheets will be provided. Each class will end with a brief talk on the topic of the week. These include: selecting your material; introducing your family to your world; finding the recurring themes in your life, along with periods of crisis and change; spicing your writing with details; and description. There will be handouts, suggested writing assignments, a bibliography and a memoir lending library. Class size limited to 12.

Anne Sirna has been teaching at WC-ALL since 2003. She is

the author of six books and numerous articles and personal experience stories. She has taught writing courses at WC-ALL, Philadelphia’s Main Line School Night and the Saint David’s and Sandy Cover Writers’ Conferences. She is the daughter and granddaughter of writers.

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SESSION II TITLE: Children of Abraham, Part II AREA: Religion COURSE LEADER: David Robinson DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, March 21 - April 25 4:00-5:15pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Daly 218 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion A continuation from Session I, this session will continue to follow the development of the three great faiths of the Western Traditions. While participation in Session I is not a prerequisite, it would enhance the learning experience of Session II. Handouts from Session I will be available for new students.

David G. Robinson retired as Chaplain and Department Head

of the Religion/Philosophy Department at Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School in Bloomfield Hills, MI, where for years he taught courses in the areas of moral philosophy, Western Traditions and World Religions. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College (A.B.), and after his “first” career as a Surface Warfare Officer in the U. S. Navy, graduated from Episcopal Divinity School (M. Div.) in Cambridge, MA. Since relocating to Maryland he has taught several courses for WC-ALL.

SESSION I TITLE: Vital Ideas: Sex AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Dick Hawkins & Jane Hukill DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, January 31-March 6 4:00-5:00pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Smith 110 FORMAT: Moderated Discussion We will read selections from the Vital Ideas Anthology on Sex, published by the Great Books Foundation. The text is meant to deepen reflective thinking and encourage debate in the classroom. Dick and Jane have used this “shared inquiry” format for many years. Among the readings will be John Donne, Andrew Marvell, Sigmund Freud, Margaret Atwood and Fay Weldon. Two selections from the text are read and discussed each week. This series is meant for readers who want to engage in the discussion of provocative ideas through great literature. Because this is a seminar format, enrollment is strictly limited to 20 participants. The text will be available for sale at a price of $17 at the WC-ALL office. This class is limited to 20 students.

Dick Hawkins and Jane Hukill, as a team, have been offering

courses for many years through WC-ALL. They are both past Chairs of the WC-ALL Council.

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SESSION I

SESSION II

TITLE: Basics of Digital Photography AREA: Science & Technology COURSE LEADER: Dick Lance DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, February 1-March 7 10:00-11:15am Six Weeks

TITLE: Great Illustrators AREA: Fine & Performing Arts COURSE LEADER: Frances Phaneuf DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, March 20 - April 10 4:00-5:00pm Four Weeks

LOCATION: Kent County Public Library FORMAT: Discussion and Demonstration

LOCATION: Daly 106 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

A course for beginners in digital photography. Attendees should at least have a digital camera and some experience in using it. In the course I’ll emphasize (a) getting familiar with a camera and its settings, (b) the art of photography, including good composition, light and subject arrangement, (c) managing collections of digital photos, including editing, printing, displaying and archiving plus photo album and book production.

First Session: The Philadelphia Sketch Club 1860, an organization restricted to men. Discussion and examples of prominent illustrators beginning with Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth and many more.

Dick Lance is Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Cornell

University. He is a past chair of WC-ALL and has been active teaching at Washington College and WC-ALL since he retired and moved to Chestertown in 1998. He has taught courses in computers, engineering, physics and digital photography for WC-ALL for the last 8 years.

Second Session: Female artists were considered “women of leisure.” So as not to be left out The Plastic Club, the first successful women’s club, was established in 1936. Discussion and examples of “The Red Rose Girls” (Jessie Wilcox Smith, Elizabeth Shippen Green & Violet Oakley), Beatrix Potter and May Gibbs. Third Session: Contemporary artists of the 20th-21st Century. Examples will include Gullah artists Cassandra Gillen & Jonathan Green, Al Hirschfeld and Tasha Tudor. Discussion of the importance of medical illustration in today’s world will include examples of medical illustrators Max Brodel, Gerald Hodge and Scott Rawlins Fourth Session: Day trip to Brandywine River Museum & Andrew Wyeth’s Studio in Chadds Ford, PA

Frances Phaneuf is a graphic designer with a degree in Visual

Communications from the Pittsburgh Art Institute in Pennsylvania. She is a member of the American Society of Botanical Artists and has studied botanical illustration and porcelain painting in Great Britain, Longwood Gardens and the Humboldt Institute in Steuben, Maine. 12

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SESSION II

SESSION I

TITLE: Great Decisions 2012 AREA: Social Science COURSE LEADER: Jane Hukill DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, March 20 - April 24 4:00-5:15pm Six Weeks

TITLE: Children of Abraham, Part I AREA: Religion COURSE LEADER: David Robinson DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, February 1-March 7 4:00-5:15pm Six Weeks

LOCATION: Smith 110 FORMAT: Moderated Discussion

LOCATION: Daly 218 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

Great Decisions 2011 will feature in-depth, thought-provoking articles written by independent experts on eight issues of concern to U.S. policymakers today. These will represent our foreign policy challenges of tomorrow. Topics covered may include: Middle East Realignment; Promoting Democracy; Mexico; Cybersecurity; Exit from Iraq and Afghanistan; State of the Oceans; Indonesia; Energy Geopolitics. Volunteers from the class will lead five of the six sessions.

The three great faiths of the Western traditions all worship the same one God . . . yet to those unfamiliar with these traditions it seems unlikely that they could all claim to have originated from the same patriarch, Abraham. This two session course will look at the origins of these faiths from a wandering ‘abiru in the Tigris-Euphrates valley and trace their development into the faiths we know today as Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

Students will need to purchase the book published by the Foreign Policy Association for $20.00 at the WC-ALL Office. This course is limited to 20 students.

Jane E. Hukill is a past Chair of the WC-ALL Council and has coordinated this series for a number of years.

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This course encourages questions, will provide lots of information, and hopefully will generate interesting discussions.

David G. Robinson retired as Chaplain and Department Head

of the Religion/Philosophy Department at Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School in Bloomfield Hills, MI, where for years he taught courses in the areas of moral philosophy, Western Traditions and World Religions. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College (A.B.), and after his “first” career as a Surface Warfare Officer in the U. S. Navy, graduated from Episcopal Divinity School (M. Div.) in Cambridge, MA. Since relocating to Maryland he has taught several courses for WC-ALL.

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SESSION I

SESSION II

TITLE: Myths of the Greeks and Romans AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: John DeJong DAY AND TIME: Wednesdays, February 1-29 4:00-5:00pm Five Weeks

TITLE: First Light, Part II AREA: Religion COURSE LEADER: Connie Robinson DAY AND TIME: Tuesdays, March 20 - April 24 4:00-5:15pm Six Weeks

LOCATION: Daly 106

LOCATION: Smith 222 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion/DVD

FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion The course will cover the Greek gods as they are developed in Hesiod and Homer. Then we will look at the Roman version of the stories and their impact on the Roman educational system. Next we will look at how the stories survived as the empire declined into the Dark Ages. Finally, we will look at their role as learning revived up through the 19th century.

John DeJong’s educational background includes a B.A. in history from Haverford College and an M.B.A. from NYU. This course has nothing to do with finance or investments.

Why did Jesus happen when he happened? Why the confluence of the Baptism movement of John and the Kingdom movement of Jesus? Why among the tiny villages around the Lake? Why the confrontations in Jerusalem? Why then? Why there? Why were the titles of Caesar Augustus – Divine, Son of God, God from God, Lord, Redeemer, Liberator, and Savior of the World – taken from a Roman emperor on the Palatine hill and given to a Jewish peasant on the Palestine plain? What were the priorities of Jesus’ proclamation of the Kingdom? How was the status quo of the Roman imperial theology subverted by the obscure Galilean whose message continues to indict empire today? This two-part course includes DVD presentations by two leading Jesus scholars, John Dominic Crossan and Marcus Borg, on location in Galilee and Jerusalem. A written text and summary notes are provided for each student. Participation in Part 1 is not required for participation in Part 2. Connie Robinson is a graduate of West Chester University (B.S., M.Ed.) and Princeton Theological Seminary (M.Div.). She worked as a math teacher at Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School in Michigan where she also coached field hockey, lacrosse and crew, lived and worked in the junior-senior boys dormitory, built a wooden boat in the basement of faculty housing, took up long distance running, and survived faculty meetings by knitting sweaters. Since relocating to Maryland she has taught several courses for WC-ALL in the area of contemporary Biblical and theological scholarship.

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SESSION II

SESSION I

TITLE: Poetical Artists/Artistic Poets: “The P.R.B.� AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Ralph Thornton DAY AND TIME: Mondays, March 19 - April 23 4:00-5:00pm Six Weeks

TITLE: Digital SLR: Beyond the Basics AREA: Fine & Performing Arts COURSE LEADER: Bob Miller DAY AND TIME: Thursdays, February 2-February 23 4:00-6:00pm Four Weeks

LOCATION: Smith 110 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

LOCATION: Smith 336 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

A survey of the literary works of the mid-century clutch of artists known at the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, with special attention to the poems of the Rossettis, Patmore and Morris.

This course is designed for students who feel they already have a basic understanding of their SLR camera and would like to go Beyond the Basics. The instructor will assume students know how to set aperture and shutter speed on their cameras. The class will begin with a basic review of camera operation and then move onto exposure using manual mode. There will also be sessions on photo tips for travel, close-up and landscape photography as well as teacher demonstrations of Photoshop to enhance images in the computers. Students will also have the opportunity to shoot photo assignments and have their work critiqued. An optional field trip will be offered so students can have some hands-on instruction in the field.

Ralph Thornton is retired from the English Department at

LaSalle University. His undergraduate degree is from Washington College and his Ph.D. is from the University of Pennsylvania.

Students should have a Single Lens Reflex camera for this class. This kind of camera usually takes interchangeable lenses and has full manual control.

Bob Miller is a retired science teacher with a 35+ year passion

for photography. He does all kinds of photography but has recently specialized in nature photography. He has taken his camera all over the world including Africa, Iceland, The Arctic, Australia, Europe and the United States. He has won many awards and was recently named Digital Photographer of the Year by the Arundel Camera Club. His photographs have been published in The Baltimore Sun, Backyard Gardens and most recently in the fine art photography magazine B&W. Bob enjoys teaching and loves to share his love for photography with others. 26

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SESSION I TITLE: Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADERS: David Newell & Wayne D. Benjamin, M.D

DAY AND TIME:

Thursdays, February 2-March 8 10:00-11:15am Six Weeks

SESSION II TITLE: Four WW II Battles That Made a Difference AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Terence Finn DAY AND TIME: Mondays, March 26 - April 16 4:00-5:15pm Four Weeks

LOCATION: UUCR, 914 Gateway Drive, Chestertown FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

LOCATION: Smith 332 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion

“Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care” will be team-taught by a physician and an ethicist. The course will present four major ethical perspectives and their application to current ethical dilemmas in health care. Each class will begin with a presentation of a major moral theory, followed by a practical discussion of patient care cases. Following an overview of the course and a presentation of the case-study method of moral reasoning, we will take up theistic ethics/natural law (St. Thomas Aquinas), the greatest happiness principle (Bentham and Mill), respect for persons (Kant), and the fair distribution of benefits and burdens (Rawls). Our final session will be an open discussion of the current state and future prospects of health care in America.

This course will focus on four critical World War II battles: the Battle of Britain, Pearl Harbor, the Battle of the Atlantic and Normandy. It will draw upon the instructor’s interest and research on the subject over many years.

Terry Finn retired in 1994 after a long career with NASA and

on Capitol Hill. He received a B.A. from Williams College, an M.A. from the University of Sussex in Great Britain and a Ph.D. in American Government from Georgetown University. He has authored two novels, including one about an American P-47 pilot in England in 1943.

J. David Newell, Ph.D., has taught courses in medical ethics at

Washington College, Grinnell College, West Point and the Medical College of Pennsylvania. He is Professor Emeritus in Philosophy and Religion at Washington College, a Senior Fellow at the Aspen Institute, and the current minister at the Unitarian Universalists of the Chester River. He is the founder and first chairperson of our Community Healthcare Ethics Committee. He is now serving on the WCALL Council. Wayne D. Benjamin, M.D., is a graduate of Bethany College and the University of Louisville Medical School. He is Board Certified in Family Medicine and has had a primary care practice in our community for the past 37 years (Chestertown Family Medicine). He has served on the Community Healthcare Ethics Committee, the Physician Advisory Board to Blue Cross and Blue Shield, the Board of the Chester River Hospital Center (CRHC) and has twice served as President of the Medical Staff at CRHC. 16

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SESSION II TITLE: Universal Studios IV AREA: Fine & Performing Arts COURSE LEADER: Patricia Molloy DAY AND TIME: Sundays, March 18 - April 22 1:30-4:45pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Goldstein 100 and 117 FORMAT: Lecture/Film/Moderated Discussion Since Universal was relatively dormant during Hollywood’s Golden Age, Session IV will conclude a year-long study of the studio by looking at some of its films from the late fifties until the early eighties. This session’s schedule will include Cary Grant’s most profitable movie OPERATION PETTICOAT, the award-winning TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, Alfred Hitchcock’s THE BIRDS, Steven Spielberg’s JAWS, the comic romance of HOUSE CALLS and the elegiac romance of ON GOLDEN POND.

Patricia Molloy is a former public relations executive with a

B.A. from Skidmore College and an M.A. from Georgetown University. She considers herself fortunate to be able to find joy, meaning and sustenance in classic movies.

SESSION I TITLE: Reflections & Observations on Maryland’s Eastern Shore AREA: Humanities COURSE LEADER: Fletcher R. Hall DAY AND TIME: Fridays, February 3-March 9 4:00-5:00pm Six Weeks LOCATION: Smith 332 FORMAT: Lecture/Discussion The course will examine and discuss the unique area of Maryland known as the Eastern Shore. Rich in history, cultural heritage, folklore and quirks, the Eastern Shore offers a wealth of little known facts, interesting places and events, and recent political past full of bizarre and mysterious events.

Session One: An overview of the Eastern Shore of Maryland Session Two: An Examination of the Eastern Shore’s Recent and Checkered Political Past Session Three: The Bounty and Productivity of the Eastern Shore (with guest speakers) Session Four: Cruising Down the Chesapeake Bay Session Five: A review of recommended books Session Six: Quirks and other interesting stories and folklore about the Eastern Shore

Fletcher R. Hall is a native Eastern Shoreman, whose family

arrived on the Shore in the early 1600’s. He grew up in the small farming town of East New Market. He is a graduate of Washington College, with a degree in Political Science. He received a M.Ed. From Bowie State University, He is Chairman & CEO of F.R. Hall & Associates, LLC, a government relations and communications firm in Washington, D.C. 24

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Pakistan C. Staelin Hawes 4-5pm Six weeks Smith 332

Failing to Success R. Mahaffey 4-5pm Six weeks Smith 332 Vital Ideas: Sex Hawkins/Hukill 4-5:15pm Six weeks Smith 110

First Light I C. Robinson 4-5:15pm Six weeks Smith 222

Victorian Architecture B. Janson-LaPalme 4:00-5:30pm Six weeks Daly 107

Tuesday

Ethical Dilemmas Newell/Benjamin 10-11:15am Six weeks UUCR 914 Gateway Drive

Children of Abraham I D. Robinson 4-5:15pm Six weeks Daly 218 Greek/Roman Myths J. DeJong 4-5pm Five weeks Daly 106

Digital SLR B. Miller 4-6pm Four weeks Smith 336

Thursday

Digital Photography D. Lance 10-11:15am Six weeks Kent Co. Library

Wednesday

Thursday

Eastern Shore F. Hall 4-5pm Six weeks Smith 332

Friday

Session II At-A-Glance: March 18-April 26

Friday

Modern Theatre D. Batcheller 4-5pm Four weeks Smith 332

Universal III P. Molloy 1:30-4:45pm Six weeks Goldstein 100/117

Monday

Wednesday

The American Century L. Rather 4-5:15pm Five weeks Goldstein 100

Sunday

Session I At-A-Glance: January 29-March 9

Children of Abraham II D. Robinson 4-5:15pm Six weeks Daly 218

Tuesday

First Light II C. Robinson 4-5:15pm Six weeks Smith 222

Memoir Writing A. Sirna 4-5:30pm Six weeks Smith 110

Monday

Four WWII Battles T. Finn 4:00-5:15pm Four weeks* Smith 332 * Starts March 26

Great Decisions J. Hukill 4-5:15pm Six weeks Smith 110

Poetry: Form & Expres. H. McIntyre 4-5:15pm Six weeks Smith 336

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Sunday

Universal IV P. Molloy 1:30-4:45pm Six weeks Goldstein 100/117

Poetical Artists: PRB R. Thornton 4-5pm Six weeks Smith 110

Great Illustrators F. Phaneuf 4-5pm Four weeks Daly 106

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Notes

Notes

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WCALL Spring 12 Catalog  

The full version of the Spring 2012 Course Catalog of the Washington College Acsdemy of Lifelong Learning

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