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DESTIG ISTANBUL | TRAVEL TO ART | ISSUE 08 / JULY 2020

TOP ARTISTS TO COLLECT | SAN FRANCISCO | GLASS MASTERS | HOT PICKS


DESTIG AWARDS nominate at www.destig.com


Discover Your Soul In Istanbul


Home Fragrances with the smell of the simplest element of nature - our land. Viktoria Yakusha, during 9 months has been developing it for a modern minimalist house and its owners, who cherish traditions and prefer natural materials. Line of 3 basic home scents – MOCHAR, CVIT and POLYN, released in the form of a diffuser, candle and soap. The packaging is handcrafted of local organic materials and the inspiration for the niche home fragrances comes from the earth - a natural element that gives life to all living things.

WWW.FAINA.DESIGN


DESTIG Table of contents

10 Welcome to Turkey 30 20 Turkish Artists 42 Design Hot Picks 54 Introduction

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56 Patrick Roth

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66 Pam Caughey 76 Jing Zhao 86 Feleksan Onar 90 Darcy J. Sears 100 Andrzej Michael 108 Margaret Drake 119 Michela Cattai 120 Angell by Ora Ito 122 Nathan Sandberg

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132 Louise Durham 142 InsidherLand 144 Nikola Levinets Park 146 Pamela Axelson 154 Bonnie Hinz 162 Marvin Lipofsky 166 Karen Olsen-Dunn

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Welcome to D8 2020 has been an intense year so far, lets hope things improve in the second half of this year. We invite you to escape with us for a while - to a place of serenity, beauty and insight. We bring you art that is healing, art that elevates the mind, art that asks questions of all us. We take you on an enchanting journey to the lands of Turkey and explore incredible San Francisco. And as always - we bring you design that makes you just want to renovate your home. Enjoy and forget 2020 for a while! - Mike Walters (Editor in Chief) 006


TRAVEL TO ART D8 ISTANBUL

176 Joe McGee 186 Narayana Montufar 196 San Francisco 198 SF Arts v Covid 200 Legion of Honour SF

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202 Aida Muluneh 204 Cynthia Faw 212 Annie Tull 222 Lingling Zhao 230 Robert Margetts 238 Hannah Gibson 242 Stephen Moscowitz 250 Cynthia Rose Tom 258 Brandi Dieter

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268 J. Kimo Williams 270 Bjorn Norgaard 274 Michele Koutris 282 Cynthia Richardson 290 Rebecca Horne 298 Vlastimil Beranek 306 Leclercq Associes

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Team Mike Walters - Editor in Chief Andrew Martin Davis - Producer Richard Maurice / Paul Martins - Journalists John West - Travel & Brand Advertising Alice Carreras - Art & Design Advertising Zayne Walters / Ziizou Mikel - Interns Victor Sanchez / Jennifer Boothe - Designers

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ZANZIBAR

...probably the best beaches in the world www.tanzaniatourism.go.tz


Discover how to create your best art and succeed in sharing it with the world.

www.artandsuccess.com


WELCOME TO TURKEY EXPLORE AN ENCHANTING LAND THAT NOURISHES THE SOUL.

There are probably a million and one ways to fill your

of antiquity and contemporary, and of East and West.

holiday with incredible things to see in Turkey. Where can you start? Experience the vacation of a

Turkey is one of the fastest growing tourism

lifetime by mixing natural attractions, Unesco sites,

destinations in the world, a truly fascinating country,

blue flag beaches and marinas, modern museums and

culturally and historically, a great place to visit.

art galleries, great tourist attractions, all in one visit.

Beautiful beaches, outdoor activities, great natural

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wonders, boat voyage tours, historical and religious

The history of Turkey tells of a 10.000 year old

sites, shopping and pampering, entertainment and

civilisation, a historical timeline of prehistoric times,

nightlife, world heritage sites and more. Turkey is

Anatolian civilisations, Roman period, Seljuk Empire,

diverse, and offers fantastic experiences to visitors.

Ottoman Empire and the modern Turkish Republic.

Full of relaxing moments and delightful memories.

Turkey's is a vast country with a dramatic landscape.

Treat yourself to time at a luxury Turkish spa hotel,

It's world-renowned untouched nature and distinct

join the blue voyage on the traditional wooden Gulets,

geography includes breathtaking natural beauties,

taste unique Turkish food flavours, journey to the

unique landscapes and plants, rich lush green forests,

heart of Turkey's wildlife, follow your city passions, or

turquoise coasts and beautiful pristine beaches.

plan your romantic holiday under the shining sun.

This is an enchanting land that nourishes the soul.

YROTS ERUTAEF

Turkey is a modern country with a captivating blend


Turkish lifestyle is a vivid mosaic, juxtaposing the West and the East, the modern and the ancient. Life in Turkey is a rich variety of cultures and traditions, some dating back centuries and others of more recent heritage. Any visitor to Turkey will find a great deal that is exotic, and much that is reassuringly familiar. The surprising blend of East and West makes up the Turkish lifestyle. Turkish culinary culture is renowned as one of the world's best. It is considered to be one of the three main cuisines of the world because of the variety of its recipes and flavours. Fresh and healthy, local and seasonal produce are at the heart of Turkish cooking culture. Turkish people are passionate about food; indeed, Turkish cuisine is world-renowned for its diversity and flavour, drawing influences from all corners of the former Ottoman Empire, and each region of the country boasting its own specialities. Turkish culture is unique in the world. Turkey may be the only country that contains every extreme of Eastern and Western culture. Come and discover the harmony in diversity. Turkish culture reflects this unparalleled historical richness and diversity, and remains mostly shaped by its deep roots in the Middle East, Anatolia and the Balkans, the cradle of many civilizations for at least twelve thousand years. Turkey has a Mediterranean climate with plenty of sunshine, mild temperatures and a limited amount of rainfall. It is said that all of the four seasons exist in Turkey. The Summer (June, July, August) is the busiest season for visiting Turkey to experience warm summer temperatures, sea and pool swimming, sun bathing, seaside restaurants and rich nightlife. Spring (March, April, May) is a great time to visit Turkey to experience its beautiful natural lands, local life, mild temperatures and smaller crowds of tourists. Autumn (September, October, November) is just perfect for visiting to discover and explore historical sites, local life and unique vegetation changes, all in comfortable temperatures. Winter (December, January, February) is one of the best times to visit Turkey, to experience authentic local life, skiing and other winter sports.

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Turkey has 81 main cities. From these you can plan your trip to iconic destinations. Every city has some unique characteristics, attractions and festivals. Turkey is a country of great diversity, in terms of both culture and economics. Big Turkish cities usually enjoy a more modern, western style culture and a wide array of economical options. Here are some of the main cities: Istanbul, the city of the past, the present and the future. Istanbul not only joins continents, it also joins cultures and people. Close your eyes, imagine yourself back in time, centuries ago. Istanbul is one of the most visited and soul nourishing places in the world. Antalya, the paradise on earth, the pearl city of the Mediterranean, and the Turkish Riviera. Within the wide boundaries of Antalya there is history, natural beauty and a rich variety of local lifestyles to be discovered. Izmir, the frontier and beautiful sunshine city of Turkey. Izmir city, with its 8,500 years of history, is gloriously situated on the western edge of Turkey. Nicknamed the bountiful, the fruitful and the beautiful. Izmir offers visitors many options for a unique holiday. Ankara, the beating heart of Turkey which bears the footprints of many civilizations. Ankara is the capital of Turkey and itself a historic, beautiful city. From its surrounding lakes to chilled atmosphere, Ankara is just there waiting to be discovered by you. Bursa is like an open air museum, one of the capital cities of the Ottoman Empire, it stands as a reflection of history from the early periods of the Ottoman times. Balikesir, which is called Ida in Homer's Iliad, is also a charming city that presents the best characteristics of Turkey's Marmara and Aegean regions. Balikesir is often at the top of holiday destination lists for those that are informed, and for good reason too. Konya, the stunning city of hearts and whirling spiritual dervishes. Located on the ancient Silk Road, Konya is one of the oldest and finest cities in Turkey.

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LEAD FEATURE

SEA, SAND AND SUN... MEMORABLE SUMMERS IN COASTAL TURKEY. When you think of sea, sand and sun, you should think of Turkey. Popular beaches, traditional villages, hospitable locals and nice fragrant flavours welcome you to the most beautiful summer holidays. Enjoy various tones of cool turquoise, silky sand, golden sun and  blue flag beaches. Time to surround yourself with unlimited blue? THE TURQUOISE COAST Turkey has one of the longest coastlines of any country on the Mediterranean, and the stretch from Cesme to Alanya is bordered by such clear, picturesque waters that it is known as the Turkish Turquoise Coast. THE MEDITERRANEAN COAST Antalya is the largest city on the Mediterranean with its charming harbour. Known as the  Turkish Riviera, it is the most stunning part of Turkey's Mediterranean coast with its perfect sun, endless clean beaches, ultra luxury resorts, surrounding nature and history. Turkey's serene Eastern Mediterranean shore is made up of some of the Mediterranean's least well-known shores and of inlets that have yet to be discovered. THE BLACK SEA COAST The Black Sea coast of Turkey is famous for its lush green forests, traditional wooden houses, extraordinary plateaus, and of course... untouched beautiful beaches. THE SOUTH AEGEAN COAST Situated on a peninsula, Bodrum is one of the chicest of resorts in Turkey. Celebs from east and west visit and

coastline, olive groves, pine forests, friendly locals,

enjoy historical architecture, sublime beaches, fishing

wonderful fresh foods and delicious local wines, that are

villages and trendy nightclubs. Fethiye is one of the best

comparable with the greatest European vineyards.

coastal areas in Turkey. There are numerous lovely bays

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and coves for mooring and relaxing in this area. Dalyan

THE NORTH AEGEAN COAST

is a small town on the south western coast of Turkey.

The North Aegean coast of Turkey is beautiful, historic

Dalyan is on a river delta, its narrow waterways,

and agriculturally rich. It also offers long stretches of

surrounded by reed beds, also perfect for a relaxed

lovely, sandy, child friendly beaches surrounded by pine

family holiday. The Loryma Peninsula offers a beautiful

and olive clad hills.


TURKEY'S BEST SECLUDED BEACHES Unspoilt, deserted beaches with perfect blue skies, scorching sunshine and azure coloured calm seas... from hidden bays to pristine secluded coves. If you are looking for a quiet escape, check out these 10 secluded beaches.

Cirali: If you want a charming, relaxed,

Sarigerme: A large sandy beach; scenic

Kabak: The perfect place to escape

and romantic atmosphere, Cirali is the

and very spacious. Surrounded by pine

package holiday groups. Most visitors

best beach for you. It is secluded and

forests and facing a long stretch of

come here to chill out in one of the

tranquil, backed by a forest, filled with

clean sea. Its soft fine sand makes it a

many wooden huts and bungalows. Set

Roman ruins.

very special destination for families

in the pine forested valley and offering

with children of all ages.

a mix of both sand and pebble beaches.

magical mix of pine forests and golden

The Butterfly Valley: Turkey's most

Assos: The old town and ancient city

sandy beach. This secret of a beach is

photogenic beach is Butterfly Valley.

occupy a rocky peak, with stunning

famous for its superb swimming

Thousands of butterflies live in the

views of the Aegean and Greece

opportunities and natural beauty.

trees behind the beach. The exclusive

beyond, its harbour is one of the most

destination offers just a handful of

picturesque to be found anywhere on

treehouses in which to rest your head.

the Aegean coast.

never crowded beaches, because the

Foca: Popular with Turkish holiday-

Palamutbuku: This untouched cove is

Black Sea water is usually pretty cold.

makers living in nearby Izmir city. Its

just far out into the South Aegean and

historic sites include a Genoese castle

is awash with almond trees, olives and

Inkumu: On the Black Sea coast. with a

and a small ancient theatre. The resort

wild flowers. The water is clean and

vista consisting of green pine forests,

is split into two bays with beaches in

cool, and the sea is like turquoise silk

hot white sand and bright blue seas.

abundance on both sides.

linen, a place for pleasant days.

Phaselis: An ancient city, which has a

Sinop: Many fascinating things to see, and the beaches are small. Nice and

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GAZIANTEP - A WORLD CITY OF CUISINEÂ In 2015, Turkey's southeastern province of Gaziantep was added to a most exclusive list by UNESCO. The title of Creative City of Gastronomy recognises Gaziantep's unique, long and vibrant gastronomic history. Gaziantep stands out as one of the world's major gastronomic cities. It is not just history, it is a vibrant food and drink culture. Gaziantep cuisine is very rich, ranging from kebabs, meat dishes, dishes with yoghurt, olive oil dishes, cold desserts, pilafs, vegetable dishes, meatballs, pastries, salads, and stuffed vegetables to healing soups. The beverage culture is one of the rich experiences to observe. Drinks here are made with love and a flourish. Gaziantep is one of only eight cities in the world that have been added to UNESCO's global gastronomy list. The cuisine of Gaziantep is acknowledged to be the richest in Turkey; visitors will savour its unique fusion of Anatolian, Mediterranean, European and Middle Eastern tastes. The true strength of Gaziantep's cooking tradition comes from the fertile lands of the surrounding region. Cooking is an art in Gaziantep; if you come to this city then you will taste visual art as you witness the endless creativity of many exceptionally talented Chefs engaged in what can simply be termed Culinary Artistry. 020


CONNECT WITH ANCIENT HISTORY Throughout its long history spanning over 10,000 years Anatolia, the land that is now Turkey has been the birthplace of many great civilisations and empires all of which have left their mark in monumental ways.

Gain memories of a lifetime as you lose yourself in the ancient cities and sites of Turkey, which include the cities of Ephesus, Aspendos, Perge, Hierapolis, Aphrodisias, Gobeklitepe, Hattusas, Catalhoyuk, Assos, Troy, Ani, Demre (Myra), Side and the Aizanoi Ancient City. Where else in the world can one experience so many sites in safety and comfort? There are innumerable antique cities and ancient ruins in Turkey for the lovers and fans of archaeology. You can immerse yourself in a rich heritage that extends from the neolithic period when people started farming to the classical period to magnificent middle-age cities. From the Neolithic site of Catalhoyuk to well preserved ancient Greek and Roman ruins, to Byzantine churches and Ottoman mosques, the layers of history in Turkey has myriad architectural, archaeological and religious legacies. The Aegean Region: The ancient and antique cities of Aizanoi, Amos, Anavarza, Aphrodisias, Blaundos, Ephesus, Erythrai, Hierapolis, Kaunos, Kolophon and Notion, Knidos, Lagina Hekate, Laodicea, Letoon, Miletos, Musgebi, Pedesa,  Pergamon, Phokaia, Sardis, Stratonikeia, Telmessos, Telmissos, Teos, Tlos, and Tripolis. The Mediterranean Region: The ancient and antique cities of Side, Antiphellos, Aspendos, Chimera, Daglik, Demre (Myra), Etenna, Kekova, Kibyra, Limyra, Olba,  Olympos, Patara,  Perge,  Phaselis, Sagalassos, Seleukeia, Selge, Selinus, Termessos, and Xanthos. The Marmara Region: Assos Antique City, Troy Ancient City. The Central Anatolia Region:  Alacahoyuk Archaeological Site, Astra Antique City,  Cappadocia Underground Cities, Catalhoyuk Neolithic, Hattusha Ancient City, Karahoyuk Antique City, Kilistra Antique City. The Eastern and Southeastern Anatolia Region:  Ani Ruins, Arsameia Ruins, Dara Mesopotamia Ruins, The Gobeklitepe Temple Site, Zeugma Archaeological Site. 022


THE BEST MUSEUMS IN TURKEY A great number of museums in Turkey display the

Here is a list of the best Museums in Turkey:

historical artifacts unearthed by excavations carried out

Topkapi Palace Museum, Istanbul

throughout the lands of Anatolia; a region that has been

Hagia Sophia Museum, Istanbul

home to various civilizations for thousands of years.

Mevlana Museum, Konya Istanbul Archaeological Museum, Istanbul

Turkey has many private and state museum directorates

Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, Ankara

attached to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Zeugma

Zeugma Mosaic Museum, Gaziantep

Mosaic Museum in Gaziantep, Antalya Archaeology

Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, Istanbul

Museum, Museum of Anatolian Civilizations in Ankara,

Antalya Archaeological Museum, Antalya

Istanbul Archaeological Museum and Topkapi Palace

Gobeklitepe Museum, Sanliurfa

Museum in Istanbul are some of the most popular

Goreme Open Air Museum, Nevsehir

museums in Turkey.

Rahmi Koc Museum, Istanbul Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, Istanbul Pera Museum, Istanbul Rezan Has Museum, Istanbul Santral Istanbul Energy & Arts Museum, Istanbul Cengelhan Rahmi Koc Museum, Ankara Baksi Museum, Bayburt Suna Inan Kirac Kaleici Museum, Antalya Sakip Sabanci City Museum, Mardin

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DESTIG DOES TURKEY

ARCHITECTURE

HISTORICAL MONUMENTS Turkey has been part of human civilization since classical times and has numerous ancient sites. Turkey; such an exotic country, the meeting point of various civilizations, has always been a vital link between East and West. This of course created a country with breathtaking historical monuments and ruins. Some of the most famous historical towers and monuments include: Ani Ancient Ruins, Anitkabir Ruins, Aspendos Theatre,  Basilica Cistern, Beyazit Tower,

MONUMENTAL BUILDINGS

Binbirdirek Cistern, Canakkale Clock Tower, Catalhoyuk, Dolmabahce Clock Tower, Doner Kumbet, Eflatunpinar,  Ephesus, Fasillar, Fish Lake, Fountain of Ahmet III, Galata Bridge, Gallipoli,  Galata Tower,  Gobeklitepe Temple, 

The lands of Turkey host major aspects of our shared history.

Hadrian's Gate, Hasankeyf Ruins, Hattusha,

The former capital of Istanbul is the only city in the world to

The Halicarnassos Mausoleum, Haydarpasa

span two continents, the country also features the historic city

Railway Station, Hippodrome and Monuments,

of Troy and many battlefields of the Crusades. Of course, this

Imrahor Monument, Ishak Pasha Palace, Izmir

vast history has left behind a number of historical and religious

Clock Tower, The Monument of Liberty,

monuments for tourists to discover and visit.

Monument of the Republic, Maiden's Tower, Nemrut and Karakus Tumulus, Obelisk of

RELIGIOUS MONUMENTS

Theodosius,

Turkey has a long history of religious buildings, with two of the

Tophane, The Trojan Horse, Valens Aqueduct,

best examples of Ottoman architecture found in cities of

Walled Obelisk, Yilanli Obelisk, Yildiz Tower.

Edirne and Istanbul. Some of the the best known religious monuments include: Akdamar Church, Central Izmir Synagogues, Divrigi Great Mosque, Eyup Mosque, Fatih Mosque,  Hagia Sophia,  Chora Museum, Kizil Church, Mevlana Tomb and Complex, Mihrimah Sultan Mosque, Osk Monastery, Rustem Pasha Mosque, Sokullu Mehmet

Pasha

Mosque,

Sumela

Monastery, Selimiye

Mosque, Sultan Ahmed Mosque,  Suleymaniye Mosque, Yeni Mosque, Zeyrek Mosque. 026

Red

Tower,

Side

Theatre,


TURKISH COFFEE, 40 YEARS OF FRIENDSHIP Turkish coffee is the perfect way to finish off a good meal.

Turkish coffee derives its name from a specific preparation

When ordering, you specify whether you want it plain,

method; finely powdered roast coffee beans are boiled in a

with some sugar or very sweet and it is brewed with the

pot also known as cezve in Turkish and served in a cup

specified amount of sugar mixed in with the coffee

where the dregs settle. The most distinctive characteristic 

granules.

is that only the flavour is consumed, not the grounds. Therefore, this beverage made from Arabica coffee is

A cup of Turkish coffee is remembered for 40 years. With its

healthier than most coffee types.

delicious foam and wonderful aroma, there is no drink quite like Turkish coffee. Served in small but delicious

Black Pearls: Coffee historians described the coffee beans

doses, both calorie and caffeine counts in a cup of Turkish

as black pearls and Turkish coffee has a flavour worthy of

coffee are moderate, meaning you can enjoy it more often.

this description. The fine grounds sink to the bottom of the cup and are not for drinking but used by fortune tellers to

Turkish coffee grounds, can be read to tell one's fortune. It

read the drinker's future. Coffee fortune telling was born

is the only coffee that can be used to predict the future.

out of Turkish coffee and is an inseparable part of the

The wonderful taste of Turkish coffee has been bringing

pleasure and conversation associated with coffee.

people together for centuries, inspiring countless works of art and having a profound influence on culture.

How to Serve: Turkish coffee is served in small cups. Usually, a glass of water and Turkish Delights are served

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One of the traditions that should be fulfilled in Turkey is to

with Turkish coffee and they are generally consumed

see the preparation of Turkish coffee and surely taste it.

before drinking the coffee.


INTRODUCING 20 CONTEMPORARY

TURKISH ARTISTS


AYLAN TURAN Born in Hamburg in 1973, Ayla Turan began her art career after graduating from Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University. Addressing objects or persons from everyday life with a childlike approach, Turan aims to direct the viewer to look deeper into what they see and to read many topics regarding social problems. Turan has produced statues for public areas in Germany, France, Hungary, Israel, Latvia, South Korea, Dubai, Egypt, Italy, India, Syria, Burkina Faso, China, Sweden and Mexico. www.aylaturanart.com

ALI ELMACI Elmacı graduated from Mimar Sinan Fine Arts Faculty, Painting Department in 2010. He had three solo shows at x-ist, titled "Inheritance Passes From Father to Son" (2011), "Save Me With Your Fire" (2012), ''Kill Him Make Me Laugh'' (2014) and ''The Chair That Walked All Over People'' He has also been in several group exhibitions. Among the exhibitions are: Guy Hepner Gallery, New York, 2016 -  Contemporary İstanbul, Isabel Croxatto Gallery - 2017  Blood Spoils the Dream, Art On İstanbul. www.alielmaci.com

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REFIK ANADOL A media artist and director born in Istanbul in 1985. Currently based in L.A, California. He is a lecturer and visiting researcher at UCLA. He works in the field of sitespecific public art with parametric data sculpture approach and live audio/visual performance with immersive installation approach, his works explore the space among digital and physical entities by creating a hybrid relationship between architecture and media arts with machine intelligence. www.refikanadol.com

BEYZA BOYNUDELIK Born in Istanbul in 1975, she lives and works in Istanbul. She received her B.A. (1999) and M.F.A. (2003) from Painting Department, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, Istanbul. Currently working on the P.H.D. thesis at the same university. Being an artist who has  always worked with human issues, she continues to deal with urban life and its effects on the citizen; who has now great access to all the facilities to live a good life, yet insufficient to communicate with each other.  www.beyzaboynudelik.com

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ERDEM TAŞDELEN A Turkish-Canadian artist who currently lives and works in Toronto. His practice is rooted in conceptualism and involves a range of media including installation, video, sculpture, sound and artist books. His diverse projects bring structures of power into question within the context of culturally learned behaviours, where he often draws from unique historical narratives to address the complexities of current sociopolitical issues. Taşdelen's work has been shown in numerous exhibitions. www.erdemtasdelen.com

YONKA KARAKAŞ According to Karakaş, every knowledge acquired takes away all the freedom of the mind. A free mind loses its freedom completely due to dogmatic ideas acquired in time and never apprehends the process of losing. The biggest problem of a human being who is in the effort of existence is that he/she sets on the way without being aware of several walls, which will eventually surround them. Unfortunately, this human being confronts a single state of mind at the end of the road. Reality. www.yoncakarakas.tumblr.com

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ARDAN ÖZMENOGLU Ardan Özmenoglu is a versatile Turkish contemporary artist who works in a wide range of mediums including large-scale glass sculptures, works on Post-It® notes and neon lighting. Since her first exhibition in 2006, her unique work has been featured in over forty exhibitions in the U.S. and abroad including Istanbul, Berlin and Croatia. She cleverly uses ubiquitous items, Post-It® notes, to create pieces of art that unite seemingly opposing ideas: www.ardanozmenoglu.net

BARIS GOKTURK A Turkish artist living and working in Brooklyn, New York. He currently teaches at John Hopkins University, Pace University and Hunter College where he got his MFA in Painting. He is a recipient of the Tony Smith Award and Graf Travel Grant from Hunter College. He has shown his work internationally in the USA, Germany, Spain, France, Korea, Turkey and Puerto Rico. Baris recently was an ApexArt fellow in Seoul, Korea and at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine. www.barisgokturk.com

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BURÇAK BINGÖL Her works explore notions of belonging, cultural heritage, identity, decoration and failure by blurring the boundaries between these seemingly distinct notions. Through her labor-intensive creative process of tracing, copying and re-forming, she adopts an analytical approach to new configurations. The works created are psychological landscapes that hover between abstraction and representation, rejection and preservation that both embrace and disregard Eastern and Western traditions. www.burcakbingol.com

IPEK KOTAN "My work stems from a visceral need to create with my hands using the exteriors of my forms simple like a frame in which I bring out complex textures and colors so that together with the form they can radiate a calm and soothing energy. I was born and raised in Istanbul. Currently I’m based in Amsterdam, Netherlands. My work is represented in over 250 private art collections and in public collections in Germany, the Netherlands and Turkey." www.ipekkotan.com

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CEYDA AYKAN Ceyda Aykan (b.1985) completed her MFA in the Painting and Drawing Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2012 as a Fulbright Scholar. She completed her BFA in Painting at Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University in Istanbul in 2009, during which she was awarded an Erasmus Grant to spend a year painting and printmaking at the University of Seville. Prior to her MFA she worked in London. Her work has been exhibited in Chicago, Seville, Istanbul, Miami, and New York. www.ceydaaykan.com

ESER AFACAN A native of Turkey now working as a painter in Canada. He moved to Canada in 2003 from Oslo, Norway, where he lived and worked for 25 years. Once, Eser applied to the Norwegian government asking to stay in prison for two years. This was so he could be left in peace to work. He also wanted to change criminals, to show them how progress in the inner-soul can be made through art. A lot of people have tried to do such a thing with religion as a tool. With Eser there would be no religion at all, only art. www.afacan.com

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SELIN BALCI "I am an interdisciplinary artist. My projects merge traditional art practice with scientific materials and biological mediums such as mold spores. I create a synthetic ‘world’ in which I observe living organisms’ endless interactions, struggles, and conflicts across the picture surface. Forming borders, divisions, and edges; in my work, mold growth metaphorically represents human actions and motives. My work shows the temporal nature of living on earth by growing, changing and dying." www.selinbalci.com

BIRSEN OZBILGE Birsen Ozbilge was born in Ankara, Turkey, in 1970. Soon after, her family moved to Istanbul. After she graduated in 1987 from Kandilli Kiz Lisesi  she joined  Mimar Sinan, The Academy of Fine Arts  in Istanbul, and graduated in Mastering Paintings with Mosaic and Fresco. After graduation she exhibited in several collective shows. In 1996 she had her first solo exhibition called "Pulp Art", in Sefahatane, Istanbul. In 1996 she moved to New York City, where she lived for seven years. www.birsenozbilge.com

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BIRCE YILDIZ An Abstract Expressionist Turkish Artist. She was born in 1979 in Istanbul. The Essence of Substance, Movement, Variability, Mobility, Formation, The Universe, The Formation of The Order, Repeated Forms In Nature, Loop are the concepts that creates the general problematic of the paintings created by Birce Yıldız. "Art for me is an adventure, which is transformed into incarnation from the energy of motion in an eternal space ... A Mystical Pursuit." www.birceyildiz.com

NILHAN SESALAN Nilhan Sesalan whose works are in numerous collections, parks and museums around the world can be regarded as the representative of lyrical abstraction. The artist who also contributes to life with her designs and writings says in a poem: “I love my thoughts, the process in which they make me believe… when I am convinced they will not leave me. I transfer them to a material and I say ‘done’. With that energy, I can hold my breath longer and find power for life.” www.nilhansesalan.com

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ŞÜKRAN MORAL One of the seminal performance artists in Turkey. Her work challenges the position of women in society, focusing in particular on violence against women or other underrepresented groups. Moral’s performances have often taken place in very diverse spaces, from brothels and hamams to mental hospitals, disrupting thus their normal function and turning them into discursive platforms for art. Şükran Moral lives and works in Istanbul and Rome. www.sukranmoral.com

ELMAS DENIZ A concept-driven visual artist. Her works investigate the intersections and points of entanglement between economics and nature. The capitalism-led deterioration of nature, and our perception of it, as well as the related consumerist culture, are the central concepts in Deniz’s practice. She questions how the economic system continuously reshapes our perception through subtle but consistent manipulations. Her works critically expose the faults of the system and propose alternative possibilities. www.elmasdeniz.com

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AZIZE & AZIME ÖNLÜ "We are twins, in our mother's belly we waited together for adventure. Our first toys were each other so were never in need of dolls, we did not even want toys.  We opened our eyes and grew in a perfect universe with mathematics and aesthetics. As such, our games, which started with each other, grew to include the most natural materials. The method we use in our work is an effort to justify the concept of “game”. Intimacy, unreality, sweet competition, intelligence, struggle, freedom, pleasure..." www.azizeazimeonlu.com

KEREM OZAN BAYRAKTAR Establishing physical and conceptual environments. Using digital visualizations, photographs, animations, models , everyday objects, texts and graphics, Bayraktar focuses on the behavior of natural and artificial systems, their occlusion points, boundaries, collapses, mutations, and how we make sense of them. These systems consist of organizations ranging from spontaneous urban plants to exoplanets, which are different in terms of content but have similar systemic principles. www.keremozanbayraktar.com

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DESIGN

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HOT PICKS

NUMBER 8


CERASELLE - HANDMADE JEWELRY Ceraselle is an italian fashion workshop that was born in Spain. We design modern minimalist high fashion accessories that can be customized by every woman. Ceraselle is handmade jewellery that uses the fusion of ceramics, leather and metals to create collections that are carefully designed to be worn with great ease. When modelling and carving clay, the limits of the material are explored and pushed to their extremes. The glaze variations we use are the direct result of a great number of chemical formulas, that reveal, after firing, the wonders of high-temperature effects such as countless hues, colours and textures. All products are handmade with two layers of  high quality Spanish leather, laquered, edged and tooled with manual pressure machines.

www.ceraselle.com 043


MS & WOOD - MEET THE ELLE CHAIR We are Masters&Wood. We are a design oriented, solid wood manufacturer situated within the high-end furniture market. Our position allows us to release the full measure of innovative energy and reach new heights in solid wood expression. MS&WOOD facilities are situated in the idyllic town of Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Drawing from Fojnica’s extensive woodworking tradition, MS&WOOD's manufacturing facility is the place where innovative minds meet cutting edge technology - where the classical carpentry techniques of old meet advanced 5 axis CNC machining technology. MS&WOOD artisans work with hardwood species such as European and American walnut as well as oak and ash. Each tree is proudly sourced from FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

www.mswood.ba 044


ALENTES - CEMENT FURNITURE Alentes | Essential Details combines warmth with minimalism to offer friendly eclectic interiors. We showcase object, furniture and lighting collections with our signature styling of raw materials, natural colors, velvet textures and architectural forms. Quality, handmade, original objects designed + made by Alentes. Operating since 2014, with a team of experienced and inspired architects, artists and technicians, we strive to materialize our personal values and experiences. Our color and texture pallete is a product of continuous material blending, research and small discoveries. We fabricate a unique aggregate of stone, marble and cement. Mixed and poured by hand, the objects cure for twenty eight days. They are then assembled and sealed with a protective coating.

www.alentes.com 045


STETSON - ART MEETS HANDBAGS "Handmade handbags designed in Rhode Island. Our handbags are sure to spark fun conversations. In 2003, after an exhibition of my computer - generated art failed to result in any sales, I cut the pieces up and sewed them in to bags. They sold immediately. Fast forward, we now sell in several hundred boutiques and specialty stores and enjoy a worldwide cult-following of collectors. Each piece is made in our atelier in Rhode Island. I still sew and sign each piece. Art can happen in unexpected places. And a dressy outing accented with one of our pieces can often be an opportunity to make new friends. Whether you are one of our early first patrons, or a new collector, it is an honor for me to make something that I know you will enjoy using." - Kent Stetson

www.kentstetson.com 046


SYURO - A GENUINE FEEL OF JAPAN We are SyuRo, from Japan! SyuRo takes pride in delivering Japanese tradition and artisans’ skills, as daily goods and items suiting modern needs. We hope our business helps traditional skills meet daily goods manufacturing. Better than artsy or cool, our products are exquisite and warm. They’re things you would want to use yourself or to give to someone close to you. Our products appeal to all of the five senses. At SyuRo, we cherish exploring the old to understand the NOW. “Monozukuri — stories to tell — reflects our thinking. Ordinary and natural, modest ideas with really big-spirit — Good products, like good ideas, take time. We convey tools which people can use in daily life, as design products, and disseminate Japanese tradition and technology of craftsmen, to people of different genres through the SyuRo filter.

www.syuro.info 047


SUPERLEGGERA CHAIR - LEGENDARY When is a chair not just a chair? That’s when the seat in question is the Superleggera Chair, originally designed in 1949, but not produced and marketed broadly until 1957 by premium Italian furniture maker Figli Amadeo Cassina. Designed by iconic Italian designer Gio Ponti and named for its lightweight and streamlined profile, the Superleggera Chair defined a new day for functional, highly appealing and elegant design within the larger wave of modernist innovation. This powerful combination of simplified strength made the Superleggera an immensely popular creation. Aesthetically pleasing while also groundbreaking in its lightweight design, this chair is still in production more than half a century later. The Superleggera Chair: A commercial success based on simplicity, practicality, and elegance.

www.cassina.com 048


ZWITSHERNBOX - NATURE IN A BOX The “Zwitscherbox” has a motion sensor that will set off the most exhilarating singing of birds. Every time you enter the room it will go on for two minutes and then gently subside if no further movement occurs. It is perfect for the bathroom, where we have peace and tranquility – something the “Zwitscherbox” can remind us of. Breathe deeply, relax, and replenish yourself with new energy. Make it a perfect day. The “Zwitscherbox” can help you do it. Its natural sounds create a soothing atmosphere that lets you relax intuitively. Like taking a walk in the woods. We listen to the exhilarating sound of birds singing, our gaze softens, and we start to breathe more deeply. It is beneficial for the body and the spirit! Always coming as a surprise, the “Zwitscherbox” changes the way we think and gives us new ideas.

www.zwitscherbox.com 049


GIO LAMP - RADICAL LIGHTING Designed by Ammunition and made possible by Gantri’s radical approach to manufacturing, the Gio collection is available for people seeking a better approach to design, craft and sustainability as they shape and illuminate their spaces. Ammunition is a studio dedicated to putting design talent at the center of imagining, creating, and operating new product and service ventures. Founded in 2007 and based in San Francisco, California and Brooklyn, New York. The Gio Collection is inspired by Italian lighting designs of the 1970s that sought to remake and refresh historic archetypes through new materials and processes. The unique character of the Gio Collection came to life by manipulating and rationalizing classical geometric elements so they interact with each other in playful ways.

www.gantri.com 050


101 COPENHAGEN - SUBLIME DANISH 101 Copenhagen is a Danish design brand founded in 2017 with a strong vision to create a world of beautiful lighting and accessories of exquisite craftsmanship, quality and timeless design for Scandinavian living. Our passion for materials and refined textures is combined with our design aesthetic and an organic, calm color scheme. The 101 Copenhagen Design House carefully curates and designs objects for Scandinavian living. The creative drive is centered in a fusion of the Scandinavian design tradition influenced by the timeless Japanese approach to material and techniques. The objects designed reflect the symbioses of design traditions whilst also featuring unique embedded stories, symbols and associations expressed in a minimalist idiom.

www.101cph.com 051


MARIPOSA - TIMELESS ARGENTINA Lars Kjerstadius once came across a classical Argentinian design. The “Butterfly Chair” consisted of leather and steel and was originally thought of as a smart fusion between craftsmanship and industrial production. Lars’ admiration for this beautiful design and concept led him to dedicate ten years of his life to improving its comfort and style. Mariposa, meaning butterfly in Spanish, is the result of creating a butterfly chair for the modern inhabitants of the 21st century. Cuero Design: Family heirlooms that you will pass down through multiple generations. We want to help you collect memories with our products. To make sure this happens, we make timeless pieces that we know will remain beautiful in 30, 40, 50, well, in some cases, even a hundred years from now.

www.cuerodesign.com 052


THE

URUGUAY ART EXPERIENCE www.turismo.gub.uy


IMAGE TITLES

WE ARE SHALLOW Whenever we have to decide on Form v Function... we always find ourselves going with Form. We tried many ways to add image titles for your utmost convenience but all those extra labels cluttered the pages and made them not-so-beautiful. So we kindly ask you to also visit www.destig.com to explore the website versions where all art images have their titles. DESTIG TEAM 054


MEET THE ARTISTS

READY? DESTIG TOP ARTISTS INTERVIEWS 055


PATRICK ROTH


"Glass is a wonderful, mysterious but also very difficult material to work with. It has this “fourth dimension”. When you are sculpting with glass you also sculpt with light and refractions. Glass can be very strong and massive but at the same time it´ll be very fragile and delicate. Same as me!”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Patrick Roth, born 1976 in northeastern Bavaria.

a teacher at a glass school in Rheinbach (Germany) from

Classical educated in glass-cutting, Master of

2009-2016. In 2016 I quit my job to become a freelance

industries in glass working with a unique material for

artist building up my own studio in Bregenz (Austria) on

23 years now Freelance glass sculpteur, working in

the banks of the beautiful Lake Constance.

his own studio in Bregenz (Austria). “A thing is meaningful as long as it has to do with glass”

Why is your work unique? I don´t know if my work is unique, but I really don´t care

Tell us about yourself and your background.

about this! Most important for me is to be happy with the

Born and growing up in a traditional Bavarian glass

final expression of my work. Mostly I´m focused on

region right next to a glass factory, the material

sculptural casting techniques but frequently I'm drawing

became a part of my life from the very beginning.

on my Classical education in glass-cutting and engraving.

Finally I studied decorative art glass as a glass cutter

For the castings I really like special colors in glass, like

at school in Zwiesel (Germany). I'm also a master of

uranium and neodymium which change due to different

industry in glass, in 2009 after working as a workshop

light aspects. Another really special color I´m able to cast

manager for Lobmeyr in Vienna for 3 years, I became

is gold ruby red... one of the most difficult colors in glass! 057


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Give us an idea about your process.

strong and massive but at the same time it

90% of my sculptures are created when I

is very fragile and delicate. Same as me!

am sleeping. The first thing I do when I

"You can´t work against the material so it's kind of a dialogue between the glass and me. We have to find the final compromise to be fine in both ways."

arrive at my studio is quick sketches so as

Tell us about some of your successes.

not to lose the ideas and the power of my

The biggest achievements for me as an

dreams. From this very point the whole

artist so far are having my works in

process starts. You can't work against the

several galleries in Europe (for example

material so it´s kind of a dialogue between

Gallery Sikabonyi in Vienna) and the USA

the glass and me. We have to find the final

(Gallery at Four India, Nantucket) along

compromise to be fine in both ways.

with some other great sculptors of our time like Michael Behrens, Peter Bremers

What is the biggest benefit of creating?

or Petr Stacho. But I´m also incredibly

Through the last years I figured out that

happy to have the opportunity to share

my biggest source is discontent about

my knowledge with young people through

something or someone, even with myself.

annual internships at my studio. My most

So creating those sculptures became a

notable artworks so far, I think are: “The

kind of therapy for me.

Seacret” which I sold at the Vernissage to a huge private collection in Austria. It´s

Why are you attracted to glass?

standing right between Tony Cragg and

Glass is a wonderful, mysterious but also

Erwin Wurm now. And “Der Büßer” (The

very difficult material to work with. It has

Penitent), which is the fastest selling

this “fourth dimension”. When you are

sculpture so far. After 30 minutes of

sculpting with glass you also sculpt with

sharing it on social media, a Collectress

light and refractions. Glass can be very

from Germany fell in love with it. This one 059


060


I think I could have sold for 5x more. But my works are always unique. I never create the same sculpture twice. What concepts are you currently exploring? One project which is still not finished is called “Same Difference”. I´m exploring the possibilities of working with foam as a casting positive. (see "S.H.I.E.L.D; Echoes from Gold"). My idea behind is to have this positive/negative structure to enlighten both sides of the story. But finally it has to be one! Another concept on which I return sometimes is doing trilogies with classical cuttings from the 19th century trying to use them in new contexts like the “Behind the Scenes” series! Tell us about what you are most passionate about. For sure I´m really passionate about glass, contemporary and historical! In the past I also taught history of glass at the master degree level in Germany. It´s a material used by mankind for more than 5,000 years now so there´s a lot to explore about it. My second passion is music. I´m a real so called “metalhead” and I have played in bands for more than 25 years. It´s also kind of inspiration sometimes. Some of my objects are named after songs from my favourite bands. If the statement of the song fits with the statement of the sculpture it´s an absolutely logical step for me! How should we approach interacting with your creations? My work is more abstract but always an interaction between optics, haptics and title. So I want people looking at my work to discover it by their own selves. The worst thing for me is when you can clearly see from 10 meters away what it´s all about. You have to uncover the message behind by yourself. And even if for you there´s a different meaning it´s ok for me. Most important is that somebody can feel the power and the passion I put in while working on it. If I get this feedback of strength and depth then I am fine. What projects are you currently working on? Currently I´m working on some smaller cut and engraved pieces for an upcoming wandering exhibition in Germany called “Back on Tour”. It´s about contemporary European glass engraving. Together with other European glass artists who mainly work with this technique we had the first edition

"My works are always unique. I never create a sculpture twice." 061


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in 2015-16, touring through 7 countries. Now, this second edition was set in the National Glass Museum in Riihimäki (Finland) and later it will take place at the European Museum of Contemporary Glass in Rödenthal (Germany). And in this group called GEN (Glass Engraving Network) we also have concrete plans for the third edition to take place in Spain and France in 2021-22. I´m also working on some new casting sculptures for several exhibitions mainly in Germany and Austria. One I will present together with my long-term friend from the Czech republic, Petr Stacho!

"My work is more abstract but always an interaction between optics, haptics and title. So I want the people looking at my work to discover it by their own. The worst thing for me is when you can clearly see from 10 meters away what it's all about!" 063


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"I have so many strange ideas I want to realize in the future. In the past I did some installations mainly with glass which cannot be sold like sculptures or other objects but for me it is existentially necessary to make people think about their lives and what's going on in this crude world right now."

What can we look forward to?

What role should art have in life?

I have so many strange ideas I want

Ouch, difficult question, and there

to realize in the future. In the past I

will be no answer. Everything can

did some installations mainly with

be art – it´s about the context and

glass which cannot be sold like

the viewers choice too. So called

sculptures or other objects but for

“fine art” stands for it´s own. A bit

me it is existentially necessary to

like narcissism probably. But if you

make people think about their lives

really want to transport a message

and what´s going on in this crude

then sometimes art must hurt!

world right now. I really do hope I will be able to realize it somehow.

How do you want your work to impact the viewer?

Tell us about where you are based.

I´d like to answer this while

Like I mentioned before, I decided

imagining my “Same Difference”

to set up my studio in this beautiful

series. If you are affected only by

area in Western Austria next to the

the beauty of the object it will be

stunning Lake Constance in 2016.

only half way. So try to reach in and

The location is an important aspect

find the 'other' point of view. Both

in doing creative stuff. A big lake,

aspects, positive and negative will

the

tell you the whole story!

mountains

and

also

the

personality of local people are huge influences on their own.

www.pr-glas.com 065


PAMELA CAUGHEY


"My current paintings are expressions of energy, emotion, automatic drawing and are reactive. I do not begin with any preconceived ideas. I like the spirit of the day to allow the painting to converse with me. This is liberating; this is freedom."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Pamela Caughey grew up in Wisconsin, where she

You started out in science; your first degree was in

received her Bachelor of Science degree in

Biochemistry. Tell us about your journey to art.

Biochemistry from UW-Madison in 1983. After

It was a very long time before I could “shake off” the

moving with her family to Hamilton, MT in 1986, she

impact my first career choice had on me; it just wasn’t a

began her serious study of art, and in 2010 received

good fit for me. There were a lot of lasting repercussions

her MFA in Painting and Drawing from the

including chronic anxiety, depression and severe panic

University of Montana School of Art. She works in

attacks. However, looking back, it was the pain and

many media, with special interest in cold wax/oil,

suffering that played a crucial role in being the artist I am

encaustic, mixed media and acrylic.

today. For that I am grateful. I found so much content that I could express through my art and looking back, I

Her works are in the permanent collections of

wouldn’t trade the difficulty of my past for anything.

several museums (Missoula Art Museum, Holter Museum of Art, Nicolaysen Museum of Art) and

What advantages did your science background offer to

public buildings nationally and internationally. Her

your art career, how do the two co-habit in your mind?

work also appears in the newly published book by

My foundation in science taught me how to focus,

Rebecca Crowell and Jerry McLaughlin, “Cold Wax

research, think laterally and organize my thoughts as well

Medium: Techniques, Concepts, Conversations”.

as document what I am doing. Most importantly, I find

After teaching courses at the University of Montana

that art is a science as well! It requires a great deal of

Bitterroot College, she is now a full time studio artist

discipline, knowledge, experimentation, risk taking and

and teaches workshops from her Hamilton, Montana

constant research. I am sometimes amazed how much an

studio, throughout the country and abroad.

artist must know about materials, technique, art history, 067


"Looking back, it was the pain and suffering that played a crucial role in being the artist I am today. For that I am grateful."

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"I think I have always been a bit entrepreneurial. It is a challenge to market our work, but in the end it allows us to share our work with those who appreciate it." content, design, technical and professional aspects in

expressed in any 2D medium. The most important thing I

order to earn a full time living.

feel I have discovered is what I want to say. The technique follows once this is known.

You worked with watercolors for 20 years before expanding into other media - tell us about this journey.

Tell us about your current paintings.

I was lucky to have a mother-in-law who painted in

My current paintings are expressions of energy, emotion,

watercolor. It was her guidance, patience, enthusiasm

automatic drawing and are reactive. I do not begin with

and encouragement that began my trajectory into art.

any preconceived ideas. I like the spirit of the day to allow

There was so much to learn technically; watercolor is still

the painting to converse with me. This is liberating; this is

one of the most challenging mediums I’ve worked in.

freedom.

I essentially relied on dozens of books to learn the basics of color, design and technique. What I learned during my

You learnt to solder then you started your jewelry line,

watercolor days served me very well in ever other

have you always been entrepreneurial?

technique I transitioned to. Each medium has it’s pros and

After graduating with an MFA in painting and drawing, I

cons. While watercolor likes to flow, encaustic (hot wax)

took some time out to learn metalsmithing from my

requires working quickly, while oils/cwm require

expert neighbor, Tom Moates. He taught me to solder

knowledge of solvents, mediums and requires patience to

silver and copper and I was hooked. I love 3D mediums as

allow the paint to dry. Acrylic/mixed media dries more

well as 2D. I think I have always been a bit

quickly unless you use proper mediums or techniques to

entrepreneurial. It is a challenge to market our work, but

slow it down or just accept it. Having a solid foundation in

in the end it allows us to share our work with those who

color and design means your personal voice can be

appreciate it.

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"I anticipate that future work will be very formally based. I am fascinated by complex color, expressive line and uncharacteristic shape. It is these formal elements that drive me now."

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'Disquietude' dealt with the

2020, it was of course very

intense ramifications of global

unsettling

terrorism - tell us about this.

However, being married to a

Disquietude was my MFA

biochemist

Thesis exhibition. For two

scientific background helped

years, I focused on what causes

me

the "terror" in terrorism and it

pathogens exist and move

is, and always will be, fear. Fear

around the world just as we do.

and anxiety were what I knew

I’m not surprised and feel that

so well. Terrorism, whether

population, modes of travel

it is  from chemical, biological

and the way we treat each

or nuclear means, results in

other and our planet will only

trauma, pain, anxiety and fear.

increase the potential for such

And the entire exhibition was a

outbreaks.

to

and and

horrifying. having

understand

a

that

metaphor for what I had felt inside. Fear is fear, regardless

Your

of what causes it.

exhibition 'Simply Not' came

This exhibition was a major

about following a disaster?

catharsis

In 2016, I was about 75%

in

purging

the

darkness I felt inside.

most

recent

major

ready for an upcoming solo museum exhibition to be held

'Ubiquitos

Migrations

of

in a 2400 sq foot space. On

Pathogens' explored global

July 31, while painting in the

travel and pathogens?

living room, the Roaring Lion

My next major solo exhibition,

Fire began midday about a mile

“Ubiquitous:

of

down the road. We had been

Pathogens” was an extension

evacuated in the past, but this

of etching copper plates based

time, seeing an orange glow

on

microscopic

down the road was the only

images of pathogens I saw

warning we had to get out

from the Rocky Mountain

quickly. We grabbed what we

Laboratories

Hamilton,

could in about 45 minutes.

Montana. I was inspired by the

Thanks to my family, many

morphology and individuality

exhibition pieces were saved,

of each pathogen; both deadly

but many were also lost. There

and beautiful. And, again, the

was nothing left after the fire.

wake of destruction, death and

Fortunately, I was able to rent

pain left behind allowed me to

a space and order a hotbox to

once again find a metaphor to

create encaustic monotypes

Migration

electron

in

express fear. How do you view coronavirus from your unique art/ science vantage point? A coronavirus was part of the Ubiquitous exhibition in 2014. When the pandemic erupted in

"A coronavirus was part of the 2014 Ubiquitous exhibition. When the pandemic erupted in 2020, it was of course unsettling and horrifying."

on. I incorporated ashes from our house into the hot wax and in the end, felt these relatively monochromatic

pieces

on

fragile

added

an

paper

important dimension to the final exhibition. Once again, the difficulties of life did not 071


"On July 31 2016, while painting in the living room, the Roaring Lion Fire began midday about a mile down the road. We had been evacuated in the past, but this time, seeing an orange glow down the road was the only warning we had to get out quickly."

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"I now devote all of my teaching to helping others understand these concepts so they can get to the business of creating their best art, not just art that is “ok”."

course like this back then. That is what motivated me to create this online course and make it lifetime access. We need to hear these concepts many times before they sink in. I now devote all of my teaching to helping others understand the fundamentals of color and design so they can create their "BEST" art, not just art that's "ok". At first, I wasn't sure how well the course would be received, but after 700 positive testimonials, I'm very grateful it's helping artists of all levels hone their visual

crush my creativity, but rather became an inspiration for

language skills, gain confidence in their personal voice and

meaningful content.

discover a great deal of joy in the painting process.

You have explored universally relatable experiences, are

You are no slouch on YouTube, tell us about your

there other areas you want to explore in the future?

channel and how it all began.

While past exhibitions were highly conceptual between

My YouTube channel began when I decided to hit the

2010 and 2014, I anticipate that future work will be very

video button on my new iphone in early 2017. I started

formally based. I am fascinated by complex color,

with a time lapse video while painting in cold wax and oils.

expressive line and uncharacteristic shape. It is these

On a whim, I uploaded it to YouTube and to my

formal elements that drive me now.

amazement, people hit the LIKE button. Documenting what I’m doing using video was new for me, but I but I

Tell us about your art instruction practise, Art & Success

found it to be a great way to learn a lot about my process.

- what do artists achieve from studying with you?

I love to share the good, the bad and the ugly of my art

In the fall of 2018, I launched my first online course,

making process and YouTube became a great way to

Powerful Design and Personal Color. Having attended a

share this.

multitude of past workshops that focused mainly on technique, I wanted to share what I feel are the most

You have been successful in your various endeavors,

important tools one can have in their artistic toolbox – a

what qualities have helped you along the way?

solid foundation in design and color. I could have greatly

I am greatly humbled by any success I have experienced in

reduced my own 20 year learning curve if I'd taken a

life, but at the same time, I continually focus on the fact I

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"I am greatly humbled by any success I have experienced in life, but at the same time, I continually focus on the fact I am a beginner whenever I try something new."

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am a beginner whenever I try something new. Whether painting, doing videography, learning about marketing or anything else, I never feel I am an expert in anything. That is how I want it to be. I learn from others as much as they learn from me. Any obstacles along the way are just problems that

"Life is short. I want to leave this earth knowing I did as much as I could to share with artists the most important lessons I’ve learned over 30 years as an artist."

need to be solved. Being creative in any endeavor means never giving up and believing there is a solution if we just stick with it. How can you brighten up whats left of 2020 what can we look forward to from you? Thanks for asking! With all of my LIVE 2020 painting workshops cancelled (including 3 in New Zealand and one in both Vienna and Bainbridge Island, WA) and a large solo exhibition postponed until 2021, I will be focusing on creating more online courses, creating a lot more paintings and hopefully helping as many artists as I can through my teaching, coaching and mentoring website, www.ARTandSUCCESS.com. Life is short. I want to leave this earth knowing I did as much as I could to share with artists the most important lessons I’ve learned over 30 years as an artist. www.ARTandSUCCESS.com www.pamelacaughey.com 075


JING ZHAO


"My goal is to capture the beauty of my subject. My works use the line, shape, value, color, texture, and edges of all these technical elements to create a poetic interpretation of my inner voice. These basic concepts provide the fundamental structure for my visual goal."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Jing Zhao lives in Frisco, TX. USA She learned

For various reasons, I studied law instead. After having

drawing from a private teacher from her childhood.

been an attorney in China for many years, I moved to

Even through her career path leading her in law, art

America to continue to study American law and worked at

has always been a companion to her. She is a

an Immigration law firm. After that, I changed course,

professional oil painter now and is already snapping

getting a computer science master's degree and becoming

up top awards for her figurative work. She is the Best

a software engineer working in the telecommunication

of show winner at the 20th American Impressionist

industry. Later on, I was back to the legal consulting field

Society's Juried National Exhibition 2019.

and became a business owner. Meanwhile, art has always been a companion to me and I eventually returned to my

Tell us about yourself and your background.

true love; painting.

I was born and raised in Qingdao, China and now live in Frisco, Texas. I have been drawing since the age of

To further develop my artistic skills, I attended the

five. I began my formal art education at the age of

Peninsula School of Art, Scottsdale Artists' School, and

eleven with a private art teacher. From eleven to

studied with the great artists such as Kevin Macpherson,

eighteen, I drew at least 4 hours every day in hopes of

Zhaoming Wu, John Michael Carter, Daniel Gerhart,

someday attending the top fine art academy in China.

Huihan Liu, and many other great artists. 077


"It is not my goal to merely depict the scene I see, but rather to use my artistic eye to express my inner response towards what I see." 078

Tell us about your work and style, why is

personal life experiences and my inner-

it unique?

spiritual world. I use the technical

My goal is to capture the beauty of my

elements to capture the expression while

subject. My works use the line, shape,

nature's color influences the light and

value, color, texture, and edges of all

atmosphere. My visual vocabulary has to

these technical elements to create a

do with what I initially see in the subject

poetic interpretation of my inner voice.

so that I can create my own mental image

These

of the result of the painting.

basic

concepts

provide

the

fundamental structure for my visual goal of the paintings. I think that my work

Tell us about your process and what do

leans majorly towards Impressionism.

you feel when you are creating?

Impressionism

and

Some ideas always come to me after I did

accurate depiction of light on forms

some research or when inspiration struck.

without very specific details and using

Once I have a solid idea with the mood

bold, broken colors and brush-strokes. It

and emotion, I will quickly glance at all the

is rooted in realism. When I see the

photos to see which one grabbed my eye

subject,

and

immediately. Since I have traveled to

communicate my unique vision. It is not

different places in the world, I have

my goal to merely depict the scene I see,

thousands of pictures I took during the

but rather use my artistic eye to express

trips. Sometimes I find the picture as a

my inner response towards what I see,

reference, while at other times I find a

depicting my emotion and mood from my

model painting from life.

I

try

is

to

an

emphasis

interpret

it


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Before I begin to paint I always ask myself what kind of mood I am trying to capture, what the image is in my mind, what I intend to paint and what kind of emotion I am trying to express. After making a few decisions I begin to think about the technical approach. First I tone my surface with a major background color. Then I use charcoal to do a simple drawing with design and composition which is easy for me to make changes and analyze focal points and simplify the subject. Then I place big shapes and values to block in the shadow part and paint from the dark to light. In the whole process, I pay attention to placing the brushstroke with variety and always checking back with technical requirements - it is a problem-solving process. If all these elements are accurate then my painting will be complete. When I am painting at the beginning, I feel so excited and passionate about the image in my mind. However, during the process sometimes I feel frustrated and impatient because your eye sometimes is much more critical than your hand. I think the best artists are those who are painfully selfcritical. This is good for self-betterment, rather than defeat. What are your sources of inspiration? I enjoy creating portraits or figures and landscapes in which I can find a certain beauty in a special characteristic or moods either from my daily life or a photo I took. I try to hold onto a child-like curiosity and use the artistic well-trained eye to see the beauty of our routine life. This is my inspiration. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums? My favorite medium is oil because of its flexibility and depth of color. Tell us about some of your achievements. I have the Memberships including: Oil Painter of America, American Impressionist Society, Portrait Society of America Outdoor Painters Society, California Art Club. My works had been Juried into many National Exhibition including: Oil Painters of America's 27th Annual Juried National Exhibition / Oil Painters of America's 28th Annual Juried National Exhibition / Oil Painters of America's 29th Annual Juried National Exhibition / American Impressionist

"I think the best artists are those who are painfully self-critical. This is good for self-betterment, rather than defeat." 080

society 20th Annual Juried National Exhibition / The 34th Annual Juried Bosque Art Classic Exhibition / The Allied Artists of America's 106th Annual Juried Exhibition / Oil Painters of America's 2019 West Regional Exhibition / The 4th Annual American Impressionist society Juried -


Impressions Small works showcase / Outdoor Painters Society Juried invitation for PleinAir Southwest Outdoor Painting Competition and Show / Artists on Location Juried invitation for Artists on Location Plein Air painting Event. I have the following National level Awards: Best of Show at the 20th American Impressionist Society’s Juried National Exhibition 2019 / Boren-Selvidge Award at Bosque Art Classic 34th Annual Juried Art exhibition 2019 / Art Muse Contest Emerging Artist Winner in May 2019 / State-level Award / 1st Place Award in the Texas members of the Portrait Society of America Exhibition 2018. I have been featured in Southwest Art Magazine and my works in American Art Collector and Fine Art Connoisseur. I was a speaker as American Impressionist Society National Best Show Winners Panellist, as well as a featured demonstrator at the AIS National Small Works Show. 081


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"The livelihood of youth from different backgrounds is a common theme I explore in my portrait paintings, especially from the mountain areas or the poor country. I try to depict the lovely youth of the poor mountain areas and evoke people's compassion to carry hope to these lovely children."

“A Girl from Festival” I had my ideas

From the Guatemala trip, I spotted

first come to me such as mood,

a beautiful girl in a crowded market.

emotion. Based on these concepts, I

The girl’s brightly colored head

quickly glanced at all the photos

scarf caught my attention first.

until I found a picture I took many

Then I noticed the girl’s expression:

years ago. The beauty immediately

not happy, kind of sad. I knew that

caught my eye. I decided to use that

that was the kind of emotion I

picture as a reference. Before it

wanted to paint. After returning

comes to the actual painting, I see a

home, I created “Guatemalan Girl in

mental image of the painting

the Market.” “Guatemalan Girl in

usually revolving around design,

the Market” went on to win the

shape, tone, light, color, brush-

Boren-Selvidge Award at Bosque

strokes and edges. All these kinds

Art Classic 34th Annual Juried Art

of visual elements and the image

exhibition 2019.

lead me thinking and working from day and night and sometimes I

Tell us about some of the themes

couldn’t fall asleep. "A Girl From

and

Festival" won the best of the show

explored.

in

The

the

society

American 20th

expressionist

Annual

concepts livelihood

that of

you

have

youth

from

National

different backgrounds is a common

Exhibition which was held at the

theme I explore in my portrait

Salmagundi Club New York 2019.

paintings, especially from the 083


mountain areas or the poor country. I try to depict the lovely youth of the poor mountain areas and evoke people's compassion to carry hope to these lovely children. “Mountain Child” is an example, as well as "Young Mother in Guatemala” which was from the trip with Art Ambassadors for a Colorful World to Guatemala in 2018. I was so touched and impressed by many young mothers who are hungry or sick, and couldn’t attend school but had to raise children. They are beautiful and their eyes filled with purity and wish. After that trip, I created that painting. "A Guatemalan Girl” for 2019's Art Ambassador for a Colorful World Trip. What are you passionate about? I am passionate about the figure or portrait which I could capture some characteristic beauty. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive. There are a lot of positive compliments and encouragement that I always appreciate and am very humbled to receive. Here is one of my Award Winner Judge’s feedback: “A Girl From Festival” "In Jing’s painting, composition and a feeling of “controlled Abandon” find their perfect subject in the flamboyant dancer she has chosen, Masterful use of Color, Light, and shade, lost and found edges and creation of textures, are all built on a creative framework of shapes and lines woven together as by a musician or composer. It’s natural, but beyond nature. Explosive!" Another Award Winner Judge’s feedback for "Check My Phone First” "There is a lot that can be said with a suggestion and for me, that always wins over a rendering. So many artists torture the brushwork to death leaving a static and uninteresting surface. I loved the simple yet confident brushwork and the concentrated chroma in this lovely work. All of this supports her posture and the mood. It's excellent." What are you currently working on? I am currently on some equestrian performer pieces. When I was in France visiting Chantilly last fall, I was so lucky to bump into a group of equestrians preparing for a horse show. I got permission and took hundreds of photo references in this one-in-a-million opportunity. I was

"Art is a way to bring forward a moment in time that takes away from the tension or stress of life and high-light the stories that make life beautiful." 084

shocked by the beauty and historic story. So I try to depict the beauty scene from my mind’s eye. What can we look forward to in the future, what directions will you be exploring? I think I will explore combining portrait or figure and


"Most of my subjects are people from different backgrounds and cultures. I sometimes consider whether these subjects will draw in the viewer to wonder about their life story or what’s going on in the scene." How do you feel about art and its role in the world? Art has always been a way to communicate feelings or a story. Art can bring back fond memories, bring peace, provide a colorful retreat for our daily life or even speak truth in times of conflict. In our world landscape together to create more storytelling themes or

today there is often unrest. Art is a way to bring

new arenas of interest, and so on and so forth. To explore

forward a moment in time that takes away from the

my own personal creative direction will always be my

tension or stress of life and high-light the stories that

future efforts in my life.

make life beautiful. I believe art has the power to change the world. It inspires individuals and changes

Tell us about your location and its influence on your

individual’s life.

work. I live in Frisco TX , USA. Since I love to travel, I like to learn

How do you want your art to affect the viewer?

and paint all over the country. I studied with many top

Most of my subjects are people from different

great master artists in different locations in the USA. Such

backgrounds and cultures. I sometimes consider

as Kevin Macpherson, Zhaoming Wu, John Michael

whether these subjects will draw in the viewer to

Carter, Daniel Gerhartz and many other great artists, So I

wonder about their life story or what’s going on in the

got so much influence from them.

scene. I want my art to bring about understanding and

I also admire the great masters in art history like Sargent,

perspective to my viewer

Sorolla, Fechin, Zorn. Their masterpieces are always my guide to keep my goals in my sight.

www.jingzhaoart.com 085


FELEKSAN ONAR 086


"THROUGH GLASS, I SPEAK, BREATHE AND LIVE." While drawing on sources from her personal history as well as collective memory, Feleksan Onar's works in glass deal with the notions of identity, constructed narratives, historical relations and impacts of politics on society. In her most recent work, ‘Perched,’ her storytelling in glass reflects on the Syrian refugee situation while

with

‘41X’,

exhibited

during

the

16th

International Architecture Exhibition, she particularly focuses on the cultural interaction that evolved through the art of glass making between the Ottoman Empire and Venice. Onar started off in a private atelier and later on received her formal education in glass at Glass Furnace, Istanbul. She initiated her own atelier, Fy-Shan Glass Studio, in 2003. Since then, she systematically educated herself formally in all sorts of glass making techniques: fusing and slumping, kiln casting, flame working, hotforming and blowing, cold-working and practices to incorporate unique techniques in her works that present the amazing qualities of the material she loves. "Glass, not only expresses my past and present, but also my anxieties and expectations for the future. Through glass, I speak, breathe and live." Feleksan Onar, born and raised in Turkey, completed her undergraduate degree in economics and music history at Cornell University and graduate studies at Harvard Business School. She works out of her atelier in Pera, Istanbul as well as in Berlin and Murano. The artist’s works are housed in important public collections worldwide including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; Pergamon Museum, Berlin; Riihimaki Glass Museum, Finland; and Contemporary Glass Art Museum, Eskisehir, among others, as well as in private collections. Her most recent solo exhibitions have been held at Arkas Museum, Izmir; Victoria and Albert Museum, London; Pergamon Museum, Berlin; and Magazzino Gallery at Palazzo Polignac, Venice.

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NOTIONS OF IDENTITY, CONSTRUCTED NARRATIVES, HISTORICAL RELATIONS AND IMPACTS OF POLITICS ON SOCIETY. 088


WWW.FELEKSAN.COM

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DARCY J. SEARS


"I am primarily interested in line and form, the contours of the human body. I explore the figure in all of its imperfections. All sizes and shapes of the human body are beautiful and complete in my eyes. While at times, I use models for my work, I may not realistically portray them. I want to capture their mood, spirit, and their essence."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

"Primarily self-taught, I had no formal training but

Tell us about your work.  

wonderful teachers such as Eugene Daub, Tebby

Initially, I was a realistic figurative sculptor. Over the

George, Bruno Lucchesi, and Peter Rubino. Initially, a

years, my path has evolved into a stylized representation

realistic figurative sculptor, my path has evolved into

of the human figure. The human form is my inspiration -

a stylized representation of the human figure. The

my compositions celebrate our imperfections and find

human form is my inspiration. I often introduce the

beauty in physical shapes. I often introduce mythical

mythical by integrating classical Greek forms."

touches by integrating classical Greek forms with my own personal style.

Tell us about yourself and your background. I am a San Francisco Bay Area sculptor who has been

Tell us about your process and what you feel when you

working with clay and bronze for over 20 years. I was

are creating.

born in Southern California and received a BA degree

My technical method is to work with slabs of clay and to

at the University of California, Santa Barbara. I spent

build from the inside out. I then switch my focus to the

many years in the corporate world before becoming a

outside as the piece nears completion. This process

full-time artist.

utilizes a hollow center around which the clay is added 091


"My work is driven by my need to mold life out of clay. Clay is a wonderful medium with few boundaries. Wings can sprout on anyone and trees can have wheels. Clay enables me to transform the mundane into something magical." Tell us about some of your proudest moments. My work has been exhibited in galleries in both California and France. I was an artist-in-resident at Saint-Quentin-la-Poterie, an artist town west of Avignon. At the end of the program, I had a solo exposition. I also participated in a group exhibition, “France Amerique,” in Paris and exhibited at the Claire de Villaret Galerie. In California, my sculptures have been shown in many venues, including SF Art Market 2019, which had 26,000 attendees and STartup Art Fair LA 2020. and modeled. Form is always central to my work. The finishes are the alchemy where clay is transformed into art. What are your sources of inspiration? I am primarily interested in line and form, the contours of the human body. I explore the figure in all of its imperfections. All sizes and shapes of the human body are beautiful and complete in my eyes.  While at times, I use models for my work, I may not realistically portray them. I want to capture their mood, spirit, and the essence of who they are. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums?  My work is driven by my need to mold life out of clay.  Clay is a wonderful medium with few boundaries.  Wings can sprout on anyone and trees can have wheels.  Clay enables me to transform the mundane into something magical.  Bronze work is an extension of clay with the added element of defying gravity. One single toe can be a balance point for a six-foot piece. 092


"Form is always central to my work. The finishes are the alchemy where clay is transformed into art." "Bronze work is an extension of clay with the added element of defying gravity. One single toe can be a balance point for a six-foot piece."

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"My newest collection represents a personal artistic challenge in terms of scale and ambition. This venture into larger than life bronzes is transforming my artistic expression." What are you passionate about? Spreading joy and beauty in people’s lives through sculpture. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive from people that discover your work. Whenever someone walks into my studio, I notice that they are immediately drawn to my large bronzes. They possess a magnetism that people respond to through touch and social interaction. People want to know about their history and often take pictures with them. It is really lovely. Quotes from collectors below:  “I have been lucky enough to have collected several pieces of Darcy’s work over the past few years. Her work is thoughtful and the tactile surfaces are compelling. The abstraction of classical forms elevates the space where her work resides in my home.” Colin F.  “I bought a silver leaf angel lamp from Darcy and it has become a symbol for me of peace. The sarong she wears represents truth and integrity. Her beauty is life, her feet stand firm against ignorance and violence and her wings are creativity and protection-may this angel resonate love for all.” Kathryn L. What are you currently working on?  My newest collection represents a personal artistic challenge in terms of scale and ambition. This venture into larger than life bronzes is transforming my artistic expression. These pieces are more permanent and I hope to place them in large outdoor art installations.  I love the idea of sharing these sculptures with the public and having them integrated with nature. The juxtaposition of bronze or high fired clay in a natural setting is a perfect fit. 094


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"My studio is in the iconic Industrial Center Building (ICB) in Sausalito CA, one of the largest collectives of artists on the West Coast. Over 100 artists work in this building and the influence of a community of artists in continually inspiring."

096


"Art is what we all cling to feed our souls… beauty, color, imagination, joy, and freedom especially in these times." What can we look forward to in the near future? My future work will become more and more abstracted as I continue to create larger bronze sculptures that are vertical and highly textured. Recently I have also been experimenting with digital imaging to manipulate the size and scope of these larger pieces. How does your location influence your work? My studio is in the iconic Industrial Center Building (ICB) in Sausalito CA, one of the largest collectives of artists on the West Coast. Over 100 artists work in this building and the influence of a community of artists in continually inspiring. Painters, photographers, and other visual artists are my friends, critics, and collectors. My proximity to San Francisco and the wonderful culture there is always stimulating. How do you feel about art and its role in the world? Art is more important than ever in today’s world of the pandemic, fake news, and negativity. Art is what we all cling to feed our souls… beauty, color, imagination, joy, and freedom especially in these times. 097


"My future work will become more and more abstracted as I continue to create larger bronze sculptures that are vertical and highly textured."

098


How do you want your art to affect the viewer? Each piece has my story in it, but I want the viewer to look at my sculpture and add their story, their interpretation, and their own joy.  What has the Covid pandemic meant to you and how has it influenced your creativity?  There is no better time to create. Many people have become isolated and introspective, but people are also looking for a distraction.  I executed a Zoom virtual open studio, which was a huge success. Buyers called in and bought art from all over the United States. Collectors have told me that they want to connect with artists and art during this dark time. People are looking for beautiful joyful sculptures. View my virtual studio tour at: www.djsears.com 099


ANDRZEJ M KARWACKI


"My works have an intention of equanimity that is neither a thought nor an emotion. And truly it is an exploration of my own social psyche... My paintings, narrate events experienced, learned and forgotten and learned again by the human mind."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Andrzej holds Masters in Urban Architecture and

Jersey City State University. While I was earning a BFA in

Integral Psychology. Andrzej's current paintings are

painting, I had the opportunity to explore everything from

Cosmo-centric and see humanity and art as an

sculpture to printmaking, drawings to graphic art. At the

integral part of nature. Living in the SF Bay Area, he

end of the 5-year BFA program, I continued to the

has a broad creative practice; his works are exhibited

University of Pennsylvania where I earned my Master's

throughout The United States and Europe.

Degree in the field of Urban Architecture in 1994. Architectural design taught me to observe and imitate

Tell us about yourself and your background.

nature through new media.

I was born in Poland, in the historic town of Brzeg, I grew up during the years of political oppression and

After relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area, my artistic

era of communist Poland. There I attended the School

direction began to take shape after integrating Eastern

for the Arts and Literature. Unconsciously, these

spirituality into my artwork. For me, Eastern Spirituality

primary years were the platform for a deep attraction

and forms of Zen and Buddhism were closer to seeing the

towards peace, poetry and art as a form of creative

world as beautiful rather than violent as had been the

preservation. In 1984, I moved to New York and

view in the preceding years. My artistic philosophy led me

continued my education at the School for the Arts at

to resume academic work at the California Institute of 101


Integral Studies in San Francisco where, in

be explored repeatedly with new nuances

2010, I received a Masters in Integral

coming to the fore each time.

Psychology

The process includes the additional step

and

a

certification

in

Expressive Art Therapy.

"I have literally reconstructed my paintings to embrace the underlying order and harmonic balance that supports the organic and at times extremely chaotic nature of life."

102

of including strips of collages made from various newspapers and magazines to

Tell us about your work and style, why is

bring fragments of images and text into

it unique?

the composition. The collage also serves

My work is always driven by a desire to

to ground the work in time and place, with

create meaningful content.  

references to Art, Poetry and the Bay

Equanimity Redefined is my current

Area’s contemporary lifestyle.

series of paintings. Here, I have literally

These works capture the pursuit of a type

reconstructed my paintings to embrace

of art that was perceived in The “New

the underlying order and harmonic

American Painters” movement as being

balance that supports the organic and at

distinctly American. In style, they bring to

times extremely chaotic nature of life.

mind works of John Chamberlain and

The style is created by the application of

Mark di Suvero who have similarly

paint with a palette knife to thin wooden

prioritized spontaneity and expressive

boards, which are consequently cut up

force. My work goes a step beyond and

into strips and collaged together in a

successfully combines two very different

different order thereby creating more

artistic styles; Abstract Expressionism

graffiti-like painting landscapes, reading

and

the composition like a book that can be

composition.

Pop

Art,

into

one

cohesive


"Like in music, where each instrument and each note adds to another until a process starts to become felt, colors and tones flow until a composition becomes visible. The creative process is nothing more than a playful rediscovery of something that was not there before.�

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Tell us about your process and what you feel when you are creating. Creating art is like composing music, elements come together to create a symphony for your senses. Like in music, where each instrument and each note adds to another until a process starts to become felt, colors and tones flow until a composition becomes visible. The creative process is nothing more than a playful rediscovery of something that was not  there before. I stop when a work of art seems somewhat but not completely complete, allowing the viewer to bring his/her own experience into it. How does your location influence and inspire your work? Currently, my studio is located in the San Francisco Bay Area. I use urban life as well as the cultural graffiti of the city's political and social climate to direct my works' themes. Sources of inspirations are simply all around us. Mostly, our soulful purpose as humanity  and the role we play in the man-made world, and the natural world in which we coexist and share with each other and other living organisms.  I would want my art to be non-linear in that way. My use of contemporary materials such as newspapers, photos, collage, paint, strips of aged wood and fabric allow me to communicate timeless concepts that are more-so based on Buddhist philosophy. My works have an intention of equanimity that is neither  a thought nor an emotion. And truly it is an exploration of my own social psyche. Tell us about some of your achievements and notable projects. As an urban architect I was part of a team, and a designer creating urban environments all around the San Francisco Bay Area during the 90’s. These still exist and serve as living playgrounds for social interaction. As an artist, I have created thousands of artworks that are now placed in both public and private places. I work with designers and art galleries to compose inviting and colorful environments. But, due to my client's need for privacy, I can’t disclose names. However, my website shows many locations in the installation images.  Some of the public places include, San Francisco Palace of Fine Arts, libraries, schools and shopping villages. 105


"If society wants to fight disease, racism and other forms of bias in access to care and equality, we need to bring our center back to community and social values. I hope my work speaks to that thru positive messages and creativity."

106


ARTIST STATEMENT It is an interesting biological fact that all of us have, in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean… we have salt in our sweat, in our tears, in our skin. And when we go back to the ocean – whether it is to sail or to observe it – we are going back to this instinctual belief that we all originate in the gesture of the moving sea. If you close your eyes and you listen to your breath, it’s exactly like the quiet waves, gently sounding across the grains of sand. Our urban lives are coupled with the ocean life. And so is our creative personal nature. Our artistic language is familiar, universal and repetitive. We try to interpret what we see and express its emotional understanding. By engaging with art we allow ourselves to notice the similarity of the feelings that arise. And that is our collective Nature. That is our universal ability to sense one into another. My artwork is an exploration, a gesture which reflects a moment in life, a composition which tells a personal story. And as “Nights through dreams tell the myths forgotten by the day.” ― C.G. Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections. So do my paintings, narrate events experienced, learned and forgotten and learned again by the human mind.

What are you currently working on? My work these days is mostly based in private commissions. Some include figure paintings, pop art and

www.andrzejmichael.com

collage arts. How do you want your art to affect the viewer? Tolstoy mentioned in his bio, that he considers his work successful if the reader has his/her own emotional response or connection to his literary works. Perhaps, that is all. If one, in his/her process of contemplation with my paintings is able to experience some sort of emotional connectivity, then perhaps, I succeeded. Either way, Tolstoy simply put it "We cannot fail to observe that art is one of the means of affective communication

between

people,

by

words

one

transmits thoughts to another, by means of art, one transmits feelings.” This goes beyond just the pandemic. If society wants to fight disease, racism and other forms of bias in access to care and equality, we need to bring our center back to community and social values. I hope my work speaks to that thru positive messages and creativity. 107


MARGARET DRAKE


"I grew up having a special interest in horses and Indians and the western way of life.”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Margaret was raised in a small ranching community

Tell us about yourself and your background.

in Northwestern Colorado. She currently lives on a

I grew up having a special interest in horses and Indians

ranch near Glen Rose, Texas. After retiring from

and the western way of life. My upbringing in the extreme

research within the pharmaceutical industry in 2009,

north western corner of Colorado where ranching and

she studied three-dimensional portraiture, then she

Indians and cowboys and bandits existed influenced me

moved on to figurative sculpture, studying from

immensely. My years spent grooming, riding, and caring

masters in the field. Margaret’s work has appeared in

for my horses was time well spent, as I now am aware of

many prestigious juried shows throughout the

the anatomy of a horse based on that experience. I still

United States. In 2016 Margaret won "Best of Show"

live on a ranch in Glen Rose, Texas, and continue to have

at the Breckenridge Texas Fine Art Show. In 2017

horses and a variety of other animals close by to serve as

her piece “Mr. Remington’s Cowboy” was acquired

models.

by the Museum of Western Art for permanent exhibition. In 2019 and 2020 she was chosen to

Tell us about your work and style, why is your sculptural

teach sculpting at the prestigious Western Art

approach unique?

Academy, Kerrville, Texas.

I would mention that being a woman sculptor in the 109


110


"My upbringing in the extreme north western corner of Colorado where ranching and Indians and cowboys and bandits existed influenced me immensely." 111


"I strive very hard to depict athleticism with grace and beauty as well" 112

western art genre is not easy. Western art

touch of color to my own individual taste.

was traditionally created by the American

All of this makes my pieces a bit different

male cowboy. Although I’m not a cowboy,

from the conventional sculptures of

In my area of art, I am required to

western art and animals. When people

compete with traditional male cowboy

see my work, they always marvel at the

artists. Because of this I am driven to

detail I put into each piece. In 2016, one

prove that I can create pieces every bit as

of my pieces, “Ohitika” won Best of Show

good and perhaps better than their

at Breckenridge Fine Art show.

output. How do you want your art to affect the Tell us about your process.

viewer?

I have not yet created any monumental

With my work, I want people to smile and

works, so all of my pieces are “tabletop”

feel good when they see my art. I want

size art works. I strive very hard to depict

them to appreciate the detail and the

athleticism with grace and beauty as well.

accuracy

I also do my own patinas, so I can add a

portraying.

of

the

subject

that

I’m


"Although I’m not a cowboy, In my area of art, I am required to compete with traditional male cowboy artists. Because of this I am driven to prove that I can create pieces every bit as good and perhaps better than their output."

113


"I also do my own patinas, so I can add a touch of color to my own individual taste. All of this makes my pieces a bit different from the conventional sculptures of western art and animals."

114


"With my work, I want people to smile and feel good when they see my art. I want them to appreciate the detail and the accuracy of the subject that I’m portraying."

115


"In the near future, I will continue to strive to create pieces that are better and better, in their portrayal of beauty and grace and detail."

116


"I believe art and the associated appreciation of beauty is inherent within the human brain. It is an element of the environment which we all crave because it makes us “feel good” when we see something that affects us." How has the Covid pandemic affected your work? During this time of isolation with the COVID pandemic, I must say that my everyday life is not affected much. An artist spends many hours alone, creating and thinking and planning, and so this is not so unusual for me. www.margaretdrakestudio.com www.margaretdrakefineart.com www.instagram.com/MargaretDrakeStudio www.facebook.com/MargaretDrakeStudio What are you currently working on? I am currently working on a Kiowa Black Legging Warrior, which I hope to finish within the next few months. I also have a piece coming out of the foundry very soon that I am particularly excited about. It’s a cavalry officer during the Indian Wars making a charge with a saber in his hand. The horse is in full gallop with only one leg on the ground. What can we look forward to from you in the future?  In the near future, I will continue to strive to create pieces that are better and better, in their portrayal of beauty and grace and detail. I have been approached about creating a monumental piece or two as well. What do you think about art's role in our lives?  I believe art and the associated appreciation of beauty is inherent within the human brain. It is an element of the environment which we all crave because it makes us “feel good” when we see something that affects us.  Because of this, art, in all forms, will be an important part of the human story until the end of time. 117


TIM WILSON GALLERY QUEENSTOWN, NZ New Zealand's most successful living landscape Artist invites you to visit Queenstown. And while you are here, stop by the best landscape art gallery in the country.

WWW.TIMWILSONGALLERY.COM


MICHELA CATTAI Michela Cattai is based in Milan and Venice. Following her graduation in Painting from the Accademia di Belle Arti in Venice with Fabrizio Plessi, she started her research on glass by attending a Design course held by Ennio Chiggio, thanks to whom she understood the meaning of semantic and semiotic in the context of Italian design. In 1992, she founded the Galleria Michela Cattai in Milan, with the aim of building an important dialogue between art and design. Still bonded to Venice, she decided to deepen her study of glass inside the furnace, by experiencing for herself the Murano blown glass practice. She learnt the old renaissance techniques and the history of glass. Cattai developed her process and through a careful study of color and shape, she realized abstract artworks that have wrinkled models and different color shades. Her career built on creativity, continuous study and experimentation has been defined by the creation of artworks that summarize her history and her identity. The result of her most recent research is shown in the dialogue between glass and recycled materials, through which the artist not only goes far from the classical rules of working glass but also reflects her desire to draw the public’s attention to a global and very contemporary message. In this type of process the artist works with the awareness of respecting the world and creates works

that take responsibility for future generations. Michela Cattai’s artworks are presented in many international exhibitions and fairs, and are part of private and public collections. She collaborates as designer and art curator for the world famous house of Venini. www.michelacattai.it 119


ANGELL BIKE BY ORA ITO In the spring of 2017 Ora ïto received a telephone call

lights, for a total weight of 13,9 kg. This smart bike

from Marc Simoncini,  the serial entrepreneur and

offers the luxury of invisible fittings that disappear into

founder of the well-known French online dating

its fluid contours.

service, Meetic. He had an idea: “What if we created the best electric bike in the world?” Two years later,

3 riding modes are available: Free ride, Navigation and

delivering on the promises of it creators, Angell is now

Sport, with a maximum speed of 25km/h and an

available for pre-order. With a beautiful streamlined

autonomy of 70km. Angell is one of the lightest electric

design, Angell bike is the archetype of the electric

bicycles in the world. Its touchscreen delivers real time

bicycle we were waiting for.

information such as weather, air quality, battery levels, speed and calories burned. For the peace of mind of the

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Made out of aluminium and carbon, the design

future owner, the battery has an automatic lock system

includes a touchscreen on the handlebars, a removable

protecting it from theft and recharges in less than two

battery weighing under 2kg and hyperbolic Indicator

hours.


THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY ORA ÏTO STUDIO DECODES THE DNA OF OUR TIMES, IMAGINING CHANGES TO COME. Angell exists in black or silver, available for preorder at the retail price of 2690 euros all tax included. A number of additional accessories are available to purchase, such as: mudguards, wooden baskets, helmets, anti-pollution masks, etc. In 1997, Ora ïto hijacked the Vuitton and Apple brands by creating virtual products. Garnering attention, these immediately became icons of the digital revolution. As a major design phenomenon incorporated into pop culture, the multi-acclaimed success of his aluminium  Heineken bottle sparked his future collaborations with other partners at the height of luxury goods and industry. Firms such as  Cassina, Bouygues, Cappellini, Alstom, Laguiole, Citroën, Zanotta  and  Accor  all seek his mark for their brand, a recognisable label of modernity.  The multidisciplinary Ora ïto studio decodes the DNA of our times, imagining changes to come, revisiting mobility, objects, hotels, furniture and restaurants with a relentless methodology for which he invents a neologism: simplexity; the fluid vocabulary of the digital age. In 2013, he created and opened  MAMO, an art centre on the roof terrace of  Le Corbusier’s Cité Radieuse  in Marseille, where world-renowned contemporary

artists

ranging

from

Xavier

Veilhan to  Dan Graham  are exhibited. In 2017, he began a series of collaborations with  Daniel Buren with whom he has conceived hotels, cinemas and public art projects. Most recently, Ora ïto has signed a tram way in Nice and the new Marseilles metro for Alstom, a sailing yacht with Perini Navi, a nomad and ephemeral AccorHotel  as well a highend electric bicycle named Angell. www.ora-ito.com | www.angell.bike 121


NATHAN SANDBERG


"If I am not alone with glass in my studio, I am working with it in a classroom with students. The material is always there... I don’t approach making from a need to sell direction. I’m making it to be enjoyed and am grateful when people are moved to own it. ”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Nathan Sandberg is an artist and educator based in

hung out in the darkroom and poked around in trays of

Portland, Oregon, USA. From OnGrade Studio he

chemicals developing photographs. This early behavior

produces work for exhibitions and develops fresh

continued through college where I eventually earned a

curriculum in kiln-glass. He has established himself

BFA in Glass and Ceramics, with a good understanding of

as one of the top kiln-glass educators of the day and

photography, from the Southern Illinois University-

his artwork can be found in collections worldwide.

Carbondale. After a few years working as a full-time glassblower I took a job in the Research & Education

Tell us about yourself and your background.

department at Bullseye Glass Company where I

Curiosity about materials and processes has driven

investigated the materials we were producing as well as

me since before I was aware of it. I’m 41 years old and

developed curriculum to teach.

can remember a time when I was a youngster, digging clay out of the banks of Lake Erie and firing it adjacent

Tell us about your work and style, why it is unique?

to a campfire. During middle school, I would attend

I have experience with a variety of glass-working

summer sessions at the local community college to

disciplines and am able to draw on all of them for any

learn about computers and ceramics. In High School I

given project. I routinely take what I know about 123


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glassblowing and translate it to kiln-glass.

part. I don’t approach making from a need

This works well in reverse too, and helps

to sell direction. I’m making it to be

my work stand out. Making unique work

enjoyed and am grateful when people are

is important to me and is sometimes

moved to own it.

challenging when you consider that

"I’m inspired by the built environment both for what it looks like and what it represents. I can’t help but pay attention to the fine details of how our world is connected."

glassmakers have been sharing a set of

What are your sources of inspiration?

very old techniques seemingly forever.

I’m inspired by hardworking people with original ideas that are dedicated to their

Tell us about your process and what do

craft and those who have come before me

you feel when you are creating?

and managed to make amazing objects of

For better or worse, I have many ideas

glass, clay and metal thousands of years

and projects in process at the same time.

ago. I’m inspired by the built environment

If I am not alone with glass in my studio, I

both for what it looks like and what it

am working with it in a classroom with

represents. I can’t help but pay attention

students. The material is always there.

to the fine details of how our world is

Once the beginning of an idea has formed,

connected.

and it could come from anywhere, I need to at least poke at it immediately. I’ll run a

Why are you attracted to glass?

test, make a sample, perhaps a foam

I’m honestly not sure I have a choice in

model or even a list of words, but rarely a

the matter. We get along really well. The

drawing and rarely do I want to know

history

exactly what the work will look like

connection, as a material, to science,

before it is finished. That develops during

industry and art is very intriguing and

the process of making, and is the exciting

inspiring to me.

of

glass

and

its

modern

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126


Tell us about some of your achievements. My greatest achievement has to be the fact that I have managed to build a recognizable career on and around glass. I am very proud of the fact that I have a studio to create and teach in, a house to live in, and a somewhat stable domestic life that includes a supportive, loving wife who is an artist. Tell us about some of the themes you have explored. As an observant person I am captivated by the accidental arrangements of form, color and surface that exist within our built environment. While making works in kiln-glass to celebrate these mundane details I started thinking about making work that could potentially cheer people up or at least distract them from their personal situation for a few minutes and give them a bit of relief. So, I began drawing from the acute understanding of glass that I had been building. I started exploiting some of the more formal, seductive qualities of the material. I also started thinking practically about HOW people live with what I create. What are you passionate about? I’m passionate about decency and equal rights and opportunities for everyone. I’m also passionate about working hard with my hands and doing the best I can no matter what the job is. I’m equally passionate about being innovative and never feeling like my ideas came from someone/somewhere else. I also like growing vegetables. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive. Regular feedback includes complimenting me on original designs and appearances, an elevated degree of quality craftsmanship, and a good understanding of color. For a while, I always heard that my glasswork looked more like other materials than glass. This was never an objective of mine but was something that I believe came from having a near simultaneous experience in art school learning about glass and ceramics. What are you currently working on? I am currently focused on fortifying and sustaining my studio practice while I figure out how it fits in the modern world. I think I realized fairly recently that this is my career and our

"I am captivated by the accidental arrangements of form, color and surface that exist in our built environments."

lifestyle all in one. I like the challenges and variety that comes with living as an artist. On any given day I could find myself wearing a wide range of hats, sometimes all at once. Some that fit well, some that I’m excited to try on, and some that I can’t believe I even own! 127


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What can we look forward to in the future - what directions will you be exploring? I had an exhibition in early 2019 that was a significant change of direction for me and I’ve been busy with other projects since then. I’d like to spend some time with what remains of that, very formal, work and let it evolve a bit. Conceptually, I’m interested in questioning what naturally occurring means. I also learned that apparently there are no right angles in nature and that seems like fertile ground for exploration ripe with potential content.

"Conceptually, I’m interested in questioning what naturally occurring means. I also learned that apparently there are no right angles in nature and that seems like fertile ground for exploration ripe with potential content." 129


130


Tell us about your location and its influence on your work?

"Art is more important now than ever in the world."

While I don’t knowingly refer to it in my work, the natural landscape here is amazing. The thing about this

How you want your art to affect the world?

location that I do think informs my work is the large

I think the world needs more one-off, unique instances

number of creative people trying to do something

of beauty rather than mass produced attempts. I want

similar. The strong sense of innovation, making, creating,

my work to be visually interesting enough to catch a

growing and building that exists in this region is

viewer and hold them for a minute or two. I’d like to

energizing.

enhance their life on some level. Maybe this momentary instance of beauty brings a bit of

How do you feel about art and its role?

joy to their day. Maybe it teaches something that

I wish more people could appreciate art, and live with it.

broadens their understanding of the world. Maybe I can

Art is more important now than ever in the world.

even spark their curiosity enough to inspire them to go

Somewhere within the topic of art lives beauty, which

out and begin creating something. From another

the world absolutely needs more of. The idea that most

perspective. I am aware of the resources and energy that

art doesn’t do anything and is expensive, and takes up

go into glass production and how it contributes to

space stands in the way of many people being able to live

climate change. There is also the fact that what I make is

with it. That said, people need to be able to take the time

going to be on the planet forever. While quality has

to appreciate it. Many of us are handcuffed by the

always come before quantity, I do feel as if I could make

struggle to simply survive that we never get to enjoy

fewer things and still feel satiated.

anything authentic anymore. Art should give us a chance to relax, take a break, think and escape… dream.

www.nathansandberg.com 131


LOUISE DURHAM


"I find it hard to imagine anyone who doesn’t wonder at the beauty of a rainbow in the sky, it’s something universal.... My work is anchored in a belief and a trust of all that is good, seeking to embody wholeness and connection."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Shoreham based artist Louise V Durham has worked

only to move to another boat community in Shoreham by

with glass for the last 15 years. Her work is

the sea in the year 2000. These communities have been a

influenced and inspired by her love of gardening and

great inspiration in my life, I now live a few minutes walk

the beauty that is found in connection, be that with

from the Shoreham houseboat community, its the kind of

other humans, plant life or nature in general. Both

place that’s very difficult to leave. There's the natural

the materials and the content of the work speak of

beauty of the place and that of the people too, a place

the light that ignites all living beings, she aims to

where people know how to pull together, and who on the

nudge us to live naturally, remembering kindness to

whole share common values. I didn’t get a job as a

each other and ourselves.

therapist until many years later but instead set up a charity “Moor Arts” with the aim of providing creative

Tell us about yourself and your background.

opportunities to people experiencing mental health

I was born in Johannesburg but raised here in the UK.

problems and learning disabilities.

I trained as an Occupational Therapist after travelling in my early twenties. I didn’t really want to be a

During this time I took a part-time class in stained glass,

therapist, but I was heart broken from the break up of

and that's when it all began. Initially I was no good at it

my first love and kind of stumbled into it knowing only

from a technical point of view, but I loved the process so

I wanted do something, anything meaningful. I lived on

much and could usually fall back on the materials enough

a canal boat in London whilst completing my degree,

to make a nice enough piece to give to someone for a 133


birthday present, so I just kept

afield in the Middle East and Australia.

making. I had a few exhibitions with my glass work in Shoreham and

Tell us about your work and style,

Brighton, and then the sculptures

why is it unique?

were born.

For many years I have had a daily prayer or just reminder to myself “I

"An act of handing it over to Trust, knowing that all will become clear and surrendering to the fact that life isn’t always easy or straight forward and nor should we expect it to be." 134

The sculptures are a co-creation with

offer my power in the service of Love".

my craftsman and wonderful partner,

I say it most days, in fact it’s the

Chris, a plantsman, fine artist and

nearest thing I have to a spiritual

generally phenomenally talented kind

practice. If I haven’t said it already I

of guy. He had found an interesting

always say it, at least in my head when

piece of timber that already had a

I get to my glass cutting table. It’s

brilliantly shaped hole in it. I made the

something I started doing when I was

glass to fit, we worked out the logistics

in a tight spot in my life. When I

took lovely photos, made another 5 or

realised that life felt much better and

6 and had an exhibition in our garden.

had more meaning if I dedicated my

They sold like hotcakes. A year later I

actions and my being to Love. An act

was ready to give up my therapy work

of handing it over to Trust, knowing

and we have both been making our

that

living solely from the sculptures since.

surrendering to the fact that life isn’t

all

will

become

clear

and

always easy or straight forward and The vast majority of our business

nor should we expect it to be.

comes via a strong online presence through our website, Facebook and

You get to a certain age where all the

Instagram, selling predominantly in

difficulties that came your way make

the UK and USA, and many other

sense, we can not have the light

places throughout Europe and further

without the shadow, but we can be


"My work also includes simple symbols - the heart, the star, the rain drop / leaf shape, I suppose when we use these kind of shapes we are directly communicating something about what we all innately seem to understand."

very clear about our intentions. My work is anchored in a belief and a trust of all that is good, seeking to embody wholeness and connection. So this is the essence of my work, and work to me is all of it, the glass, the housework, parenting, gardening, the photography, the yoga practice - its actually all the same thing. When I’m able to be fully present with any of these areas of my life, magic happens, I just know what to do. So there it is, my stained glass practice is just that, a practice, I just keep making what comes through. I try not to interfere too much on an intellectual level, I mean if I did I would never have been able to put myself out there as an artist at all, I would still be condemning the first piece I ever made. I never thought I would make my money as an artist, but people just liked it. I think there is something in the pieces that I make that speak of vulnerability, my style has a simplicity, a childlike charm. An obsession with including all the colours, it speaks of wholeness. Once I have the whole spectrum of glass laid out on my table I feel there's a healing vibration in that, it just makes me feel better somehow. I find it hard to imagine anyone who doesn’t wonder at the beauty of a rainbow in the sky, it’s something universal. My work also includes simple symbols - the heart, the star, the rain drop / leaf shape, I suppose when we use these kind of shapes we are directly communicating something about what we all innately seem to understand, our connection to each other, our connection to nature, ourselves, and the universe and beyond. 135


Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums? I never tire of the alchemic relationship between light and glass. The reflections being as beautiful as the piece itself, or maybe even more beautiful. I'm not your usual stained glass artist, its an exact art form that is really for the perfectionist. I’m the opposite, I'm an imperfectionist, and I think that that is part of my work. Eager to move away from straight lines and traditional ways of working within this medium I found my circles, my curves, my wonky lines and there I stay. Maybe the glass work is not as flawless as you would find in a church window but when the light shines through, the wonky line is no longer an issue, the colours just come alive and we can appreciate what is seen. This is how I feel about us imperfect beings, at the end of the day we all have the same hurts and insecurities, its just whether we are given the opportunities to let our light shine anyway. The search for perfection is a pointless and impossible task, we are not perfect and neither are we meant to be. If we can just view the world through a different lens it can all change before our eyes. Glass gives me this moment of magical transformation. Tell about your achievements and notable projects. What comes to mind when I read this question is not any particular major exhibitions and wonderful commissions, though I have had those. But the thing I feel most proud of is the greenhouse Chris and I made together last year at our allotment. The brick base was already there from 50 years ago, falling apart but still there, a foundation on which to build a dream.  Chris made the wooden frame and I recycled all the old glass from the derelict corpse of a thing we inherited, by heating the water on a fire washing them down and cutting each piece to fit. It was a big job, but we’ve used the same skills we use to work on the sculptures to create it. Now its filled with tomatoes, cucumbers, aubergines, figs, peppers, chillies and a great deal more to feed ourselves now and way into the future. That to me is more meaningful than any prestigious show or award, its giving us freedom and beauty and self -

"I never tire of the alchemic relationship between light and glass. The reflections being as beautiful as the piece itself, or maybe even more beautiful." 136


sufficiency. It’s always about making beautiful spaces, growing plants / food / family with us, we seem to do pretty well with it all. I go to our allotment every day; it’s a place where we can forget all about the terrible things that are happening in the world, naturally social distance and grow our food and flowers, yes flowers, that’s another part of what we do, we grow a silly amount of dahlias mainly. It great, we’ve done the flowers for many a friends wedding. As far as my achievements with the glass work goes, it has been our deep honour to make many memorial pieces and even a few head “stones” for graves in Germany. I was also asked to make a piece encasing some of the ashes of my friend's father. The ashes formed a very subtle, delicate constellation-like shape onto the clear glass, the actual ash is hardly visible but mysteriously woven into the fabric of the glass. When I worked as a therapist, it was mainly with the elderly. I was fascinated by the care we give to those who are at the end of their lives, it often feels that we are removed from this natural process. There is much taboo around death in our society. It is of course, very painful to imagine life without our loved ones but we need to accept there’s nothing we can 137


"Stained glass historically has a sacred essence with its place in our churches and I embrace this fully." do about the fact that we all die. I hope that my death

Growing our own food, planting trees, supporting

will be one that unites people, and creates an

projects and charities that are really making a difference.

opportunity for more Love to grow between people who

We all need to take more personal responsibility for

might not have got to know each other if they didn’t

what we have created as a nation and a global

share a love for me. There is beauty in our departure

community. It’s so easy to feel disempowered, people

from this earthly place, it’s not easy to see through the

have been dulled into a false sense of reality where an

eyes of grief but it’s there. I definitely feel the presence

individual is powerless against the status quo, but we

of my loved ones who have passed over, I feel their

mustn’t underestimate the difference an individual can

support and love in the memories I hold in connection

make.

with my daily life. The fact that I can make something for someone that might make them feel some comfort and

The world can seem pretty bleak right now; reading the

closeness to their loved ones gives me a real sense of

papers, listening to the news, not knowing what story to

satisfaction. Stained glass historically has a sacred

believe in the first place as we are doubtless only being

essence with its place in our churches and I embrace this

told one side of anything anyway. I try to move away

fully when it comes to these special pieces.

from all of that, it only messes with my head. Whilst I know my core truth inside, all individuals are created

138

What are you passionate about?

equal, we need to look after our planet and do what we

I am passionate about living, about living well and

can to restore its health, and that whatever the question,

learning to live better and about passing this on to the

Love will hold the answer. So whilst I respect anyone

younger generations. For me this means taking more

who goes out and stands up for our rights and tries to put

responsibility to create the world we want to live in.

things right, my way is to create something different, and


offer what I can as the individual I am. Support the bees by growing as many flowers as possible, support our family by growing the food that we eat, this for me is empowering and making a difference. I truly believe we need to simplify our lives, stop taking from the earth and start really nurturing it, stop being such a selfish race, always striving for more and start making moves in our communities here and now to create something better, something much more whole and something we can actually pass down. Tell us about some the feedback you have received. I do have many messages of thanks and appreciation but seeing as it arrived on my doorstep this morning I will share an extract from a letter from a friend, I had sent her one of my hearts in the post. In her letter she wrote “Your art work really seems to Hail the Divine, both externally and internally and I thank you so much for the reminder to be grateful.” What are you currently working on?  My main project at the moment is a 13 piece commission for a Sausalito Houseboat in California. This as you can imagine really ticks my boxes, loving houseboats as I do. I started 2020 with a yoga retreat with one of my best friends, Yvonne Coomber a painter and all round wonderful woman. In our blissed out yoga-ed state we sat and chatted, somewhere in that she realised that my initials spelt out the word LOVED if you added the O and E. It seems pretty apt so Chris has created a little LoVeD logo and right now its a bit of a focus to bring that in where we can, somehow incorporating a little LoVeD stamp onto the sculptures and working it in with future works. How does your location influence your creativity? I live on a strip of land between the river Adur and the sea in Shoreham. We bought our home when I was pregnant at the beginnings of our family days. My son was born in this house, and 14 years later, every day I rejoice at the beauty that's around us. In the summer months the sun sets over the river and we watch it most evenings from our back doorstep or our bedroom. The beach is 2 minutes walk, always reliably there for when I need to stomp or jump in and and refresh. Shoreham was the hub of the film industry from 1914 for a decade, it was the place to be if you 139


"Once the pieces are made, it is common to see Chris and I running down to the beach, lugging great big sculptures to the river bed to catch the light before it goes. It’s magic when the conditions are right and we know we have captured something special." were an up and coming actor, it was chosen for the

you are making in big batches it offers the opportunity to

wonderful light and big skies, it still holds this magic. The

work in a more meditative state, I love making little

work is completely a product and an expression of this

packages for people and sending them out on mass.

wonderful place, the wood used for the sculptures are old

All artists will say that something changes when it

groyne timbers (sea-defence wood). Whilst not exactly

becomes “work” but I think there's nothing to stop you

found on our local beach but bought from timber

making it “play” again, for me that comes from making

merchants, this is wood that has been weathered and

what I make as a gift again. There may be a monetary

shaped from decades of the sea moving around it. Once

exchange that happens but I still hope that the person

the pieces are made, it is common to see Chris and I

receiving feels the Love that I pour into all the pieces I

running down to the beach, lugging great big sculptures

make, be they 6cm or 6 feet in size.

to the river bed to catch the light before it goes. It’s magic when the conditions are right and we know we have

I was joking before the lockdown how my life had got too

captured something special.

geographically small, I mean I was either at home, at my studio 5 minutes walk away or at my allotment another 2

140

How has the Covid pandemic influenced your work?

mins walk away from the studio. For the first 6 weeks I

As soon as I first learnt how to cut glass well enough I

worked in our workshop shed in the garden where I used

started making little hearts. Now, there are probably

to work before glass became a means of making money,

around 2000 of these hearts out in the world and in so

so life got a little smaller. I didn’t mind that. I also

many different countries. When the pandemic craziness

welcomed the opportunity to have unlimited time with

began I retreated to my garden workshop, leaving my

my family, and not have anything at all written on the

shared community studio. We had sculpture commissions

calendar, an open invitation to hang out at my allotment

to work on but that all felt too big and besides working

and explore quiet, explore calm, sleep well, eat well and

with wood dust is no good for the lungs so we really felt

work. Then yes, I started to miss my freedom, missed my

to look after ourselves and do what was manageable.

parents and going dancing, seeing my friends, hugging my

Everyone was in a state of shock, I felt I wanted to reach

friends, but the worst thing of all has been not being able

out to as many people as I could, so I made a rainbow

to be natural with the children in my life. The really little

heart design and put it out there, within 24 hours I had

ones who don’t understand what all this nonsense is

over 100 orders. People needed to feel the Love. When

about, literally having to back away from them while they


"I am an optimist in these crazy times, a sensitive soul who believes deeply in the power of Love and Beauty, that to see beauty in this world and each other we can learn to Love." ask for a cuddle. I mean that’s heart breaking. We

Art has an incredibly important role in all this as well,

have a lovely 2 year old neighbour who was used to

both the making of and the appreciating. We need

coming round and hanging out with us, suddenly that

more space to express ourselves as we have all been

had to change and for him, that was impossible to

through something extraordinary, a time of difficulty

understand. So we made Sunday afternoon Puppet

holding within it some golden nuggets, the seeds of

Shows over our dividing wall, that was nice, finding a

possibility for change.

way we could connect without touching. Once we find a way, us humans are good at adapting.

I am an optimist in these crazy times, a sensitive soul who believes deeply in the power of Love and Beauty,

The years since I turned 40, have definitely been

that to see beauty in this world and each other we can

richer, on all levels, and with it geographically smaller.

learn to Love again. In these times of incredible

I no longer have the wanderlust I had throughout my

separation emerges a solidarity and dare I say “Up-

life and just want to be home. By home I mean within

rising”, I don’t mean this in the revolutionary sense

the kilometre that holds my home and garden, my

but in an evolutionary way. If you look at the youth of

studio space and my allotment. This lockdown time

today (or at least the ones I know) you have to believe

has taught me I don’t need to fill my life so much, that

the worlds in safe hands. I mean the technology is

we don’t need to be together to be together. Its been a

there to make a better future right? Now it just takes

wonderful time for examining and extracting from our

more people to make the right decisions for the

lives what is not essential and what we could chose to

collective, I have to believe that this is part of a

change for good. Now there is such a high level of

process of humanity waking up and eventually

anxiety for people; coming out of lockdown seems in

learning how to do things another way. Let’s hope

some ways more daunting than going in. It's going to

people don’t have to press the snooze button too

require a lot of sensitivity and tolerance, vulnerable

many times, we need to wake up now.

people are going to need a whole lot of support. www.louisevdurham.com

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INSIDHERLAND PRESENTS THE NIEMEYER II The Niemeyer II stool is a curvy

and handcrafted by her team of

considered as fragments from the

seating design piece, created to

Portuguese master craftsmen and

contact with architecture along

complement the rounded shapes

jewelers, the impressive creations

with other artistic forms such as

of the Niemeyer II armchair.

have been highlighted as soulful

painting, sculpture and music. Her

designs that embody the expertise

creative eye contemplates the past

Named after the famed Brazilian

of traditional craft techniques.

and changes a distant reality by

Architect Oscar Niemeyer, the

InsidherLand is positioned in major

creating connections, eliminating

rounded flowing lines of the stool

strategic

high-end

the unnecessary and adding details

are influenced by the remarkable

luxury decoration and has been

that could have been true. She

'Casadas Canoas' designed by

serving discerning architects and

transforms travels to the past into

Niemeyer in 1951.

design studios who seek for one of

meaningful pieces that go far

a kind pieces of art.

beyond what the memory recalls.

Barbosa in 2012, Insidherland is a

As a trained architect, Joana

"I’m a strong believer that I’m not

Portuguese brand of exclusive

Santos Barbosa received a variety

a creator of objects but a fearless

design inspired by the natural

of influences that defined her

sculptor of dreams." - JSB

wonders and the excellence of art.

creativity. InsidherLand provides a

Drawn with the creator's signature

series of striking modern objects

markets

of

Created by Architect Joana Santos

142

www.insidherland.com


NIKOLA-LENIVETS The largest art park in Europe

144


Nikola-Lenivets is the largest art

landscapes for 10 years before he

appeared on the land, which marks

park in Europe. It is located around

was inspired to place his artworks

the beginning of Nikola-Lenivets

a tiny village in the Kaluga region.

and installations in this area. In

art park.

There, right under the open sky,

order to attract new creative

a collection of works of modern art

forces and expand the audience, in

Nikolay Polissky creates all his

and architecture has developed.

2006 he created the Archstoyanie

works together with the society of

Nikola-Lenivets is 650 hectares of

festival there, which attracted

artists - Nikola-Lenivets Crafts.

land open for creative experiments

other artists and the attention of

He calls them his co-authors and

and the search for innovative

the general public to the art park.

explains that without their help,

solutions in various fields - from

nothing would have happened. The

art to eco-farming. The park hosts

After years of studying the Nikola-

team follow him wherever the

the creation of objects by artists

Lenivets area through painting,

artist and his village assistants are

and architects of the highest

Nikolay Polissky suddenly came up

invited. Nikolay Polissky and the

international level, and by local

with the idea of 'entering the

Nikola-Lenivets Crafts artists have

residents. The founder of the park

landscape'. By presenting a huge

together created key projects in

is the artist Nikolay Polissky.

army of snowmen on the snow-

Russia, in many European cities,

covered bank of the Ugra River, he

across Asia, and they represented

The artist who made Nikola-

decided to turn their stand into

Russia at the Venice Biennale of

Lenivets famous, Polissky visited

reality and asked the locals to

Architecture in 2008.

the place of power for the first

make two hundred pieces. In 2000

time in 1989. He then painted oil

that first great project, Snowmen,

www.nikola-lenivets.ru 145


PAMELA AXELSON


"My interest is time, how the past and present mingle, each affecting the other. Overlaying ink/ink wash drawings on transparent Gampi paper allows me to explore that mingling in a visual way. Each drawing is an experiment and a discovery."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Pamela Anne Axelson was born in Abilene, Texas on

Barcelona. She received her BFA at San Francisco Art

November 19, 1950. As a child she lived in Payette,

Institute in Painting and Sculpture in 1972. She has

Idaho, Butte, Montana, Morrill, Nebraska and

worked as a marble worker, welder, arts educator and

Granada Hills, California (LA).

nurse practitioner. She received her MFA from Rutgers University, Mason Gross School of the Arts in 1988 and

As an adult she has lived in San Francisco, Chapel Hill

MSN from UCSF School of Nursing.

and Carrboro, North Carolina, and Plainfield, NJ. She currently lives and works in San Francisco. She lives

Tell us about yourself and your background.

with her partner Don Dahlstrom. She has worked as

I grew up in the rural west and have lived almost all of my

an artist since 1967 with studios in San Francisco,

adult life in urban settings. I have traveled across the US

Chapel Hill, Brooklyn and Hoboken.

by car and train 6 times using the central route, the southern route and the northern route. I have traveled

She has two children, Eliza Axelson-Chidsey, a

through the North East and on to Newfoundland twice. I

Brooklyn-based designer, and Gustav Axelson-

have traveled to Peru, Chile, Mexico, British Colombia,

Chidsey, an educator and explorer living in the city of

Ireland, London and Spain. I have done many backpacking 147


"A dialogue between the wash and the lines develops slowly, some merge or overlap, some remain isolated. The drawing tells me where to go next." Tell us about your process. The drawings start with the laying down of lines and ink washes in the space of the page (5'x5' or 6'x6') to see where the drawing wants to take me. A dialogue between the wash and the lines develops slowly, some merge or overlap, some remain isolated. The drawing tells me where to go next. There is no "idea" for the drawing, just this process. I feel scared, stupid, excited, edgy, angry, disgusted, inspired, doubtful, challenged, fulfilled; there are periods when I do not like the drawing. Sculptures begin with a thought like "I've always wanted to make a mountain to be able to touch it and to see inside the mountain." Then I choose a material like steel, clay, wood, wax, steel boxes and begin to make the forms that will make up the piece.

trips on the west and east coasts, hiking to high altitudes above timberline, to see the barren rock of alpine areas, to what feels like the top of the world. I have always liked rocks and mountains and dirt. I have read widely about the Neolithic and human evolution, trying to understand what we have been, where we have been, how we have been. Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique? My interest  in space, line, ink and ink wash, and transparency have allowed me to develop a method of drawing that layers ink/ink wash drawing done on semitransparent gampi paper so one can partially see one drawing through another. Parts of each drawing are retained, creating a drawing removed from the intent of either. The drawings allow exploration and surprise discoveries. My sculpture involves the assembly of forms only related to one another by their final installation as one piece. With the drawings and the sculpture

the

final

presentation

involves

the

organization of multiple separate parts, using numbers and grids. 148


What are your sources of inspiration? Light moving on water, earth formations, sedimentary forms, tree branching, maps and geography. Neolithic ceramics, cave paintings, stone age tools, xray images, and many artists. To name a few: Agnes Martin, Richard Serra, Gary Kuehn, Eva Hesse, Alberto Giacometti, Eduardo Chillida,

Joseph

Beuys,

Magdalena

Abakanowiz,

Magdalena Jetlova. Materials that inspire me include stone, wax, clay, steel copper, skin. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums?

"The sculptural mediums I use have durability and allow for decay and change under environmental influences. Most allow for direct and spontaneous forming."

Ink, Ink wash allows for mark making with transparency within the marks and overlay which retains the residue of the first mark laid down. The gampi paper is very skin-like. The sculptural mediums I use have durability and allow for decay and change under environmental influences. Most allow for direct and spontaneous forming. Tell us about some of your most notable projects. In the early 1970's I began a rock-making project which involved gathering different colored earths from places in the bay area which I layered into bags and pressed in a charcoal heated press to make the walls of a cave representing the historic and emotional and psychological parts of myself. In the 1980's I made an outdoor clay piece 149


composed of 88 individual clay figures made on a hillside above an arced drop off, all focused on a spot in the future. The piece remained on its site for over a year and was never damaged. In the 1980s and early 1990s I built a number of forged and welded vertical steel pieces, considered The Forest along with smaller pieces The Grasses. One group show I helped organize was titled Random Sequence Response where the artists made pieces that were designed and installed to interfere with each other, to intrude. Starting in the late 1990s I began a piece made up of numerous artichoke heart jars containing memory elements which are stored in stackable steel and wire open boxes creating the 3d sense of memory as one looks through the layered jars. Most recently I am finishing The Mountain, made up of 512 stacked clay cylinders arranged as a cube of 8 cylinders wide by 8 cylinders deep by 8 cylinders high in the order in which they were made suggesting geologic sedimentary history and evolution. Tell us about some of the themes you have explored. Layering as a representation of time. Transparency and overlay as expression of time. The impact of vertical density on the space between forms. Loss and rediscovery over time, transformation of memory. What are you passionate about? I am passionate about the earth, the passage of time, the branching of trees, the flow of rivers, artifacts hidden in the earth/how time buries history, especially human history. Also... assemblies of sculptural form. Tell us about some of the feedback you've received. People often say the drawings expose emotion and psychological depth. They find the drawings beautiful, mysterious, spacious, compelling, unique. People often ask how and of what the drawings are made. People enjoy hearing the stories of how the assembled pieces are made. People often comment on the work as being distinct and a very different approach to art.

"People often comment on the work as being distinct and a very different approach to art." 150


What are you currently working on?

and constant change of the immediate

I am finishing The Mountain 512 clay

environment around the Noonan

cylinders. I am finishing another of the

building and along the SF Bay

large transparent ink and ink wash

Shoreline.

drawings. How do you feel about art and its role

"I will continue to evolve the ink, ink wash drawings. I may use more color in both the drawings and the sculpture."

What can we look forward to next?

in the world today?

The next stage in the sculpture after

I feel that making and seeing art of all

the Mountain will be The Forest. I will

kinds

continue to evolve the ink, ink wash

experience inspiration and surprise in

drawings. I may use more color in both

the absence of financial value, in the

the drawings and the sculpture.

absence of consumption. Art is a gift

allows

many

people

to

to life, not a commodity but an Tell us about your location.

experience allowing for new insight.

My current studio is located at the

Art may be more important to

Noonan building at pier 70 in San

people's lives now than it's ever been.

Francisco on the southern waterfront. It is right in the middle of a huge

How you want your art to affect the

construction site with mountain-sized

viewer/ world?

piles of dirt, large rectangular holes,

I want it to draw them in and to show

road construction, and in a dynamic

them something they have never seen

process of change. I have a visceral

before, to inspire them in some way,

response to the dirt and constructionÂ

to let them visit me on the inside. 151


"I feel that making and seeing art of all kinds allows many people to experience inspiration and surprise in the absence of financial value, in the absence of consumption. Art is a gift to life, not a commodity but an experience allowing for new insight." 152


"I want my art to draw the viewers in and to show them something they have never seen before, to inspire them in some way, to let them visit me on the inside." What has the Covid pandemic meant to you and how has it influenced your creativity? The COVID pandemic has given me a different sense of space and time and human interaction. I have felt sad, fearful but also a sense of a significant change we are passing through. It has intensified the work on The Mountain, pushing me to finish this complex of cylinders during this time, organizing and numbering and firing the final pieces. The piece has become part of the COVID era even though I started it 5 years ago. It's resolution, its resting place is in this time. The drawings I am finishing during this time are different spacially and in their density. www.pamelaaxelson.com

153


BONNIE HINZ


"My distinctive style is created from blown glass, fused glass, and metal. I create larger-scale sculptures, typically for the wall. I enjoy the juxtaposition of using these mediums: the way the strong, industrial and durable nature of metal can work in harmony with the fragile, organic nature of glass.”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Bonnie Hinz lives in the upper Midwest of the USA

“regular career” and became a legal assistant. I worked in

She creates distinctive sculptures from blown glass,

a law firm, but realized that I didn't like sitting at a desk all

kiln-formed glass, and metal. She combines these

day, and my need for being creative started to resurface.

materials into exquisitely integrated designs.

I then worked as a residential interior designer for several

She has created many commissions for residential,

years. However, that still wasn't fulfilling my “itch” for

commercial and healthcare settings around the US.

creativity. My interest in glass began with stained glass. But after a

Tell us about yourself and your background.

while, I yearned for something more dimensional. I then

I have always felt a deep need to create, and this has

saw an exhibit at the Minneapolis Institute of Art

been an integral part of who I am as a person. As a

featuring the wonderful glass sculptures of Dale Chihuly.

child, I was constantly making things, and came from a

I was amazed and intrigued. I watched the videos at the

family that if you needed something, you made it. My

exhibit, and thought it looked fun and dangerous. I found a

parents encouraged me, and I was not afraid to tackle

local college that was offering glass blowing classes and

any creative endeavor. As I grew older, however, I

signed up on a whim. I got hooked. I completed all the

began to neglect my creativity. I felt like I needed a

glass blowing classes, and then after some soul searching, 155


"My designs swirl with layers of arresting hues. An integral part of my work is the sinuous line. I will often sketch out a spontaneously fluid design, and then translate that into metal" 156

decided to build my own glass blowing

lightness. My intuitive use of color and

studio. After making vases and bowls for a

space comes from my years of working as

time, I decided to start creating larger

an interior designer. My designs swirl

sculpture. I loved the combination of glass

with layers of arresting hues. An integral

and metal and thought that would be the

part of my work is the sinuous line. I will

framework upon which to create larger

often sketch out a spontaneously fluid

work. A friend taught me how to weld, I

design, and then translate that into metal.

joined the local Guild of Metal-smiths, and took blacksmithing classes to learn the

Tell us about your process and what do

basics of metalworking. I also began

you feel when you are creating?

working in fused glass at that time.

All my sculptures begin with a sketch. Someone once told me, “if you can't draw

Tell us about your work and style.

it, you can't make it.” All the mechanics of

My distinctive style is created from blown

the piece are figured out on paper before I

glass, fused glass, and metal. I create

begin. Once I have the full-scale drawing

larger-scale sculptures, typically for the

complete, I then begin the metalworking.

wall. I enjoy the juxtaposition of using

After the metal is finished, I then make

these mediums: the way the strong,

the glass, either by blowing the glass or

industrial and durable nature of metal can

fusing it in a kiln. I am regularly going back

work in harmony with the fragile, organic

and forth between metalworking, glass

nature of glass. I enjoy combining the two

blowing, and glass fusing, which keeps

materials

integrated

things interesting. While creating my art,

designs. Even though my sculptures are

because I am introverted, I enjoy creating

made with metal, they have a sense of

my artwork completely by myself.

into

exquisitely


157


What are your sources of inspiration? Nature is what inspires me most: the line of a gracefully bending blade of grass, the shape of a seed pod, the colors in a flower, the coiling tendrils on a grapevine. Why are you attracted to glass as a medium? I love that the possibilities of glass are endless—there is always more to explore. I am consistently fascinated by its magical transparent nature and the interplay of light, shadow, texture and color. Tell us about some of your achievements and notable artworks? I have created many site-specific commissions around the United States, mostly in the healthcare industry, but also in commercial, hospitality, and residential settings. I am most proud of the work that I have in healthcare settings, as art can be a healing influence. If my artwork can bring even a moment of joy, hope or even distraction to someone who is hurting, then I feel it is successful. Tell us about some of the themes and concepts that you have explored. I am continually exploring the expression of nature's beauty - how nature and abstraction can interact with each other and the patterns they create. I love the graceful free-form curves and fluidity of the lines found in the natural world and incorporate these into my work. I have also explored the interpretation of movement and simplicity in the human form. What are you passionate about? Outside of art, I am most passionate about finding homes for shelter dogs. I have volunteered at the local Animal Humane Society for many years, helping at their fundraising events, and assisting people in finding the perfect dog for their family, which is immensely satisfying. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive. Many times when we are installing artwork in a commercial setting, people will come by, stop and stare with their mouths agape, and say “WOW that is amazing!” This is really

"I love that the possibilities of glass are endless—there is always more to explore."

fun for me to hear! People often assume that a man has fabricated the metal for me. When I tell them that I made the whole thing by myself, they are surprised. People that have commissioned my work often tell me after the installation that it is better than they had envisioned.

158


What are you currently working on? In between the commissions on which I am currently working, I have been experimenting with a process that involves eco-printing. This involves taking leaves that I collect from my neighborhood, placing them between sheets of paper, and boiling them for several hours. This imprints the dye from the leaf onto the paper, which conveys a painterly effect. I then transfer this image to glass, and create collages from these images, at times also weaving in messages of reflection. The goal of these collages is to inspire people to be present in the moment, to slow down and take a mindful look at the natural world around them. I want to remind people to really pay attention and see the beauty in the ordinary, and as they are observing, to pivot from the tensions of the day and to breathe in nature and be revived.

"I want to remind people to really pay attention and see the beauty in the ordinary." 159


160


"There is so much negativity and division in the world today. I want my artwork to be uplifting, joyful and encouraging to those who view it. I want it to bring unity, have a healing effect on people and inspire optimism."

What can we look forward to in

How do you feel about art and its

the future?

role in the world today?

I will always be creating larger wall

Art rises above all the things that

sculptures. I welcome challenges

divide us and brings us together.Â

that encourage me to innovate, and

It is a universal language that can

am always striving to push the

bring hope and connect us. It can

boundaries of ideas and what I can

inspire society to cope with their

accomplish.

emotions and to identify with one another.

Tell us about your location and its influence on your work.

How do you want your art to

I am located in Minneapolis, MN, a

affect the viewer?

vibrant art community, which is in

There is so much negativity and

the upper Midwest of the USA.Â

division in the world today. I want

My husband and I enjoy walking

my artwork to be uplifting, joyful

through the many wooded areas

and encouraging to those who view

around our home with our dog.Â

it. I want it to bring unity, have a

My favorite place to be is in our

healing effect on people and

gazebo, which overlooks a lake and

inspire optimism.

woods. This is the place where I can stop, contemplate and imagine new ideas for my artwork.

www.bonniehinz.com 161


MARVIN LIPOFSKY 162


HE WAS THE MOST INFLUENTIAL GLASS ARTIST IN CALIFORNIA. In Memory. September 1, 1938 — January 15, 2016 Marvin Lipofsky, 77, renowned San Francisco Bay Area teacher and sculptor who worked with glass, died of natural causes in January 2016. Mr. Lipofsky was born and raised in Barrington, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, where his parents Henry and Mildred Lipofsky owned a small department store. He earned his BFA in Industrial Design, 1957-1962 at the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, followed by an MS and MFA in Sculpture,

1962-1964,

University

of

Wisconsin,

Madison. Mr. Lipofsky was among the first students to work with Harvey Littleton, the celebrated founder of the American Studio Glass movement, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Immediately upon graduation, he was hired by the University of California, Berkeley to build and direct its glass program, where he taught until 1972. Teaching full-time, he developed the glass program at the California College of Arts and Crafts (now the California College of the Arts) in Oakland where he remained until 1987, when he left to work full time in his studio in Berkeley until his death. In addition to his daughter Lisa Lipofsky-Valenzuela, Mr. Lipofsky was survived by his grandchildren, Briana & Antonio, his sister Barbara Marsh, and his good friend, Jeanette Bokhour. Mr. Lipofsky's work was prized for its rhythmic forms and complex concave and convex shapes, which suggested both abstract and organic sources. Glass was his chosen medium of artistic expression and passion. A consummate colorist, and fine artist, Mr. Lipofsky took great advantage of the chromatic possibilities of working with hot glass. He was dedicated to honoring the artists who worked with him and the places where he made his work. Celebrated for his working method, Mr. Lipofsky regularly traveled to glass workshops around the USA and the world (he visited 30 foreign

163


countries, including Bulgaria, China,

Museum of Modern Art, the St. Louis

Israel, New Zealand, the Soviet Union,

Museum of Art, the National Museum of

and from coast to coast in the USA; he

Modern Art in Kyoto, Los Angeles

taught over 300 workshops around the

County

world), where he gathered the raw

Metropolitan Museum of Art in New

material for his pieces, worked with local

York, the Renwick Gallery (National

sculptors and their students in their hot

Museum of American Art) Smithsonian

shops, observed local communities and

Institution at Washington, D.C., and the

traditions, and then returned to Berkeley

MusĂŠe des Arts Decoratifs in Paris,

to assemble his final objects.

among many others. The recipient of a

Museum

of

Art,

the

Lifetime Achievement award from the Mr.

Lipofsky

functioned

as

an

Glass Art Society in 2009, he was also

ambassador for sculpture in glass, often

the subject of a retrospective exhibition

naming groups of works that resulted

at the Oakland Museum of California in

from his voyage for their place of origin,

2003.

for example, the Stockholm Series (1989) and the Kentucky Series (2000).

A founding member of the American Studio Glass movement, he was the

164

Mr. Lipofsky's work was widely exhibited

most influential glass artist in California.

and collected. It is included in the

Marvin Lipofsky was a formidable

permanent collections of the Corning

character and leader in the close knit

Museum of Glass, the Museum of Art

community

and Design in New York, the Oakland

collectors,

Museum of California, the San Francisco

internationally.

of

glass

within

the

artists

and

USA

and


WWW.MARVINLIPOFSKY.COM

165


KAREN OLSEN-DUNN


"My work expresses my emotions about the fracturing and dislocation of what we are doing. So I break up the image and show the cracks, the glitches, the damage that we live with day-to-day.”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Karen Olsen-Dunn is an abstract realist painter

Tell us about yourself and your background.

known for using color as structure for her high-key

I wandered from Canada to England, France, Egypt and

colored landscapes and prints.

back to England before finally settling in San Francisco. I discovered painting in 1999 while on a sabbatical from

She

has a

formal

education

in

psychology,

Silicon Valley and from there grew to being a full-time

painting/drawing, and digital media with post

visual artist. I get so much strength from being a painter

graduate course work in printmaking. She  received

and printmaker. It centers me, helps me concentrate and

her MFA from California College of the Arts in

cut through all the extraneous noise and entanglements

2007 and BA in Psychology from San Francisco State

of life. When I finish a piece I get such a sense of

1988.

accomplishment from completing a work - it sustains me.

She has shown her work in numerous exhibitions and

Outwardly I’m happy! Inwardly, not so sure. I laugh a lot at

art fairs locally and nationally and teaches various

the absurdities around me - of people and the world - and

methods of Modern Lithographic printmaking and

remain grateful that I’ve had an amazingly long term

Image transfer in her studio at Pacific Felt Factory

relationship with somebody I still love and find funny.

and at Kala Art Institute in Berkeley.

I love my son, and my dog. 167


"The result is a rich, layered, complex image of color and pattern a woven story where some parts of the world are recognizable but others are pixelated, nonsensical, and unknowable."

168

Tell us about your work and style, why is

natural world. When I take a direct

it unique?

photograph of landscape it’s naturally

I combine the traditions of painting with

beautiful, but what is obscured is the

the ever-changing techniques and tools of

action of the human race. We are not

this heavily technical digital world.

adding, we are subtracting, be-spoiling

I carefully interweave acrylic paint with

our landscapes with building, drilling,

photographic imagery that has been

mining, forestry. My work expresses my

transferred from film to a prepared panel

emotions

to create a collage. I’m drawn to heavily

dislocation of what we are doing. So I

saturated colors. I use a transfer process

break up the image and show the cracks,

because it drops the full load of the

the glitches, the damage that we live with

pigment directly to the substrate; using

day-to-day.

about

the

fracturing

and

pigment as though I’m using paint. The result is a rich, layered, complex image of

The physical process entailed in my work

color and pattern - a woven story where

is to first prepare a panel surface with

some parts of the world are recognizable

layers of gesso and sand it to an

but others are pixelated, nonsensical, and

extremely smooth finish. I then add paint

unknowable.

layers in between, transferring chunks of photographic material from film using an

Tell us about your process and what you

acrylic solution. While working I am

feel when you are creating?

enervated, deep in concentration, lost in

My subjects are landscapes and the

time to the rhythms of the process.


What are your sources of inspiration? Colors and patterns are my inspiration. The palettes of a David Hockney or Matisse paintings, wide ocean vistas such as the Mendocino coast, textile patterns of everyday fashions, native plants and flowers, all help to inform my work. When I see colors and patterns that speak to me, I feel light and airy, the rhythms make me want to move, to dance, and to create. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums? Acrylic paint is so rich and jewel-like in it’s plasticky texture... The image transfers are immediate, recognizable, and allow a form of expression like all collage does, that is to say, it’s a form of automatic editing. I only put in the pieces I like and any extraneous material is left out, resulting in a piece that is complex, vivid, and alive. Tell us about some of your achievements and notable projects. Five of my paintings were recently purchased by a donor for the newly built Sutter campus of the California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco. My work was featured in the Spring issue of Verdad Magazine an online magazine of art and literature. See www.verdadmagazine.org I will be an artist-in-residence for 3 months at the Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, California from September through November, 2020. I will create a new body of large scale prints based on my fractured landscape series of paintings. Tell us about some of the themes you've explored. As a visual artist, how do I protest and express my dismay at the loss, the fracturing, the fragmenting, the dismantling, the absolute assault on natural resources? It leads me to exploring the ugliness that can coexist with great beauty, the sense that no beauty is fully complete without flaw. There is always

"It leads me to exploring the ugliness that can coexist with great beauty, the sense that no beauty is fully complete without flaw." 169


170


"To live without over-thinking without the intricate webs of explanation, opinion, and argument!" an undercurrent of incompleteness, of darkness, however concealed. I use high-key, garish, multi-tonal colors that don’t follow the normal chromatic rules of the natural world. Oceans are pink, trees are red, lakes are electric green, skies have triangles, reflections are refracted. Paintings are cut, layered, and reassembled out of order with paint and photographic materials. What are you passionate about? Living life without the extraneous constructions that blind us to the clarity and simplicity of life’s energy. To live without over-thinking without the intricate webs of explanation, opinion, and argument! Getting rid of the extraneous, to be kind, to do no harm, to love what I do. 171


"When I see colors and patterns that speak to me, I feel light and airy, the rhythms make me want to move, to dance, to and create."

172


173


"My studio is in the Mission District in San Francisco California. The energy, multidimensional culture, and vistas of the city still energize me. I live surrounded by the ocean, in city enveloped by the natural world." What can we look forward to in the near future, what directions will you be exploring? I’m looking forward to the world opening up, being able to travel, getting inspiration from landscapes beyond California. I’d love to do a lot more sculptural work using paper and prints - taking over a room with a slew of ideas that includes multiple types of media - digital, analog, using hands and machines. I would like to do paintings that have more than four sides - sculptural panels that express landscapes in a new way. Tell us about your location and its influence on your work. My studio is in the Mission District in San Francisco Tell us about some of the feedback you typically

California. The energy, multidimensional culture, and

receive from people that discover your work.

vistas of the city still energize me. I live surrounded by

When people walk into my studio in San Francisco they

the ocean, in a city enveloped by the natural world.

invariably comment on how bright and colorful the works are. They say the studio filled with my work makes them happy. I’ve even had couples come in during my Open Studio walk-throughs and take photographs of themselves with my work in the background. What are you currently working on? During shelter-in-place I’ve been working on a series of collaged prints that start out being assembled on an iPad and end up as 18x24 monotypes on Japanese washi paper. The imagery is typically botanical, wild animals, and birds that has been sourced from collections in the public domain. The subjects are highly abstracted and cut up and then reassembled to create a new image in garish saturated colors. There’s always a message to these prints, either obscured or blatantly in the title such as, “Birds Know the Truth: Changes are Gradual in Any Movement”. 174


"I want the viewer to look and look again and see things that look familiar and yet are confounding."

www.karenolsendunn.com

How do you feel about art and

What has the Covid pandemic

its role in the world today?

meant to you and how has it

I feel as an artist that I have a

influenced your creativity?

responsibility to take a personal

I’ve been very creative and

stance on the current zeitgeist.

much more vocal about issues

To use my art to express my

than ever before in my work.

thoughts and feelings about the

I’ve

chaotic changes that are all

terrified, and sad moments

around us.

where I know the world will

  

never be the same after this

How do you want your art to

period. I think of my 19 year old

affect the viewer?

son and how the world is now a

I want the viewer to look and

scary place for him to navigate.

look again and see things that

This past month I had to say

look

are

goodbye to my brother in

confounding. I want them to see

Canada on Facetime because I

beauty

and

could not be there in person as

composition but also have a real

he suffered from a stroke. I truly

sense that not everything is as it

feel for families who have had to

should be, that there is danger

do the same as their loved ones

beyond or at least a real sense of

were dying of Covid-19 in

foreboding.

hospitals.

familiar in

and the

yet

color

gone

through

panicky,

175


JOE MCGEE


"I would call my work Mysticism, a bit Surreal in nature, as I draw my images from a dream state (imposed). I have no preconceived idea of what a painting (or a sculpture) will be until I begin working.�

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Joe McGee, b. 1954, in Louisville, Kentucky, USA,

Tell us about yourself and your background.

graduated with honors from the University of

I received my BFA in Sculpture in 1986, from the Hite Art

Louisville in 1986, with a BFA in Sculpture, receiving

Institute, University of Louisville, Kentucky. I was 25

a Winthrop Allen Award in his senior year.

years old when I went back to college for a Fine Arts Degree, and had worked in construction until that point.

In the 30 plus years since graduation, McGee has

I had no idea what being an artist was, I just wanted to be

maintained a constant biennial solo exhibit schedule

one. I have been making my art now on a daily basis since

of both his 2D and 3D art, showing mostly in regional

the mid 1970s. I always had to have a day job to support

universities. He also has participated in many group

my family, but found I could set evening hours to work in

exhibitions over this period. McGee was awarded an

my studio (right behind my house) to hone my craft.

SAF/NEA Fellowship in Drawing in 1988, and a KY Arts Council Professional Assistance Award in 1993.

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique? I would call my work Mysticism, a bit Surreal in nature, as I

His artwork can be found in many private and public

draw my images from a dream state (imposed). I have no

collections in the region.

preconceived idea of what a painting (or a sculpture) will 177


178


be until I begin working, either in frequent

stopping a session. The next time I come

early morning sessions or my now

into the studio, I decide if my previous

decades habit of evening sessions in my

session was good or bad. If not, I will go

studio, which is located right behind my

back into the work, often many times in

home.

the days that follow. I do know when a work is finished, and will then let it rest.

"I feel fortunate to have my art, it keeps me balanced. The hours I spend on my craft give me great satisfaction, a sense of purpose... what more could one ask for?"

Tell us about your process and what you feel when you are creating.

What are your sources of inspiration?

I sit for a moment looking at my painting

I am a lover of Ancient Arts, my art heroes

wall where the canvas hangs, drink a beer

are from the Archaic Greek and Egyptian

or two to find a relaxed state (in my

periods, from other past cultures I have

evening sessions), listen to music (mostly

studied in detail, not so keen on Modern

Rock from my youth in the early 70s).

Art though of course I am part of it. I read

Then quickly, I get up from my chair and

World History each day, a dedicated

begin putting paint onto the canvas, just

library patron here in Louisville, KY. The

like that. I feel something come from

folly of mankind plays out over and over

within, I seem to pull images out of a

to this day. I don’t watch TV much. I like to

mental rolodex in my mind. I will paint,

go out in nature daily, watch the clouds.

continuously stepping back to look at the

That sort of thing.

composition

from

a

distance,

then

attacking the surface again and again.

Why are you attracted to painting as

Action painting! Only at the end of a

your preferred medium?

session will I tie together a story perhaps

I had been hurt (lower back) for many

that has appeared in a given work before

years, and have focused on painting as a 179


180


preferred medium almost by necessity. Spinal surgery last summer has eased this pain, perhaps I may indulge in 3D soon. But, even while an art student, I always worked in both 2D and 3D mediums in my work. I feel confident in both, and for me it seems to keep the ideas flowing from my mind. Tell us about some achievements and notable works. Oh, after all these decades of making art, two large concrete sculpture commissions I did for the Brown-Forman Corp., at their Woodford Reserve Distillery located in Versailles, KY, stand out and give me a sense of accomplishment. For the cast concrete sculptures (a KY Mother Figure in 1996, and my homage to the Horse, the figure cast in 2002) will be there for many years after I have left. In 2018, I showed my paintings, along with Textile Artist Penny Sisto (she is an amazing spirit and artist), in a 2-person exhibit honoring the life and work of Thomas Merton, the famed Trappist monk/mystic/author who spent half of his life at Gethsemani Abbey, located just below Louisville. The exhibit was at Bellarmine University, where Merton’s huge archives are housed. Merton of course, has influenced many, including me, with his teachings of Compassion and Self Introspection in matters of Faith. Tell us about some of the themes and concepts that you have explored. Looking back, I seem to have repeated a handful of themes (working in year-long cycles) over the years. The Mother Figure (Earth) appears on a regular basis in my art. I often work around the concept of death/rebirth and the Mother Figure has become a sort of deity for me. Other themes I repeat are Floral works and Equestrian works (this is Thoroughbred Horse country here in KY of course, I have long been around the horse and the industry for many years here in Louisville). And then, there is the Cult of Frida Kahlo, of which I am a longtime card carrying member! She is my muse! What are you passionate about? The Earth, my Family, my Art! But more than that, this shared experience as human beings on this planet gives me voice to

"Viewers like my use of color, and the movement of my brushwork, and the connection to their own lives they might interpret in my storytelling, the shared human experience."

share my stories through my art. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive from people that discover your work. Viewers like my use of color, and the movement of my brushwork, and the connection to their own lives they might interpret in my visual storytelling, the shared human experience. 181


182


What are you currently working on? I was involved heavily in a 3 year project (2015-2018) leading up to the 50th Anniversary of the death of Thomas Merton. I immersed myself in his writings, in particular his Journals. I only did art based on my interpretations of his life, his teachings leading up to the December 2018 event. This was a very intense 3 year period for me, one of selfcontemplation. I was drained after the conclusion and the exhibit. Since the conclusion, I have left Merton, waiting for another theme to emerge. Frida Kahlo has appeared again. And I drifted back into Equestrian Art and Floral Works as of late. But, I have yet to latch onto a definitive theme, just do whatever pops into my head! I am happy! What can we look forward to in the future – what directions will you be exploring? I’m getting older, mid 60s, I will just keep going on with my art, painting in particular. As I have recovered somewhat from my back injury over the last months, I would like to do some sculptural work again soon. We’ll see! 183


184


"I like to think of my stories (my paintings /sculpture) as a conversation with all who share this world along with me. We are strangers of course! But that is OK with me, for it must be so. If my conversation is one on one, or to a mass audience, it makes no difference. For I have spoken and I have listened to the response."

Tell us about your location and its

art. Art, the expression of our inner

influence on your work.

thoughts, the visual retelling of the

Well, KY is about Bourbon and

world we see, we share, has been

Thoroughbred Horses, Louisville big

there for a long time. Just put one’s

on both as we are home to Churchill

ideas on the wall of a cave or

Downs. Louisville is a funny place,

something. Now, we place images

sort of South, but more Liberal in

on a phone for others to see, but

politics and social views. Founded

isn’t it the same thing! Art defines

early in our nation's history, we sit

us!

How do you feel about art and its

mass audience, it really makes no

www.joemcgeeart.com

role in the world today?

difference. For I have spoken and I

As humans, it seems we must make

have listened to the response.

on the Ohio River, which was the Mason-Dixon Line, the

boundary

How do you want your art to

line that separated the South and

affect the viewer/ world?

the

War.

I like to think of my stories (my

Louisville, just big enough a city, is

paintings/ sculpture) as an ongoing

pretty diverse in its people and

conversation with all who share

thinking. I was born here in 1954,

this world along with me. We are

and have lived in Louisville all my

strangers of course! But that is OK

life. It’s a good homebase!

with me, for it must be so. If my

North

in

our

Civil

conversation is one on one, or to a

185


NARAYANA MONTÚFAR


"I love being the link between art, astrology, and spirituality. Through my painting, writing, and astrology practice, I see myself as a channel that connects people to their own personal power."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Narayana Montúfar is a San Francisco-based

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique?

abstract artist and astrologer who finds inspiration in

I came to art through astrology. I always loved art, but it

the symbolic language of astrology. In her process,

wasn’t until I began to work with my birth chart that I

she visualizes how the energy of zodiac signs,

realized the creative potential within me that was begging

planets, and astrological aspects translates onto

to be explored. This astrological influence set the tone,

paper and canvas in the form of richly colored and

not only for the style of my work and inspiration behind it,

textured abstract paintings.

but also for my process, which is closely tied to the neverending ebbs and flows of the planets and the influence

Tell us about yourself and your background.

they have on us here on Earth.

I am originally from Mexico City, where I was exposed to art at an early age through my family. But back

Tell us about your process and what you feel when you

then, my appreciation for art was always as an

are creating.

outsider, as I never attended art school or was

As a painter and astrologer, keeping up with what’s

interested in making art. It wasn’t until my eighth year

happening in the astral plane is of second nature, as I

of living in San Francisco that I began a deep spiritual

continuously strive to materialize the famous motto: “As

journey, which eventually drove me to explore

Above, So Below.” I time my process with what is

painting, originally as a self-discovery and healing

happening in the sky to channel its vibe and meaning in

modality.

the form of color, shape, and texture. When I am creating, 187


"I time my process with what is happening in the sky to channel its vibe and meaning in the form of color, shape, and texture." I tap into a side of me that I can’t otherwise access, as I enter a meditative state of peace, and a feeling of oneness with the universe. What are your sources of inspiration? My biggest source of inspiration is exploring the cosmic dynamics that not only affect us as a society, but that also live inside of us as we each create a unique relationship to them. I am fascinated by the wide variety of ways we humans approach our connection to the universe; and how realizing this is the key to unlocking its power and reaching that ultimate

state

of

self-discovery

and

self-

empowerment. This human-cosmos connection is the driving feeling behind my art. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums? My favorite mediums are ink on paper and acrylic on canvas; which are on opposite sides of the spectrum. I enjoy painting with ink on paper when I am in the mood for a dynamic and fast-paced process that creates a bright and eye-catching look. With acrylic on 188


"I am fascinated by the wide variety of ways we humans approach our connection to the universe; and how realizing this is the key to unlocking its power and reaching that ultimate state of selfdiscovery and selfempowerment. This human-cosmos connection is the driving feeling behind my art."

189


190


canvas, the process is much

What

are

you

passionate

slower and meditative as I

about?

patiently work on a painting

I love being the link between

for many days, letting each

art, astrology, and spirituality.

layer dry before adding the

Through my painting, writing,

next one to get a deeper and

and astrology practice, I see

more mysterious look.

myself as a channel that connects people to their own

Tell us about some of your art

personal power. I love creating

achievements.

something beautiful out of

Becoming a self-taught artist

nothing, whether that is filling

feels like my absolute biggest

a white canvas with a colorful

achievement because I always

composition,

knew that the classical way of

information to light, or helping

learning would not apply to

someone turn an insecurity

what I wanted to do with my

into a strength. I am passionate

creativity. I only began taking

about helping others manifest

my art practice seriously at the

the best possible reality they

end of 2017, and by February

can imagine for themselves.

bringing

vital

of 2019, I was invited to form part of my first gallery show

Tell us about some of the

with two other female artists.

feedback you typically receive

And in the summer of 2019, I

from people that discover

presented my work in the San

your work.

Francisco Castro Art Walk for

When people discover my

two months in a row!

work, they say they love how vibrant and expressive it is,

Tell us about some of the

often admitting it makes them

themes you have explored.

feel happy and even want to

Using geometric forms and

smile. Some astrologers that

distinct, solid colors, I created

have been looking for art that

a Sixties Nostalgia Series in

truly reflects what astrology

which I delved into the concept

means say they are glad to

of reminiscence for bygone

have finally found it. But even

eras as a way of resurrecting

those who are not that well-

the past. I also created a

versed in the language often

method for visually translating

like what they see, as this

the

of

visual expression helps them

certain planetary alignments

better understand the overall

through a more fluid and

feeling of what is currently

spontaneous process. These

happening in the sky.

energetic

essence

fluid paintings help the viewer connect with the larger cosmic

What

are

you

currently

forces affecting us all, and that

working on?

otherwise would be difficult to

I am currently fully immersing

grasp.

myself in a newly launched 191


"I love creating something beautiful out of nothing, whether that is filling a white canvas with a colorful composition, bringing vital information to light, or helping someone turn an insecurity into a strength."

192


"I mostly try to create momentary joy and happiness through vibrant colors and light compositions. But sometimes, what’s behind the painting is a call for inward observation; which is normally induced by intense patterns and dark palettes." product called Birth Chart Painting. Although the idea had already been sparked by an artist friend of mine, it wasn’t until one of my clients requested hers as a commission, that I dared to paint someone’s astral DNA. Although it was a bit terrifying at first, I found the process quite fascinating, as it blends both of my passions in a unique and personalized product that people can truly enjoy as they connect to the uniqueness of their chart. What can we look forward to in the near future, what directions will you be exploring? To me, being an artist means constantly exploring other mediums as well as concepts. For a while, I have been considering playing around with cyanotypes as well as site-specific installations. Both concepts seem quite interesting to me from the process perspective, and I think that when mixing art with astrology, installations could really help create a time and space experience that would help the viewer better understand the complex way in which astrology works. Tell us about your location and its influence on your work. San Francisco has had a huge influence on my work in the sense that creativity can be found in many different forms, coming from people of many different places and backgrounds. Originality and inspiration can be found everywhere; and what’s most exciting to me is how artists here are usually collaborative and willing to help each other along the way. I also find the San Francisco art scene exciting in the sense that most artists here are spiritually woke, as well as interested in playing a meaningful role in our society. 193


194


How do you want your art to affect the viewer? When I create my art, I do it hoping that the feeling I was holding at that moment of conception translates into the painting to invoke a certain sentiment in the viewer. I mostly try to create momentary joy and happiness

"Every time I create, I do it hoping my creations provoke a moment of stillness and contemplation."

through vibrant colors and light compositions. But sometimes, what’s behind the painting is a call for inward observation; which is normally induced by intense patterns and dark palettes. Either way, every time I create, I do it hoping my creations provoke a moment of stillness and contemplation. What has the Covid pandemic meant to you and how has it influenced your creativity? Even though the pandemic has been a time of great sadness, for me, it has been a time of huge transformation, which I believe is being reflected in my art. I have also noticed people responding more positively to art and even being more interested in buying art; perhaps because it is one of the most underestimated forms of healing. In a way, this has been a window of time in which my creativity has been given more room for play. www.naramon.com 195


196

We know some parts of the country have opened up,

ballet, theater, and opera; plus almost boundless

but San Francisco is still unable to welcome visitors.

outdoor adventures, San Francisco justifiably stands

We look forward to doing so one day soon. We know

out as one of the ultimate must-visit cities on any

you miss San Francisco. Truth be told, we miss it, too.

traveler’s wish list.

It may measure less than 50 square miles and have a

San Francisco is known for its scenic beauty, cultural

population that doesn’t even crack a million, but San

attractions, diverse communities, and world-class

Francisco justly ranks as one of the greatest cities in

cuisine. Measuring 49 square miles, this walk-able city

the world. Famous for grand-dame Victorians, cable

includes landmarks like the Golden Gate Bridge, cable

cars, a dynamic waterfront, and a soaring golden

cars, Alcatraz and the largest Chinatown in the United

bridge, this city truly has it all. With trend-defining

States. A stroll of the city's streets can lead from Union

cuisine ranging from Michelin-starred dining to

Square to North Beach to Fisherman's Wharf,

outrageous food trucks; world-renowned symphony,

Japantown and the Mission District, with intriguing


"YOUR CITY IS REMARKABLE NOT ONLY FOR ITS BEAUTY. IT IS ALSO, OF ALL THE CITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, THE ONE WHOSE NAME, THE WORLD OVER, CONJURES UP THE MOST VISIONS AND MORE THAN ANY OTHER INCITES ONE TO DREAM." GEORGES POMPIDOU FORMER FRENCH PRESIDENT neighborhoods to explore at every turn. Views of the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay are often laced with fog, creating a romantic mood in this most European of American cities. The city has a colorful past, growing from a small village to a major city nearly overnight as a result of the 1849 Gold Rush. The writers of the “beat” generation, the hippies of the Summer of Love in the late 1960’s and the large gay / lesbian / trans/ bi population have all contributed to making San Francisco the fascinating place it is today. The city is home to world-class theatre, opera, symphony and ballet companies and often boasts premieres of Broadway-bound

plays

and

culture-changing

performing arts. San Francisco is one of America’s greatest dining cities. The diverse cultural influences, proximity of the freshest ingredients and competitive creativity of the chefs result in unforgettable dining experiences throughout the city. San Francisco has well over 32,000 hotel rooms, from first-class hotels and ultra-chic boutique hotels to familiar names in lodging and budget friendly inns. The San Francisco Travel Association is the official destination marketing organization for the City and County of San Francisco. For information on reservations, activities and more SF insights, visit www.sftravel.com 197


SF ARTS SHELTER IN PLACE San Francisco is home to some of the finest artistic

Google Arts & Culture. This highly interactive and

and cultural institutions in the United States. It is

intuitive platform practically gives you a private

also a city where innovation and technology are as

tour of the world’s greatest museums.

much a part of the landscape as Victorian houses and cable cars.

SFMOMA, the Asian Art Museum, the de Young and Legion of Honor museums, the Walt Disney

When San Francisco’s museums and performing

Family Museum and the Chinese Historical Society

arts organizations temporarily closed their doors to

of America are also participating in the current and

help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, their

globally connected Instagram #Museumfromhome

drive to share and inspire kicked into the highest

phenomenon, which delivers works of art right to

gear. The result is a broad and colorful spectrum of

followers’ smartphones and other digital devices.

ways to experience the enrichment of San Francisco while sheltering in place.

The Contemporary Jewish Museum is also strongly participating in the #Museumfromhome, as well as

198

The de Young and Legion of Honor museums,

#jewseumfromhome via @jewseum on Instagram

SFMOMA, the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford

and Twitter. The Asian Art Museum is also actively

University and Alcatraz Island are all featured on

participating in #MuseumMomentofZen.


Frieda Kahlo and Diego Rivera courtesy SF MOMA

199


The Legion of Honor Museum - San Francisco The Legion of Honor, San Francisco's most beautiful museum, displays an impressive collection of 4,000 years of ancient and European art in an unforgettable setting. Built to commemorate Californian soldiers who died in World War I, the Legion of Honor is a beautiful Beauxarts building located in San Francisco's Lincoln Park. Overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Golden Gate Bridge and all of San Francisco, the Legion is most noted for its breathtaking setting. Its collections include Rodin's Thinker, which sits in the museum's Court of Honor, European decorative arts and paintings, Ancient art, and one of the largest collections of prints and drawings in the country. The Legion of Honor is part of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Â 200


www.legionofhonor.famsf.org 201


AIDA MULUNEH "WATER LIFE" SERIES

202


Internationally acclaimed artist

Her images express these harsh

Aida Muluneh was born in Addis

Aida Muluneh has presented her

daily realities, which affect not

Ababa, Ethiopia in 1974 where she

extraordinary 'Water Life' series.

only women's progress but also the

currently

futures of their communities.

country at a young age and spent

The new series features 12 striking

lives.

Aida

left

the

an itinerant childhood between

pieces commissioned by WaterAid

Taking inspiration from traditional

Yemen and England. After several

with support from the H&M

ornamentation and body paint

years in a boarding school in

Foundation, and was shot in the

from across the African continent,

Cyprus, she finally settled in

extreme landscape of one of the

the

has

Saskatchewan, Canada in 1985. In

hottest and driest places on earth,

explored not just issues of water

2000, she graduated with a degree

Dallol, Afar, in Northern Ethiopia.

scarcity and ecological emergency

from the Communication Dept

but also the vital role of art in

with a major in Film from Howard

The powerful Afrofuturist artwork

advocacy

University in Washington D.C.

responds to the urgent issue of a

represented in global media.

Ethiopian-born

and

how

artist

Africa

is

lack of access to clean water which

After graduation, she worked as a journalist at the Washington Post.

has a devastating impact on the

Commenting on her new series,

lives of women and girls. Globally,

Aida Muluneh said: "My main goal

Muluneh has been a jury member

one in ten people have no clean

in building this collection is to

on several prominent photography

water close to home and one in

address the issues caused by a lack

competitions most notably the

four don't have a decent toilet,

of access to clean water, and the

Sony World Photography Awards

causing diarrheal diseases that

impact that has not only on a

2017 and the World Press Photo

claim the lives of a child every two

society as a whole, but on women,

Contest 2017. In 2018 she showed

minutes. In Aida Muluneh's native

particularly in rural regions. We

"Being: New Photography 2018"

country, Ethiopia, the figures are

cannot refute that it is mainly

at MOMAÂ NY. She is the Founder

stark, with almost six in ten people

women who bear responsibility for

and Director of the Addis Foto

being denied access to clean water,

collecting water, a burden that has

Fest (AFF), the first international

despite the significant progress

great consequences for our future

photography festival in East Africa

made over the past 20 years.

and the development of our nation.

hosted since 2010 in the city of

My focus in this project was to

Addis Ababa. She continues to

Muluneh herself, while living in

address these topics without the

educate,

Ethiopia, has encountered streams

clichĂŠ that we see in mainstream

cultural projects with local and

of women traveling on foot and

media. In a sense, to advocate

international institutions through

carrying heavy burdens of water.

through art."

her company DESTA in Ethiopia.

curate

and

develop

203


CYNTHIA FAW


"I want the viewer to relate to an image that contains something familiar, but also something beyond their daily experience: a journey that tantalizes with potential escape."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Watercolor artist Cynthia Faw paints memories of

B.A. and Master of Architecture degrees, I managed the

voyages through both natural and imaginary worlds.

building design process for large commercial, civic and

A resident of Seattle, Washington U.S.A., Cynthia

corporate clients working with firms in St. Louis, Dallas

garners much of her inspiration from sailing on the

and Seattle. Ten years ago I refocused my priorities and

Salish Sea and visiting other lands around the globe.

have concentrated on painting full time.

Her marine landscapes and dreamscapes artworks are included in numerous private collections.

Tell us about your process and what you feel when you are creating.

Tell us about yourself and your background.

I begin by imagining the completed work. Watercolor, like

I was raised in Champaign, Illinois, a university town

Sumi-e painting, can be quite unforgiving, and demands

where the Arts were readily accessible. As a child I

forethought. I do, however, make allowances for “happy

delighted in train trips to see Chicago’s world-class

accidents”. Sketchbook studies help me to develop the

architecture. I decided in primary school that I wanted

composition, line, value, shading and hues. I spend several

to become an architect, because I enjoyed solving 3D

days working on these studies. Next I draw the image

problems. Painting and drawing were part of my

directly on watercolor paper. Adding a series of washes

undergraduate studies, a language for communicating

from lighter to darker tones fleshes out the image, to

my design solutions. I loved painting in its own right.

which I sometimes add drybrush strokes. It usually takes

After graduating from the University of Illinois with a

between a week and a month to complete a painting. My 205


colors are often more saturated than

opportunity

to

take

classes

in

is common, but I believe there is no

anthropology, and the insights gained

“right” or “wrong” way to use water-

have helped me better understand the

color.

peoples I have met during my travels in 50 countries (so far). How a person

"My paintings tell stories from my observations and imagination that reflect how I visually process the world. I hope the viewer delights in my images and escapes their daily grind." 206

Describe the unique DNA of your art.

sees

art

is

influenced

by

their

On its surface, my work is represent-

experiences and culture: none of us

ational marinescapes and landscapes,

see quite the same thing. My paintings

often with people, boats or buildings

tell stories from my observations and

associated with traditional activities

imagination that reflect how I visually

that transcend our current time.

process the world. I hope the viewer

I want the viewer to relate to an image

delights in my images and escapes

that contains something familiar, but

their daily grind, hearing the waves

also something beyond their daily

breaking on the shore or the call of the

experience: a journey that tantalizes

heron, feeling the heat of the noonday

with potential escape. Though most of

sun or the motion of a boat rolling on

my subjects are literal, sometimes I

the sea.

skew the plane of reality a bit, using a bird’s eye view, or incorporating

How do people tend to react when

symbols from my pattern language.

they first encounter your paintings? They gaze for a while; my paintings

How do you want to impact viewers?

have a calming effect, portraying

I marvel at the world and its fantastic

people, creatures or natural features

diversity of peoples and creatures.

in a quiet state. People have told me

As an undergraduate I had the great

they find my images refreshing.


Direct us to your most notable works and why. I like to portray edges between things: sea and dry land, earth and sky, past and present. I’ve painted a series of views from lighthouses looking out to sea, incorporating remembered elements that aren’t necessarily real. I also enjoy depicting atmospheric images— portraying landmasses or boats through sea fog, for example. My “Anchorages” series of works was created to memorialize special places I’ve anchored in the Caribbean and the Salish Sea; these incorporate symbols from my navigation: compass roses and depth markings. Tell us about themes you've explored. I look at life as a voyage—coming from the known,

going

somewhere

unknown,

then

repeating it. The fact that I’ve sailed a small boat for 35 years contributes to my passion for voyaging; I enjoy both crossing seas and gunkholing where wild nature prevails. The themes of my work are greatly influenced by travel of all kinds: over land, across oceans, through time. Since I live at the edge of the sea, depictions of edges have a special place in my work. I am grateful to live near people who fish and build wooden boats, and I celebrate their crafts in my work. I also celebrate old-growth trees and the wild creatures that visit my home. What are you currently working on? I am currently working on a studio painting for myself: I have never expressly painted with myself as a client! Composed of individual panels, each depicts places and symbols from one branch of my Swiss immigrant family. There are landscapes, a falcon and peacocks (my name means peacock: Pfau). Since one of the peacock images is derived from a stained glass window, I’m using the opportunity to incorporate formlines.

"I like to portray edges between things: sea and dry land, earth and sky, past and present." 207


What can we expect from you in the future? I am planning a series called “Habitations”, exploring the dwellings of cultures different from my own Eurocentric heritage. What I’m seeking to portray is the light, air, comfort, privacy and intimacy of what makes a home. My Anchorages series has many more journeys to include. My purpose is to further develop my formline work and abstract symbols. More wooden sailing boats, fishing trawlers and workboats are planned. I also want to continue painting things that are endangered, such as: bridges, lighthouses, buildings, shorelines, creatures and forests—in the hope that viewers will feel moved to help save them. If I am able to cross the Atlantic again in 2021, my plan is to travel around the African continent, and I am excited just anticipating painting memories of new places. What attracts you to your current mediums? I’ve always preferred working in watercolor because it allows me to be both expressive and technical; watercolor sticks and pencils further extend my wetpalette range. Also, since I often include bodies of water in my images, water media seem appropriate. 208


"I think a better model would be for societies to nurture every person’s capacity to both appreciate and create art." What do you feel when you are creating? Pure joy! I’m challenged to become my absolute best self; continually invigorated and renewed. What are your views on art's role? I believe Art in all its many forms is (and has always been) Humanity’s highest achievement— but Art does not belong on a pedestal.  The intensely human, cultural insights channeled through the arts are what matters. In some indigenous cultures, well-off tribal members spent large parts of their days creating art--supported by others who did the hard labor. This is still somewhat true. I think a better model would be for societies to nurture every person’s capacity to both appreciate and create art. Tell us about your location and how it influences your art. Relocating

to

Seattle

was

a

deliberate act to embrace nature at my doorstep--offering me both subjects and inspiration. Seattle’s fishing fleet is docked a mile from my home studio. All my life I have also been drawn to the formline art of the Pacific Northwest's indigenous peoples, and I collect works by Coast Salish, Haida and Kwakwaka’wakw artists. 209


"I believe Art in all its forms is (and has always been) Humanity’s highest achievement— but Art does not belong on a pedestal. The intensely human, cultural insights channeled through the arts are what matters."

210


"I value centeredness and quietness—themes of my work" How has the Covid pandemic affected your creative expression and how has it changed you going forward? With my June show, travel and family visits all cancelled, I’ve had a surplus of time to devote to planning and creating art. I value centeredness and quietness—themes of my work—so I view this strange lapse of planned activities as a great gift of creative time. I recently painted 'en plein air' with a fellow artist and am encouraging myself to loosen up my brushwork. Perhaps the greatest change I have noticed in myself is a focus on my gratitude at simply remaining free and healthy when so many others have lost the gifts of life and liberty during these past three months. www.cynthiafaw.com 211


ANNIE TULL (ÁINE)


"I truly believe the human soul is at its most vibrant when it is in communion with nature, but we as a species have gone astray... we need to tune back into the rhythms of the earth and remember that we are part of a much greater whole."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

ÁINE is an installation artist, painter and designer

The connection between the human soul and nature is a

based in Northern California. Working in thread, oils,

key theme in your creations, tell us about this?

and other media, she explores the emotional effects

I truly believe the human soul is at its most vibrant when it

of light, color, form and space on the human psyche.

is in communion with nature, but we as a species have

By working in both two- and three-dimensional

gone astray. So many of the issues we face as a global

media, ÁINE reaches beyond the traditional art

community today stem from our disconnection from the

audience to inspire people in their everyday spaces.

land. In order to remember how we’re supposed to live, we need to tune back into the rhythms of the earth and remember that we are part of a much greater whole that

You

work

across

a

variety

of

media

and

environments. Is fluidity central to your creativity?

is full of magic and beauty and harmony, but only if we participate as we are meant to.

Absolutely! My practice is largely about connecting with and conveying big ideas, in whatever form they

Your education covers both the fine art and interior

may take. Having the fluidity to experiment in

architecture lanes, how has that shaped your practise?

different media allows me to shift my perspective and

I now have the skills and expertise to conceive of art in the

approach a concept from a new point of view. I think

context of the built environment. I’m able to manage the

this is critical to being able to coexist within a world as

entire experience of my work, from conveying concepts

rich and varied as ours.

and sourcing appropriate materials, to actually building it 213


opportunities and be adaptable so that you can welcome

“I had to ask myself sincerely Who am I... The answer came through a sankalpa meditation: “I am Light.” it felt like a call to action, to use my art to bring light to a darkening world.“

in whatever the universe has to offer. You recently adopted an artist’s name. Tell us why and how will it further enhance your artwork and journey? 2020 is an auspicious year for me - it’s the year that has always stood for “the future.” I also turned 30 in February, and had to ask myself sincerely “Who am I, when it comes to standing for something in this world?” The answer came through a sankalpa meditation: “I am Light.” That

with my own two hands. My clients trust me to sculpt

rang so true for me; it felt like a call to action, to use my

their space into something that will enhance their daily

art to bring light to a darkening world. At the same time, I

use, and know that I will do it with full knowledge of

had begun intently studying the sacred traditions of the

building codes and best practices to ensure a fully

Celts in Ireland, a people whose very core tied them

functional, safe, and engaging space.

inextricably to the land. I wanted to take on a name that would remind me of this calling, so I chose the name Áine

Your practise serves traditional art audiences and the

(pronounced “awn-yah”), meaning “radiance,” after the

transitory through your 2D art and 3D installations.

Celtic goddess of love, protection, and fertility. These are

Was it an organic journey to this point or was it planned?

all qualities I hope to bring to the world through my art.

I would love to say that this was all part of a master plan,

214

but in reality, I’ve found my way simply by putting one

Your recent installation in Oakland, California received

foot in front of the other. This journey has essentially

a lot of major press - tell us about this project.

been made up of a series of decisions that each felt right

My first string installation came directly out of my work

in their time, and it’s just been a constant evolution to this

on Enlisted’s new office design. Throughout the process, I

point. I think it’s important to stay open to different

worked really closely with their founder, Beau Oyler. In


"My installations, ethereal as they may be, are there to hold space for the people and functions that occupy them." discussing how the best ideas “float to the top,” I started

Whether multi-layered and complex like Amazon’s Forêt

thinking about how one could activate the ceiling plane.

Moiré or the quieter elegance of “All That Glitters,” each

I pitched the idea of a multi-story installation that would

piece speaks to the unnamed yet intimate connection

serve as a metaphor for the team’s collaborative design

with our environment that we all intuitively seek.

process. Their logo was a knot, so string seemed like a great choice for material. It was a wild idea, but fit the

You are a Yogini (female master practitioner of yoga) -

company’s brand perfectly, and led to me single-handedly

how has this influenced your creativity?

installing 60,000 linear feet of paracord in a vintage

When I returned to painting in 2016, my practice was

building at the heart of Uptown Oakland!

deeply tied to meditation. Every week I would choose a crystal and contemplate its color in my third eye. I came

Your recent installations - at Amazon’s new video

out of these mediations feeling grounded, inspired, and

production headquarters and for a high-end residential

with a strong desire to paint what I had just seen. My

development firm - can you tell us about the benefits

paintings manifested as color fields undulating with light,

they bring to work and residential environments?

full of hidden depths and places for discovery. People felt

My installations, ethereal as they may be, are there to

drawn into them and could contemplate them for hours.

hold space for the people and functions that occupy them.

It was amazing to see these paintings that came out of my

They surround and embrace, and invite you to take part,

own meditation became the object of meditation for

to live in relationship with them, and to enjoy your own

others! That set the course for me to continue working

personal experience of them. In a sense, they are

from this place of sincerity inside of me. It’s a similar kind

placeholders for the whispering ways of nature that are

of alchemy with my installations, just on a much bigger

omnipresent, stunningly beautiful, but also background.

scale, and in a more immersive and encompassing way. 215


"People felt drawn into them and could contemplate them for hours. It was amazing to see these paintings that came out of my own meditation became the object of meditation for others!" 216


"They surround and embrace, and invite you to take part, to live in relationship with them, and to enjoy your own personal experience of them. In a sense, they are placeholders for the whispering ways of nature that are omnipresent, stunningly beautiful, but also background."

217


"Every week I would choose a crystal and contemplate its color in my third eye. I came out of these mediations feeling grounded, inspired, and with a strong desire to paint what I had just seen." 218


"Paintings and installations activate different parts of my brain and the flow back and forth between the two is balancing." Tell us about some of the different types of installations you have done. When I left the interior design world, all I wanted to do was work with my hands. There had been countless times as a designer that I would dream up something awesome only to be disappointed by the limitations of contractors. That was a major pain point for me, knowing that I had the potential to make a space shine, but wasn’t able to for reasons outside of my control. So I started calling my designer friends to let them know I was available for feature installations. This led me to some really varied projects in the beginning, like a “Cask of Amontillado”-inspired partition and an elevator lobby wallpapered with pages out of an Oxford English Dictionary. But my favorite installation medium quickly became string, of all kinds. I now mostly work with different types of yarn, cord and rope, each exploring a different use of the medium and achieving very different results. There’s so much potential with “string.” Who knew something as simple as a straight line, when repeated ad infinitum in space, could create so much complexity -- and beauty! Painting v Installations. How do you approach them, what are the similarities/ differences? Paintings and installations activate different parts of my brain and the flow back and forth between the two is balancing. When I start a painting, it’s very loose, usually just an initial outpouring of color onto canvas that then gets layered and refined and evolves organically. It’s the opposite with installations; they’re methodical, exacting and concrete. Initially, it’s all mathematical projections and studying the 219


way lines interact in three dimensions. Installing the work requires more brute labor than anything. It’s not until the end that I can step back and see how the single strand gives way to a vast and shimmering landscape, equal parts real and imagined. Ultimately, both media take me to the same place of stillness, and I’m glad to have different means of getting there. Tell us about your paintings. My paintings, though abstracted, almost always grapple with the relationship between untouched landscape and human projection. I’m fascinated by how humans connect with the world around them, both physically and spiritually, and this manifests itself in various ways in my work. With the “Intersections” collection, I explored what happens to wildly abstract colorfields when you frame and harness some aspect of them with straight lines. More recently, I’ve been painting the women of the world engaged in the act of merging with nature at a soul level. Namasté, Love embodies my message to the world as she addresses the flowers: “We are the same; the divine light in me honors the divine light in you.” I hope this imagery can inspire others to find the source of their own connection so that we may collectively return to an era of harmonious coexistence with the world we inhabit. How has presenting your work helped improve your understanding of connecting with potential clients? I’ve shown my work in so many different contexts over the years: coffee shops, arthouses, bars, festivals, retail stores, galleries, healthcare facilities, and corporate offices. What I’ve found is that art speaks to all kinds of people for all different reasons and the people who connect the most with my work won’t always be the ones who are in a place to buy it. I’ve also learned that there are different ways to understand the concept of “buying artwork:” There’s the literal translation of someone actually purchasing a piece from me and then there’s the more figurative sense of someone believing in the work I am doing because it has touched their soul. Ideally, you find clients that will buy your work both literally and figuratively, but it’s hard to say which is more valuable in the end. 220


"Try to zoom out. I find it fascinating that at the most micro level of molecular biology, everything is in chaos. But as you zoom out, things become more clear, and more peaceful." What can we look forward to from you in the second half of 2020 and into 2021? In the wake of the COVID crisis, I’ve been thinking a lot about the concept of “shelter” and plan to experiment with outdoor installations as a means of reimagining how humans occupy our planet and coexist with each other and with nature. I’ve also got some fun ideas for bringing a multi-media aspect to my string installations! If you could have only one message to artists and non-artists alike, what would it be? Try to zoom out. I find it fascinating that at the most micro level of molecular biology, everything is in chaos. But as you zoom out, things become more clear, and more peaceful. The orders of magnitude lessen, and eventually - if you zoom out far enough all there is is blackness - total quiet, complete, unconscionable darkness. Try to zoom out from your own experience just a little, and see what clarity that broader perspective can bring. www.annietull.com 221


LINGLING ZHAO


"I am a contemporary painter interested in the connections between modern life, historic and spiritual traditions. I am also committed to making work that evokes a strong emotional reaction in my viewer."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Contemporary painter Lingling Zhao’s practice is at

viewer. I have always been interested in the visual world.

the intersection of modern painting, mysticism, and

I grew up in a small village near Chengdu, China and my

traditional Chinese iconography and philosophy

father was an architect. He had a vast collection of art and

luminously expressed in a series of unique imaginary

artifacts that I found deeply inspiring and I began making

worlds. As such, Lingling Zhao’s vibrantly colored

art when I was five years old. I went on to earn my BA

paintings offer stirring depictions of otherworldly

from the Northwest Textile University, Xian, China and

beauty, spiritual beauty and translucent treatment

also studied fine art at the Southwest State University,

of light and form, intended in part to act as a vehicle

Minnesota. Today, I live and work in Las Vegas with my

for enlightenment and self-discovery.

husband and my son.

Tell us about yourself and your background.

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique?

I am a contemporary painter interested in the

First and foremost, I am a painter whose formal process or

connections between modern life, historic and

technique is informed by a spiritual outlook. I use styles

spiritual traditions. I am also committed to making

and images that seem to be in contrast to one another and

work that evokes a strong emotional reaction in my

intend to evoke emotion in my audience. My work is very 223


unique in the sense that it

What are your sources of

expresses a synthesis between

inspiration?

abstract

The

content

(such

as

main

source

of

my

spirituality, feelings, emotions

inspiration comes from the

and imagination) and some

spiritual movement of our

very technical and intentional

collective consciousness.

processes. I blend motifs from

As Oliver Wendell Homes Jr.

realism, academic painting and

said: “A mind that is stretched

surrealism with those symbolic

by new experiences can never

vocabularies of ancient and

go back to its old dimensions.”

historic traditions from all over

I am inspired by the growing

the world. As well, my work

movement to search for a path

functions as a commentary on

to

contemporary life and the

through listening, using our

shared

hearts and senses. Compassion

universal

spiritual

experience.

balance

in

ourselves,

and love exist for me as vibrations within and express

Tell us about your process and

the evolution of the soul.

what you feel when you are creating.

Why are you attracted to your

My process starts in the

preferred mediums?

assemblage of elements that

I prefer oil paint for the unique

exist in my subconscious, e.g.

vibrant colors, and the slow

spiritual or mystical motifs that

dry and ease of use and

are forever in my mind. Much

control. As well, I like oil paint’s

of these images are triggered

transparency within deeper

by a near death experience

layers. The oil in the pigments

from my childhood. Namely,

reflects light and all angles

my work begins with my

beautifully. Pragmatically, oil

feelings and imagination.

paintings last much longer

For

painting

compared

Banyan Tree explores the

materials.

instance,

my

to

other

paint

origins of humankind and our shared

224

history

and

inter-

Tell us about some of your

connectedness, and yet also

achievements

and

notable

mirrors my own experience

projects.

and memories.

My work has been exhibited at

My spiritually inspired work

a wide variety of museums,

functions to gently open my

galleries and cultural centers

audience’s hearts while at the

such as the Japanese American

same time allowing them to

Museum, Los Angeles. Desert

understand my message in

Oasis, Las Vegas. The Sahara

their own way. So while I use a

Library Gallery, Las Vegas. The

personal iconography, I hope

University of Costa Rica, and

the work is open ended enough

Gallery 416, Minneapolis and

to allow this perceptual space.

St. Paul.


"My spiritually inspired work functions to gently open my audience’s hearts while at the same time allowing them to understand my message in their own way." As well, I love to complete commissioned projects and I am proud to say my work is held in private collections and on view at corporate collections. Other projects include my cover illustration for the book Presentation Techniques of Patterns Design by Shao Hua Lian, Hunan Art Publisher, 2005. Other special honors include the installation of paintings at the Spring Hill Suites Convention Center, Las Vegas, 2018, and at The USChina Cultural Association, Las Vegas, 2017. Last year, my work was published in a special addition of a magazine featuring one hundred Chinese artists living outside of China, published on 70th anniversary of the People Republic of China. Tell us about some of the themes and concepts that you have explored. The main theme of my work has been the intersection between the natural world and the spiritual realm. My paintings are realistic but express abstract concepts such as natural energy. As well, I am also drawn to the ideas behind quantum physics. I also like to refer to traditional Chinese art, primarily Chinese classical painting. What are you passionate about? I am passionate about expressing my spiritual journey through painting. As well, in many of my paintings I use the Ying and Yang symbol. Balance and harmony are important to my work and life. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive from people that discover your work. After exhibits, when I review the guest books, I read visitors’ messages and I feel particularly inspired by sentiments such as “This painting really deeply touched me”; or “I loved the philosophy behind this painting”. 225


226


"We go through these crises and rise to be stronger. My work will examine these troubling themes and continue to pair unexpected forms, evoking I hope emotion and hope in my viewers."

What are you currently working on?

for two years as a way of establishing

I am currently working on a group of

strong roots, only to suddenly in the

paintings entitled Raising Phoenix.

third year grow two to three feet per

The

new

day! I believe there is a lesson in the

canvases feature dark scenes such as

life of this plant that can apply to

different disasters, war, and even fire.

human life as well. We should focus on

But there is still hope after such

building strong foundations before we

events. We go through these crises

can take off and thrive. There is much

and rise to be stronger. My work will

to explore in this analogy and I am

examine these troubling themes and

excited to see where this takes me.

background

of

these

continue to pair unexpected forms, evoking I hope, emotion and hope in

Tell us about your location and its

my viewers.

influence on your work. Living in Las Vegas gives me a lot of

What can we look forward to in the

opportunities to be inspired and

near future, what directions will you

influenced by others. I am surrounded

be exploring?

by beautiful nature, fascinating shows,

I will continue creating inspirational

and interesting architecture. As an

painting that seek to touch the hearts

artist living in a relatively small

of my viewers. In my upcoming series I

community I find I have a lot of access

explore the phenomena of a particular

to see talent, including performances,

bamboo plant that grows very slowly

art and galleries. 227


"I am an emotional person and my work reflects that. My paintings are often inspired by real life events." How do you feel about art and its role in the world? I like to say that art is energy and vibration which motivates and inspires. Artists often create art to communicate with others, to share views, beliefs, and feelings. It is important because it can shape perceptions of current events as well as resonate on a more personal and intimate level. It is said that art is a mirror to society and the world is in pain. I believe artists have a significant role to play. Today more than ever the world needs balance and harmony to overcome current challenges. I hope that my art can offer reprieve, thoughtfulness, spiritual meditation and exploration. How do you want your art to affect the viewer? I am an emotional person and my art works reflect that. My paintings are very often inspired by real life events. For example my painting Old Women Praying responds to my trip to the country where I saw sorrow and grief (and hope) in the scene of local women praying while workers were re-building Kathmandu after the disaster. Similarly, my work Vegas Strong responds to the massacre in Las Vegas on October 17, 2017 and depicts 228


58 lanterns symbolizing the souls we lost that day. When this work was exhibited, people really seemed to bond with the work. This kind of reaction is really what gives me the inspiration to keep on making artwork. I want my work to have a deep meaning and make a real impact. I want my art to respond to the world today. What has the Covid pandemic meant to you and how has it influenced your creativity? Covid-19 pandemic had a profound impact on all of us. Over 90% of all artists have lost their income. Many museums, galleries and art institutions have closed, and some might not open again. The loss to our society will be immeasurable and can only be softened by government action. I hope there will be enough will to support our community. In terms of my own practice, the pandemic inspired recent work such as The Rise of Phoenix where the three dancers emerge from the disaster enriched by the experience. The beauty of their movement demonstrates their spiritual higher

"It is said that art is a mirror to society and the world is in pain.I believe artists have a significant role to play. Today more than ever the world needs balance and harmony to overcome current challenges." ground and the hope for a better future. In The Break, we see a masked baby in a nursery contemplating a scene of of surreal fissure. The pandemic is here to stay, and it will change our lives and our behaviors. And yet, as we accept this new reality of social distancing, constant protection, and quarantine, we still dream of freedom. www.linglingart.com www.greatspiritualgifts.com 229


ROBERT MARGETTS


"I combine abstract imagery, cartoon drawing, and geometric shapes and patterns with a touch of cubism and stir it all together. I leave it up to the audience to tell me what they see in my paintings.�

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

"My name is Robert Owen Margetts and I enjoy

opening various franchise brands. One day I picked up a

dabbling in Cubism and abstract imagery. I’m just

paintbrush and started to paint. The rest is history.

your typical Canadian boy living and working in Dallas, Texas, paying taxes and loving life."

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique? I like to combine abstract imagery, cartoon drawing, and

Tell us about yourself and your background.

geometric shapes and patterns with a touch of cubism and

I was born and at times housed along the riverbanks of

stir it all together. I leave it up to the audience to tell me

the great St. Lawrence River in Montreal until settling

what they see in my paintings.

into the quiet sanctuaries of foster homes on Prince Edward Island, Canada. At age 9, I won the lottery and

Tell us about your process and what do you feel when

was adopted by a family from New Jersey. I attended

you are creating?

boarding school in New Hampshire and graduated

I typically start with shapes in mind and figure out how to

from Tulane University with a BA in History. After

drop hidden images into all my paintings. Some of the

college I headed to Asia. For the next 30 years of my

imagery is obvious while others will take some time to

life, I lived the life of Riley bouncing all over the world

understand the meaning of the painting. I often put down 231


the canvas for days at a time and work on

famous. Consequently I really have no

other projects until inspiration hits me.

accolades or awards to boast about. I do have a few (105) websites and blogs

"I love bold colors and shapes. Something inside my head tells me to paint until the canvas is completely covered in wild patterns. I guess you could say that I am inspired by cartoons and comic pop art." 232

What are your sources of inspiration?

and have sold hundreds of paintings

I love bold colors and shapes. Something

around the world and have written and

inside my head tells me to paint until the

published a few books, but have never

canvas is completely covered in wild

had a showing inside some gallery.

patterns. I guess you could say that I am inspired by cartoons and comic pop art.

Tell us about some of the themes and concepts that you have explored.

Why are you attracted to your preferred

I originally started working with wood

mediums?

carvings and that eventually led to

As stupid as it sounds, I couldn't afford

dabbling with acrylic paint. I thought to

the artwork that I saw in magazines and

myself, why can't painted wood carvings

knew that I wanted to decorate my house

be considered artwork and hung on walls?

in wild zany pop art. You might say that invention is the necessity of desire. In a

What are you passionate about?

perfect world, that statement makes

I am passionate about abstract art with

perfect sense.

vibrant colors and bringing a smile to the average person on the street. Artwork

Tell us about some of your achievements

doesn't have to be dominated by the

and notable artworks.

experts and gifted artisans of the world.Â

That is a hard question to answer. I never

I think the average Joe with a little

started out to become an artist or even

patience and some spare time can create


thought-provoking imagery. And who knows, perhaps one day his artwork shows up in the Guggenheim Museum or in a landfill. Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive from people that discover your work. Most of the people that have bought my work really like the pop-art feel and the vibrant shapes, patterns and colors. It's art that almost any person on the planet could paint if given the time and the fortitude to accept failure from time to time. What are you currently working on? I am still working on developing newer and more interesting abstract paintings with hints of cartoon and comic book art. I would like to continue with more superhero figures hidden inside some cubism paintings. What can we look forward to in the future, what directions will you be exploring? In the future, expect more abstract comic art and more hanging wood carvings. I don't know what direction I am going to take in the next 2-10 years. I paint and carve whatever inspires me at that time. Maybe I will go back to carving exotic pop-art painted dinosaur fish.   Tell us about your location and its influence on your work. I live in Dallas, Texas and constantly travel to Austin to see my kids and check out the artwork. That city is full of fresh artists and great things to see, eat and drink. And yes, Texas has a lot of cows, boots and sport teams so there is plenty of things to inspire a new artist. How do you feel about art and its role in the world today? I have always loved art and was jealous of all those incredible artisans of the world that spewed talent without even trying. As I said before, since I couldn't afford to buy the things (paintings and sculptures) that I saw in store windows, art galleries, magazines and books; I decided to paint them myself. Art inspires everyone. To some, art is a movie or a poem and to others, art is life.

"I am passionate about abstract art with vibrant colors and bringing a smile to the average person on the street." 233


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How do you want your art to affect the viewer? When people look at my artwork, I want them to be jettisoned back to their early years in life when everything they touched and painted was beautiful. I hope people smirk to themselves and say I remember painting something like that in elementary school. I hope it inspires new artists to try and put themselves out there. Everyone is an artist, don't be afraid to fail. Art should be something that you love to do and expresses how you feel inside.

"I have always loved art and was jealous of all those incredible artisans of the world that spewed talent without even trying... Art inspires everyone. To some, art is a movie or a poem and to others, art is life."

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Biography I was born and raised on Prince Edward Island until being adopted by a great family in 1972. My brother and sisters and I moved to New Jersey; attended schools and universities and then headed to Asia to start my own business. I lived in Taiwan for 6 years before coming back to the United States in 1994 and joined the workforce. Working for numerous internationally recognized franchise brands for the next 20 years, I had the opportunity to travel the world, meet new people and get exposed

to

a

plethora

of

new

traditions and cultures. One night I woke up in my bed in Charlotte, North Carolina, picked up a paint brush and started to paint. www.robertmargetts.com www.batkar.pixels.com www.rmargetts.blogspot.com

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HANNAH GIBSON 238


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Hannah Gibson BSc Geology MA Glass Whilst studying Geology at the University of Edinburgh Hannah became fascinated by the mineralogy and the reactions between various elements, metals and compounds. This led her towards a passion for the alchemy of glass. Capturing

the

nostalgic

imagery

of

childhood, exposing hidden narratives, through cast sculptural glass stands at the core of Hannah's work. Passionate about sustainability and recycling, using only 100% recycled glass, and found objects. Sweet Nothings are a series of individual, unique Cast Glass figures. Usually found in pairs, whispering ‘Sweet Nothings’ to one another. What are they whispering? ‘Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot. Nothing is going to get better. It’s not.’ (Dr Seuss, The Lorax).  www.hannahgibsonglass.co.uk

CAPTURING THE NOSTALGIC IMAGERY OF CHILDHOOD, EXPOSING HIDDEN NARRATIVES, THROUGH CAST SCULPTURAL GLASS. 241


STEPHEN MOSCOWITZ


"My work is realistic. Most important to me, it tells a story. Some paintings show a clear tale, but most are subtle and work with the viewer."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Stephen Moscowitz creates fine art that tells a story.

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique?

Stephen’s interest in art began at an early age. After

My work is realistic. Most important to me, it tells a story.

a long career as an illustrator in the fast-paced

Some paintings show a clear tale, but most are subtle and

advertising world, Stephen has embraced a world of

work with the viewer. I paint with heavy body acrylics, but

incredible beauty and vivid images. His deep respect

my works are smooth. I scrumble-brush areas to blend

and love for nature, as well as all of the world’s

colors and tones. That also keeps the painting smooth. As

creatures, is evident the moment he puts brush to

for uniqueness, not sure that this technique is mine alone.

canvas. Describe your process and how you feel when painting. Tell us about yourself and your background.

I need to paint. Painting wildlife requires a camera. I live in

I attended the Rochester Institute of Technology

an area that supports birds and a variety of habitats. I am

where I majored in art and design. After graduation, I

constantly observing how they spend their days. When I

worked in the advertising and publication industry for

find a situation to paint, I look for the right photo or try to

several years; first as art director and later as an

shoot it. The marshes, woods and open areas are all

illustrator. My career has been strongly influenced by

around, giving me plenty of background views. I start with

artists such as Maxfield Parrish, NC Wyeth and

very rough scribbles, refine them with my reference and

Norman Rockwell. I seriously love nature and its

create a pencil drawing. The drawing is to the size of my

creatures, both real and imagined.

painting. I usually paint a background color and roughly 243


"I paint from my photos. How I feel when creating a painting?‌ peaceful and absorbed. Arlene says I am unaware of anything else." Tell us about some of your notable moments in art. I consider DESTIG choosing me to have this opportunity an accomplishment. I have paintings hanging all over the country. For 5 years, I was on the Board of Directors of the non-profit gallery I was a member of for a dozen years. I was recently juried into an elite Art Gallery representing incredibly talented artists. My paintings have won many awards. Mostly local, not notable. I was also hired to teach art at the college I matriculated at. How have your themes / concepts evolved over time? I have been painting wildlife for a long time. I have gained a reputation for that. Since moving to the Low Country of South Carolina, painting birds has become my major theme. I have recently decided to add still life add shapes and some of the details. I then will transfer my drawing to the canvas using a transfer paper (i.e: graphite). Then using reference, feathers, eyes, wing positions, et al, I paint my subject. I generally have 2-3 paintings working at the same time in different stages. This enables me to keep working when I get bored or tired with what I am doing. For my still life paintings, I set up the objects in my studio and light the composition. I paint from my photos. How I feel when creating a painting‌ peaceful and absorbed. Arlene says I am unaware of anything else. What are your sources of inspiration? My eyes mostly, but occasionally a client will be specific about what I should do. In those cases, I rely on using my imagination to visualize what they are suggesting. Why did you choose your preferred mediums? When I was doing illustrations there was always a deadline. I had to work quickly. Acrylics dry quickly and I can work over (shading, glazing or fine detail or texture) an area right away. I no longer have the urgent deadlines but have held on to the process. 244


245


"As I researched the masters, I found that they would paint all sorts of things to exhibit their skills. I now follow that concept, painting jugs and mugs has truly begun to make even my birds and animals look better." painting to my career. As I researched the masters, I

Share with us some feedback from your patrons.

found that they would paint all sorts of things to exhibit

I hear “beautiful” a lot. “Great body of work.” There are

their skills. They would use a variety of objects with

also very favorable comments about the detail I achieve.

difficult textures like glass and wood, foods, fruits and

Peers allude to my bold colors, my brushwork and

vegetables and reflective items. I noticed rapid growth in

composition. “I want that” is something else I often hear.

their skills. I now follow that concept, painting jugs and mugs has truly begun to make even my birds and animals

What are you currently working on?

look better.

I just completed 6 new paintings to hang in my newest gallery. I am doing some catch up work. Shortly I will be

What are you passionate about?

doing a large painting of a heron landing on a branch and

I am passionate about lots of things. Life, the world

a still life of kitchen objects for a longtime friend/ patron.

around me, has lately become emotional to me. Truly, my

246

strongest energy is directed to my work. I am fully

Tell us about your location and how it influences you.

involved in raising my skills. I am feeling the need to

I live in paradise. Every where I look, I see a painting. The

increase my repertoire as well. Using Social Commentary

area supports myriads of wildlife. The day I moved into

as a motive for my work keeps popping up in my thinking.

my home a Great White Egret walked through my yard.


"I live in paradise. Every where I look, I see a painting. The area supports myriads of wildlife."

247


"I wonder if the world can afford to buy art. So much is going on all over the planet. Will people be able to focus on art? Artists will hopefully steer the population to a better understanding." This part of the south has attracted artists from all over the world. Galleries are plentiful. Insights into what paths you will explore in the future? My work is continuing to evolve. I will be trying to become slightly more impressionistic with my bird paintings. I will be starting to work on a series of small bird paintings. I will be continuing to work on paintings of objects. My still life works have been small, so I am planning to work on larger pieces. Social comment is always on my mind, I will be experimenting with how to paint it. How do you feel about art today? I wonder if the world can afford to buy art. Economies are dropping. So much is going on all over the planet. Will people be able to focus on art? Artists will hopefully steer the population to a better understanding. How do you want the viewer to experience your art? I hope the viewer will see my work favorably. I try to put “nice” in my work. I want them to be touched by and glad to see my efforts. I love the animals I paint. That is what I hope they see. Tell us about your feelings of 2020 and Covid 19. This pandemic is very frightening to me. I am 84 years old. That is why I am extremely cautious about going anywhere. Staying at home has been beneficial to my creativity. I have more time to work and less distractions. The general mood around this lock-down is pensive. That mood gives durability to my “art thinking”. www.stephenmoscowitz.com 248


STEPHEN MOSCOWITZ - MY LIFE IN ART As early as I can recall I considered myself to be an artist.

publishers. When computers changed the world of art, I

My father, an amateur artist shared his materials with me

did not want to become “digital”. The need for illustration

at the age of three. I spent most of my time drawing at

shrank and the agents that represented me found less and

home and school.

less work at exceedingly lower payment.

In high school, art became my top priority. My parents

Oddly, at that time, one of my sons bought a motorcycle.

convinced the principal that I would be better off having

“Paint it for me Dad”, he asked. I choked a little, having

art classes than math, science, and language. I had a

never painted on metal or curved surfaces. It took me a

wonderful teacher who taught me everything he knew

while but once done, and his bike hit the streets, my

about mediums and techniques. I won Scholastic Art

phone began to ring. Over several years, I painted

Awards yearly and a scholarship to The RIT School of Art .

hundreds of motorcycles. My work won a bunch of awards for the bike owners. I painted wolves and eagles,

In college, I found out that I needed to get much better at

stripes, flames, and famous people.

my art. I had great teachers and one of them guided me to follow the commercial art courses. After graduation, I

I started doing art on paper and canvas. I developed a

went directly to work in advertising. I became an art

following of clients wanting art for their homes and

director and was attracted to the joining of art and words.

offices. I have been doing that for nearly a quarter

That training became the energy that eventually turned

century. I have had work hung in a few galleries and

me into an illustrator. I spent a bunch of years doing

recently been juried and invited to join The Perspective

illustrations for advert agencies, magazines, and book

Gallery in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.

249


CYNTHIA ROSE TOM


"My eyes are mesmerized by bright vibrant colors and the nonsensical play of graffiti art. My art involves many shapes and definitive angles, while strategizing the placement of colors on the canvas. This gives me joy and a sense of visual balance when looking at a painting."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Cynthia Rose Tom is a self-taught contemporary

was action-packed with dancing, traveling, performing,

abstract artist, born and raised in New Jersey. She

and studying. When I graduated high school, I received a

has traveled to over 30 different countries

dance scholarship from the University of Illinois and

submerging herself into culture and developing her

explored the art of contemporary dance. I learned that

own unique style. Influenced by Cubism and inspired

when we look at movement in a contemporary form, it is

by life, her abstract artwork is colorful and a

very similar to looking at a painting in a contemporary

passionate expression of freedom and creativity.

form: movement is being expressed by the placement of

She currently lives in Pompano Beach, Florida with

the body. During choreography, I was looking at a blank

her loving husband and two beautiful children.

canvas and manipulating the scene though movement with

bodies

in

space;

manipulating

light

(color),

Tell us about yourself and your background.

acknowledging breath, and incorporating sound. During

I started drawing when I was very young. I loved to

this time, I also studied music, theatre, theory,

create and make things out of everything, whether it

composition, choreography, and stage production.

was a birthday card for my parents or a still life drawing for art class. Although I didn’t know then that

It wasn’t until after college when I found painting as the

painting would become my main creative pursuit,

art form that suited me the most and, at that time, my art

since my artistic career really started in dance at the

really took a shape of its own. After college, I moved to

age of three. I was always very busy, and my schedule

Japan where I taught English. I was able to travel to 251


"Within each painting, there is a deeper personal interpretation of my own, it isn’t meant to be finite, rather a guide for the viewer." different parts of Asia, experiencing the many different

because my work is influenced by Contemporary Art and

cultures of the continent. I started journaling about my

Cubism with artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and

travels: jotting down experiences, sketching pictures that

František Kupka. My eyes are mesmerized by bright

I saw, and even capturing recipes of my favorite dishes.

vibrant colors and the nonsensical play of graffiti art.

I was on a traveling kick and ventured outside of Asia.

My art involves many shapes and definitive angles, while

I bounced from country to country soaking in the world in

strategizing the placement of colors on the canvas. This

all its beauty. I traveled to over 30 different countries

gives me joy and a sense of visual balance when looking at

learning about culture, art, music, and cuisine of the

a painting. In addition, my work is unique because I make

areas. These experiences helped to develop and influence

myself available as a contract artist. I can be hired by

my journey in abstract art.

someone who is interested in a custom painting. Once contacted, the client and I go through a series of steps in

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique?

order to create a custom painting for them. The client and

My work and style are unique because it represents me

I develop a rapport that individualizes the painting,

as an artist that no one can replicate. It has a sense of

making it unique and one of a kind.

colorful style that is appealing to the eye in a well-

252

balanced and thought out arrangement. Within each

Tell us about your process and what do you feel when

painting, there is a deeper personal interpretation of my

you are creating?

own, but my interpretation of my artwork isn’t meant to

When I am not contract creating, I start with many blank

be finite, rather a guide for the viewer. In the end, it is

canvases and a full stock of paints. I am usually painting

open for the viewer to form their own opinion and

many paintings at once and normally start a new one

establish their own meaning. My style is also very unique

before the previous one is finished. The sign of when a


"Art is everywhere and is a true sense of freedom. If I allow myself to give in to that freedom, the inspiration pours out of my skin. Ideas start flowing and my mind races."

flowing and my mind races. Another source of inspiration stems from the ability to say yes. Welcoming ideas and allowing the universe to guide me in a natural way. The inspiration propels itself onto canvas or expresses itself through dance or through music. The more ‘yes’, the more letting go, the more allowing the world to guide you, the more everything comes naturally without even thought. It is freedom of expression that we truly call art. The freedom to express life in multiple forms.

painting is almost finished, is when I start a new one. The

What are you passionate about?

new idea sparks a new painting and the finishing of the

I am passionate about my children and raising them in a

old. The feeling is always great. It is a release of the mind,

loving and understanding world. I am passionate about

a release of a thought, a release of a vision. It is like a birth

the environment and what we can do to preserve it for

into a concrete and memorable physical state.

the next generations. I am passionate about traveling, learning about different cultures, and understanding

What are your sources of inspiration?

these cultures. I am passionate about food and the

My sources of inspiration comes from this yearning and

restaurant industry including the multiple intricacies of

ongoing desire to create. I wouldn’t be who I am today if I

wine and beer. Most of all, I am passionate about our

ignored it. I love to express. Art is everywhere and is a

freedoms to express. Everyone should have the ability to

true sense of freedom. If I allow myself to give in to that

express how they feel without being judged or ridiculed in

freedom, the inspiration pours out of my skin. Ideas start

any way.

253


"The more ‘yes’, the more letting go, the more allowing the world to guide you, the more everything comes naturally without even thought."

254


255


"You must have a specific amount of resources in order to even play in the art world game. This limits our audience to see only what people can afford to display." Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive from people that discover your work. When I first started painting and sharing my work with acquaintances, friends, and/or family, I would receive feedback that my work looks like a child’s scribbles on a piece of paper. Later, in my career, I learned to set specific intentions when I paint. I remember telling myself that every stroke on canvas must have a meaning… and that is what it became. Every single color, every stroke, every picture was intentional. My work then became one of kind for me and for the people that viewed it. What can we look forward to in the near future, what directions will you be exploring? I want to produce a show. The show will be two exhibitions in one:  1) Exploring food and wine through abstract art, and 2) I want to finish my portrait series called, “The Sunglass Series.” How do you feel about art and its role in the world today? Art is a funny dichotomy because the art world is a billiondollar global industry, yet the starving artist out there is waiting to be discovered with limited resources but a lot of talent. This recognizes the idea that you must have a specific amount of resources in order to even play in the art world game. This limits our audience to see only what people can afford to display. In reference to the role art plays in the world of technology, we have allowed ourselves to be reliant on the internet in many ways. The internet has become a platform to express our ideas, share our stories, and promote our creative sides though many social media platforms. These social media platforms begin to be more about your followers rather than the quality of your art, therefore, making it hard to cut through the bullshit to find the good stuff. In addition, viewers are relying on pictures rather than the tangible pieces of art, to determine whether they want to spend money to purchase it. In the end, viewers 256


"I want viewers of my art to feel happy immediately when they see it... For me, my art is about the experience. The end result is just the end result, but the journey is what matters"

opt out and this billion-dollar industry starts to suffer. Yet, on a more positive note, social media and the internet have created a wider audience base. When quality is discovered, the amount of people that can be reached is tremendous. How do you want your art to affect the viewer? I want viewers of my art to feel happy immediately when they see it. I want them to feel like art is colorful, fun, and can be expressed in many ways. It should be inspiring and project a sense of freedom that we feel: like everything is going to be okay. For me, my art is about the experience. The end result is just the end result, but the journey is what matters.   www.cynthiarosetom.com 257


BRANDI DIETER


"I want my artwork to show that beauty can still be found in a world that is crumbling apart. I want to bring beauty back to these places that have long been deserted and bring out the story that these places have been longing to tell."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Colored pencil artist, Brandi Dieter, uses a

and looking at her beautiful pet portrait drawings in awe

combination of color and attention to detail to create

wishing that someday I could draw like her. At a young

realistic looking drawings. Brandi currently resides in

age, I started working with colored pencils that my mom

Colorado where much of her inspiration for her

used for her drawings. I quickly outgrew my kiddie

drawings originates. She hopes to use her drawings

Crayola colored pencils and decided that my mom’s

to emphasize forgotten places in the world.

Prismacolor colored pencils were much easier to work with since they allowed me to blend. As a child, I was

Tell us about yourself and your background.

constantly drawing. I drew everything that inspired me

I was born and raised in Southern Colorado and have

from aspen trees to a series of furnished rooms on a sheet

been around the area almost my entire life. Being

of paper. Today, I still find myself drawing things that

constantly in the mountains as a child influenced my

inspire me from aspects of nature to historical buildings.

love for nature and exploring, which in turn has greatly impacted my art. My life was filled with art

Tell us about your work.

growing up. My mom was always drawing when I was

I am a colored pencil artist. My artwork is created using

a child. I remember going out to her makeshift studio

techniques that are presented in a realistic style. I mostly 259


260


"Sometimes I will just drive around in search of interesting places and stumble upon something that intrigues my interest. Other times I will do some research on places that I would like to see and visit them in person."

use colors that are represented in the

How do you select the places you draw?

natural world including grays, browns,

My initial process starts with exploration

greens and occasionally yellows or reds

and taking pictures. I love seeking out

depending on the subject I am drawing.

adventure so anytime I can get out and

With every piece I draw I want to

discover new places it rejuvenates me and

emanate interest and emotion.

activates my creative juices. Sometimes I

Besides drawing, I also enjoy creating

will just drive around in search of

more hands-on crafts such as macrame

interesting places and stumble upon

and weaving. I also enjoy creating pottery

something that intrigues my interest.

on both the potter’s wheel and using

Other times I will do some research on

slabs, however, limitations to a potters

places that I would like to see and visit

wheel and a kiln keep me from fully

them in person. Photography is my outlet

pursing this direction.

to capture any captivating sights that I

My artwork is unique because I use

may see. This in turn often ignites my

colored pencils to create my pieces and

desire to draw and recreate what I

draw subjects that not many people

observed. I use the images I capture as

would

also

references for my artwork to create

occasionally fuse other mediums into my

realistic images and incorporate as much

drawings such as ink or markers to make

detail as possible. When I am drawing or

them feel more unique. I feel like colored

creating other forms of art, I feel happy

pencil artists are few and far between.

and serene. All of the worries and

When I tell people I draw with colored

tribulations of life ceases while time

pencils, they are usually surprised by my

passes by quickly. Every hour I spend

preference.

creating feels like only a few minutes.

think

to

draw.

I

will

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262


What inspires you? My source of inspiration typically stems from observing the world around me. I am generally inspired by beautiful landscapes, interesting architecture and traveling to places I have never seen before. What draws you to working with colored pencils? My preferred medium is colored pencils even though I do work with a variety of different mediums. With colored pencils I can create rich colors and add a lot of depth to my drawings by building and blending colors in order to create realistic looking images. Sometimes if I want to achieve a richer color I will use markers as a base layer and then go back over those areas with colored pencils. What are your proudest moments so far in creating art? As a young artist, I have yet to have my artwork presented in a gallery or a museum, however, I believe that every piece that I complete is an achievement. I put a lot of labor-intensive hours into each piece I draw so when I complete a drawing I feel a great sense of accomplishment. I believe that some of my newest pieces such as "Last Standing" and "Nichols Mine Shaft" are some of my most notable pieces in my abandoned series thus far. The bricks, perspective and amount of detail that I included in "Nichols Mine Shaft" were challenging but well worth the hours I spent working on it. What themes have defined your creative work thus far? One particular theme that I have explored is my Abandoned Colorado series which has been featured in this article. This series originated from a college drawing course that has since expanded to a concept that I am passionate about. With a avid fascination for ghost towns and abandoned buildings, I decided that doing a series of drawings for my semester long project on this subject would be fun but challenging for me. Little did I know that this series of drawings would extend past my college years. What reward do you get from drawing these places? I am super passionate about nature, adventure and history. Many of the drawings I create capture all of these elements in one. When I draw pictures of abandoned buildings I don’t just draw them because they look interesting. I draw them also because they each have a story to tell. 263


264


What are you currently working on? I am currently working on adding to my abandoned series. I have a few pictures I took last year that I have been itching to draw. One particular image is of an old school house near Buena Vista, Colorado. I have been fascinated by this particular building since I was a little girl. What can we look forward to in the near future? In the near future I hope to start experimenting with oil paints. This is a medium I have never really explored but have always wanted to learn. During Christmas last year, I traveled to the coastline of Northern California with my family and was inspired by the magnificence of the ocean. I hope to do an ocean series in oil paints based on my inspiration.

"In the near future I hope to start experimenting with oil paints. This is a medium I have not really explored but have always wanted to learn." 265


266


"I believe that art allows artists and viewers to step into a world of imagination, fantasy or idealism that nothing else can quite achieve."

Tell us about your location.

interrupted in so many different

Being in Colorado has greatly

ways. One person’s interpretation

impacted my artwork. I spend a

may be completely different than

great deal of time outdoors whether

another person’s view. It can also

it be hiking, camping or driving

completely vary from the artist’s

around

intention for creating the piece.

on

dirt

roads

in

the

backcountry. Virtually every time I

I believe that art allows artists and

have the opportunity to spend

viewers to step into a world of

outdoors, I find something new that

imagination, fantasy or idealism that

inspires me. Colorado has many

nothing else can quite achieve.

fascinating places to visit from abandoned

ghost

towns

to

What should we feel in your art?

breathtaking scenery. I do feel quite

I want my artwork to show viewers

privileged to live in a place that

that beauty can still be found in a

constantly encourages me to be

world that is crumbling apart. I want

creative.

to bring beauty back to these places that have long been deserted and

What does art mean to the world?

bring out the story that these places

I believe that art is an important

have been longing to tell.

form of expression in our world today. The greatest aspect of art is

www.bdieter.artspan.com

that just one piece of artwork can be

www.instagram.com/art_by_brandi 267


A DIFFERENT 'SHOOT' J. KIMO WILLIAMS, A VIETNAM WAR VETERAN RETURNED TO THE COUNTRY WITH HIS CAMERA

268


In 1998, Kimo returned to Vietnam for the first time, specifically to the place of his first assignment. From this cathartic return, he realized what he missed as a soldier. In 1969 as a high school senior,

fall of 1970 never having had the

James"Kimo" Williams was born in

future Vietnam Vet Kimo Williams

chance to fully engage with and

Amityville, New York, and spent

always thought Vietnam was a

understand the Vietnamese, their

much of his childhood divided

third-world backward and gloomy

culture or to embrace their land.

between Air Force bases, urban

environment.

neighborhoods of Baltimore, rural In 1998, Kimo returned to Vietnam

Mississippi and a lot of time on his

Once there, he realized it was

for the first time, specifically to the

grandparents farm in N Carolina.

nothing like that at all. The country

place of his first assignment in Lai

had very beautiful landscapes and

Khe. From this cathartic return, he

Moving to Hawaii with his father in

majestic flowing rivers. The non-

realized what he missed as a

1967, he volunteered to serve in

combatant Vietnamese locals were

soldier and wanted so much more.

the military and was deployed to

warm, cordial and very friendly. He

He returned in 2000, 2001, 2005,

Vietnam in 1970. He holds an MA

relished the opportunity to engage

2007, 2008 and 2010. During each

in Management from Missouri's

with the people and the culture.

trip, he had his camera with him

Webster University as well as a BA

However, because of the nature of

and captured the faces of those he

in Composition from The Berklee

his presence there, a full cultural

encountered, which provided the

College of Music in Boston.

investigation

essence from his perspective of

was

out

of

the

question. Kimo left Vietnam in the

what this culture offers to visitors.

www.kimopics.com 269


BJØRN NØRGAARD 270


Sarcophagus

The base is crafted in sandstone from

Art in the shared space, 2018

France, and the three pillars supporting the sarcophagus are of Danish granite, Faroese

Sarcophagus for the Danish royal family.

basalt and Greenlandic marble, respectively.

One of the world's largest glass sculptures ever made. The whole weighs over 4.5 tons

The elephant heads on the pillars are cast in

and is installed in Denmark in the

silver. The sarcophagus itself is of cast glass,

Cathedral of Rosklid.

and, in a hollow space in the glass, two figures representing The Queen and Prince

The preparation of the monument began in

Henrik are sand-blasted on the inner side.

2003, when the sculptor, professor Bjørn

Allegories, heraldry and symbols in gilded

Nørgaard, was commissioned to create a

bronze are found on the top.

modern sepulchral monument that can be incorporated into the large number of royal

PHOTOGRAPHER: KELD NAVNTOFT, OF

grave monuments at Roskilde Cathedral.

THE ROYAL DANISH HOUSE ©

ONE OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST GLASS SCULPTURES EVER MADE. THE WHOLE WEIGHS OVER 4.5 TONS 271


WWW.BJØRNNØRGAARD.DK

272


MYKONOS YOUR PERFECT PARADISE Welcome to Greece's most famous cosmopolitan island, a whitewashed paradise in the heart of the Cyclades. Set out on a journey to discover a fascinating world where glamour meets simplicity. On Mykonos celebrities, college students and families mingle together to celebrate the Greek summer. Whether you are an entertainment junkie out for a real good time, or a visitor who wishes to explore the island’s history and tradition, Mykonos will certainly meet your expectations. W W W . V I S I T G R E E C E . G R


MICHELE KOUTRIS


"I happened upon an article featuring a famous international artist. Some years ago he traded his canvas and brushes for an iPad and stylus. He continues to create sophisticated works of art on an iPad. This piqued my interest, so I picked up my iPad and started on a new journey.”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

"My name is Michele Koutris. I am a Digital Artist.

Whenever I had a spare moment I was drawing. I loved

I paint Fine Art on an iPad. I live in Hackensack, New

working with pastels.

Jersey, a stones throw from NYC. What is unique is that I paint Free-Hand on an iPad just as I would on a

When I was eighteen I was a full time student at Juilliard.

canvas."

During the day I was being trained in voice, theory, and languages. In the evening I was performing at the world

Tell us about yourself and your background.

famous "Copacabana’’ Nightclub in NYC.

The Arts have always been a large part of my life. Starting as young as eleven years old I was performing

They felt my story was so unique that the famed columnist

on TV. I was already being trained for the opera by

Earl Wilson of The New York Post wrote an article about

Helen Jepson a member of The Metropolitan Opera

me titled "Her Double Life’’ I was working with stars such

Company in NYC.

as Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., and others. This was quite a heady experience for an eighteen year old, barely

When I was thirteen, I was given a scholarship at the

out of High School. I was still drawing when I could. It has

Juilliard School of Music to continue my voice training.

always been a source of relaxation. 275


276


"It could be a feather that I’ll use for one of my ladies hats, a unique eye color, a rose kissed by dew, or a woman’s bare shoulders. When it all comes together in my head, I then begin to paint."

I went on to get my Actors Equity card

after decades of conventional painting he

and performed in Musicals both in and

put down his canvas and picked up an

out of New York including the leads in

iPad. This piqued my interest, so I too

"The Music Man" and “Fiorello".

picked up my iPad and started on a new

journey. I use my iPad as I would a canvas.

I was twenty-one when I married. I went

I found an App that is a large Paintbox

on to have three children and now five

filled with brushes, oils, acrylics, charcoal,

grandchildren.

pastels, watercolor and more. My iPad is

my canvas, my stylus is my brush. I then

I became a songwriter in the mid-1980’s.

pick my medium from the paintbox.

I was taken under the wing of Clyde Otis, a well respected Writer and Publisher.

What is the creative process like for you?

I enjoyed some exciting successes; a song

First, I turn on my iPad. I go though all the

in a movie, a single that was Nominated

photographs I have collected. Some days I

for song of the year by CASHBOX

know exactly what I want to create. Other

Magazine and a cut on the Greatest hits

days it’s just a happy accident. Just the act

album of Jeannie C Reilly of (Harper

of creating is exciting to me. Be it a new

Valley PTA) fame. Yes, I was still painting,

painting, a new song, or even a new

and by that point I was painting with oils.

recipe.

How do you paint?

What inspires you?

A little over 3 years ago, I happened upon

I look for inspiration every day. I collect

an article written about The famed British

photographs / paintings that interest me

artist, David Hockney. He explained how

From all Eras. It could be a feather that I’ll 277


278


use for one of my ladies hats, a unique eye color, a rose kissed by dew, or a woman’s bare shoulders. When it all comes together in my head, I then begin to paint. How does your approach compare to the traditional? It all starts with my iPad. My paintbox App allows me to pick any mediums I’d like to try. Usually it’s oil or oilpastels. Sometimes it feels so real that when I touch the iPad screen I think I’ve gotten paint on my hand or smudged the painting. A perk is, there’s no clean up when you’re done! You have had some impressive receptions of your work? During the last three years I was invited to exhibit my paintings at the Parallax Art Fair in Chelsea, London, this is an international Art Fair featuring artists from over 30 countries. I was also featured in two issues of "Women in Art 278" a magazine that featured women-artists from around the globe. What are your current creative plans? I love to explore everything. Maybe one day I may want to paint a landscape, or seascape or abstract. For now I’m content with what I’m currently creating but that could certainly change in the future. What are your life passions? I’m passionate about my family, my art, my music and life. Tell us about some of the feedback you have received. The feedback has been great. I market a great deal in Europe. They send me Lovely comments in many different languages along with sweet emojis of hearts, flowers, and happy faces. I’m lucky and appreciative that they enjoy my art greatly. What can we expect from you in the near future? I will be working on more in my series "Women around the Globe" you can see two of these paintings in this issue. A beautiful woman from an African nation and a beautiful woman from the Middle East.

"I’m passionate about my family, my art, my music and life."

What directions are you keen to explore with your art? I know I want to explore doing more of my ladies in Black and White, with a touch of color in their lips and or eyes. This will lean more towards Pop Art. 279


280


"I’ve heard from many of my followers that my paintings always make them smile. I will happily accept that as my contribution." Tell us about your location. My location is Northern New Jersey USA. I feel living only half-hour from NYC is a plus. New York City is one of the art capitals of the world. You have the opportunity to visit art museums., such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. (MoMA) and countless galleries. and take away from the experience what you will. What do you think the future holds for art? I think that art will always have a role in the world. I believe now more than ever we need art and artists to bring beauty into this world full of turmoil that we are all currently experiencing. What impact do you want your work to have on viewers? I’ve heard from many of my followers that my paintings always "Make them smile". I will happily accept that as my contribution. www.mkoutris.artspan.com www.facebook.com/fineartbymichele 281


CYNTHIA RICHARDSON


"My work is based in reality and inspired by nature, but takes it in many different directions... My paintings often interpret what I see around me. Sometimes it's a wide expanse of sky, sea, farmland or forest. Other times it's a smaller detail."

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Cynthia Richardson, AIA. Anacortes, WA, USA.

much of my development as an artist. Sharing insights

Cynthia is an architect and artist whose acrylic

learned through many years of painting, she has helped

paintings are inspired by the beauty of the natural

me understand so many things that I never could have

environment around her. In a style she calls "relaxed

discovered on my own. Ongoing classes with Mike Wise,

realism", she captures the essential character of her

plus workshops with other professional artists continue

subjects, from tiny flowers to seascapes, forests, and

to expand my horizons and introduce me to new ideas.

majestic mountains.

And sometimes there's an "aha!" moment that takes me to a new level of understanding.

Tell us about yourself and your background. In college I took a couple of art classes, but then for

Tell us about your work and style, why is it unique?

over 40 years I set art aside to focus on earning a

My work is based in reality and inspired by nature, but

Master of Architecture degree, raising 3 children,

takes it in many different directions. I like to challenge

serving on the City Council, and a full-time career as

myself by trying new techniques, materials, color palettes,

an architect. A few years ago, just for fun, I took a

subject matter, etc. One day I might try a small detailed

weekend painting workshop - and I was hooked.

still life, another time it could be a large impressionistic

A firm believer in continuing to learn throughout life, I

seascape. Museums, galleries, books, magazines, and the

embarked

internet all give me opportunities to be inspired by the

on

weekly

painting

classes

with

impressionist painter Dianna Shyne. I credit her for

work of other artists. Like adding spices to a pot of soup, I 283


"If someone says, "That doesn't look like your usual style", that's a good thing. It means I'm continuing to change and grow." can incorporate those bits of inspiration into my work and the result is a new unique flavor. If someone says, "That doesn't look like your usual style", that's a good thing. It means I'm continuing to change and grow. Tell us about your process and how you feel when creating. Wherever I travel, I'm always taking reference photos. But rather than copying a specific view, I use these for inspiration and create my own compositions, rearranging elements from several photos and choosing my own color palette to develop a new scene of my own creation. Using a variety of resources, I aim for expressing the character, or essence, of my subject, whether it's a tree or a mountain, a bird or a barn, and expand on that essence to produce a uniquely new work of art. Often I begin a painting, and as it progresses it takes on a life of its own.  As I add or eliminate details, rearrange elements or modify colors and values, it evolves into a richer statement than I could have envisioned at the start. Why are you attracted to your preferred mediums? Acrylics suit my personal working style perfectly. They dry quickly, so I can enhance or correct an area right away - no waiting for the paint to dry. No odor or toxic chemicals. Easy cleanup with water. And so many techniques are possible, from heavy impasto to drybrush, glazing, washes, scumbling, spattering - using brushes, palette knives, textures, mediums, and various tools - acrylics can do it all. Tell us about some of your achievements. Artist's

Magazine

Competition

Honorable

Mention,

Permanent art collections of Island hospital, Skagit Valley Hospital, Anacortes City library, Featured artist at LaConner's annual Art's Alive festival, Selected for juried art shows multiple years at Anacortes Arts Festival, Edmonds Art Festival, Schack Art Center and others, Open Studio Tour

participant

each

year,

Numerous

local

and

international collectors, Shown in 6 Washington galleries. 284


"Often I begin a painting, and as it progresses it takes on a life of its own. As I add or eliminate details, rearrange elements or modify colors and values, it evolves into a richer statement than I could have envisioned at the start."

285


"Collectors often say they choose my work because of how it makes them feel - cheerful, or peaceful, or optimistic. Perhaps it reminds them of a familiar place in their life." What is your studio like?

Tell us about some of the feedback you typically receive

My small studio proves that you don't need a huge space

from people that discover your work.

to produce good art. When I started painting, I cleared an

Collectors often say they choose my work because of

area in one end of my architectural office, added an easel,

how it makes them feel - cheerful, or peaceful, or

cabinets, and layout table, and I was all set to paint. By

optimistic. Perhaps it reminds them of a familiar place in

working on only a couple of paintings at a time, I don't

their life such as a barn on their grandparents' farm, or a

need a lot of space. Paintings hang all around my house,

favorite childhood pet or a vacation destination.

with extra canvases and frames stored in the attic. It's

In return, it makes me feel good when someone likes my

simple, but it works well for me.

work enough to purchase it and take it into their home. What can be better than that?

Do you collect the work of other artists?

286

We bought our first original painting 50 years ago and it's

What are you currently working on?

still a favorite. Being more aware of art now that I am a

Trees have been favorite subjects for years, whether in

painter, I like to support other local artists by purchasing

dense forests or standing alone in solitary majesty.

their work and displaying it throughout our home. And

Recently I've been painting a series of various types of

being avid birdwatchers, we love our growing collection

trees silhouetted on stark white canvas. Each tree species

of bird sculptures.

grows in particular environments, with distinctive


"It's not surprising that nature provides my favorite subject matter. Inspiration is everywhere." patterns of trunks, branches, flowers and leaves or needles. Within any given species, each tree is a unique individual, and I like to think of these tree paintings as "portraits" of those individuals. Starting with detailed observations and photos of many individual trees, I combine details to create "tree portraits" that capture the essence of a tree's character. Another type of "portraiture" that I enjoy is capturing the personalities of birds and animals. Some are domestic, others are wild and free, but each has its own character. What can we look forward to in the near- future, what directions will you be exploring? Working as an architect for four decades has been a creative career. But budgets, client preferences, building codes, contractors, and other factors constrain an architect's creativity. As an artist, I can express my own ideas freely. I can be whimsical or serious, exuberant or melancholy, painting any subject I choose, or no subject at all. And I'm no longer limited to drawing mostly straight lines. So who knows where this exploration will lead me next? How does your location influence on your work? Living in a small coastal town northwest of Seattle, I am surrounded every day by the beauty of the natural environment. There are so many lovely scenes to paint glorious sunsets over the San Juans, majestic mountain peaks, fertile farmlands, quiet marshes, rushing rivers, cliffs, beaches, forests, clouds - the possibilities are endless. So it's not surprising that nature provides my favorite subject matter. Inspiration is everywhere. The challenge is how to choose among so many amazing subjects. My paintings often interpret what I see around me. Sometimes it's a wide expanse of sky, sea, farmland or forest. Other times it's a smaller detail - a bird, tree, flower, or small animal. Choosing the subject might depend on my mood, or a technique I'd like to try, or a theme I want to explore. Sometimes I just make things up. I think of my approach as "relaxed realism". 287


"As an artist, I can express my own ideas freely. I can be whimsical or serious, exuberant or melancholy, painting any subject I choose, or no subject at all."

288


"For me, it's the simple pleasures of painting, increasing my skills, and creating images that never existed before." How do you feel about art and its role in the world today? Art plays many roles for society and for individuals grand museums and sculpture parks, graffiti, murals, painters in every medium, children's scribbles, daily journal sketchers, photographers, whittlers, glass artists, jewelers, and more. Some people create art to make a political statement or challenge our perceptions. Others to relieve anxiety. All of these have validity. For me, it's the simple pleasures of painting, increasing my skills, and creating images that never existed before. What has the Covid pandemic meant to you and how has it influenced your creativity? Luckily, I recovered from a mild case of Covid and can continue painting in my home studio. I look forward to painting with friends again, and participating in galleries and festivals. www.cynthiarichardsonart.com

289


REBECCA HORNE


"Creating! I want my art to evoke a positive emotion or cause someone to feel happiness, energy or peacefulness when they see it. I can honestly say that I’m very passionate about making art!”

WEIVRETNI TSITRA POT

Rebecca is a self-taught artist currently working in

to them that I always wanted to copy but never could.

alcohol ink and fluid acrylics. She began painting as a

Although, I’ve taken many courses, I consider myself a self

child whose father was an artist. She has explored

-taught artist. I have always made art in one medium or

many creative mediums throughout her life such as:

another my entire life. I had a need to make my art look

watercolors, landscapes, flower and pet portraits in

exactly like a photo. Very tedious work that took all of my

oil. Rebecca discovered fluid art in 2018 and has

concentration and I began not to enjoy it or finish it. So I

passionately embraced it as the style of art that

put the paint brush down and waited for inspiration.

evokes and liberates her creative spirit. She feels

I discovered fluid art and a fire was lit inside like never

that this type of art allows her to have full creative

before! I can honestly say that I feel I’m doing what I was

freedom when she works.

meant to do with my art and I’m so happy and excited to see what the future holds.

Tell us about yourself and your background.    I live in West Columbia, SC with my husband Scott

How did you develop your unique style?

Chitty. My father was an artist. He would paint with

I have learned so much from other amazing artists.

watercolors and oils. His work had a dream like quality

I notice that many of us fluid artist copy each other’s 291


styles constantly. I promised myself to

Often, I’ll tell God that it’s his day to paint.

learn from them but not to copy and to try

I blindly pick colors, I’ll have no previous

to develop my own style by taking a small

expectations and then magic happens!

piece of different techniques and merging

I’ve never felt so happy with my art. I feel I

them into something no one else was

have true creative freedom where I can

doing. My style is still developing and

do whatever I want. For the first time in

changing. I guess I’m looking for the

my life I’ve taken full creative control over

perfect flow effect. I love adding a twist in

my art. I feel very liberated.

paint. Like a silk scarf floating in the wind

"I guess I’m looking for the perfect flow effect. I love adding a twist in paint. Like a silk scarf floating in the wind that has a twist in the it." 292

that has a twist in it. Also, I really love

What is your greatest inspiration?

doing larger canvases for the acrylics. As

Well, in a word, paint. The movement, the

for alcohol ink, I love the airy effect it can

colors... All the beautiful colors! I get so

have. The colors are so beautiful.

excited when I’ve ordered paint that I haven’t tried yet. I open the box and it’s

Tell us about your process.

better than 100 Christmas mornings!

My process is fun. I go to bed with ideas

They’re so pretty! Then, all the things I

and wake up with more. I keep a note pad

can do with paint. Anything is possible.

so that I can write them down before I

There’s no limit. I love that I can make the

forget. I have a purpose, a plan. Also, I’ll

liquid do whatever I want it to do and

draw out the form I want it to have. I’ll

have all the colors work so beautifully

plan out the colors and how I’m going to

together. Yes, paint is my inspiration!

mix them and the order they will be placed on the canvas. So many failed

How has your style evolved?

experiments and then it finally happens!

I have learned that I have a short -


293


attention span and I prefer instant gratification. I have always preferred abstract art. When I discovered fluid art and alcohol ink I knew I had met "the one" or "the two". I have to work quick. I have an hour at the most if I’m lucky after the paint is placed on the canvas. Success or fail. No inbetween. Once the piece is dry enough to move it, then on to the next one. I love that. Tell us about your some of your successes so far. Because this is just my second year working in this medium, I’m only recently getting my work out there. The catalyst that got the ball moving is my very dear friend Julie Seel and her Cottontown Art Crawl. The success from that gave me the courage to enter two pieces into the South Carolina State Fair Fine Art Competition. To my surprise, I won four Awards! The State Fair purchased both pieces.  My art was on display at Harbison Theater. Then in February, Aloft Hotel wanted my art displayed in their Columbia location. Also, this past February, I donated 4 pieces to Artist For Africa. I am excited that my art will help someone's life! What directions are you interested to explore next? I’ve explored working with resin. Until I have a real studio space where no pets are allowed, I’ll have to wait. What are you passionate about? Creating! I want my art to evoke a positive emotion or cause someone to feel happiness, energy or peacefulness when they see it. I can honestly say I’m passionate about art! Do you enjoy getting feedback from viewers of your work? I talk about this all the time. I just did a piece that I named "Where’s The Cat", someone said I see a cat in it. I still haven’t seen it! I love hearing everyone tell me what they see in my work. It’s so much fun! Also, people are very curious how I made it or how I came up with the shape and colors. They’ll tell me how a piece makes them feel. I love that something I’ve made has the ability to capture someone’s imagination.

"I have to work quick. I have an hour at the most if I’m lucky after the paint is placed on the canvas. Success or fail. No in between." 294


Tell us about your 'twist' works. Right now I’m obsessed with my twist look. I feel like I’m just now getting a good handle on it and I’m going to try to do more with the twisting. What elements do you want to add to your work? I’m very interested in texture. I’m currently taking a course in it and would like to work it into fluid art. I'm still trying to make it click in my head but I’m really excited about the possibilities. How do you want the viewer to relate with your works? I’d like them to really look at it and for the piece to light up their imagination. When they leave or come home, they see it and smile.

"I’d like them to really look at it and for the piece to light up their imagination. When they leave or come home, they see it and smile." 295


"I constantly have people who are asking me to paint traditional style art. I just can’t do it anymore. I owe it to myself to follow my heart and make abstract art until the day that I change my mind."

296


"I’ve always been the person who does the opposite. I refuse to fall in line and follow the crowd and do what everyone else is doing. I’ve always been called weird, different, eccentric and I’m finally at an age now where I embrace it."

Tell us about where you are based.

weird. More people here are

I’m in West Columbia, SC. My area

starting to like abstract! Great

has always been a very traditional

timing for my art!

location. Many people I know have a traditional style of home, dress,

What does art mean to you?

food, art or whatever. I’ve always

I really used to worry about that.

been the person who does the

I’ve seen art programs getting

opposite. I refuse to fall in line and

government funding cut or done

follow the crowd and do what

away with. I notice the pressure on

everyone else is doing. I’ve always

young adults to have the career,

been

different,

the mortgage, the pressure, the

eccentric and I’m finally at an age

debt. They end up not following

now where I embrace it.

their passion. Sometimes I would

I constantly have people who are

think that the arts on a local level

asking me to paint traditional style

would never survive. Now with

art. I just can’t do it anymore. I owe

social media it seems that the arts

it to myself to follow my heart and

are re-emerging stronger than

make abstract art until the day that

ever. All forms are thriving!

I change my mind. Fortunately for

I believe that the artistic creators

me, my area recently began to

out there will create. They have to.

called

weird,

evolve. It’s now becoming more friendly towards different or

www.messyrtisart.org 297


PHOTO: SHELL AQUA SATIN

VLASTIMIL BERÁNEK Vlastimil Beránek is the third generation exponent

just on the glass material´s inner aesthetics or a

of the highly established, Beránek glassmaking

single frame view. They claim their own space.

family which secured its place in Czech glass

They are one-of-a-kind and completely unique

history during the 1940s by founding a glasshouse

sculptures of glass.

at Škrdlovice. He was personally in charge of the glassworks from 1992 to 2008.

A brief summary of his training: Born 1960 in Nové Město na Moravě, Czech

The focal point of his personal interest lies in the

Republic.

free creation of molten glass sculptures.

Specialized School of Decorative Arts Brno, Czech Republic / Prof L. Martínek .

His sculptures feature a rigid, elementary form,

Academy of Applied Arts Prague, Czech

often bordering on the edge of the technology´s

Republic / Prof. St. Libenský.

very possibilities. They possess a monumental, free-of-all-compromise expression, not relying 298

Enjoy viewing the following works>


TWO ENDS (GOLD/AMBER)

299


AICHEL (BRONZE)

300


TEMPTATION (EMERALD)

301


AQUA

302


VENUS

303


OPEN SPACE (WOOD)

304


WWW.VLASTIMILBERANEK.COM

305


LECLERCQ ASSOCIÉS The second chapter to Jean Balladur’s beachfront resort town La Grande-Motte

306


The history of La Grande-Motte

taking on the extension of the

of the holiday resort emerged from

mirrors the tale of the Ugly

resort, encompassing an enlarged

the same Colbertist and interven-

Duckling. For a long time decried

pedestrian seawall, an extended

tionist spirit of the fifth Republic

as a symbol of the degradation of

harbour with a promenade and

on which the ambitious French

the French coastline, the seaside

new family accommodations.

business district ‘La Défense’ was

resort has transitioned from being

built. Six seaside resorts, joined by

wittily labelled “la Grande Moche”

In the early 60s, the French

a coastline motorway, were drawn

(greatly unattractive) to “la Grande

Languedoc coast was but an

onto the previously untouched

Mode” (greatly fashionable) in the

austere landscape of marshlands

coastal land of the Languedoc.

space of 50 years.

and vineyards, attracting only rich

Jean Balladur inherited la Grande-

hunters and hungry mosquitoes.

Motte, a location named after a hill

The brainchild of French architect

Holidaymakers preferred to hit the

of grapevines rising high above the

Jean Balladur is now regarded as a

road and travel to the thriving

surrounding landscape. The thick

model

the

Spanish Costa Brava. This summer

swamp area was drained and

foundations for a future that goes

exodus was unacceptable to famed

reforested with over 30,000 pine

beyond summer holidays and puts

General de Gaulle. Unwilling to

trees to stabilise the soil, making

to question the widely proclaimed

stand by the wayside, he decided

the dune the starting point of an

failure of the ‘villes nouvelles’

to take action and provide the

architectural adventure that was

(planned cities). French architect

French middle class with their very

driven by the vision to create a

agency

own summer holiday destinations.

green pedestrian haven. As Jean

The government-led development

Balladur put it back in the 1960s:

of

success,

Leclercq

laying

Associés

continuing this success story by

is

307


“the survival of plant life goes hand in hand with the

lakes and dried out marshes. Adopting the same

survival of man, doesn’t it? When man dreamt of an

geomorphic principles, Balladur assembled a concrete

enchanting place, a heaven on earth, he didn’t place it

landscape that mimics the topography of the Cevennes.

within a sumptuous palace but within a garden”.

His pyramids are imbedded in the coastline to “comb the wind” and provide shelter to vegetation. The

Balladur was dissuaded by the failures of megalomaniac

curvature of his buildings protect large private

architectural projects such as Versailles, Brasilia and

seawards-facing gardens while tracing the lines of a

Chandigarh and dismayed by the large complexes and

green resort, offering numerous pathways through

soulless planned cities that prioritised motorised over

pine, cypress, and tamarix trees.

pedestrian mobility. Instead he imagined an animated city – a city that grew in myths and legend, gradually

La Grande-Motte is composed of two neighbourhoods:

making up for its lack of history. His vision was made to

The Levant lies to the east, with its pyramidal and

human scale and the shapes he drew were organic and

masculine features. The conch of Venus lies to the west,

sensual. In his eyes, “high rise parallel-piped blocks

with curved low-lying architecture. These two famous

plant their walls perpendicularly into the ground. Their

neighbourhoods frame the town’s heart, the harbour

tall vertical lines and right angles violently and

and dockyard. “It is this hole in the landscape and its

disdainfully stab both the ground and the sky.” Instead,

dockyard that we are transforming with the extension

he turned his attention to geometrical forms, designing

of the seawall and the harbour, as well as the

pyramidal buildings, as these “pyramidal shapes raise

construction of 500 large-scale accommodations to

the earth in a wave-like motion. They gently leave the

cater to the growing number of families permanently

horizontal ground through the movement of rising

residing in the town” explains François Leclercq. “La

slopes before returning to earth through their

Grande-Motte has become an integral and active part

counterparts. Their movements are very natural, like

of the larger zone of Montpellier. People live and work

mounds, devoid of brutality”.

here, yet the majority of the housing available was originally designed as studios fit to summer holiday

308

Balladur found inspiration in the great Aztec pyramidal

makers. Suitable a accommodation was clearly missing

structures erected some 2000 years ago in what today

for the new permanent residents. Additionally, in order

is Mexico City, which payed homage to the belt of

to accommodate the ever-growing number of boats

inactive volcanoes that surrounded this site of former

using the harbour, we are installing 400 new anchors."


Honouring Jean Balladur’s pedestrian and laidback

space. The fullness of material fulfils no other function

vision for the town, François Leclerq’s architectural

than to render visible the body of empty space. Solid

development features a promenade of 1,5km joining

material plays the same role as the bandages worn by

the beaches of Levant and Couchant through the new

H.G. Wells’ Invisible Man: making visible the gesture of

harbour. Named “Ball*ade”, a play on words combining

the invisible.” This large-scale project is envisioned to

the French word for promenade and Balladur’s name,

be completed within 10 years. François Leclercq

its construction began with the extension of the seawall

concludes: “The building site is evidently fascinating for

in 2019. Ultimately, “more space will be given to

its scale, but also and foremost for the resident’s

pedestrians and non-motorized transport, as well as to

architectural culture. In La Grande-Motte no one wants

new plots of vegetation at the front of the sea facing

to return to the Provençal style. People continue to

buildings”, explains the urban architect.

imagine ways of how to best pursue Jean Balladur’s concrete work of art."

Once the dockyard has been disassembled, the construction of a dozen buildings will begin with one

About Leclercq Associés

masterful architectural stroke: a new hill will bring

Leclercq Associés have been developing a transversal

together both neighbourhoods, the masculine and the

approach

feminine. “This hill will not be made of one block like the

landscape for over thirty years. Their projects, all of

existing Balladur buildings, but a grouping of a dozen

which are unique, encompass contextual analysis,

buildings, each silhouette sculpted to follow the flow of

formal design, a sense of uses, an original approach to

the winds, the sunshine, and the views. Seen from the

materials, pleasure in construction, new itineraries in

sea, this ensemble of buildings will converge into a soft,

the city, and a reinvention of urban situations.

single three dimensional lens shape, bridging and

Originality of approaches to construction, functional

connecting the two neighbourhoods”. This composition

innovations, user comfort, and environmental design,

pays a tribute to the relationship between full and

have gained Leclercq Associés’ projects regular

empty space, which was dear to Balladur. Reflecting on

attention, they are published in the press, and have, on

the subject, Balladur once advised not to “be misguided

several occasions, been rewarded with regional and

by the material that installs the thought of architecture

national prizes.

within lived space. In reality, this material is neither

cement, nor stone, nor steel, nor wood. It is just empty

www.francoisleclercq.fr

combining

architecture,

urbanism

and

309


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DESTIG Issue 8  

2020 has been an intense year so far, lets hope things improve in the second half of this year. We invite you to escape with us for a while...

DESTIG Issue 8  

2020 has been an intense year so far, lets hope things improve in the second half of this year. We invite you to escape with us for a while...

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