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WHEN BUYING OR SELLING A HOME, YOU NEED TO ASK YOURSELF…WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT FROM MY REALTOR? Is Experience a Priority? I have been in the real estate business for more than 12 years and have been an Arizona resident for 30 years. I’ve sold single-family homes, condos, town homes and land in various price ranges all over the Valley. Time spent in the real estate industry has made me familiar with market trends and my sales experience is a valuable asset to my clients. Is My Realtor Working Full Time on My Behalf? I am a full-time Realtor; this is what I do for a living. I’m on top of the ever-changing inventory and market conditions which allow me to properly assess the needs of my clients. I am available, as well as accountable, during every transaction, especially the more challenging ones. I love my job and my clients benefit from my enthusiasm!

Featured Listings

3466 E. Bridgeport Pkwy., Gilbert, AZ 2740 Sq. Ft. / 4 Bed / 2 Bath • Offered at $290,000 It’s a steal…priced below comparable homes! Split floorplan. Priced below comps. Lots of tile in traffic areas, wood in living room and formal dining. 4 bedrooms + game room. 10 ft. ceilings. Tile countertops in the huge open kitchen. Built-in micro, big pantry, breakfast bar plus nook, custom adjustable media niche, surround sound plus speakers. Pebble-finish play pool plus gated grassy area. 3 car garage plus RV gate. Quaint little pond at entryway. Excellent value!!

Will My Realtor Be an Effective Communicator? I connect with my sellers at least once a week with helpful feedback, support and updates in market conditions. My buyers receive constant updates when new listings are available and guidance through the contract timelines and transaction process. I am proactive to ensure a stress-free closing for my clients. Will My Realtor Be Professional? As a Top Producer with Realty Executives, I negotiate and work with fellow Top Producers in the industry on a daily basis. I maintain a high standard of ethics and professionalism. As your representative, I have a fiduciary duty to you that requires honesty, disclosure and confidentiality. Ninety percent of my business comes from repeat clients and/or referrals from those happy clients.

Arizona Homeowner January / 2009

the spirit of the old west Still Alive Today

660 W. Muirwood Dr., Phoenix, AZ 3002 Sq. Ft. / 5 Bed / 3 Bath • Offered at $450,000 Wow!!! New lower price! Spacious home with one bedroom and bath downstairs (guest suite) open island kitchen w/ walk-in pantry, formal dining and living areas, large master bedroom and bath, nice size secondary bedrooms, fireplace in family room, surround sound, pre-wired for security system, oasis backyard w/ rock waterfall and lush landscaping, balcony off master for mountain and sunset views.

So many questions…one answer:

4435 E. Chandler Blvd. Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85048 Office 480.961.5800 Cell 602.679.9100 karrielaw@cox.net www.myrealtorkarrie.com

6422 S. Crestview Ct., Gilbert, AZ 3703 Sq. Ft. / 5 Bed / 3.5 Bath • Offered at $725,000 Exquiste home in Seville golf course community on one of the largest lots in the area (29,000 s.f.). True luxury living with gourmet kitchen, stainless steel appliances, built-in refrigerator, granite counter tops, tile back splash, cherry cabinets, wet bar and more. Family room features entertainment center w/ surround sound, gas fireplace and custom lighting, accent paint throughout. Custom shutters, custom fenced diving pool and spa w/ tile floors, brick accent walkway, astro turf with netting for sports, in-ground trampoline, grass area by pool, built-in gas BBQ....... almost like a resort! Seeing is believing. Don’t miss this one!!!

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996 Realty Executives Karrie Law 4435 E. Chandler Blvd. Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85048 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

household stone surfaces Maintaining Their Original Luster

ISSN-1939-9693

american western fare

Roaring Fork’s Rotisserie Chicken Pizza If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.


January 2009 The Lion King ASU Gammage Auditorium, Jan. 2nd – Feb. 8th 480.965.5062 or asugammage.com This Broadway musical has been wowing spectators with its story of a young lion prince who experiences tragedy and learns invaluable life lessons. Before your eyes, the entire Savannah is brought to life through amazing costumes, dancing and a musical score like no other. The Lion King is the winner of five Tony Awards including Best Costume Design and Best Musical. Tostitos Fiesta Bowl University of Phoenix Stadium, Jan. 5th 480.350.0900 or fiestabowl.org Debuting in 1972, the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl has become one of the most popular bowl games in college football. Many pre-game activities will be held at the stadium including a cheerleader-led pep rally and marching bands. Charged-up spectators, spectacular weather and a good, old-fashioned game of football make this one of the Valley’s sources of pride every year. PF Changs’ Rock ‘n Roll Marathon Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza, Jan. 18th 800.311.1255 or rnraz.com As one of the most popular racing events in the nation, this marathon and half-marathon draws tens of thousands of participants every year – over 30,000 in 2008. With over 70 bands (and a promise of live music every mile), cheerleaders and dance squads to motivate you, this is one event that puts the “fun” in run. Be sure to check out the big act headliner concert the night of the race as well as the Arizona Health and Fitness Expo, with over 100 exhibits, that takes place the two days prior to the race. Winemaker Dinner Series Bourbon Steak at the Fairmont Scottsdale, Jan. 21st 480.513.6002 or localwineevents.com Imagine a wine lover’s specially prepared dinner in one of the Valley’s top-rated restaurants. This month’s Winemaker Dinner Series is hosted by DeLille Cellars owner Jay Soloff. Savor award-winning wine carefully paired with a delectable fourcourse meal created by world-renowned chef, Michael Mina. Carnivale! Phoenix Art Museum, Jan. 23rd 602.307.2040 or friendsofeuropeanart.org The Phoenix Art Museum brings Venice to life with Carnivale! Guests are invited to don traditional costumes and masks similar to those worn at 16th century Italian masquerades. This one-of-a-kind event includes festive food, drinks, and live music from Arizona’s party band Snake Eyes. Attendees will have an opportunity to bid on unique artwork and antiques. The Promise Ball The Phoenician Resort, Jan. 24th 602.224.1800 or jdrf.org Over the past eight years, The Promise Ball has raised more than $11 million to fund the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Guests will enjoy an elegant cocktail party, dinner, silent and live auctions and headlining entertainment. President and CEO of the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, John Junker, will be honored this evening. Individual tickets as well as sponsorships for this event are available.

In Arizona, natural stone in the home, both indoors and outdoors, is not only practical but also aesthetically complementary to the Southwest’s desert environment. Bringing the outdoors inside, stone can give any room an earthier feel, “and with a little bit of care and maintenance,” says Erik Johnson of The Cantera Stone Source in Phoenix, “it will last a long time.” Although durable, cantera is a relatively softer stone often used for columns, fountains and fireplace surrounds and comes in a variety of textures and colors. It’s susceptible to light abrasion and strong acids so harsh chemicals such as chlorine should never be placed in cantera fountains. Instead, “A few drops of non-acidic algaecide will clear up any algae,” says Johnson, “and light sanding will also remove calcium lines.” For fireplace surrounds, homeowners can also lightly sand areas where there is erosion or discoloration. “We recommend working first in a not-so-visible area,” says Johnson, “to test and get used to the process.” Homeowners also have their choice of sealer – natural or dry stone seal, wet seal or color-enhancing seal. “You don’t have to seal all stone, but in high traffic areas or where stone is exposed to the elements a yearly seal with a high-quality sealer is recommended,” says Johnson. Although the task of sanding and sealing may be intimidating, Johnson says it’s much easier to do than one might think. However, if you do choose to have regular maintenance, you may want to employ the services of a company that specializes in the care of stone. Serving Arizona for almost 50 years, Natural Stone Care is a full-service company that offers maintenance tips on their website and free on-site consultations. Many homeowners have travertine, slate, marble and other stone surfaces covering their floors. “Arizona is a dusty state where ninety percent of the dirt is dry,” says David Brown of Natural Stone Care, “so the key is – less is more.” Most people over clean their floors with wet cleaning when all that is needed is a dry cleaning by vacuum, a dust mop or tack mopping (having the mop just wet enough). If a cleaner is used, a neutral non-acidic one is recommended. “People should buy specialty cleaning products from a stone company instead of using a common household cleaner because acid is damaging to stone,” says Brown. When grout becomes soiled, a flood mop should be used with a good cleaner. Scrub grout with a soft bristled brush then pick up water with a mop. Other floor tips include using walk-off mats at all entrances, wiping up spills immediately, avoiding chairs with rollers and gluing scrap leather on the bottoms of chair legs. “People should be aware that when a floor starts to show wear and tear,” explains Brown, “just cleaning and sealing might not take care of the problem.” Natural Stone Care’s solution would be to hone it to remove scratches or etches, polish the floor to a high gloss finish and possibly grind it to achieve a flush surface. Grout sealing and/or staining can also renew the original color of the grout. “When sealing, we use a ton of product – and the best,” says Brown, “so that it really lasts.” Stone kitchen countertops can be maintained by cleaning with stone cleaners, using cutting boards and hot pads, and applying a stone disinfectant. “Most homes with stone in the kitchen use granite for the countertops,” says Brown, “because it does not get etched from acidic foods. With marble, travertine or limestone you can get dull white spots from anything acidic.” However, a professional re-honing can bring the surface back to its original luster. Granite countertops, Brown says, should be sealed every three to five years. Outside stone surfaces may be left natural if a homeowner isn’t concerned about erosion. However, if so, then a seal every three to five years is recommended. If the area is exposed to water, sealing more often will keep your home in its like-new condition.

Your Home

It may be hard for some to believe that nearly 100 years ago Arizona became the 48th state in the union. However, in its urban areas and especially rural ones, you will still find the spirit of the Old West as real as it is legendary. “We’re actually only a few generations away from our frontier history,” says Marshal Trimble, writer and official state historian. “My grandfather was a cowboy, my father was a cowboy, and although I’m not a real cowboy I know all about ‘em. I believe there’s a whole lot of myth in the real cowboy and some real cowboy in the myth.” The Code of the West, such as hard work, honesty and integrity, Trimble says is still in our psyche. Although he believes these “great American values” are more prevalent, or at least more recognizable, in the smaller towns. “If you screw up out there,” he says, “in some cases, you might as well leave town.” And yet even in the cities, Arizona still has its tough lawmen such as infamous Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio whose been known to enforce the law as if it still were the Old West. Arizona boasts more than 300 days of sunshine a year. “It’s where people come to reinvent themselves,” Trimble explains. “As western writer Bret Harte once said, ‘In the West you can get a fresh deal.’” Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tucson are modern cities that have moved forward in all areas of urban development. Yet they also embrace the past, not only to increase tourism, but because it’s a source of pride for residents. Scottsdale is especially committed to celebrating its roots. Laura McMurchie of Scottsdale’s Convention & Visitors Bureau says the unbridled spirit of the Old West can be seen in many of the city’s art galleries, as well as in public sculptures such as “Jack Knife” (Ed Mell’s bucking bronco), “Passing the Legacy” (Herb Mignery’s salute to the pony express) and even the wild mustangs at the entrance to WestWorld. “Passing the Legacy,” McMurchie explains, “is symbolic of the melding of Scottsdale’s historic and modern western appeal.” In “Old Town” and in the Main Street Arts & Antique District, shops, restaurants and western art galleries line the quaint streets where Scottsdale’s mounted police are on patrol. “It wasn’t the cow that made the cowboy,” Marshal Trimble says, “it was the horse.” The horse is, in fact, a theme at Scottsdale’s Museum of the West, Fort McDowell Adventures, Arizona Cowboy

College, the Parada del Sol Rodeo and a myriad of dude ranches throughout the state. At Arizona Cowboy College, tourists can’t seem to get enough of a no-frills experience at a real working ranch. The Rusty Spur Saloon, Greasewood Flats and Rawhide Wild West Town attract tourists and residents alike. Hidden gems such as the Hermosa Inn in Scottsdale, formerly the home/studio of famous cowboy artist Lon Magargee, bring the cowboy legend to life right in the heart of the nation’s fifth largest city. “I’ve traveled all over the West,” Trimble says, “but Arizona is the only place where a small portion of the land is privately owned. The vast open spaces and sanctuaries here are good for the

soul.” In the smaller towns such as Carefree, Flagstaff, Prescott, Sedona, Globe, Bisbee and, of course, several of the ghost towns, it doesn’t take much to notice the Old West/cowboy influence. Many of the historic buildings remain, restaurants and bars are westernthemed, residents often wear western apparel and western celebrations are a regular and crowdpleasing event. In the cities and in the small towns, Arizona is proof that celebrating the past only enriches the present. The rich cowboy heritage that was once the cornerstone of life in Arizona, continues today and is precisely what makes our state as special and unique as it is.

Rotisserie Chicken Pizza

Local Flavor!

Event Calendar

Ingredients: Pizza 1 cup roasted chicken breast, no skin 1/2 cup diced tomato 1/2 cup poblano chili, roasted, peeled and diced 1/2 cup shredded pepper jack cheese 1/4 cup basil pesto (see recipe below) 1/4 cup basil, cut into 1/4” strips Ingredients: Dough 4 cups bread or high gluten flour 1/4 oz. yeast 1 oz. sugar 1 oz. olive oil 1/4 tsp. salt 1 & 1/4 cup warm water

Featuring Roaring Fork 4800 N. Scottsdale Rd. #1700 • Scottsdale 480.947.0795 or eddiev.com

Ingredients: Basil Pesto 1 bushel basil 1 cup pine nuts, raw 1 cup grated parmesan cheese 4 each garlic cloves 2 cups extra virgin olive oil salt as needed

Preparation (Dough): Mix yeast, sugar and water and let yeast bloom. Mix everything in dough mixer for 10 minutes. Let rest overnight in fridge. Preparation (Pesto): Combine basil, garlic and pine nuts in food processer and puree. Add cheese and process till blended. With machine running add oil until blended. Preparation (Pizza): Preheat oven with pizza stone to 450 degrees. Weigh dough out to 5 oz. rounds and roll out to 1/4” thick. Place dough on cornmeal dusted pizza peel and pierce dough with a fork lightly. Garnish pizza with remaining ingredients, using cheese last. Bake on pizza stone until crisp and cheese is bubbling. Remove from oven and sprinkle top with basil. Serve immediately.


January 2009 The Lion King ASU Gammage Auditorium, Jan. 2nd – Feb. 8th 480.965.5062 or asugammage.com This Broadway musical has been wowing spectators with its story of a young lion prince who experiences tragedy and learns invaluable life lessons. Before your eyes, the entire Savannah is brought to life through amazing costumes, dancing and a musical score like no other. The Lion King is the winner of five Tony Awards including Best Costume Design and Best Musical. Tostitos Fiesta Bowl University of Phoenix Stadium, Jan. 5th 480.350.0900 or fiestabowl.org Debuting in 1972, the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl has become one of the most popular bowl games in college football. Many pre-game activities will be held at the stadium including a cheerleader-led pep rally and marching bands. Charged-up spectators, spectacular weather and a good, old-fashioned game of football make this one of the Valley’s sources of pride every year. PF Changs’ Rock ‘n Roll Marathon Wesley Bolin Memorial Plaza, Jan. 18th 800.311.1255 or rnraz.com As one of the most popular racing events in the nation, this marathon and half-marathon draws tens of thousands of participants every year – over 30,000 in 2008. With over 70 bands (and a promise of live music every mile), cheerleaders and dance squads to motivate you, this is one event that puts the “fun” in run. Be sure to check out the big act headliner concert the night of the race as well as the Arizona Health and Fitness Expo, with over 100 exhibits, that takes place the two days prior to the race. Winemaker Dinner Series Bourbon Steak at the Fairmont Scottsdale, Jan. 21st 480.513.6002 or localwineevents.com Imagine a wine lover’s specially prepared dinner in one of the Valley’s top-rated restaurants. This month’s Winemaker Dinner Series is hosted by DeLille Cellars owner Jay Soloff. Savor award-winning wine carefully paired with a delectable fourcourse meal created by world-renowned chef, Michael Mina. Carnivale! Phoenix Art Museum, Jan. 23rd 602.307.2040 or friendsofeuropeanart.org The Phoenix Art Museum brings Venice to life with Carnivale! Guests are invited to don traditional costumes and masks similar to those worn at 16th century Italian masquerades. This one-of-a-kind event includes festive food, drinks, and live music from Arizona’s party band Snake Eyes. Attendees will have an opportunity to bid on unique artwork and antiques. The Promise Ball The Phoenician Resort, Jan. 24th 602.224.1800 or jdrf.org Over the past eight years, The Promise Ball has raised more than $11 million to fund the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Guests will enjoy an elegant cocktail party, dinner, silent and live auctions and headlining entertainment. President and CEO of the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, John Junker, will be honored this evening. Individual tickets as well as sponsorships for this event are available.

In Arizona, natural stone in the home, both indoors and outdoors, is not only practical but also aesthetically complementary to the Southwest’s desert environment. Bringing the outdoors inside, stone can give any room an earthier feel, “and with a little bit of care and maintenance,” says Erik Johnson of The Cantera Stone Source in Phoenix, “it will last a long time.” Although durable, cantera is a relatively softer stone often used for columns, fountains and fireplace surrounds and comes in a variety of textures and colors. It’s susceptible to light abrasion and strong acids so harsh chemicals such as chlorine should never be placed in cantera fountains. Instead, “A few drops of non-acidic algaecide will clear up any algae,” says Johnson, “and light sanding will also remove calcium lines.” For fireplace surrounds, homeowners can also lightly sand areas where there is erosion or discoloration. “We recommend working first in a not-so-visible area,” says Johnson, “to test and get used to the process.” Homeowners also have their choice of sealer – natural or dry stone seal, wet seal or color-enhancing seal. “You don’t have to seal all stone, but in high traffic areas or where stone is exposed to the elements a yearly seal with a high-quality sealer is recommended,” says Johnson. Although the task of sanding and sealing may be intimidating, Johnson says it’s much easier to do than one might think. However, if you do choose to have regular maintenance, you may want to employ the services of a company that specializes in the care of stone. Serving Arizona for almost 50 years, Natural Stone Care is a full-service company that offers maintenance tips on their website and free on-site consultations. Many homeowners have travertine, slate, marble and other stone surfaces covering their floors. “Arizona is a dusty state where ninety percent of the dirt is dry,” says David Brown of Natural Stone Care, “so the key is – less is more.” Most people over clean their floors with wet cleaning when all that is needed is a dry cleaning by vacuum, a dust mop or tack mopping (having the mop just wet enough). If a cleaner is used, a neutral non-acidic one is recommended. “People should buy specialty cleaning products from a stone company instead of using a common household cleaner because acid is damaging to stone,” says Brown. When grout becomes soiled, a flood mop should be used with a good cleaner. Scrub grout with a soft bristled brush then pick up water with a mop. Other floor tips include using walk-off mats at all entrances, wiping up spills immediately, avoiding chairs with rollers and gluing scrap leather on the bottoms of chair legs. “People should be aware that when a floor starts to show wear and tear,” explains Brown, “just cleaning and sealing might not take care of the problem.” Natural Stone Care’s solution would be to hone it to remove scratches or etches, polish the floor to a high gloss finish and possibly grind it to achieve a flush surface. Grout sealing and/or staining can also renew the original color of the grout. “When sealing, we use a ton of product – and the best,” says Brown, “so that it really lasts.” Stone kitchen countertops can be maintained by cleaning with stone cleaners, using cutting boards and hot pads, and applying a stone disinfectant. “Most homes with stone in the kitchen use granite for the countertops,” says Brown, “because it does not get etched from acidic foods. With marble, travertine or limestone you can get dull white spots from anything acidic.” However, a professional re-honing can bring the surface back to its original luster. Granite countertops, Brown says, should be sealed every three to five years. Outside stone surfaces may be left natural if a homeowner isn’t concerned about erosion. However, if so, then a seal every three to five years is recommended. If the area is exposed to water, sealing more often will keep your home in its like-new condition.

Your Home

It may be hard for some to believe that nearly 100 years ago Arizona became the 48th state in the union. However, in its urban areas and especially rural ones, you will still find the spirit of the Old West as real as it is legendary. “We’re actually only a few generations away from our frontier history,” says Marshal Trimble, writer and official state historian. “My grandfather was a cowboy, my father was a cowboy, and although I’m not a real cowboy I know all about ‘em. I believe there’s a whole lot of myth in the real cowboy and some real cowboy in the myth.” The Code of the West, such as hard work, honesty and integrity, Trimble says is still in our psyche. Although he believes these “great American values” are more prevalent, or at least more recognizable, in the smaller towns. “If you screw up out there,” he says, “in some cases, you might as well leave town.” And yet even in the cities, Arizona still has its tough lawmen such as infamous Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio whose been known to enforce the law as if it still were the Old West. Arizona boasts more than 300 days of sunshine a year. “It’s where people come to reinvent themselves,” Trimble explains. “As western writer Bret Harte once said, ‘In the West you can get a fresh deal.’” Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tucson are modern cities that have moved forward in all areas of urban development. Yet they also embrace the past, not only to increase tourism, but because it’s a source of pride for residents. Scottsdale is especially committed to celebrating its roots. Laura McMurchie of Scottsdale’s Convention & Visitors Bureau says the unbridled spirit of the Old West can be seen in many of the city’s art galleries, as well as in public sculptures such as “Jack Knife” (Ed Mell’s bucking bronco), “Passing the Legacy” (Herb Mignery’s salute to the pony express) and even the wild mustangs at the entrance to WestWorld. “Passing the Legacy,” McMurchie explains, “is symbolic of the melding of Scottsdale’s historic and modern western appeal.” In “Old Town” and in the Main Street Arts & Antique District, shops, restaurants and western art galleries line the quaint streets where Scottsdale’s mounted police are on patrol. “It wasn’t the cow that made the cowboy,” Marshal Trimble says, “it was the horse.” The horse is, in fact, a theme at Scottsdale’s Museum of the West, Fort McDowell Adventures, Arizona Cowboy

College, the Parada del Sol Rodeo and a myriad of dude ranches throughout the state. At Arizona Cowboy College, tourists can’t seem to get enough of a no-frills experience at a real working ranch. The Rusty Spur Saloon, Greasewood Flats and Rawhide Wild West Town attract tourists and residents alike. Hidden gems such as the Hermosa Inn in Scottsdale, formerly the home/studio of famous cowboy artist Lon Magargee, bring the cowboy legend to life right in the heart of the nation’s fifth largest city. “I’ve traveled all over the West,” Trimble says, “but Arizona is the only place where a small portion of the land is privately owned. The vast open spaces and sanctuaries here are good for the

soul.” In the smaller towns such as Carefree, Flagstaff, Prescott, Sedona, Globe, Bisbee and, of course, several of the ghost towns, it doesn’t take much to notice the Old West/cowboy influence. Many of the historic buildings remain, restaurants and bars are westernthemed, residents often wear western apparel and western celebrations are a regular and crowdpleasing event. In the cities and in the small towns, Arizona is proof that celebrating the past only enriches the present. The rich cowboy heritage that was once the cornerstone of life in Arizona, continues today and is precisely what makes our state as special and unique as it is.

Rotisserie Chicken Pizza

Local Flavor!

Event Calendar

Ingredients: Pizza 1 cup roasted chicken breast, no skin 1/2 cup diced tomato 1/2 cup poblano chili, roasted, peeled and diced 1/2 cup shredded pepper jack cheese 1/4 cup basil pesto (see recipe below) 1/4 cup basil, cut into 1/4” strips Ingredients: Dough 4 cups bread or high gluten flour 1/4 oz. yeast 1 oz. sugar 1 oz. olive oil 1/4 tsp. salt 1 & 1/4 cup warm water

Featuring Roaring Fork 4800 N. Scottsdale Rd. #1700 • Scottsdale 480.947.0795 or eddiev.com

Ingredients: Basil Pesto 1 bushel basil 1 cup pine nuts, raw 1 cup grated parmesan cheese 4 each garlic cloves 2 cups extra virgin olive oil salt as needed

Preparation (Dough): Mix yeast, sugar and water and let yeast bloom. Mix everything in dough mixer for 10 minutes. Let rest overnight in fridge. Preparation (Pesto): Combine basil, garlic and pine nuts in food processer and puree. Add cheese and process till blended. With machine running add oil until blended. Preparation (Pizza): Preheat oven with pizza stone to 450 degrees. Weigh dough out to 5 oz. rounds and roll out to 1/4” thick. Place dough on cornmeal dusted pizza peel and pierce dough with a fork lightly. Garnish pizza with remaining ingredients, using cheese last. Bake on pizza stone until crisp and cheese is bubbling. Remove from oven and sprinkle top with basil. Serve immediately.


WHEN BUYING OR SELLING A HOME, YOU NEED TO ASK YOURSELF…WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT FROM MY REALTOR? Is Experience a Priority? I have been in the real estate business for more than 12 years and have been an Arizona resident for 30 years. I’ve sold single-family homes, condos, town homes and land in various price ranges all over the Valley. Time spent in the real estate industry has made me familiar with market trends and my sales experience is a valuable asset to my clients. Is My Realtor Working Full Time on My Behalf? I am a full-time Realtor; this is what I do for a living. I’m on top of the ever-changing inventory and market conditions which allow me to properly assess the needs of my clients. I am available, as well as accountable, during every transaction, especially the more challenging ones. I love my job and my clients benefit from my enthusiasm! Will My Realtor Be an Effective Communicator? I connect with my sellers at least once a week with helpful feedback, support and updates in market conditions. My buyers receive constant updates when new listings are available and guidance through the contract timelines and transaction process. I am proactive to ensure a stress-free closing for my clients. Will My Realtor Be Professional? As a Top Producer with Realty Executives, I negotiate and work with fellow Top Producers in the industry on a daily basis. I maintain a high standard of ethics and professionalism. As your representative, I have a fiduciary duty to you that requires honesty, disclosure and confidentiality. Ninety percent of my business comes from repeat clients and/or referrals from those happy clients.

Featured Listings

Arizona Homeowner March / 2009

2138 E. Sapium Way • Phoenix, AZ 3887 Sq. Ft. / 5 Bed / 3.5 Bath • Offered at $749,900 This gorgeous hillside preserve home offers travertine tile, new carpet and neutral two-tone paint. Huge kitchen has granite-tiled countertops, plenty of cabinet space, built-in double ovens and microwave, and large bayed eating area. Enjoy the fireplace with brick stone design, large master bedroom downstairs with separate tub and shower. This home has an upstairs loft that can also be a 2nd master bedroom with a walk-out balcony with wrought-iron staircase leading down to the backyard that has a nice pool, built-in BBQ and fireplace area. What a gem!

why buy new?

3523 E. Phelps St. • Gilbert, AZ 2219 Sq. Ft. / 4 Bed / 2.5 Bath • Offered at $264,999 Great Gilbert home near everything. Enter into dramatic living/dining area, downstairs bedroom is used as den/office with archway entry, family room pre-wired for surround sound and has gas fireplace, open kitchen with cherry wood cabinets, island, walk-in pantry. Upstairs features large master with walk-in closet and balcony overlooking beautiful backyard. Laundry has built-in cabinets and sink. RO system plus soft water, security system, 2.5 car garage plus service door, corner lot with R/V gate. Extremely well-kept home!

Reupholstering Your Furnishings

So many questions…one answer:

4435 E. Chandler Blvd. Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85048 Office 480.961.5800 Cell 602.679.9100 karrielaw@cox.net www.myrealtorkarrie.com

1222 W. Baseline Rd. #135 • Tempe, AZ 1119 Sq. Ft. / 2 Bed / 2.5 Bath • Offered at $160,000 Darling condo with 2 large bedrooms, both with walk-in closets and private balcony. Upstairs has new carpet. Downstairs has beautiful hardwood flooring in great room. Lovely fireplace and lots of room to spread out. Private, fenced patio for your enjoyment. Great kitchen with all appliances included, even the inside washer & dryer! One-car garage and plenty of extra parking too! Lovely grounds and sparkling pool and spa for your enjoyment! This is one of the better deals in the complex so come and take a look!

Looking for the deals?? I’m your short sale and foreclosure specialist and know of the best buys! Call me! Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996

spring training

ISSN-1939-9693

Realty Executives Karrie Law 4435 E. Chandler Blvd. Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85048

If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

Photo Credit: Scott Sandler

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

A Revered Valley Tradition

ahi tuna done right

Yard House’s Marinated Version

Arizona Homeowner January / 2009  

The Lion King ASU Gammage Auditorium, Jan. 2nd – Feb. 8th 480.965.5062 or asugammage.com This Broadway musical has been wowing spectators wi...