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The

COURIER

Immaculate Heart of Mary June 20

June 2020

Official Newspaper of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Winona-Rochester, MN | dowr.org

'It Should Not Be This Way'

Statement of USCCB President on George Floyd and Protests in American Cities From usccb.org

By ANNETTE KRUTSCH

WASHINGTON, May 31, 2020 – Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles and president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has issued a statement on George Floyd and the protests in American cities that have taken place over the last several days. This follows the Friday statement from seven U.S. bishop chairmen of committees within the USCCB. Archbishop Gomez’s full statement follows: The killing of George Floyd was senseless and brutal, a sin that cries out to heaven for justice. How is it possible that in America, a black man’s life can be taken from him while calls for help are not answered, and his killing is recorded as it happens? I am praying for George Floyd and his loved ones, and on behalf of my brother bishops, I share the outrage of the black community and those who stand with them in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, and across the country. The cruelty and violence he suffered does not reflect on the majority of good men and women in law enforcement, who carry out their duties with honor. We know that. And we trust that civil authorities will investigate his killing carefully and make sure those responsible are held accountable. We should all understand that the protests we are seeing in our cities reflect the justified frustration and anger of millions of our brothers and sisters who even today experience humiliation, indignity, and unequal opportunity only because of their race or the color of their skin. It should not be this way in America. Racism has been tolerated for far too long

Advice for the Weary �

in our way of life. It is true what Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. said, that riots are the language of the unheard. We should be doing a lot of listening right now. This time, we should not fail to hear what people are saying through their pain. We need to finally root out the racial injustice that still infects too many areas of American society. Statement, cont'd on pg. 4

ational trends have suggested that individuals and families who were not before identified as having emotional or mental health problems are beginning to struggle, and those who experienced mental health challenges before COVID19 are now seeing worsening of their symptoms. We need to acknowledge that this is something very new and very difficult that we are all going through, and that uncertainty is very hard to bear. We should realize that the suffering is a real and normal reaction to this new reality. Many of us are trying to invent new ways of doing what needs to be done (health-care workers, of course, but also teachers, parents home-schooling children, laid-off workers suddenly being home with spouses full-time while both worry about their financial future), so we all must adjust our overly demanding standards for ourselves and others. The obvious advice to limit news consumption, eat a healthy diet, take walks/ other exercise, practice prayer/meditation all holds true. And perhaps just as important is to begin thinking about these stressful times as opportunities to strengthen social bonds with friends &

Advice, cont'd on pg. 12

INSIDE this issue

Is This a Divine Punishment? page 5

Family Reunification...

Happy Anniversaries! page 11

page 14-15


The Courier Insider

Pope Francis Prays for 2 Soul of George Floyd, Peace and Justice in U.S. By Courtney Mares

VATICAN CITY, Jun. 3, 2020 (CNA) - Pope Francis said Wednesday that he is praying for the soul of George Floyd and all victims of racism, adding that nothing is gained by violence. “Dear brothers and sisters in the United States, I have witnessed with great concern the disturbing social unrest in your nation in these past days, following the tragic death of Mr George Floyd,” Pope Francis said in a video broadcast June 3. “We cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life. At the same time, we have to recognize that the Corrections In the article "Choose Hope," which appeared on page 13 of our April 2020 issue, Catholic Charities of Southern Minnesota reported that 1,624 birthparents were supported by the generosity of donors last year. Catholic Charities seeks to clarify that 444 familes received various forms of support from their Pregnancy, Parenting and Adoption Program last year. These 444 families comprise 1,624 individuals.

Officials The Most Rev. John M. Quinn, Bishop of the Diocese of WinonaRochester, announces the following appointments: Pastor Very Rev. William Thompson: currently Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia of the Diocese of Winona-Rochester and Pastor of Pax Christi Parish in Rochester and Ss. Peter and Paul Parish in Mazeppa; transferred to the Office of Pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in Lewiston, St. Anthony of Padua Parish in Altura, and Immaculate

violence of recent nights is self-destructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost,” the pope said. Pope Francis prayed for the intercession of Our Lady of Guadalupe, the patron of the Americas, to intercede for peace, justice, and reconciliation in the U.S. at the end of his Wednesday audience, livestreamed from the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace. “Today I join the Church of St. Paul and Minneapolis, and of all the United States, in praying for the rest of the soul of George Floyd and all the others who have lost their lives because of the sin of racism,” the pope said. “Let us pray for the comfort of families and friends who are heartbroken, and pray for national reconciliation and the peace we yearn for.”

Conception Parish in Wilson, while remaining Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia of the Diocese of Winona-Rochester, effective June 1, 2020. Rev. John Sauer: currently Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish in Owatonna; transferred to the Office of Pastor of Pax Christi Parish in Rochester and Ss. Peter and Paul Parish in Mazeppa, effective July 1, 2020. Rev. Swaminatha Pothireddy: currently Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish in Adams, St. John the Baptist Parish in Johnsburg, Queen of Peace Parish in Lyle, and St. Peter Parish in Rose Creek; transferred to the Office of Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish in Owatonna, effective July 1, 2020. Rev. Thé Hoang: currently Parochial Vicar of Pax Christi Parish in Rochester and Ss. Peter and Paul Parish in Mazeppa; appointed to the Office of Pastor of Sacred Heart Parish in Waseca, effective July 1, 2020. Parochial Administrator Very Rev. Glenn Frerichs: currently Judicial Vicar and Chancellor of the

The Courier is the official publication of the Diocese of Winona-Rochester 55 West Sanborn, P.O. Box 588, Winona, MN 55987 Vol 111 - 6

Most Reverend John M. Quinn, Publisher Matt Willkom, Editor Nick Reller, Associate Editor Telephone: 507-858-1257 Fax:507-454-8106 E-mail: nreller@dowr.org Publishing Schedule: Monthly - Deadline for advertising & articles is the 10th of the month prior. (ISSN 0744-5490) June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org

Pope, cont'd on pg. 4

Diocese of Winona-Rochester and Pastor of St. Rose of Lima Parish in Lewiston, St. Anthony of Padua Parish in Altura, and Immaculate Conception Parish in Wilson; transferred to the Office of Parochial Administrator of St. Felix Parish in Wabasha and St. Agnes Parish in Kellogg, while remaining Judicial Vicar and Chancellor of the Diocese of Winona-Rochester, effective June 1, 2020. Sacramental Ministry Rev. Shawn Haremza: appointed to assist with sacramental ministry at Pax Christi Parish in Rochester and Ss. Peter and Paul Parish in Mazeppa, effective July 1, 2020. Finance Council Very Rev. Thomas Loomis: appointed to a five-year term on the Diocese of Winona-Rochester Finance Council, effective May 18, 2020. Minnesota Catholic Conference Mr. Martin Cormack: appointed to a three-year term on the Minnesota Catholic Conference Social Concerns Committee, effective June 21, 2020.

Articles of Interest

Is This a Divine Punishment?______________5 What Is the Domestic Church?_______________6 Share Your Testimony______________________6 The Month of the Two Hearts_________________7 Catholic Schools Headlines_________________8 The Enduring Message of The Gospel of Life_10 Family Reunification..._____________________11 Diocesan Headlines_______________________12 Happy Anniversaries!______________________14

The Holy Father's Intention for

June 2020

The Way of the Heart We pray that all those who suffer may find their way in life, allowing themselves to be touched by the Heart of Jesus. Mr. Thomas Crowley: reappointed to a three-year term on the Minnesota Catholic Conference Life, Family, and Healthcare Committee, effective June 21, 2020. Rochester Catholic Schools Ms. Pamela Bowman: appointed to a three-year term on the Rochester Catholic Schools Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 2020. Ms. Sara Messina: appointed to a three-year term on the Rochester Catholic Schools Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 2020.

Where to Find the Courier Note: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Courier will only be published online (option 2) until further notice. •

Hard copies of the Courier are available in the churches of the Diocese of Winona-Rochester at the first weekend Masses of each month.

An online version may be viewed at www.dowr.org /offices/ courier/index.html

To be added to the home delivery list, readers should send their names and addresses to:

Child Abuse Policy Information The Diocese of Winona-Rochester will provide a prompt, appropriate and compassionate response to reporters of sexual abuse of a child by any diocesan agent (employees, volunteers, vendors, religious or clergy). Anyone wishing to make a report of an allegation of sexual abuse should call the Victim Assistance Coordinator at 507454-2270, Extension 255. A caller will be asked to provide his or her name and telephone number. Individuals are also encouraged to take their reports directly to civil authorities. The Diocese of Winona-Rochester is committed to protecting children, young people and other vulnerable people in our schools, parishes and ministries. The diocesan policy is available on the diocesan web site at www.dow. org under the Safe Environment Program. If you have any questions about the Diocese of Winona-Rochester’s implementation of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, please contact Mary Hamann at 507-858-1244, or mhamann@dowr.org.

Diocese of Winona-Rochester The Courier 55 W Sanborn St. Winona, MN 55987 or nreller@dowr.org


Open Wide Our Hearts Resuming Public Masses

Beginning May 27, churches in Minnesota were allowed to reopen for public worship. Parishes have been instructed that they should only reopen once they feel ready to implement the diocesan protocols that reflect the guidance of public health officials, so not all parishes will be open right away, and for some it may be a while before they return to their regular schedule of Masses. Across the Diocese of Winona-Rochester, pastors and their staff and volunteers are working hard to make sure we can offer Mass while also keeping people healthy. I am grateful that our churches are now open for gatherings at 50% capacity, not to exceed 250 people. There is always a risk of spreading COVID-19 whenever people gather, but the Bishops of the State of Minnesota recognize that the Holy Sacrifice of the

Rejoice in Hope Bishop John M. Quinn Bishop's Calendar

George Floyd

We have all been horrified at the brutal and senseless murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. This tragedy has triggered countless peaceful protests, some of which have turned violent and led to riots, looting, and destruction of lives and property. These events have reminded us that racism is not a thing of the past, but is unfortunately very much a present reality in our nation and local communities. Fortunately, many of the recent protests, such as in Rochester, Winona, and Worthington, have remained peaceful. Additionally, many of the protesters have shown respect for their fellow citizens and protestors in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, as they have worn masks and social distanced, in

June 1, Monday 12 p.m. - Higher Education Working Group Conference Call

June 2, Tuesday 11 a.m. - Holy Hour and Priest Pension Plan Board Meeting June 3, Wednesday 12:30 p.m. - Minnesota Catholic Conference Meeting - via Zoom June 4, Thursday 1 p.m. - Holy Hour and Bishop’s Cabinet Meeting 4 p.m. - Weekly Zoom Conference with Minnesota Bishops

order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus while also standing in solidarity with those who are suffering unjust discrimination. It can be easy to feel outraged and helpless in the face of the racism that still plagues our country. However, we are not powerless and there are things we can do to help build a more just society. First of all, we should pray for the victims of racism, for those who actively discriminate against people based on their race, and for all of us, that we may have a deeper appreciation of the Godgiven dignity of each and every human being, regardless of the color of their skin. Secondly, we can reach out and befriend people of different races, to better understand and respect those who are different from us, and become more aware of how racism affects our local communities. We should all examine our own consciences to see how we have failed to live up to the Lord’s command to love our neighbor as ourselves. If we honestly reflect upon our own thoughts, words, actions, and attitudes, and ask the Holy Spirit to enlighten us as to how we have failed to treat others with respect and dignity, we may be surprised at what the Lord reveals to us. A more just world starts with each one of us, and it is our duty as Christians to not only speak out against racism, but to first and foremost love and respect those we encounter in our everyday interactions. In a 2018 pastoral letter entitled Open Wide Our Hearts: the Enduring Call to Love, the U.S. Bishops addressed the issue of racism, its history in our country, and its manifestation in our world today. I encourage parishes and individuals to consider using this document for reading and discussion, observing all the protocols

June 5, Friday 10 a.m. - COVID-19 Diocesan Task Force Meeting

June 7, Sunday 11 a.m. - Mass - Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity - Live-streamed from the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart, Winona June 9, Tuesday 12-2 p.m. - USCCB Higher Education Working Group Zoom Conference

for social distancing and a safe environment. The letter could even be incorporated into a larger event that might include speakers and break-out sessions, and the opportunity to meet and listen to those who have encountered racism in our communities. This letter, along with a companion study guide, can be found on the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops website. Class of 2020

All of our lives have been drastically changed by the COVID-19 pandemic this spring, but for the Class of 2020, school not only switched to distance learning, but all the usual senior yearend milestones were either cancelled or greatly modified due to the inability to have large in-person gatherings. Despite the challenging circumstances, however, our graduates and their teachers and administrators have been creative in celebrating the accomplishments of these young men and women. Graduation ceremonies, end-of-the-year parties, and celebrations with family and friends looked different from other years, but many were held nonetheless. Some of the ways schools marked graduation included drive-in or drive-by commencement ceremonies, Zoom senior parties, sociallydistanced greetings from faculty and staff, and graduates exiting their cars one-by-one to receive their diplomas. We also continued the tradition of our annual Diocesan Baccalaureate Mass, to send our Catholic high school seniors off with a blessing and a blessed crucifix. This is always a wonderful occasion during which we give thanks to our Triune God for the many graces He has poured out upon the graduates. This year,

June 14, Corpus Christi Sunday 11:30 a.m. - RCIA Candidate Reception and Confirmation - St. Thomas More Catholic Newman Center Parish, Mankato June 17, Wednesday 1 p.m. - IHM Seminary Finance Council Meeting 3 p.m. - Bishop’s IHM Seminary Advisory Board Meeting

June 11, Thursday 4 p.m. - Weekly Zoom Conference with Minnesota Bishops

June 18, Thursday 1 p.m. - Holy Hour and Bishop’s Cabinet Meeting 4 p.m. - Weekly Zoom Conference with Minnesota Bishops

June 12, Friday 10 a.m. - COVID-19 Diocesan Task Force Meeting

June 19, Friday Day of Sanctification for the Clergy

3

due to COVID19 restrictions, students were not able to attend the Mass in-person. However, thanks to technology, the Mass was able to be viewed live online by graduates and their families and friends. Despite the unusual times in which we are living, our graduates will journey into the next phase of their lives with the solid foundation of their Catholic education. Please keep them in your prayers as they face a world full of uncertainties. They, like all of us, will have many challenges in the coming months and years, but we pray that they will keep Christ at the center of their lives and use their Catholic education to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ wherever they go. Lastly, I am happy to announce that our Catholic schools will be open for the fall term. Administrators, teachers, and staff are working hard to ensure the safe return of our students to their classrooms. I look forward myself to return to teaching in-person classes at St. Mary’s University and will be ready to welcome my students this fall. We are grateful to all of our teachers and parents in the diocese, who persevered in living the teachings of our faith this spring. You remain in our thoughts and prayers throughout this summer break. Blessed are you!

From the Bishop

�ear Friends in Christ,

Mass is an essential part of our lives as Catholics, and so it was important to find a way to safely resume public Masses. I know that for many of you, the Eucharist is what sustains your life of faith, and it has been a great hardship to be away from Mass and Holy Communion for so long. At parishes where public Mass has resumed, people have been grateful and excited to once again be able to worship together and receive Communion. Despite the wearing of masks, a shorter and simpler liturgy, and social distancing, our people are filled with joy at being able to once again take part in the Celebration of the Eucharist. The initial crowds have been small, and it will take time for people to become comfortable venturing back to church. However, it is a sign of hope to know that we can once again gather together as a people of faith for the Celebration of the Eucharist. Blessed are you!

Sincerely in Christ,

Most Rev. John M. Quinn Bishop of Winona-Rochester

June 23, Tuesday 1 p.m. - Sacred Heart Major Seminary Ad Hoc Strategic Planning Committee Meeting Conference Call June 24, Wednesday 10:31 a.m. - Guest Speaker via telephone on Real Presence Catholic Radio June 25, Thursday 9:30 a.m. - Holy Hour and College of Consultors Board Meeting 4 p.m. - Weekly Zoom Conference with Minnesota Bishops June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org


Pope, 4

From the Rochester Franciscans

cont'd from pg. 2

Cities across the U.S. have seen widespread protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd. Some protests have turned to nights of rioting, and conflicts with police. At least five people have died amid the protests. In the video of the May 25 arrest, an officer with the Minneapolis Police Department can be seen kneeling on Floyd’s neck for several minutes after he was taken into custody. Floyd could be heard saying “I can’t breathe” several times. He died soon after. Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was arrested May 29, and has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. He and the three other officers present at Floyd’s arrest were fired from the Minneapolis Police Department. Catholics across the Twin Cities have called for justice and unity in the wake of Floyd’s death. Clergy in Minnesota, including Archbishop

Statement, cont'd from pg. 1

But the violence of recent nights is selfdestructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost. Let us keep our eyes on the prize of true and lasting change. Legitimate protests should not be exploited by persons who have different values and

Bernard Hebda of St. Paul-Minneapolis, participated in a silent walking protest June 2 to pray at the location where George Floyd died in police custody. Archbishop Hebda had offered a Mass for the soul of George Floyd and for his family May 27. “Our Lady of Guadalupe, Mother of America, intercede for all those who work for peace and justice in your land and in the world. God bless you all and your families,” Pope Francis said. agendas. Burning and looting communities, ruining the livelihoods of our neighbors, does not advance the cause of racial equality and human dignity. We should not let it be said that George Floyd died for no reason. We should honor the sacrifice of his life by removing racism and hate from our hearts and renewing our commitment to fulfill our nation’s sacred promise — to be a beloved community of life, liberty, and equality for all.

ue to the recent events in our cities, states, and multiple countries around the world, we Rochester Franciscans share our concerns and common voice to lift others to a higher level of respect for humanity, justice, compassion and peaceful actions, as we encourage positive changes in our world. In doing so, we wish to share this statement: We Rochester Franciscans commit ourselves to be a compassionate presence for peace in the world. Believing that prayer and love can heal our society, we join with Mr. George Floyd's family, his neighborhood of south Minneapolis and all who grieve his death. As a society, we are challenged to be strong enough to change our attitudes and behavior, to end this social virus of racism among us. To do this, we must listen to and respond to the concerns of all racial groups; allowing them to define themselves as we strive to create a future cleansed of racism. On behalf of the Sisters of Saint Francis and our Cojourners,

Sister Ramona Miller

Congregational Minister/President

Further Reading Open Wide Our Hearts: the Enduring Call to Love usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/racism/upload/open-wide-our-hearts.pdf Statement of USCCB Chairmen in Wake of Death of George Floyd and National Protests usccb.org/news/2020/20-83.cfm Video: Bishop Shelton Fabre Statement on the Death of George Floyd youtube.com/watch?v=hfQvYelF_9k&feature=youtu.be

Catholic News Service Articles

After Weekend of Protests, Bishops Express Sorrow Over Floyd Killing, Racism cnstopstories.com/2020/06/02/after-weekend-of-protests-bishops-express-sorrow-over-george-floyd-killing-racism/ Vatican Official: Racism Is 'Spiritual' Virus that Must Be Wiped Out cnstopstories.com/2020/06/01/vatican-official-racism-is-spiritual-virus-that-must-be-wiped-out/ Catholics in Twin Cities Grappling with Floyd's Death, Related Rioting cnstopstories.com/2020/06/01/catholics-in-twin-cities-grappling-with-floyds-death-related-rioting/ Gomez: Killing of Floyd Is a 'Sin that Cries Out to Heaven for Justice' cnstopstories.com/2020/06/01/gomez-killing-of-floyd-is-a-sin-that-cries-out-to-heaven-for-justice/

Vatican News Articles

US Bishops Condemn Killing of George Floyd, Deplore Violence and Destruction vaticannews.va/en/church/news/2020-06/usccb-statement-gomez-condemn-killing-george-floyd.html US Bishops: Racism Not a Thing of the Past vaticannews.va/en/church/news/2020-05/us-bishops-racism-not-a-thing-of-the-past.html

June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org


Is This a Divine Punishment? Would our God really cause the physical and economic suffering of millions of people around the globe as punishment for Catholics following the licit and Church-approved practice of receiving Communion in the hand? What kind of merciful God This article is reprinted with permission from the would do that? Certainly not a loving father, or even website Where Peter Is (https://wherepeteris.com/ a fair-minded judge. These are the actions of a petuis-this-a-divine-punishment/), where it was posted on lant tyrant. April 28, 2020. The author, PAUL FAHEY, is “a husband, God has revealed to us that he “did not make father of four, parish director of religious education, death, nor does he rejoice in the destruction of and co-founder of Where Peter Is. He can be found at the living” (Wis 1:13). Suffering and death are not his website, Rejoice and be Glad: Catholicism in the actively willed by God. It was only because of sin Pope Francis Generation. that “visible creation has become alien and hostile to man” and death entered human history (CCC 400). However, God does permit his free creatures to comthink it’s completely natural for believers to look mit acts of grave moral evil (CCC 311). This is what at this pandemic and the profound suffering it is we call God’s “permissive will.” God doesn’t actively causing and ask themselves “why?” The Catechism want evil in the world, but he allows us to expericalls the experience of suffering and evil a “scandal” ence the consequences of our actions. While Jesus before going on to say, “If God the Father almighty, is clear that tragedy isn’t necessarily a the Creator of the ordered and good direct result of personal sin (Cf. Lk 13:2world, cares for all his creatures, why Before blaming Jn 9:3), all suffering and death does evil exist? To this question, as the pandemic on 5is and a consequence of sin in some way: pressing as it is unavoidable and as painful as it is mysterious, no quick divine wrath, the whether it’s my sin, someone else’s sin against me, or living in a world broken answer will suffice” (CCC 309). by original sin. While no quick answers will suf- faithful should God established creation with natufice, they certainly are tempting. pause and ask ral laws that govern its movement. If I Unfortunately, like Job’s friends in the drop a 20-pound weight, it will fall to Old Testament, there are many peo- themselves, the ground. If I drop it on my foot, I will ple who have been all too quick to experience pain. Likewise, if humanoffer their analyses. Some high-profile "Who is God?" ity abuses creation, wrecks ecosystems, Catholics have insisted that the panand pollutes the environment there will be natural demic is a divine punishment for the pope allowconsequences to our behavior. Nearly 30 years ago, ing Christians from the Amazon to engage in the Saint John Paul II taught: Christian worship practices of their native culture in the Vatican or for the “great sacrilege” of Catholics Man thinks that he can make arbitrary use of the receiving Communion in the hand instead of on earth, subjecting it without restraint to his will, the tongue. In their desperate search to explain the as though it did not have its own requisites and a present suffering, these figures have distorted the prior God-given purpose, which man can indeed Gospel. develop but must not betray. Instead of carrying Before blaming the pandemic on divine wrath, out his role as a co-operator with God in the work the faithful should pause and ask themselves, “Who of creation, man sets himself up in place of God is God?” As Pope Francis said in his homily for Divine and thus ends up provoking a rebellion on the Mercy Sunday: part of nature, which is more tyrannized than governed by him (Centesimus Annus 37). God never tires of reaching out to lift us up when we fall. He wants us to see him, not as a taskmasOr, as Pope Francis pointedly said during his ter with whom we have to settle accounts, but as Earth Day address last week: our Father who always raises us up. In life we go We have failed to care for the earth, our gardenforward tentatively, uncertainly, like a toddler home; we have failed to care for our brothers

and sisters. We have sinned against the earth, against our neighbours, and ultimately against the Creator, the benevolent Father who provides for everyone, and desires us to live in communion and flourish together. And how does the earth react? There is a Spanish saying that is very clear about this. It goes: "God always forgives; we humans sometimes forgive, and sometimes not; the earth never forgives." The earth does not forgive: if we have despoiled the earth, its response will be very ugly.

Lay Formation & RCIA

Todd Graff

Director of Lay Formation & RCIA tgraff@dowr.org

who takes a few steps and falls; a few steps more and falls again, yet each time his father puts him back on his feet.

5

This is why the Holy Father has been so adamant that we cannot return to life as usual after the pandemic, because that’s what led to this tragedy in the first place. Economic inequality has made millions of people more vulnerable to this disease and it’s likely that urban expansion and climate change contribute to the cause and spread of diseases like COVID-19. During his March 27 Urbi et Orbi address, Pope Francis explained that this pandemic isn’t a time of God judging us, but a time for us to judge the way we will respond and move forward. He goes on to say: Lord, your word this evening strikes us and regards us, all of us. In this world, that you love more than we do, we have gone ahead at breakneck speed, feeling powerful and able to do anything. Greedy for profit, we let ourselves get caught up in things, and lured away by haste. We did not stop at your reproach to us, we were not shaken awake by wars or injustice across the world, nor did we listen to the cry of the poor or of our ailing planet. We carried on regardless, thinking we would stay healthy in a world that was sick. Now that we are in a stormy sea, we implore you: "Wake up, Lord!”

We cry out to God for help, not because he is smiting us with this plague. God also is not simply sitting back indifferently, to let us wallow in the consequences of our own choices. No! God is still close to us! “At every time and in every place, God draws close to man” (CCC 1) and “God proves his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us” (Rom 5:8). God doesn’t allow suffering and death only because he respects our freedom, he also permits it because he “mysteriously, knows how to derive good from it” (CCC 311). That mysterious promise is the source of our hope in the midst of this pandemic. Let us cling to the Risen Jesus, our living hope, and beg for the grace that drives away our fear, increases our faith, and purifies our hearts.

June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org


Life, Marriage & Family Youth & Young Adults

6

What Is the

Peter Martin

Domestic Church?

�ccording to the Second Vatican Council: “The family is, so to speak, the domestic church” (Lumen Gentium #11). This means that it is in the context of the family that we first learn who God is and to prayerfully seek His will for us. In reality, we can

Director of Faith Formation and Life, Marriage & Family pmartin@dowr.org

speak of four distinct levels of Church. There is the Universal Church led by the Bishop of Rome and all bishops in union with him. There is the local diocesan church. Led by its local bishop, it is uniquely positioned to guide us on how best to implement our faith in our own time and culture. There is the local parish church, from which we receive most of our religious instruction and the sacraments. Finally, there is this fourth layer of Church. The Domestic Church plays a key role in our sanctification because it is the primary place where we practice coming to intimately love other persons. This month I asked several families to tell me about their Domestic Church by asking the following question: “How has the pandemic made Christ more of the center of your home?” Here are some of the answers I received:

We watch a taped Mass online, and then stop it when one of us has a question-we discuss-and then continue to watch/pray. We pray the Rosary together when it is offered live on Facebook. During Lent, we watched the Stations of the Cross on Mondays and Thursdays on Facebook live. During meals and before bed, we make sure to practice our prayers, as we need them now more than ever. Sometimes at supper, we go around and say what good things happened to each of us during the day. We’ve had more time to do that. We watch the homilies from different Masses/ priests during the weekend. It’s great to see the different perspectives. Some priests are very gifted at preaching: explaining the Gospel in a way many can understand and use in everyday life.

We keep doing our faith formation on Wednesday afternoon/nights; it is good to keep that routine.

In the following bullet points you will find some suggestions on how to build your “domestic church” through a life of prayer that can help all the members of your family. •

• • •

Begin praying as a family and reading from Scripture daily, certainly before meals, but also first thing in the morning or before bed. Find a time that works for your family. Use the liturgy of the Church as a model for prayer, and try to include heartfelt unstructured prayer as well. Pray a Family Rosary (each member leads a decade, and everyone shares intentions). Have a crucifix in a prominent place in the home, and in every bedroom. Make the Sacraments a regular celebration – take the whole family to Confession and Mass!

Aaron Lofy

Director of Youth & Young Adults, alofy@dowr.org

� uring this Easter season, the Church gave its faithful readings from the book of Acts in the liturgy. It is

beautiful to hear all that the early Christians had to go through to share the love and joy of Jesus Christ after the Resurrection. Just recently we had a reading from the first letter of Peter which says, “Always be prepared to make a defense to anyone who calls you to account for the hope that is in you" (3:15). One of the main ways that the early Christians proclaimed Jesus Christ was through their testimony. A testimony gives witness to what Jesus Christ has done in your life. This type of “story” answers 3 questions: 1. What did your life look like before your encounter with Christ? 2. What was your encounter with Christ?

3. Because of this encounter, what does your life look like now? June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org

• • • • • •

Begin family traditions based on the seasons celebrated in the liturgical calendar.

Make your vacation a holy pilgrimage by visiting the shrines and saints of our land and the world.

Make worshiping God a priority. Never miss Mass, even while traveling – go to: www.MassTimes. org to find a church near you! Teach stewardship and charity to your children, through word and example.

Demonstrate love for your spouse, your children, your neighbors, and the world. Remind their children that they are loved by God and have been given gifts to serve others.

Talk freely about the presence of God in the joys and sorrows of your life.

• • • •

How would you answer the question? How is your Domestic Church doing? If you need help, please don’t hesitate to ask for assistance! We all recognize the stressors of this time and no one should feel ashamed to reach out for help! Welcome into your home and support priests, brothers, sisters, deacons, and lay ministers in the Church. Participate in the lay ministries and activities of your parish community. Allow your children to witness you in private prayer. Encourage your children to pray daily on their own, to listen for God’s call, and, if heard, to respond.

For more ideas on how to build your home as a Domestic Church, go to: www.domestic-church. com or visit The Family Fully Alive, sponsored by the Knights of Columbus.

http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/vocations/ parents/tools-for-building-a-domestic-church.cfm

Share Your Testimony This is a simple outline to follow to understand the criteria of a testimony. We all have a testimony and there is no right or wrong answer for it. It is what Jesus Christ has done in your life and no one can take that away from you. As I pray and reflect on these past two months of the coronavirus pandemic, my faith has been tested. I remember my lack of zeal at times, and the ability to be truly present in the Mass before the closing down of public Masses. Now that I do not have the opportunity to physically be at Mass, how do I grow in my discipleship with Jesus? For me it is through reading the Word of God. I have been praying with the letters of St. Paul, and they are challenging me to see where I lack in my discipleship. I must remember, though, that whatever holiness Jesus has entrusted to me is unique to me and His Church. As I continue to read with the daily Gospel reading and St. Paul’s letters, I believe I will be ready for what God wants of me after this pandemic subsides. Our own testimony of what Jesus is doing with us during this pandemic is what I believe we need to be prepared to talk about when we gather in larger group settings again. This can start now through social media,

phone calls, zoom meetings, even a friendly encounter at a store. We each have a mission field that God has predestined for us; are we ready to allow the Holy Spirit to work in and through us given the opportunity?


The Month of the Two Hearts Rev. Jason Kern Director of Vocations jkern@dowr.org

with the state of the world. Here we find that fear and anxiety drive us to a sense that the world is chaotic and disordered. We come to believe that things may not end well for humanity and that God’s providence either is not influential or at least doesn’t care enough to provide for me. This sense of insecurity needs to be rejected as it robs us of peace and stability. The Heart of Jesus is our refuge in a world of constant fear. There is no fear in perfect love. Let the Heart of Jesus and His Mother console you in these days. Let them show you the truth of who you are. Let them affirm you in your true dignity that you are not alone, you are good without others approval, and you are secure in this world because of Jesus. The Hearts of Jesus and Mary are truly real. This is what will ground you to live in love in your vocation and will help you witness to others in their search for meaning and hope in our days.

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Vocations

n times of instability it naturally happens that we begin assimilating the sense of fear or instability into our own mind and heart. We can begin to feel an agitation about the state of things and begin to grasp for simple pleasures or diversions which create a sense of freedom from the anxiousness of our state of life. This is a tendency to grasp after what is not truly real. Instead of entering into deeper prayer and abiding in a lasting communion with the Father, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit, we allow ourselves to pass the time in other more frivolous ways. During the month of June, I am reminded of a devotion that is more real than any passing hobby, diversion, or even any other relationship in my life. The month of June is referred to in the spiritual tradition as the month of the Two

Hearts. June is the month each year where the feast days of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary land. They are technically celebrated as movable feasts on the Friday and Saturday two weeks after Pentecost but each year we rejoice in the merciful and immaculate hearts which confer so much grace to our diocese and Church as a whole. The Heart of Jesus has the capacity for those who devote themselves to Him to draw us deeply into His love and mercy. The Heart of Jesus is pierced with love for you and on fire with a consuming mercy to burn your sins away. This devotion has become a proven place of refuge for me when I feel the temptation to run away due to the agitations of life. The Heart of Jesus and Mary enclose me in security. There are three places of insecurity in our lives. The first place we experience insecurity is within ourselves or what we could call isolation. Often this happens when we experience that poverty of being alone or loneliness. We are afraid of being in solitude and we can run from silence. Isolation may stem from feelings of abandonment or rejection. In this place we can learn to be loved by God anew if we are willing to suffer the feelings of loneliness and let the Consoling Heart of Jesus fill us with peace and affirming love. You are enough. You are good. God is on your side and is with you right now. You are never alone in Christ. The second way that insecurity takes root in us is in comparing ourselves to others, by judging that we lack something or would be better if we were different than we are. This comparison is a way of feeling insecure in relation to other people. The Heart of Jesus teaches us the truth that we are made for union with others and are made for love. Comparison is called the thief of joy because it takes us out of our sense of security and makes us worry about external appearances or relationships that are not of God. If we learn to give and receive love from the Heart of Jesus and Mary we can learn to settle our hearts when they begin to go outside of our identity as beloved in the Son. Our security is found in the union we have with the Heart of Jesus. The last insecurity of our times is an insecurity

Congratulations, Sr. Maria Carmel Bute M.C.

n Friday, May 24, Sr. Maria Carmel Bute M.C., (pictured on the left), along with three other sisters, made their final profession of perpetual vows into the Missionaries of Charity at the private chapel of the Gift of Peace House in Washington D.C. Families were not able to be present due to the current pandemic. Archbishop Wilton Gregory presided at the celebration of the Mass. Superiors from both the Contemplative and Active branches of the M.C.’s were present as witnesses to the vows of poverty, chastity, obedience, and full-hearted and free service to the poorest of the poor. Sr. Maria Carmel is the daughter of Scott and Lisa Bute of St. Casimir Parish in Wells. Upon completion of vows, she has been assigned to the San Diego California regional house for Contemplatives.

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Catholic Schools

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Congrats, Grads! Congratulations to the 2020 graduates of our diocese's four Catholic high schools: Loyola, Mankato; Pacelli, Austin; Lourdes, Rochester; and Cotter, Winona! In spite of some disappointments brought upon their senior year by the COVID-19 pandemic and distance learning requirements, these students finished strong, and they graduated this spring with ceremonies adapted to respect social distancing. Please enjoy these pictures of the ceremonies, and join me in congratulating our diocese's newest Catholic school graduates!

Catholic Schools

Marsha Stenzel

Superintendent of Catholic Schools mstenzel@dowr.org

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Faith in the Public Arena

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The Enduring Message of

The Gospel of Life �

n March 25, Pope St. John Paul II’s landmark papal letter Evangelium Vitae (“The Gospel of Life”) marked its 25th anniversary. Addressing society’s devolving opinion on issues such as abortion, contraception, and euthanasia, Evangelium Vitae resoundingly reaffirmed the dignity of each person and emphasized the Church’s role in upholding the primacy of life. A quarter-century has passed, and attacks on life continue with alarming frequency. As each attack further darkens our society, we – the Church – must carry the light of life preached in Pope St. John Paul II’s "Gospel of Life." In solidarity with our neighbors and in service to the Church, we are called to proclaim the Gospel of life unceasingly in both word and action. We must ensure that neither civil law nor public opinion runs contrary to the truth embedded in the hearts of all people—that life at every stage is to be loved, cherished, and respected. Opposing the Culture of Death

Religious Freedom Week: June 22-29 Religious Freedom Week begins June 22 on the Feast of Saints Thomas More and John Fisher. During this time join fellow Catholics to pray, reflect, and take action on religious liberty in the United States and abroad. All people desire to know their Creator. All people have a natural impulse to seek the good and to live in accordance with that good. All people can flourish when they pursue the truth about God and respond to the truth. Religious freedom means that all people have the space to flourish. Religious freedom is both an American value and an important part of Catholic teaching on human dignity. When we promote religious freedom, we promote the common good and thus strengthen the life of our nation and the community of nations. Learn more at: www.usccb.org/ReligiousFreedomWeek June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org

Throughout Evangelium Vitae, Pope St. John Paul II compares the Gospel of life to the “culture of death.” While the Gospel of life affirms the dignity of each person, the culture of death denies human dignity. Failing to recognize each person’s intrinsic worth, the culture of death values individual persons inasmuch as they are deemed useful. This judgement based on utility leads to “a war of the powerful against the weak.” The powerful discard the weak who are perceived to be a burden or useless—an act is devoid of solidarity and a recognition of human worth. Such discarding is evident in abortion and physicianassisted suicide, wherein the victim is weak and the victim’s family does not serve its actual purpose as "the sanctuary of life." Pope St. John Paul II also cautioned that prenatal screenings be used only for legitimate medical purposes, and not as a tool in eugenics. Yet, in the United States, best estimates indicate that over two-thirds of children diagnosed in the womb with Down Syndrome are aborted. This tragedy reflects a culture that sees an atypical life as a burden rather than a gift. The culture of death extends through the whole of life, especially with the threat of physician-assisted suicide. Pope St. John Paul II states, end of life decisions have the potential

Jack Lawlis

Policy & Outreach Coordinator Minnesota Catholic Conference

to be “marked by an attitude of excessive preoccupation with efficiency and [which] sees the growing number of elderly and disabled people as intolerable and too burdensome.” The culture of death has harmed our elderly community amid the COVID-19 pandemic, with estimates listing 81% of COVID-19 deaths as having occurred in Minnesota’s long-term care centers because recovering patients are sent there and then spread the virus in the community. The concentration of COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes suggests that we’ve neglected the wellbeing of the elderly in Minnesota. Proclaiming the Gospel of Life

As the culture of death darkens our society, we look to our Lord, the best example and light of the Gospel of life. As Pope St. John Paul II said, “Truly great must be the value of human life if the Son of God has taken it up and made it the instrument of the salvation of all humanity!” In humbling Himself to come to us in human form and undergoing immense suffering for us in His Passion, Christ shows the inestimable value of human life: he ennobles it and challenges the belief that it be discarded because of its limitations, stage of development, or usefulness. We, too, can participate in Christ’s ennobling work. By supporting mothers and families during pregnancy, we affirm that life is a blessing, not a burden, and uphold the Gospel of life. By standing in solidarity with those receiving end of life care and supporting legislation that promotes legitimate improvements in end of life care, such as palliative care or hospice, we are visible witnesses to the Gospel of life. Minnesotans also stand at the edge of a decision to support or condemn the culture of death, as bills to legalize physician-assisted suicide have been introduced in Minnesota’s legislature every year since 2015. This legislation hasn’t passed, and we should ensure it doesn’t. When we take Evangelium Vitae to the public square, we bring to light where the culture of death has seeped in and caused harm. In confronting this darkness with the light of the truth, that human life is valuable and must be protected at every stage and in every capacity, we become the visible and vocal reminders needed to turn hearts back to serve the good of all.


Family Reunification

Is a Passion for Catholic Charities Director Refugee Resettlement Catholic Charities of Southern MN

By MELISSA MEYERS

hen a person looks at a house that has been bombed, they see a remnant of what used to be, shattered glass, crumbled walls, and rubble. The tragedy is not the destroyed house, but the fact that a family is always connected to a house. Just like the house that lies in fragments, often war and unrest cause families to be broken into pieces. This happens for different reasons. Maybe when fighting erupted, children were at Grandma and Grandpa’s house, or the father of the family was employed in another city, or even as simple as the mother was out shopping at the market. Due to this, it is not uncommon for families to end up relocating in refugee camps in separate countries. The challenge then becomes how to get them together again. There is no one in Southern Minnesota who knows the stories of separated families better than Fatema Giwa, Support Staff Coordinator, of Catholic Charities Refugee Resettlement. Since 2004, she has worked on hundreds of reunification cases, working tirelessly to bring separated families together, to make them whole. Her impact on the community is evident as she often runs into former clients who she helped to reunite. She has many success stories about how finally she was able to reunite families. Some of them stand out to her, like the story of Kebede* and Ibo*. After living in the refugee camps for some time, Kebede had met the man she wanted to marry, Ibo. She had been so happy the day they got their official marriage certificate from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) office. Now, if they were chosen for resettlement they would have official documentation to go together. But all her happiness left the day she finally was interviewed for resettlement. Instead of a day of great joy, it was a day of great sadness, because Ibo had not been there. They had not been notified that a US official was coming to interview her and her mother and father. Ibo had left early in the morning to visit a sick relative in a neighboring camp. When the official came to interview her and her family, he explained that to be considered for resettlement, Ibo must be there in person. She had tried to call him, but the cell phone towers were few and it was not uncommon for coverage to drop. Her mother and father pleaded with her to continue the interview. “What if it is your only chance?” When she felt the baby inside her move, she knew what she needed to do, and she hoped

Catholic Charities

John Meyers

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she needed to wait a little before she left Ibo longer. The day finally came would have his interwhen she got a call. She could hear view, too. This didn’t hapthe smile in Fatema’s voice as she told her pen though, and now she found herself without the news. It had been a year, but her husband, Ibo in a place called Minnesota, being helped Ibo, had finally been approved. He would soon be through the resettlement process by Catholic meeting his son for the first time. Charities. Fatema shared this was one of her easFor the past four decades, Catholic Charities’ ier cases because everything came together. refugee resettlement program has been there to Otherwise, much of the family reunification prowelcome refugees to their new home in Southern cess involves building a case by piecing evidence Minnesota. Our mission is to meet the needs together through documents and records which of newly arrived refugees are fragmented by unstaby providing one-on-one ble governments and havcase management to guide ing to move between refuthem on their new journey gee camps. Reunification and empower them in their cases can take anywhere new life. Services include from one to five years to assistance in accessing get approved. These are stable and safe housing, years of birthdays, holiday food, clothing, employcelebrations, and special ment services, and varimoments together, which ous other services that will are missed while separatlead to self-sufficiency and ed families wait in refuempowerment gee camps for their cases At Catholic Charities, to be processed. Since Kebede met Fatema, a she first took the job in woman with kind eyes, Support Staff Coordinator Fatema Giwa 2004, Fatema’s attention who wanted to hear her to detail has resulted in story about her husband. hundreds of families being As the interpreter told it in reunited. English to Fatema, Kebede saw she wrote down Catholic Charities Refugee Resettlement a lot of notes. At the end of the interview, Fatema Program staff have a passion to see families asked her if she had the marriage certificate from made whole again. They know this isn’t always the UNHCR. “Yes,” she said. I have kept it safe. She possible, but what keeps staff, like Fatema, going listened as Fatema explained she had a good case after all these years is that she sees herself in because Ibo was an immediate family member these families. She wants to be that welcome for and she had a proper marriage certificate. them, and, as a devout Catholic, she values the Fatema told her to be patient because it takes life-giving work that Catholic Charities is doing. a long time for the forms to go through the sys“This is my call," she said. tem. Sometimes, through an interpreter, Kebede *Note that family names and some details have would ask how things were going. Fatema would been changed for privacy. assure her everything was moving forward, but

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These Days Are Advice, COVID Relief cont'd from pg. 1 Works of Mercy Fund to Benefit Worthington Area �

In the Diocese

By LISA KREMER

� he southwestern corner of Minnesota has been hard hit by the COVID outbreak. Nobles County (the Worthington area)

has had the largest number of COVID cases per population in the state, and many of the people most affected do not qualify for government assistance. As we continue to assess the needs of the people in our area who have been affected by the COVID outbreak, Catholic Charities of Southern MN has started a Worthington Deanery COVID Relief Fund. This fund is helping people in our area (the counties of Rock, Pipestone, Nobles, Murray, Jackson and Cottonwood) who have reduced income (lost employment or reduced hours) because of the COVID outbreak, and do not qualify for other means of assistance (unemployment, stimulus money, etc.). We will help those who have “fallen through the cracks” with rent or utilities up to $500. This fund is currently supported solely by donations. If you would like to help, donations can be mailed to: Catholic Charities of Southern MN 111 Market Street, Suite #2 PO Box 739 Winona, MN 55987

Checks should be made payable to “Catholic Charities” but it is very important to designate your gift by writing “Worthington COVID Relief” in the memo line of the check. If you are in need and would like to apply for assistance, contact Lisa Kremer at 507-360-3423 or email lkremer@ccsomn.org We thank you for your support and for your prayers and concern for those who are suffering during these difficult times. Lisa Kremer is the parish social ministry coordinator for Catholic Charities in Worthington.

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By JEANETTE FORTIER

n between the solicitation calls on my phone, a friend will call to say hello and ask how I am doing. We each ask the other what we’ve been up to. There are a lot of works going on: a meal for a family, a mom making sure her children are drinking enough water, making face masks, cards to friends or family in the nursing home, funerals we can’t attend and monetary donations in support of charities. There are more: school at home, seeking peace and justice, connecting with those in mourning, forgiveness, putting up with the annoying behavior of that person you’ve had to live with for the last four months, and prayers, lots and lots of prayers. I wonder if we can title these days not as “quarantine,” but rather as “works of mercy.” For that is what we are doing; we are daily living the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy in a more profound way than ever. If we were to look at these days from the perspective that we are compelled as Catholics to be about the work of Christ, wouldn’t that bring greater meaning to what we have been living through since March? It's more than just being a kind and caring person; we follow the call and example of Christ to bring mercy and hope to those around us. Stranger, family, or friend, what we do bears more meaning because we do these things in the name of the Lord! To my sisters throughout the diocese, I miss your smiling faces (you are smiling behind that face mask, I know it) and can’t wait for the day we can be together. Stay strong of heart and spirit. Keep up your good works for mercy is all around us! Jeanette Fortier is the president of the Winona-Rochester Diocesan Council of Catholic Women

family (phone calls, Zoom, FaceTime/Skype), and with the broader community (e.g., practice “random acts of kindness;" leave a note of encouragement or a bunch of daffodils on a neighbor’s porch, support a small business that you would like to see survive this shut-down, or find some other way to spread some comfort or joy). There is some evidence that how we interpret a stressor (either as a terrible, destructive experience, or as an opportunity for connection, kindness, courage, and resilience) can affect the physical and psychological impact of the stressor down the road. If you are struggling, reach out for help. Most counseling can now be done by phone or video without having to leave your home and Catholic Charities is here to help. Call 507-454-2270 for more information.

Annette Krutsch is a licensed psychologist at Catholic Charities of Southern Minnesota.


The Televised Mass Is Offered Every Sunday Sioux Falls - KTTW Channel 7 at 7 a.m. Sioux City - KPTH Channel 44 at 8:30 a.m. Mankato - KEYC Channel 12 at 7:30 a.m.

Digital Channel 7 (DirecTV) or Channel 11 (DISH) KMNF at 9 a.m. Rochester/Austin/Mason City KIMT Channel 3 at 7:30 a.m. MyTV 3.2 at 9 a.m. NEW Twin Cities - WFTC Digital Channel 29 or Channel 9.2 at 11:30 a.m. Southeastern MN - HBC Channel 20 at 3 p.m. (repeated Wed. at 3:30 p.m.) Winona/La Crosse/Eau Claire - WLAX/WEUX Channel 25/48 at 7:30 a.m. and on our website, dowr.org (click "Weekly Mass")

By JOYE WOLF, LICSW

� uring these times of working from home, often with children to guide through their school

days at home, many couples are feeling the strain of “too much time together." Here are some ideas to help you make the best of this time, and help your marriage thrive. It’s great to spend some of your leisure time doing activities together with your spouse, such as playing cards or a board game, watching a movie, taking a walk or a bike ride together, or working on an enjoyable project. But, have some individual activities in separate rooms during part of the time, such as reading a book, magazine or newspaper, or doing a craft or hobby. Spend time outdoors in your yard, or taking a walk if you can. Being out in nature is restorative and really reduces that trapped-in feeling. Aim to keep up healthy communication. Don't let concerns or feelings fester. Talk about your needs. Problem solve together to find mutual solutions. Keep calm. Take a time-out if needed to avoid angry words and yelling. Don’t lash out or lash back. Go to another room or go outside when you need some time apart. Remember that these times are stressful, and credit yourself and your partner for doing as well as you are right now. Help each other in the home. Share chores and child care in what you mutually decide is an equitable way. Consider dividing up the chores--who is responsible for what. Or trade off chores, with an agreed-upon schedule. Play to one another's strengths in chore division when possible. The most important thing is to find a solution that you both feel good about.

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In the Diocese

Digital Channel 12.2 or Charter Channel 19 NEYC at 9:30 a.m.

Surviving and Thriving for Couples

Talk together and find agreement on a plan about how weekly or monthly finances will be used. Some experts are saying it is okay, for now, to pay minimum payments on debts. If you are still working and can afford to, plan to put aside savings for an emergency fund. If it’s not possible to save, then at least stick to an agreed-upon budget. The important thing is to have a plan you have talked about and can agree upon together. Be respectful to each other. Remember that politeness goes a long way. Watch your alcohol intake carefully. Know the CDC drinking guidelines and stay under the CDC limits. Be aware of your alcohol intake, and guard against it increasing. Find a stress-buster other than drinking. For example, exercise, listen to music, find a creative outlet, or call a friend. Practice your faith together, or at least on your own. That may include televised or “streamed” worship, reading, and prayer, for example. Practice gratitude for what is good. Naming what you're grateful for can improve your perspective on life as it is right now. We still have much to be thankful for if we give it some thought. Talk together about what there is to be grateful for. Remember why you fell in love with your spouse. What did you admired about them when you got to know them? What do you think had been admirable about you? Were you kind, patient, generous, compassionate, helpful, a good listener, encouraging, fun? This is a good opportunity to remember to be those things for each other again. Joy Wolfe is a Licensed and Independent Clinical Social Worker for Catholic Charities of Southern Minnesota.

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Happy Anniversaries!

In the Diocese

Rev. La Vern Trocinski (60 years a priest) was born in Coon Valley, WI, to Elmer and Olga (Jorgensen) Trocinski. He studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and then completed his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. On May 31, 1960, Father Trocinski was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Edward A. Fitzgerald. Father Trocinski later studied family and community development at Regis College in Denver, CO. Father Trocinski’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at Queen of Angels in Austin, Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Easton, and St. John the Evangelist in Rochester. As Pastor, he served at St. Theodore in Albert Lea, St. James in Twin Lakes, St. Stanislaus Kostka and St. John Nepomucene in Winona, and Pax Christi in Rochester. Additional assignments include chaplain for St. Elizabeth Hospital in Wabasha, Methodist Hospital in Rochester, College of St. Teresa in Winona, Lamberton Home for Children and Cabrini Home in Winona, and St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center in Winona; confessor to the St. Edward Convent in Austin; moderator for the Winona Council of Catholic Women; marriage therapist for Catholic Charities; diocesan director of the Campaign for Human Development; member of the Bureau of Priests’ Retirement, College of Consultors, Presbyteral Council, Bishop Advisory Council for Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary, and Priests’ Committee for Capital Campaign; Area Director for Austin; area director of Campaign for Human Development; diocesan Director of Family Life; Dean of the Winona Deanery; and Parochial Administrator for St. John the Baptist in Dodge Center, St. Vincent de Paul in West Concord, and St. Francis de Sales in Claremont. On July 1, 2002, Father Trocinski joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese. Very Rev. James Russell (60 years a priest) was born in Madelia, to Leo and Lillian (Ulrich) Russell. He studied philosophy at St. John’s University in Collegeville and Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona, and then completed his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. On May 31, 1960, Father Russell was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Edward A. Fitzgerald. Father Russell’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. John the Evangelist in Rochester, St. Peter in Caledonia, and St. Mary in Winona. As Pastor, he served at Sacred Heart in Adams, St. Mary in Winona, Queen of Angels in Austin, St. Theodore in Albert Lea, St. James in Twin Lakes, All Saints in Madison Lake, St. Mary in Lake City, and St. Joseph in Theilman. Additional assignments include instructor for Lourdes High School in Rochester, Loretto High School in Caledonia, and Cotter High School in Winona; spiritual director for Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona; Director of Apostolic Activity; Parochial Administrator for St. Mary in Geneva, St. Aidan in Ellendale, St. Mary in Minneiska, and Immaculate Conception in St. Clair; member of the

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diocesan College of Consultors, Board of Administration and Civil Corporation, Foundation Board, and Presbyteral Council; Dean of the Austin / Albert Lea Deanery; moderator of the Mankato / St. James Council of Catholic Women; and chaplain for Madonna Towers in Rochester. Fr. Russell also spent three years with the St. James the Apostle Society for work in Latin America. On July 1, 2008, Father Russell joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese, and he currently serves as Co-Vicar for Senior Priests and is a member of both the College of Consultors and Presybteral Council.

Rev. Robert Herman (60 years a priest) was born in Tabor, SD, to Emil and Albina (Petrik) Herman. He studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and then completed his theology degree at the Theological College in Washington, D.C. On May 31, 1960, Father Herman was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Edward Fitzgerald. Father Herman’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. Augustine in Austin, St. Stanislaus Kostka in Winona, St. Joseph the Worker in Mankato, Ss. Peter and Paul in Blue Earth, Our Lady of Mercy in Guckeen, St. Joseph in Owatonna, and St. Edward in Austin. As Pastor, he served at St. Aidan in Ellendale, St. Mary in Geneva, Sacred Heart in Hayfield, Our Lady of Loretto in Brownsdale, Sacred Heart in Adams, St. John the Baptist in Johnsburg, Holy Trinity in Litomysl, St. Francis de Sales in Claremont, Christ the King in Medford, and Corpus Christi in Deerfield. Additional assignments include instructor for Pacelli High School in Austin, Cotter High School in Winona, Loyola High School in Mankato, and Marian High School in Owatonna; confessor to the School Sisters of Notre Dame for their St. Casimir Convent in Winona; parochial duties at St. Joseph in Owatonna; Parochial Administrator for St. Francis de Sales in Claremont and Queen of Peace in Lyle; principal of Pacelli High School in Austin; and Priest Moderator for Christ the King in Medford and Corpus Christi in Deerfield. On July 1, 2002, Father Herman joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese.

Rev. James Buryska (55 years a priest) was born in Litomysl, studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and earned his theology degree at North American College and the Gregorian University in Rome, Italy. On December 18, 1965, Father Buryska was ordained to the priesthood at St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome by the Most Rev. Francis Reh. Father Buryska served as instructor for Pacelli High School in Austin; Parochial Vicar for St. Augustine in Austin; co-director of Mower County Christian Education Center; and was a member of the diocesan Pastoral Council. In 1976, Father Buryska began a decades-long ministry as a chaplain, serving at St. Marys Hospital in Rochester, the Motherhouse of the Sisters of St. Francis in Rochester, Methodist Hospital in Rochester, and Rochester Federal Medical Center. Father Buryska also served as the Director of the Chaplaincy Department at St. Marys Hospital in Rochester, and was part of the National Association of Catholic Chaplains Certification Commission, before retiring from the Mayo Clinic in 2017. Father Buryska has continued to serve at Mayo Clinic and Assisi Heights after retirement on a part-time basis.

Rev. Richard Dernek (50 years a priest) was born in Winona, to Richard and Bernadine (Kukowski) Dernek. He studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and then completed his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. On May 30, 1970, Father Dernek was ordained to the p r i e s t hood at St. John Nepomucene in Winona by the Most Rev. Loras Watters. Father Dernek’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at Sacred Heart in Owatonna, St. Augustine in Austin, St. John the Evangelist in Rochester, and St. Stanislaus Kostka in Winona. As Pastor, he served at St. Aidan in Ellendale, St. Mary in Geneva, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Harmony, St. Patrick in Lanesboro, Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Canton, St. Olaf in Mabel, St. Columbanus in Blooming Prairie, Sacred Heart in Hayfield, St. Mary in Lake City, and St. Patrick in West Albany. Additional assignments include instructor for Marian High School in Owatonna and assistant chaplain at St. Marys Hospital in Rochester. On June 27, 2012, Father Dernek joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese. Rev. Peter Brandenhoff (50 years a priest) was born on November 16, 1943, in Duluth, MN, to John and Barbara (Beier) Brandenhoff. He completed his degree in philosophy at St. Mary’s College and Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona. His theological studies in preparation for ordination were completed at St. John’s Seminary and School of Theology in Collegeville, MN. On May 23, 1970, Father Brandenhoff was ordained to the priesthood at St. John Vianney Church in Fairmont by the Most Rev. Loras J. Watters. Father Peter later earned an MA in Liturgical Studies at St. John’s University / School of Theology in Collegeville. Father’s assignments as Parochial Vicar include the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona, St. Pius X in Rochester, and St. Stanislaus Kostka in Winona. As a parish pastor, he served at St. Paul’s Parish in Minnesota City and St. John Vianney Parish in Fairmont. Additional assignments include instructor of religion at Cotter High School in Winona, chaplain at the School Sisters of Notre Dame Motherhouse and instructor of religion at Good Counsel Academy in Mankato, chairman of the diocesan Commission on Sacred Liturgy, Advocate and Defender of the Bond for the Tribunal, and Defender of the Bond for the inter-provincial appellate court. During his years in Fairmont, he was also Parochial Administrator of Holy Family in East Chain. In 1993, Fr. Peter completed a graduate degree in clinical social work at the University of Minnesota. He worked for eighteen years as a psychotherapist in a multi-discipline psychiatric clinic in the Twin Cities. During those years, he offered Mass on weekends at various parishes in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. Now a senior priest of the diocese, Father Brandenhoff lives in Woodbury, MN, with his canine, Brandy, and continues to celebrate both daily and Sunday liturgies in the Twin Cities. He enjoys playing the piano and such outdoor activities as camping, kayaking, bicycling and cross-country skiing.


Rev. Joseph Fogal (45 years a priest) was born in Wittemore, IA, to Benjamin and Rosella (Kajewski) Fogal. He attended the University of Minnesota in Mankato, and then studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and completed his theology degree at St. John’s University in Collegeville. On May 23, 1975, Father Fogal was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Loras Watters. Father Fogal’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. Pius X in Rochester and St. John the Baptist in Mankato. As Pastor, he served at St. John Vianney in Fairmont, Holy Family in East Chain, St. Edward in Austin, Holy Trinity in Litomysl, St. Aidan in Ellendale, St. Augustine in Austin, Pax Christi in Rochester, and Ss. Peter and Paul in Mazeppa. Additional assignments include instructor for Lourdes High School in Rochester and Loyola High School in Mankato; chaplain for the St. Thomas More Newman Center in Mankato; member of the diocesan Presbyteral Council, Pastoral Council, Priests’ Committee for Capital Campaign, and Priests’ Assignments Committee; Parochial Administrator for St. Joseph in Good Thunder; and Vocations Director for the Diocese of Winona. On July 1, 2017, Father Fogal joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese.

Rev. James Callahan (45 years a priest) was born in Massachusetts to James C. and June (Kelly) Callahan. He studied philosophy at Stonehill College in Massachusetts, completed his theology degree at the Washington Theological Union in Washington, D.C. and Maryknoll, NY, and earned a masters degree in cross-cultural ministry (with an emphasis on Black / African culture) from Xavier University in Louisiana. On April 26, 1975, Father Callahan was ordained to the priesthood for the Society of African Missions (SMA) at the SMA Provincialate in Tenafly, NJ, by the Most Rev. Carrol Dozier. As a priest of the Society of African Missions, Father Callahan served as a missionary priest in Liberia, Rwanda, Haiti, and South Central Louisiana. His assignments also included director of the African Culture Center, a home for immigrants and refugees from Africa in Boston, MA, and Vice-Rector of Queen of Apostles College in Dedham, MA. He entered the Diocese of Winona for ministry in 1996 and was incardinated in 2004. Father Callahan’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. Francis of Assisi and Pax Christi in Rochester, and he also provided sacramental services at the Rochester Federal Medical Center. As Pastor, he served at St. Charles Borromeo in St. Charles, St. Aloysius in Elba, and Holy Redeemer in Eyota. In 2010, Father Callahan was the co-founder of the Our Lady of Guadalupe Free Clinic in Worthington, and he is currently Pastor of St. Mary in Worthington. Very Rev. Donald Schmitz (40 years a priest) was born in Austin, to Raymond and Elizabeth (Wendell) Schmitz. He studied philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona, and theology at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul and Pope John XXIII Seminary in Boston, MA. Father Schmitz also earned a master of science degree in counseling psychology from Winona State University. On June 2, 1980, Father Schmitz was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Loras Watters. Father Schmitz’s assignment as Parochial Vicar was at St. Francis of Assisi in Rochester. As Pastor, he served at St. Joseph the Worker in Mankato, St. Anthony in Lismore, St. Kilian in St. Kilian, Our Lady of Good Counsel in Wilmont, St. Mary in Caledonia,

and Holy Spirit in Rochester. Additional assignments include chaplain and adjunct education professor for St. Mary College in Winona; Associate Judge, Defender of the Bond, and Advocate for the Tribunal; instructor for Loyola High School in Mankato; member of the Presbyteral Council; and Parochial Administrator for St. Charles Borromeo in St. Charles, Holy Redeemer in Eyota, St. Aloysius in Elba, St. Mary in Lake City, and St. Patrick in West Albany. On July 1, 2013, Father Schmitz joined the rank of senior priests of the diocese, and he currently serves as Co-Vicar for Senior Priests and is a member of the Pension Plan for Priests Board of Trustees.

Rev. Edward McGrath (40 years a priest) was born in 1954 in Dixon, Illinois, to Edward F. and Patricia (Duffy) McGrath. He studied classical humanities and philosophy at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona and St. Mary’s College, then completed his theology degree in May 1980 at the St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. He later (1991) earned a licentiate in canon law (JCL) from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, Italy. He was incardinated in the Diocese of Winona and ordained a deacon on April 18, 1979, at St. John Vianney Chapel of IHM Seminary. On June 2, 1980, Father McGrath was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. Loras J. Watters. Father McGrath’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona and St. Francis of Assisi in Rochester. As Pastor, he served at Holy Trinity in Rollingstone, Immaculate Conception in Oak Ridge, St. Mary in Minneiska, and Pax Christi in Rochester. In addition, he was Parochial Administrator of St. Joseph in Owatonna, Christ the King in Medford, and Corpus Christi in Deerfield. Over the years, concurrent pastoral assignments included instructor for Lourdes High School in Rochester and Cotter High School in Winona; chaplain for Assisi Heights in Rochester; after Fr. Dennis Schimek died, he was Parochial Administrator for St. John Baptist de la Salle in Dodge Center, Holy Family in Kasson, and in years later for St. Patrick in Brownsville, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Harmony, Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Canton, and St. Olaf in Mabel. He also served in other ministerial offices: Defender of the Bond for the Tribunal; spiritual director, Director of Apostolic Works, and faculty at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona; Master of Ceremonies, Chancellor, Adjutant Judicial Vicar, canonical consultant, and Judicial Vicar for the Diocese of Winona; Dean of the Winona Deanery; member of the Deposit and Loan Fund Board of Directors and Presbyteral Council; and spiritual director for the Legion of Mary in Mankato. Father McGrath is currently Pastor of St. Mary in Chatfield, Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Canton, Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Harmony, St. Patrick in Lanesboro, and St. Columban in Preston; serves as the priest moderator of the diocesan Pastoral Council; and is on the Priest Pension Plan Board of Trustees. Rev. John Evans, II (40 years a priest) was born in Fargo, ND, to John and Gerry (Nystul) Evans. He attended North Dakota State University in Fargo, ND, and studied philosophy at Cardinal Muench Seminary in Fargo, ND, and completed his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. On May 18, 1980, Father Evans was ordained to the priesthood for the Diocese of Fargo at the St. Paul Newman Center Chapel in Fargo, ND, by the Most Rev. Justin Driscoll. As a priest of the Diocese of Fargo, Father Evans served as Parochial Vicar for Nativity in Fargo, St. Joseph in Devils Lake, Assumption in Starkweather, St.

Benedict in Rutten, and Holy Spirit in Fargo; Parochial Administrator for Holy Rosary in Bisbee, Sacred Heart in Hansboro, and Immaculate Heart of Mary in Rock Lake: Parochial Vicar for Immaculate Conception in Columbia Heights, MN; Pastor for St. Elizabeth in Sykeston, St. Patrick in Hurdsfield, St. Aloysius in Lisbon, and St. Vincent in Gwinner; and chaplain for Prairie St. John’s Hospital / Treatment Center and SMP Health System in Fargo. Father Evans has served as chaplain for the Mayo Clinic for twelve years, that began in 2007. In 2015, he became incardinated in the Diocese of WinonaRochester. Beginning in 2019, he served as a Parochial Administrator for St. Joseph in Rushford, St. Peter in Hokah, and St. Mary in Houston. Father Evans is currently Pastor of Crucifixion in La Crescent, St. Patrick in Brownsville, and Holy Cross in Dakota. Rev. Peter Schuster (25 years a priest) was born in Wells, to Lowell and Bonita (Loke) Schuster. He attended St. John’s University in Collegeville, completed his philosophy studies at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona, and received his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. On June 13, 1995, Father Schuster was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. John Vlazny. Father Schuster’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. John the Evangelist in Rochester and St. Mary in Worthington. As Pastor, he served at St. Rose of Lima in Lewiston, St. Anthony of Padua in Altura, Immaculate Conception in Wilson, Good Shepherd in Jackson, St. Joseph in Lakefield, St. Luke in Sherburn, St. John Vianney in Fairmont, and Holy Family in East Chain. Other assignments include Parochial Administrator for St. John Baptist de la Salle in Dodge Center, St. Francis de Sales in Claremont, St. Vincent de Paul in West Concord, Good Shepherd in Jackson, St. Joseph in Lakefield, St. Luke in Sherburn, St. Columbanus in Blooming Prairie, Sacred Heart in Hayfield, and Holy Trinity in Litomysl. Father Schuster is currently Pastor of Resurrection in Rochester, Assistant Vicar for Clergy for the Diocese of Winona-Rochester, and serves on the diocesan College of Consultors and Presbyteral Council.

Rev. Michael Cronin (25 years a priest) was born in Rochester, to Paul and Ann Marie (Puchner) Cronin. He attended St. John’s University in Collegeville, completed his philosophy studies at Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary in Winona, and received his theology degree at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul. He later earned a licentiate in canon law from the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. On June 13, 1995, Father Cronin was ordained to the priesthood at the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona by the Most Rev. John Vlazny. Father Cronin’s assignments as Parochial Vicar were at St. Pius X in Rochester, the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart in Winona, Immaculate Conception in Wilson, St. Casimir in Winona, Sacred Heart in Owatonna, and Holy Trinity in Litomsyl. As Pastor, he served at Holy Trinity in Rollingstone, St. Mary in Minneiska, Immaculate Conception in Oak Ridge, St. Ann in Janesville, St. Joseph in Waldorf, and All Saints in New Richland. Other assignments include chaplain and instructor for Lourdes High School in Rochester; chaplain for St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center in Winona; Parish Administrator for St. Joseph the Worker in Mankato and Holy Family in Lake Crystal; Chancellor, Vocations Director, Director of Catholic Cemeteries, and Director of Continuing Education for Clergy for the Diocese of Winona; and Defender of the Bond for the Tribunal. Father Cronin is currently Pastor of St. Mary in Winona, Canonical Administrator of Winona Area Catholic Schools, and serves on the diocesan College of Consultors and Presbyteral Council.

June 2020 w The Courier w dowr.org


June 2020

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