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A UNIFIED BROADCAST, ONLINE, SOCIAL MEDIA and PUBLIC-ENGAGEMENT SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITY Designed to generate discussion and advance understanding of the confluence of policy, science, technology and social issues with our economic future.


TABLE of CONTENTS

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Overview and Mission Statement

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BURN: An Energy Journal with Alex Chadwick Target Audience

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Key Elements FEATURES AND ONLINE CONTENT 1. High Tide Miami 2. Food and a Warming Planet 3. Salmon: The Canary in the Hydroelectric System 4. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure 5. Power Investing 6. Solid Oil: The Next Big Thing 7. Building from Scratch 8. NRC’s Fukushima Follow-up 9. Army Energy 10. Energy and Poverty

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HOUR LONG SPECIALS 1. Coal and Climate Change 2. On Shaky Grid: Our Aging Energy Infrastructure

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Carriage Report

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BURN Audience Demographic Highlights

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BURN Production Team Bari Scott Executive Producer Alex Chadwick Host / Senior Correspondent Mary Beth Kirchner Managing Producer

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Website

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Endorsement and Testimonial

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Contact


PROJECT OVERVIEW and MISSION STATEMENT BURN: An Energy Journal It is the fundamental issue of our time: Energy; where we get it; how we use it; what happens then. It powers our homes and our economy; it creates both alliances and disturbing divisions; it enables almost all that we do, and looms large over all that we have become.

Energy is the fundamental issue of our time The Peabody-award winning SoundVision Productions presents BURN: An Energy Journal, a broadcast and digital project hosted by one of public radio’s most trusted journalists and master storytellers, Alex Chadwick. Alex will explore our energy future through the intimate stories of visionaries of research, maverick inventors, industry insiders and concerned citizens. These personal stories will help explain how and why we face an energy crisis, the dilemma of the continuing demand for energy, the realities and consequences of a mostly carbon-based industry and infrastructure, and some possible alternatives to what looks increasingly to be an ever more challenging energy and climate future in the coming decades. BURN will follow the quest for Energy answers and the stirring public initiative required to transition to this new energy world.

Explore our energy future through intimate stories

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BURN: AN ENERGY JOURNAL with Alex Chadwick Presented by SoundVision Productions As a country and a world, we face the prospect of revolutionary energy changes. Scientists and economists tell us to move quickly, but the choices are bewildering and complex. How can we imagine an energy future? Which innovations will make a world of difference? And how can people begin changing something so fundamental to our lives as energy.

Photo by Lauren Greenfield

The choices are bewildering and complex

TARGET AUDIENCE The audience for this project is engaged and informed — yet daunted by the enormity of the topic: an energy market worth trillions of dollars and a blur of complex technological advances. With all the news coverage of gas prices, energy security and global warming, many of us are simply overwhelmed by the baffling scope of energy and climate issues. We don’t know where the energy in our own homes comes from — let alone understand enough to participate in the national conversation. People feel ill prepared to do little more than adjust a thermostat or recycle their trash.

Many of us are simply overwhelmed by energy and climate issues


Our journey will begin with journalist Alex Chadwick, one of public radio’s most respected voices, sharing human-scale stories to explain and explore the very serious challenges that face communities across this country and around the world. We’ll meet scientists and engineers, policy makers and ethicists, concerned parents and committed young people. A beloved program host and correspondent, Alex has been a generalist for his 30-year career. But his reporting is now focused on Energy, and his audience (both old friends and new listeners) is invited to join his quest. This will make for a compelling and accessible introduction to the project.

KEY ELEMENTS The second season of BURN will include two hour-long public radio specials airing in 2013 and early 2014; monthly feature-length stories aired from a new Marketplace BURN desk; a groundbreaking three-way partnership with Marketplace and National Geographic that includes airing BURN content on their platforms and social media; an ambitious social media campaign backed up by BURN’s content-rich website, and collaboration with ethnic journalists throughout the country.

A groundbreaking partnership between BURN, Marketplace, and National Geographic Pooling the resources of all three organizations will produce more and deeper energy coverage and expanded audiences. Marketplace reaches 9 million listeners a week on air, and more than 450,000 people visit their website each month. More than 20 million people visit National Geographic digital media every month. In addition to our own fast-growing website (hundreds of thousands of audio downloads, millions of Twitter followers), our content is available on pbs.org (6 million monthly uniques). For Season Two, we will be expanding our partnerships with online content

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aggregators like Stitcher (a smartphone and iPad app), Flipboard and Slacker Radio. We will facilitate dialogue among hundreds of Energy-concerned communities that already exist online, in universities, workplaces, religious groups and households. Blogs and tweets will keep the stories fresh and provide a forum for sharing ideas, experiences and best practices.

STORIES CURRENTLY IN DEVELOPMENT

FEATURES AND ONLINE CONTENT 1. High Tide in Miami Because east coast sea levels have risen seven or eight inches in the last 60 years, Miami is, by some measures, the single most climate-threatened city in the world. Parts of the city already flood regularly, not from storms, but from tides. BURN will be there in October for the especially high tide event slated to hit Miami in the midst of hurricane season.

The most climate-threatened city in the world 2. Food and a Warming Planet Looks at how we’ll continue to feed ourselves as the climate changes. In Mississippi, African American farmer Ben Burkett will take us through his “climate change fields” where carbon sequestering grasses have replaced the rye and clover that died in last year’s drought, and talk about trying to persuade his neighbors to adopt climate-change practices.

Carbon sequestration grasses


3. Salmon: The Canary in the Hydroelectric System Alex will find out why hydropower produces some of the cheapest energy in the US—and some of the most expensive fish in the world.

Cheap energy and expensive fish 4. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Many people expect climate change to affect our fuel choices, but few think about its impact on the actual energy infrastructure—until extreme weather events like Hurricane Sandy bring down their power lines or threaten nearby nuclear plants. Alex talks with concerned citizens and politicians like New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg about how they expect the changing climate to affect America’s energy systems and finds out what it would take to make them less vulnerable. He also explores what a vulnerable energy infrastructure means to America’s people and communities—and whether the major changes required to keep them safe would threaten a free society. Finally, he looks at the even greater challenges facing developing countries.

Extreme weather from climate change can bring down power lines and threaten nuclear plants 5. Power Investing The energy market will be worth $5 trillion by 2015 and it will take $26 trillion in investments to meet our energy demands by 2030. BURN will track down where this money is likely to go if we continue our current energy habits, and what different investments might take us to a more renewable future. Alex will talk to Connecticut entrepreneur Justin Hall-Tipping who decided to focus on finding new forms of energy after seeing film of a chunk of ice the size of his home state falling off Antarctica into the

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ocean. Hall-Tipping, who formed Nanoholdings to work with universities and labs studying nano-scale energy, predicts we’ll soon be able to make clean energy for free. We’ll also find out what other renewable technology investors are backing.

Could nano-scale technology create clean energy for free? 6. Solid Oil: The Next Big Thing In remote areas of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, investors are scouting out vast reserves of tar sands and oil shale. Talking to some prospectors, including the owners of the oil shale company Red Leaf Resources, Alex may be present at the creation of the next big oil rush.

Tar sands and oil shale: the next big oil rush? 7. Building from Scratch Will look at the possibilities and pitfalls of placing “Centennial,” a planned, environmentally self-sustaining community of 70,000 in the middle of a pristine area just an hour away from Los Angeles. Visiting the “before” picture—sparkling blue Quail Lake nestled beside the Tehachapi Mountains—Alex will ask how the new desert town will get water and energy and avoid pollution as commuters hustle to L.A. Then he’ll talk with Centennial’s developers, concerned citizens, and MIT’s Energy Efficient Cities Project about which is greener—building a new town from scratch or greening old ones.

The pros and cons of a planned, environmentally sustainable community


8. NRC’s Fukushima Follow-up During the Fukushima disaster two years ago, Nuclear Regulatory Commission engineer Chuck Casto was among the first of a handful of experts dispatched to Tokyo help. Casto, who figured he’d be in Japan a week or two, remained for nearly a year. Now he's back in the U.S. monitoring operations of more than a dozen nuclear plants. At his office outside Chicago, Casto will describe what he saw in Japan during and after the meltdown and talk about how Fukushima changed the business of nuclear power here at home.

Fukushima changed the business of nuclear power in the US 9. Army Energy Technology always transforms warfare—maybe more so in the iPad era. Today’s soldier heads out on extended patrol with an array of life-saving communications and sensing— and 15 pounds of batteries to make sure it all works. The more complex warfare gets, the more energy it demands. To make the best use of existing technologies, the Army developed the Rapid Equipping Force, now led by COL Peter Newell, who tells BURN that wise energy use can be a matter of life and death. For example, a soldier could easily be killed changing the battery on an off-site communications tower at a forward combat outpost in Afghanistan. At dangerous sites like this, a solar alternative would be welcome, even if it were expensive. BURN and COL. Newell are looking for the right setting and circumstance for a story on extreme energy demands, and the battlefield’s new role as a proving ground for energy ideas.

For soldiers, wise energy use can be a matter of life and death

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10. Energy and Poverty An estimated 1.2 billion people worldwide—including some in the United States—have no access to electricity grids. In “Energy and Poverty,” Alex explores why poor people and nations actually spend a higher percentage of their money on energy than the rich; while middle class families spend 3 percent of their income on energy, the poor spend 10 percent.

The poor spend more on energy than the rich HOUR LONG SPECIALS 1. Coal and Climate Change Climate expert and NASA scientist James Hanson says ending emissions from coal “is 80 percent of the solution to the global warming crisis”—which poses a problem, since this fuel is the source of almost half of America’s electricity. In fact, the U.S. has the largest estimated coal reserves in the world, making it the “Saudi Arabia of coal.”

Ending emissions from coal is 80% of the solution to global warming BURN will look at this ancient fuel that meets our energy needs so cheaply, while producing one-third of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions. (The proportion is even higher in China and India: according to the Energy Information Association, these countries will generate 86 percent of the world's coal demand between now and 2030). Alex will talk with experts like Hanson and Anthony Cugini, Director of DOE’s National


Energy Technology Laboratory, about how coal power plants work, why coal is so energy rich, and how carbon dioxide goes from raw fossil fuel into our air. They’ll explore issues including whether carbon capture technology can really reduce coal-generated greenhouse gas emissions, and which other new technologies could be used to reduce the environmental impact of coal. Alex will also talk with National Research Center for Coal and Energy director Richard Bajura, at West Virginia University, and Center for Climate and Energy Solutions vice president Judi Greenwald. These segments will be produced in collaboration with National Geographic, which may share research and 125 years of archived coal industry photos. 2. On Shaky Grid: Our Aging Energy Infrastructure Will look at the impact of climate change and other threats on aging electrical grids. When Hurricane Sandy swept across the east coast last October 8th, 8,100,000 homes in 17 states lost power, many for days and weeks—and it could have been worse. In July 2012, the lights went out for 620,000,000 people in India—more than half of that nation’s population. A 2006 Carnegie Mellon study said the US ranks “toward the bottom among developed nations in terms of the reliability of its electricity service,” adding “the average U.S. customer loses power for 214 minutes per year. That compares to 70 in the United Kingdom, 53 in France, 29 in the Netherlands, 6 in Japan and 2 minutes per year in Singapore.”

US electricity service ranks toward the bottom on reliability This special will examine the science needed to modernize America’s electrical grid and look at whether “smart grid” technology can prevent power outages. It will also reveal the grid’s vulnerability to terrorist attacks and explore the challenges of linking alternative energy sources like wind and solar to the grid. Finally it will ask whether the 25 percent of the world’s population without electricity can be brought onto the grid—and whether Americans will someday be able to reverse the process, going off the grid and generating

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energy, as one scientist predicts, “from our windowpanes.”

Will Americans someday go off the grid and generate energy from windowpanes? For “On Shaky Grid,” BURN will talk to experts like MIT electrical engineering professor John Kassakian; past president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' Power and Energy Society John McDonald; “Global Energy Poverty: The Silent Crisis” coeditor Benjamin Sovacool, who is the founding Director of the Energy Security and Justice Program at Vermont Law School, and International Energy Agency engineer and energy economist Fatih Birol.


CARRIAGE REPORT

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Carriage Highlights To Date: 12 stations in the Top 10 Markets, 22 of the Top 25, and 26 of the Top 30 have carried the series. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 15

New York

WNYC-FM WNYC-AM Los Angeles KCRW KPCC Chicago WBEZ Philadelphia WHYY Dallas / Fort Worth KERA San Francisco / San Jose KQED Boston WBUR District of Columbia WAMU Atlanta WABE Houston KUHF Seattle / Tacoma KUOW Phoenix KJZZ Minneapolis KNOW

16 17 18 19 20

Miami / Fort Lauderdale Denver Cleveland / Akron Orlando Sacramento

22 Portland OR 23 Pittsburgh 24 Raleigh / Durham (Chapel Hill) 25 Charlotte 26 Indianapolis 28 San Diego 30 Hartford

WLRN KCFR WCPN WMFE KQEI KXJZ KOPB WESA WUNC WFAE WFYI KPBS WPKT

Full Carriage Report To Date (228 stations as of March 5, 2012) DMA MARKET

STATION

DMA MARKET

KLRE

ALASKA Anchorage Juneau

CALIFORNIA

KSKA KTOO

2

Coachella Indio Kern Los Angeles

20

Palm Springs Quincy Redlands Sacramento

KPCV KCRI KCRY KCRW KPCC KPSC KQNC KUOR KQEI

San Bernardino San Diego

KXJZ KVCR KPBS

ARIZONA

13

Flagstaff Grand Canyon Page Phoenix Prescott Show Low

KNAU KNAG KNAD KJZZ KNAQ KNAA

ARKANSAS El Dorado Little Rock Little Rock

STATION

KBSA KUAR KLRE KUAR

28


12

DMA MARKET

STATION

6

KQED

San Francisco / San Jose Stockton Tahoe / Reno Thousand Oaks Ventura

KUOP KKTO KDSC KCRU

COLORADO

17

30

8

Aspen Boulder Carbondale Craig Denver Grand Junction Montrose Pueblo Hartford Norwich Southampton Stanford District of Columbia

KAJX KCFC KCJX KPYR KCFR KPRN KPRH KKPC WPKT WNPR WRLI WEDW WAMU

FLORIDA

16

Fort Myers Marathon Marco Miami / Fort Lauderdale Orlando

WGCU WKWM WMKO WLRN WMFE

GEORGIA 9

Athens Atlanta

WUGA WABE

ILLINOIS 3

Chicago DeKalb Elgin Freeport LaSalle-Peru

WBEZ WNIJ WEPS WNIE WNIW

DMA MARKET Rock Island Sterling

STATION WVIK WNIQ

INDIANA Elkhart Indianapolis

WVPE WFYI

IOWA Ames / Des Moines Cedar Rapids / Iowa City / Quad Cities Clear Lake / Mason City Decorah

WOI WSUI

KRNI KLNI

KENTUCKY Corbin Hazard Lawrenceburg Lexington Richmond

WEKF WEKH WKYL WUKY WEKU

LOUISIANA Alexandria New Orleans Shreveport Thibodaux

KLSA WWNO KDAQ KLTN

MAINE Bangor Calais Camden Fort Kent Portland Presque Isle Waterville

WMEH WMED WMEP WMEF WMEA WMEM WMEW

MARYLAND Ocean City MASSACHUSETTES

WRAU


DMA MARKET

STATION

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WBUR

Boston MICHIGAN East Jordan Interlochen Mackinaw City Manistee Traverse City

WICV WICA WIAB WLMN WICA

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KNCM KNSE KNBJ KBPN WSCN WIRC KCCD KNWF WLSN WGRH WGGL KITF KXLC KNGA KNOW KRFI KZSE KRXW KNSR KNGA KNTN WIRN KRXW KNSW

MONTANA Butte

Great Falls Hamilton Helena Kalispell Libby Missoula Poison

STATION KGPR KUFN KUHM KUKL KUFL KUFM KPJH

NEVADA

MINNESOTA Appleton Austin Bemidji Brainerd Duluth Ely Moorhead Fergus Falls Grand Marais Hinkley Houghton International Falls La Crescent Mankato / New Ulm Minneapolis / St Paul Redwood Falls Rochester Roseau St. Cloud St. Peter Thief River Falls Virginia Warroad Worthington

DMA MARKET

KAPC

Elko Las Vegas Lund / Ely Panaca St. George Tonopah

KLKR KNPR KWPR KLNR KSGU KTPH

NEW HAMPSHIRE Berlin / North Conway Concord Hanover Jackson Keene Littleton Nashua

WEVC WEVO WEVH WEVJ WEVN WEVQ WEVS

NEW JERSEY Atlantic City Berlin Bridgeton Cap May Manahawkin Netcong Sussex Toms River Trenton

WNJN WNJS WNJB WNJZ WNJM WNJY WNJP WNJO WNJT

NEW MEXICO Gallup NEW YORK

KGLP

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DMA MARKET 1

STATION

Houghton New York City

WXXY WNYC-FM

Rochester

WNYC-AM WXXI

DMA MARKET Portsmouth Yellow Springs

24 25

McAlester Oklahoma City Stillwater Tulsa

WCQS WBUX WUNC

NORTH DAKOTA KCND KPPC KDPR KDSU

Grand Forks

KCCD KFJM

Jamestown Minot Williston

KUND KPRJ KMPR KPPR

OHIO 18

Cincinnati Cleveland / Akron Columbus Coshocton Grove City Mansfield Marion

WVXU WCPN WOSU WOSE WOSA WOSV WOSB

KBCW KOSU KOSU KWGS

OREGON

WFAE WFQS WFHE WUND WYQS WRQM

Bismark Devils Lake Dickenson Fargo

WOSP WYSO

OKLAHOMA

NORTH CAROLINA Ashville Buxton Raleigh / Durham (Chapel Hill) Charlotte Franklin Hickory Manteo Mars Hill Rocky Mount

STATION

22

Baker City Bend Corvallis Eugene Gleneden Beach La Grande Lakeview Pendleton Portland Tillamook

KOBK KOAB KOAC-AM KOPB-AM KOGL KTVR KOAP KRBM KOPB KTMK

PENNSYLVANIA 4 23

Philadelphia Pittsburgh

WHYY WESA

SOUTH DAKOTA Sioux Falls

KAUR

TEXAS 5 10

Austin Dallas / Fort Worth Houston Lufkin

KUT KERA KUHF KLDN

UTAH Logan Moab Richfield Vernal

KUSR KUSU KUST KUSL KUSK


DMA MARKET

STATION

VERMONT Bennington Burlington Rutland St. Johnsbury Windsor

WBTN WVPS WRVT WVPA WVPR

VIRGINIA Heathsville Richmond

WCNV WCVE

WASHINGTON

12

Bellingham Bonners Ferry Chase City Omak Oroville Seattle / Tacoma Spokane St. Maries Tacoma Turnwater Twisp

KQOW KIBX WMVE KOMQ KPBG KUOW KPBX KXJO KXOT KUOM-AM KTWP

WISCONSIN Adams Ashland Auburndale Dodgeville Door County Green Bay La Crosse Madison Menomonie Milwaukee Oshkosh Park Falls River Falls

WHAA WUWS WLBL WHHI WHDI WHID WHLA WHA WHWC WHAD WRST WHBM WRFW

DMA MARKET Superior Wausau

STATION KUWS WLBL

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BURN AUDIENCE DEMOGRAPHIC HIGHLIGHTS Projections based on the news / public affairs genre of public radio Demographics

Index or %

Men Women

54% 46%

Age 25-54 Men 25-54

104 118

College 4+ Post graduate Professional degree

268 383 442

Household income $150k+ Household income $75-150k

207 151

Home value $500,000+

213

126 119

Media Habits Read The New York Times Read The Wall Street Journal Read Business Week Read Fortune Read PC World Read Scientific American Read Travel & Leisure Read USA Today Read Vanity Fair Listen to All News Radio

502 361 179 176 170 371 230 169 267 328

Leisure Activities

Occupation President Owner / partner Senior management

176 177 250

Area of responsibility: Finance Engineering / Technology International Human Resources Information technology

146 250 242 152 226

Work for state / local gov’t Work for Federal government

138 127

Profile Opinion leader / influential Attend civic meetings Influence public policy Member local gov’t body Member business organization

Concerned w/ enviro issues Pay more for enviro-safe products

Backpack / hike Mountain bike Cyclist Golf Jog / run Rock climb Sail Ski

236 191 192 147 158 155 273 238

Attend pro football games Attend country music concerts Attend rock music concerts Frequently dine out Participate in fantasy sports groups Camp 4+ times / year

124 119 140 131 142 120

Travel 279 152 322 234 178

Hold a valid passport Make at least 1 int’l trip / year Make at least 6 domestic trips / year Take international business trips

171 218 173 223


Travel (cont’d) Travel to Central America Travel to South America Travel to England Travel to Germany Travel to Asia Stay 15+ hotel nights / year Spend $6,000+ for int’l trips

Spending 181 202 257 202 161 181 186

Technology Own laptop/notebook Own an Apple computer Spend $200+ software / year Own database software Own publishing software Own personal finance software Own spreadsheet software

147 273 135 168 158 173 161

Hold online meetings Make purchases online Make travel purchases online Obtain financial info online

176 177 214 176

Download podcasts Purchases on Amazon Purchases on Expedia Google CNN.com

338 270 189 155 223

Own digital SLR Use cell phone for business

145 161

Financial Services American Express Equity line of credit Have an IRA Have a 401k Use a money manager Own mutual funds Own annuities Value of securities $150k+ Have personal liability coverage Have long-term care insurance

172 190 185 157 196 230 169 231 135 157

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Own a vacation home Spent $40,000+ on car Own a luxury car Own a compact SUV Own an import Acura BMW Honda Lexus Mercedes Subaru Volvo

122 124 146 127 141 202 224 152 135 206 233 310

Frequent Starbucks Use overnight delivery

165 146

Public radio “dot org” audiences Professional / manager Household income $100k+ Household income $150k+

155 122 143

Donate time / money to environmental causes / orgs

272

Own a smartphone Take online subscriptions

153 143

Read E-newsletters in business / finance

218

Have 4+ social network profiles

146

Own a hybrid vehicle Own an Audi Own a VW

278 145 218

Work in engineering Occupation: C-suite/owner Academic department chair Business decision-maker

133 153 213 140

Download podcasts (age18-24) Download podcasts (age 25-34)

293 29


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BURN PRODUCTION TEAM SoundVision Productions, established in 1995, is committed to explaining emerging issues and making them relevant for diverse audiences.

Bari Scott (Executive Producer) is the driving force behind SoundVision. Joining her is a talented production team: reporters, producers, audio engineers, researchers, web developers and a management group of marketing and outreach specialists, accountants, legal consultants and office support. SoundVision’s radio features and documentaries (The DNA Files and The Really Big Questions) have been recognized for excellence with numerous honors, including two Peabody awards, and have earned the trust of leaders in science, education and broadcasting. Since its inception, SoundVision has been dedicated to bringing compelling stories to public radio listeners. As it moves into its second decade, SoundVision explores new ways to inform the public through interactive Web offerings, hands-on training workshops, community outreach programs, and partnerships with ethnic and alternative press.

Dedicated to bringing compelling stories to public radio listeners Alex Chadwick (Host / Senior Correspondent) is an independent journalist and renowned public radio reporter / program developer. His distinctive work made him one of NPR’s most recognized voices during his long career there. Among other achievements, he was part of the creative team that developed and launched Morning Edition, the most successful program in NPR’s history. As a feature reporter and host of Morning Edition, he helped create the partnership with National Geographic that led to the enormously


popular Radio Expeditions series. Called ‘the best writer at NPR,’ he has scripted awardwinning documentaries for National Geographic Television, ABC and CBS. His original online production, Interviews 50 Cents (NYT.com: ‘must see’ video), was a long-running popular feature at SlateV.com. Awards: duPont-Columbia for Radio Expeditions, 2000; Society for Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporting, 2001; Overseas Press Club Lowell Thomas Award, 1988 and 1990; various others.

Mary Beth Kirchner (Managing Producer) is a veteran producer and national program developer. Kirchner started her own production company in 1993 after serving as National Programming Director at WETA, Washington, DC. Prior to that, she was Executive Producer at the Smithsonian Institution's Office of Telecommunications. Working for more than two decades in public radio she has collaborated with National Public Radio, Public Radio International, American Public Media, the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Carnegie Hall, the BBC, the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the Asia Society, NHK (Japan) and ABC News Nightline, among many others. She is the recipient of more than fifty national awards for her documentaries, music series, radio dramas and feature stories including a 2011 Peabody medal.

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WEBSITE Our information-rich website will provide a home for aggregated and original reporting, lively debate and explanations of what it all means. See it live > BurnAnEnergyJournal.com.

HOME PAGE: welcome, overview, audio, video, photos, and dynamic reader interaction

LISTEN PAGE: full radio broadcasts and transcripts, plus photos, slideshows and video


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LEARN PAGE: a broad but basic primer on all the science relevant to the energy debate

BLOG PAGES: ongoing input from energy experts, curated by the University of Texas


CONTACT

Philip J. Shuman Director of Sponsorship Marketing 609.585.5851 shucomm@att.net

BurnAnEnergyJournal.com

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BURN sponsorship 2013  

Fundraiser pitch