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THE STYLE MAGAZINE FOR YOUR HOME JUNE 2017 £ 4.50

THE POWER OF PLANTS Expert urban gardening tips to indestructible houseplants How to master the indoor/outdoor divide

Digital decoded: TV to music Get what you want without paying too much

Our 12 favourite lighting brands

38 things to buy now Affordable treats to smart investment buys

Art for your floor The best rugs: from new neutrals to classic vintage 06 9 770957 894212


JUNE 2017 Style 23 Shopping This month’s wish list of pieces big and small that #EDloves 30 News The latest launches, hottest finds, and our guide to the best new pendant lights to buy now 43 Decorating Interior designer Oliver Gustav’s tips for using metal, how to get the perfect garden gate, and Cole & Son’s Safari-inspired wallpapers

PL ANT POWER

Whether you have a big garden or dream of a home overspilling with succulents, it’s time to flex your green fingers. And we have the ideas, inspiration and expert tips to get you started

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52 Design The Geffrye Museum’s Sonia Solicari talks inspirations. Plus, the full lowdown on Carl Hansen & Søn 57 Architecture The festivals and coffee table tomes not to be missed 61 Do adjust your set TV and music services decoded – how to get what you want without paying too much 64 Colour The politics of powder pink and why it’s perfect for interiors

COVER IMAGE: BIRGITTA WOLFGANG/SISTERS AGENCY (PHOTOGRAPHY), PERNILLE VEST (STYLING) SUBS COVER IMAGE: ‘SINGITA’ WALLPAPER BY COLE & SON

67 Rugs: art for your floor Discover the six trends and how to shop them

25 ON THE COVER This month, we are celebrating the power of greenery to transform your home. Turn to p122 to see more of how plants are used in this Danish house.

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100 Breaking boundaries This bungalow in South Africa is a masterclass in the space-enhancing benefits of indoor/outdoor living 110 The pearl of Paris White can be welcoming and eternally elegant, as this French apartment proves 120 Immaculate perfection Want to work white at home? Add interest using delicately veined marble. We show you how to shop the look 122 Open all seasons Big skylights and plenty of indoor greenery turn this home into a year-round Eden 130 Paradise reclaimed Restored to the original vision of Mexican architect Luis Barragán – a master of merging inside and out – this building is a design treasure 140 Under the canopy Sunny terraces and a soaring ceiling clad in oak lend this house a sense of natural wonder 148 Fall in love with textiles Discover the work of Swedish rug designer Märta Måås-Fjetterström – underfoot or hanging like artworks, these vintage pieces are very now 154 Urban oasis Houseplants, texture and natural light warm the hard edges of this industrial Berlin home

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130 Escape 163 News Contemporary country cabin retreats, alternative festivals to book now, and the most relaxing hotel on the Côte d’Azure. Plus, why we’re planning a visit to Manchester 171 Getaway Live like a local, taking in the architecture, culture and foodie treats in Barcelona’s coolest districts

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20 Subscribe Fantastic offers for our most loyal readers 175 Stockists Love something you’ve seen? Here’s where to buy it 186 The last word Projects and products that #TeamED have been tackling and testing this month

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TIMELESS DESIGN Returning from the 56th annual Milan furniture fair, the biggest gathering of manufacturers and designers in Europe that showcases an absolute wealth of innovation and new design, it struck me that three very specific moments stood out. 1. Mark Eley of fashion brand Eley Kishimoto taking snaps with a customised Polaroid camera. 2. The extraordinary array of marble seemingly used everywhere (but, hot news, pink onyx is the new uber-luxe material du jour). And 3. A short film about the Austrian artist Peter Handke and his poem, To Duration, shown at the showroom of Italian superbrand B&B Italia. It seemed hugely ironic to me, that here, in the midst of this festival of the new, my memorable trio are related for being comments on timelessness. Handke’s poem, written 31 years ago, is a thoughtful ode to the passing of time. The Polaroid camera was invented by Edwin H Land in 1943, declared over in 2008 due to low film stock, but brought back from the brink of extinction because one man, Florian Kaps, decided it couldn’t be allowed to die. And marble, well it’s a product that’s millions of years old.

‘As we move forward, exploring new design solutions and embracing opportunites for change, let us not forget the foundations on which such progress is built’

PICTURE: EMMA WEBSTER

It made me reflect on how happy I am to belong to a generation that straddles both analogue and digital. To recall cassette tapes, four TV channels, home phones with answering machines, Space Invaders on a Commodore and out of order public telephone boxes perhaps enables a more fulsome appreciation of Ocado, online banking, iPhones, Amazon Prime, Instagram, Twitter and Netflix. In other words, if you’re aware of what life was like before the things deemed so commonplace today, you don’t take them for granted; you truly appreciate the improvements they lend to life. The point is, as we inevitably move forward, exploring new design solutions, embracing ever smarter technology and the opportunities therein for change and betterment (how about a wardrobe with an in-built system that automatically airs and detoxes your clothes?! From Lema. Or a sofa/bed-in-acloset that really does convert from proper sofa to standard-sized comfortable bed. From Flou.), let us not forget the foundations on which such progress is built. To dismiss them is to fail to acknowledge the ties that inextricably connect all things together. Whether Polaroid, as the first instant image maker, or marble, which will outlast us all, just by existing.

Editor-in-Chief

Follow me on Instagram: @michelleogundehin

Twitter: @ELLEDecoMO

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A RT • A RCHITECTUR E • SHOPPING • DESIGN • DECOR ATING

STYLE

LOVE AT FIRST SIT All hail the new sofa size. Is it a chair or is it a couch? Who cares when it’s this perfect for curling up with a toddler, a dog, or just a good book and a mug of tea? This superb specimen is the ‘Pendel’ by British furniture makers Pinch. It’s handcrafted from solid beech and can be upholstered in your choice of 24 fabrics – we love this ‘Nympheus’ pattern by GP & J Baker, first designed by British artist William Turner more than a century ago. From £3,429, Heal’s (heals.com).


Style | S H O P P I N G

WISH LIST From affordable treats to investment buys, there’s so much that #EDLoves. Here’s this month’s pick… 1 4

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1 Take your home’s exterior back to nature with ‘Delicate Moss’ masonry paint. £33.59 for five litres, Dulux Weathershield (dulux.co.uk) 2 Make a statement with the striking, asymmetric ‘Stilla’ clock in green marble by AYTM. £116, Amara (amara.com) 3 This ‘Helicopter’ ceiling lamp makes the perfect focal point for any room. £1,100, Asaf Weinbroom (asafweinbroom.com) 4 Add a touch of tropical print with this ‘Paradisiaca’ fabric. £101.20 per metre, Casamance (casamance.com) 5 Create a tiered display of greenery with these rattan plant stands. From £118 each, Anthropologie (anthropologie.com/en-gb) 6 Made by hand, this ‘Circa’ jute rug is wonderfully understated and hardwearing. £225, Olli Ella (olliella.com) 7 This ‘Ray’ armchair by Antonio Citterio is ideal for an outdoor setting. From £2,894, B&B Italia (bebitalia.com) 8 The ‘Palma 080’ rattan table by Tine K Home is a twist on a traditional style. From £300, Tea and Kate (teaandkate.co.uk) 9 Accessorise using the colour of the moment with this terracotta plant pot. From £3.99, H&M (hm.com) 10 This ‘Harmony’ highball glass by Jabůrek Lukáš for Moser is bang on trend. £55, William and Son (williamandson.com) 11 A perfect partner for the ‘Harmony’ glass, the ‘Beak’ water jug by Tomas Kral is a stylish hit. £59, Nude (nudeglass.com) 12 The ‘Stockholm’ armchair and cushion set by Nike Karlsson is handcrafted, making every piece unique. From £110, Ikea (ikea.com) 13 Inject bold pattern with this flocked ‘Kurt’ cushion in tonal greens and blues by Martha Coates. £18.50, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 14 Cluster these ‘Polystone’ plant pots by Hay for maximum impact. From £10, Future and Found (futureandfound.com)

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WISHLIST 1 Inspired by a busy marketplace, the ‘Marché’ fabric injects energy into any room. £120 per metre, Zimmer + Rohde (zimmer-rohde.com) 2 Bring the beauty of natural materials into your home with this ‘Seagrass’ lampshade. £495, Oggetto (oggetto.com) 3 The delicate weave of the ‘Stanley’ rattan pendant light celebrates craftsmanship. £95, John Lewis (johnlewis.com) 4 Tap into the plaster pink trend with this ‘China Clay Deep’ emulsion. From £21 per litre, Little Greene (littlegreene.com) 5 The ‘BRIXX Module L’ sofa by Dedon is perfect for modern living – indoors and out. £3,020; backrest, £380, Leisureplan (leisureplan.co.uk) 6 Cosy up in style with this ‘Linen’ throw. Its lightweight thread is perfect for cool summer nights. £60, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 7 Made from ash, with a woven rattan top, the ‘Stockholm’ coffee table by Nike Karlsson is affordable and stylish. £85, Ikea (ikea.com) 8 Add a hint of sophistication with the ‘Edge’ brass plate by Stilleben for Skagerak Denmark. From £59, Skandium (skandium.com) 9 Coloured glassware has an enduring appeal, and this ‘Pink Ombre’ carafe is just £15! Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com) 10 This ‘AJ’ creamer is a 50th anniversary edition of the classic by Arne Jacobsen for Stelton. £59.95, Skandium (skandium.com) 11 We can’t believe that this wonderfully neutral jacquard-patterned runner costs just £34.99. H&M (hm.com) 12 The ‘Restore’ basket by Mika Tolvanen is a versatile storage solution, available in thirteen colours. £69, Muuto (muuto.com) 13 A practical item with a luxurious look, this ‘Korbo’ brass basket is for storing only your favourite items. £159, SCP (scp.co.uk)

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COMPILED BY: MOLLY HUTCHINSON

WISHLIST 1 ‘Fair Blue’ is a paint shade that will bring a freshness to any home. From £39.50 for 2.5 litres, Edward Bulmer (edwaredbulmerpaint.co.uk) 2 Hang these stoneware plant hangers by Ferm Living in a group or individually. £38 each, Goodhood London (goodhoodstore.com) 3 With its painterly style, this ‘Japanese Garden’ fabric has an elegant charm. £78 per metre, Osborne & Little (osborneandlittle.com) 4 The sophisticated grey and cream tones of the ‘Whitfield’ rug go with everything. From £319, Heal’s (heals.com) 5 These ‘Spun’ metal planters are an opulent way to bring greenery into your home. From £69 each, West Elm (westelm.co.uk) 6 We love the playful framework of the ‘Copa’ outdoor sofa. There is a matching table and chairs, too. £699 for the set, Made (made.com) 7 This coral-coloured cotton pillowcase is a quick, affordable way to embrace tropical colour. £3.99, H&M (hm.com) 8 Inspired by the patterns of coral reefs, this ‘Hemera’ blue cushion is another summery pick. £90, A by Amara (amara.com) 9 The ‘Line One’ floor lamp by Norr11 is a statement piece, with its marble base and strong silhouette. £449, Skandium (skandium.com) 10 The high woven back of the ‘Cala’ armchair by Doshi Levien has a dramatic, regal appearance. £1,855, Kettal (kettal.com) 11 This teardrop-shaped vase on brass legs is named ‘Echasse’, which is French for ‘stilts’. £400, Menu (menu.as)


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THE RED THREAD This is a Nordic metaphor for a shared characteristic. In the coffee table book of the same name, Phaidon shows the common aesthetic of classic Scandi designs (Phaidon, £49.95). POM POMS They’re the hot new embellishment for everything from jumpers to blankets. Toast’s woollen ‘Pom Pom’ throw is our top pick. £295 (toa.st). GINGHAM These tiny checks are now as fashionable at home as they are on the runway. Embrace the trend by upholstering a tired chair in cheery gingham fabric.

UP AND DOWN

Ikea’s latest collection, ‘Avsiktlig’, is the result of a collaboration with Swedish collective 10-gruppen, known for shaking up the design world since the 1970s. Iconic designs and new prints inspired by 10-gruppen’s spirit will feature on fabric, stationery, bedding and more. Some of the patterns, such as Carl Johan de Geer’s ‘Djungel’, haven’t been in print for over 40 years – but this is more than an exercise in nostalgia. It’s a celebration of fearless creativity. Tote bags, £4 each; fabric, from £10 for three metres (ikea.com).

FO L K M ETA L Suffolk-based cabinetmaker Plain English has spent 25 years perfecting the art of creating stylish wooden cupboards and shelves, building covetable kitchens, pantries and larders. For the self-proclaimed traditionalists, the recent decision to add metal to the mix, producing door fronts and handles in raw rolled steel, is a carefully considered one. And a triumph. The hints of metal add industrial toughness to the brand’s pared-back creations. From £1,150 for a single metal cupboard (plainenglishdesign.com).

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SLOGANS Cushions, t-shirts, notebooks bearing vague slogans: ‘Dream!’, ‘Live!’, ‘Be Happy’. We can do without the pep talk.

ETERNAL ROSES Perhaps inspired by ‘Beauty and the Beast’, Eternal Roses’ ‘Enchanted Rose’ is a preserved natural rose that will stay fresh forever. We prefer to let nature take its course. MERMAIDS First there were mermaid tail blankets, now there’s ‘The Little Mermaid Shell Bed’ for kids that want to sleep in a clam shell. It all seems a bit too fishy for us.

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURE: DAVID LOTHIAN

BOLD NEW WORLD


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M E E T T H E H IGH L IGH T S The latest pendant lights are unabashedly ornamental. Adorn your home with our edit of the best from our 12 favourite brands

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FLOS Designer Michael Anastassiades’ latest collaboration with Italian brand Flos sees him continuing to explore the idea of lighting as jewellery for the home. The ‘Arrangements’ is a prototype system of elements that can be combined to create modern chandeliers (flos.com).

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PETITE FRITURE Created by Belgian designer Sylvain Willemz, ‘Chains’ consists of black ribbed pendant lamps that can be hung as single pendants or clustered to form a striking centrepiece. From £171 for a single pendant (petitefriture.com).

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A P PA R AT U S New York design studio Apparatus’ vintageinspired lights are anything but dull. Case in point is ‘Cloud’, made up of frosted glass orbs that softly diffuse the light from three central sources. From £6,890, SCP (scp.co.uk).

4 WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: FERNANDO ALDA, TOAKI OKANO, MARK COCKSEDGE

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ARTEMIDE Architecture studio Herzog & De Meuron created the ‘Unterlinden’ light – with a classic shape, it’s designed to be used as museum lighting, but would look equally sleek at home. From £261 (artemide.com).

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WAT E R W O R K S The latest additions to the ‘R.W. Atlas’ range, a collaboration between New York design firm Roman & Williams and Waterworks, include this industrial-style chandelier finished in unlacquered brass. £2,896 (waterworks.com).

VIBIA Conceived by French designer Toan Nguyen, ‘Algorithm’ is a system of LED globe lights that offers creative freedom – choose the number of lights, the cord length and position. From £1,622 (vibia.com). SKINFLINT DESIGN We’ve long 10 loved this British company’s original reclaimed and salvaged 20th century lighting. Its latest gems include this chic opaline 1950s Slovakian pendant. £210 (skinflintdesign.co.uk).

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LOUIS POULSEN A lesson in lighting simplicity, the Danish company’s new ‘Above’ pendant by Mads Odgård features a paired back aluminium body in four different sizes. From £196 (louispoulsen.com).

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WONDERGLASS This London-based brand’s Murano glass ‘Calliope’ lights, inspired by the poetic strokes of Japanese calligraphy, are the work of Dutch designer Marcel Wanders. From £1,020 (wonder-glass.com).

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WIRED CUSTOM LIGHTING Specialising in sculptural pieces high on drama and impact, this brand’s latest collection includes the impressive ‘Rodriguez’ piece, crafted from acid-blackened iron and organically-shaped, hand-blown glass. £8,042 (wired-designs.com).

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BOCCI Lighting innovator Bocci has broken the mould yet again with the ‘84 Series’, a white glass bubble encased in a fine copper mesh basket. Every piece is totally unique, but each shares a beautiful pillowy aesthetic and a warm glow. From £384 (bocci.com).

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JAMB Named after the east London house where founder Will Fisher lives, the British firm’s new ‘Hanbury’ collection includes well-priced pendant lights, including this ‘Kick’ design in brass. From £180 ( jamb.co.uk). JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 33


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ONE, TWO, THREE… SHOP! There’s never been a better time to be an interiors shopper, with brands expanding and cropping up in new locations. Here, we take a closer look at three you might not have heard of yet – but need to know! Maisons du Monde This French design house, which operates out of its own château, has long been a go-to for European shoppers. And now it’s open to UK interiors fans. Its design team creates on-trend, affordable furniture, accessories and tableware in a vast array of styles (maisonsdumonde.com).

Libra Founded in 1972, this British brand has flown under the radar for some time. Now, thankfully, its new ‘Libra Originals’ collection (above), sourced from antiques markets in Rajhastan, will be available in more independent retailers – search online for your nearest. You can also shop the range on its site (thelibracompany.co.uk).

Barker and Stonehouse Readers in the north of England will already be very familiar with this family-run furniture store. But now it is finding a host of new fans in the south, with an impressive showroom in Battersea and another recently opened in Hove, near Brighton (barkerandstonehouse.co.uk).

THE HOME OF CRAFT

From left Bread crock by John Leach, £285. Stoneware bowls, from £9 each. ‘Oak Triple’ trivet, £14.50. ‘Corin Mellor’ plywood tray, £29.50. ‘Soendergaard’ cup and saucer, £16. Stainless-steel cafetiere, from £68

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DOMESTIC BLISS ‘Of House and Home’ at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park is a charming show of screen-prints by the illustrator Alice Pattullo. Her cheerful depictions of domestic life through the ages range from a Victorian parlour mise-en-scène to still life close-ups of Wardian cases (the 19th century precursor to the terrarium, see below). All works on display are also available to buy, and Pattullo has designed her first wallpaper and homeware range which will be on sale in the exhibition shop. 17 June–17 September (ysp.co.uk).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: DHONDT RAPHAEL

Beloved English design brand David Mellor is expanding into a new shop in London’s Marylebone. Known for its cutlery, tableware and furniture designs – many of which were created by silversmith David Mellor OBE, and now his son, Corin – the company has gained a reputation as a platform for British craft. It has championed the work of potters Svend Bayer and John Leach, and woodturner Dave Regester, who creates beautiful wooden bowls. The brand’s new home will be its largest store yet; a gallery-like space for displaying iconic pieces and new craft discoveries. See below for our top picks (davidmellordesign.com).


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THE WORLD IN YOUR KITCHEN Go on a culinary journey with these four new cookbooks. No suitcase required, but you will need a pestle and mortar Acquacotta (Hardie Grant, £25) is named after the signature soup of Maremma, a rugged stretch of coastal Tuscany. It’s a humble ‘cooked water’ of tomato, onions or whatever greens are to hand, usually served with a poached egg. As well as the recipe to this staple, you’ll also find the secret to a perfect ragù. Mountain Berries & Desert Spice (Frances Lincoln, £20) paints a picture of Pakistani life via breakfast, lunch and dinner, with poeticallytitled chapters that entice and delight.

SUPER DRY Let us introduce you to the new way to shop – a retail space that’s also a working design studio. DRY Creative Projects was founded as a branding and graphic design agency in 2011 by Jenny Kästel Tavassoli and Johan Fredlund (right). Now, with the help of designer Nana Mårskog and woodworker Calle Hansson, the company has its own homeware and clothing brands – Dry Things and Dry Costume, respectively. You’ll love its shop/ studio/showroom in Stockholm, filled with beautifully and sustainably crafted essentials. The ‘Fishbone’ table (above, £1,769) and perfect plain white shirt (above, £232) are just two examples of its completely chic instant classics (drycreativeprojects.com).

WORDS: ELIZA HONEY, CHARLOTTE BROOK

SCENTS OF TIME Take a minute or 60 to behold ‘Le Sablier’, a series of six intricately decorated scented hourglasses designed by Servaire & Co for French perfumer Diptyque. Turn the hourglass over, and it will diffuse one of six classic fragrances – ‘Orange Blossom’, ‘Ginger’, ‘Figuier’, ‘34 Boulevard SaintGermain’, ‘Roses’ or ‘Baies’ – for one hour. Designed as both beautiful objects and a sensory experience, they encourage users to luxuriate in scent and meditate on the passage of time. £120; scent refills £36 each (diptyqueparis.co.uk).

Greece: The Cookbook (Phaidon, £29.95) has been compiled by the grand dame of Greek cookery, Vefa Alexiadou. It features over 800 dishes, from red mullet baked in vine leaves to sticky baklava. Sri Lanka: The Cookbook (Frances Lincoln, £20). Beautiful photos of tea plantations and downtown fresh coconut vendors punctuate the tempting recipes in this book. We can’t wait to try the tamarind and fennel curry with prawns.

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Style | N E W S

I N S I D E S T O RY T H E G A I N S B O R O U G H S I L K W E AV I N G C O M PA N Y

W O R D P L AY New from Danish type enthusiast Design Letters are these message boards, which display letters and numbers from Danish maestro Arne Jacobsen’s hand-drawn 1937 alphabet. Whether displaying your grocery list, a quote, or a motto, they are interactive artworks. From £22.50 for an unframed A4 board, available in a range of pastel colours (designletters.dk).

The Suffolk textile brand loved by Hollywood and British royalty The small market town of Sudbury in Suffolk is the birthplace of Thomas Gainsborough, celebrated portraitist to the 18th-century aristocracy. It’s easy to imagine his well-heeled sitters as clients of The Gainsborough Silk Weaving Company, established in his hometown in 1903. Its sumptuous damask and brocade fabrics have graced royal palaces and the Titanic, as well as the set of the recently released Beauty and the Beast film. The company was founded by Reginald Warner, an entrepreneurial weaver who travelled around Europe and brought back exceptional fabrics that he used to create innovative new designs. More than a century later, Gainsborough is still making its fabrics by hand, using looms from the 1920s. It operates from the same ‘weaving shed’ that it has owned since 1924.

Gainsborough’s damasks and brocades have graced film sets, royal palaces and the Titanic

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THE GOLDEN AGE It seems the trend for metallics has finally reached its zenith with a bounty of new furnishings and accessories finished in gold, the most luxurious of all finishes. Marks & Spencer’s new ‘Barclay’ collection (below) typifies the look beautifully, with a drinks trolley (£299) and shelving unit (£399; marksandspencer.com). If an entire piece of furniture is out of reach, dip into gold with smaller accessories, like H&M’s similarly Art Deco tray (below, £17; hm.com).

WORDS: AMY BRADFORD, ELIZA HONEY

The secret of Gainsborough’s lustrous silks is not only in its traditional methods and high thread counts. Most important is the type of silk used: filament silk, the finest quality thread available, which is brought to Suffolk all the way from China on the ancient Silk Route. Once it reaches the factory, a lengthy dyeing and drying process ensues, and then it can take up to six days to weave 50 metres of fabric. Though age-old techniques are the foundation of what Gainsborough does, it has not remained frozen in time. In 2013, interior designer Russell Sage was recruited as creative director, and brought the company a new audience by using its textiles in chic London venues the Goring Hotel and Zetter Townhouse Marylebone. And last year, designer Karen Beauchamp was commissioned to create two collections. The first, ‘Renaissance’ (top), puts a modern twist on archive patterns, from damasks to gingham checks, all in a contemporary palette. Her next collection, ‘Out of the Blue’ – which she describes as having ‘a 20th-century vibe’ – will bring even more fans (gainsborough.co.uk).


Main image ‘Sharme’ mosaic in ‘Seagrass’ and ‘Pewter’ (wall), £15.99 per sheet; ‘Serac’ honed marble tile (floor), £49.86 per sqm Opposite page, top left ‘Fabrix’ in ‘Tartan 60’ (wall), £69.94 per sqm; ‘Taupe’ (floor) £69.94 per sqm Top right ‘Callow’ in ‘Plain’ and ‘Décor’ (wall), £30 per sqm*; ‘Mora’ (floor), £34.96 per sqm* Bottom ‘Spaces’ in ‘Bruges Grey’ (floor), from £44.97 per sqm. All Topps Tiles.


*PRICES VALID UNTIL 30 MAY 2017

ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

ON-TREND TILING An unrivalled selection and innovative design ideas that will brighten up familiar spaces – Topps Tiles has it all Modern interiors have never been more flexible – both in how we live in them and the materials we use to fit them. Take tiling. Once seen as little more than a practical option for kitchens and bathrooms, to contemporary interiors it is a design hero in and of itself. With a little imagination tiling can bring a truly modern edge to every room – whether that’s creating a next-generation statement wall or designing the perfect indoor-to-outdoor flow throughout a space. The real challenge, then, is less about what tiling can achieve, but how best to navigate your way through the dazzling array of sizes, styles and finishes now available to bring finesse to every aspect of your home. That’s where Topps Tiles comes in. As the UK’s leading tile specialist, Topps Tiles offers hundreds of combinations of floor and wall tiles in over 365 retail locations.

With a little imagination – and some expert advice – tiling brings a modern edge to every room in your home Visit, and you’ll find friendly expert advice on everything from initial tile selections and guidance about different laying patterns, right through to selecting the perfect grout to give your design a customised finish. And it doesn’t end there. Topps Tiles offers a ‘full-service’ approach, so whether you’re looking to build a wet room or install underfloor heating, all that can be arranged within a single visit (complete with payment plans should you wish to spread the cost). Alternatively, go online, where you’ll find everything from photo galleries and trend reports, as well as a superior room visualiser that will allow you to bring your design to life from the comfort of your sofa. With Topps Tiles, creating your ideal interior – or exterior – is easier than you think. Find your nearest store and discover the latest offers at toppstiles.co.uk

HOW TO TILE IN 2017 Tiling might seem less susceptible to the vagaries of trends, but it is in fact as subject to changing tastes as any other interiors finish. Topps Tiles’ buyers travel the world to develop new tile ranges to reflect and enhance key interiors themes. For 2017, these range from lavish finishings and bold geometric detailing to a more refined take on the urban industrial trend and a pared-back minimalism that is a natural update to Nordic chic. Find them all in store and online today.

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T H E N EW WA L L F L OW E R S Bringing the outside in doesn’t always require green fingers. The ‘Enchanted Gardens’ collection from Osborne & Little puts the world’s most beautiful botanical wonders, from Japanese gardens to English meadows, in your home. The range includes fabrics suitable for both upholstery and drapery, as well as statement wallpapers, such as this ‘Bamboo’ design (below), available in six colourways. £65 per ten-metre roll (osborneandlittle.com).

EXPLORE THE EXOTIC

WORDS: MOLLY HUTCHINSON

Bring a kaleidoscope of colour and culture into your home with Zimmer and Rohde’s new ‘Marché Dakar – Partie de Campagne’ fabric collection. Painterly scenes of marketplaces, embroidered repeats and ribbon embellishments exemplify travel and craft. Used for curtains or upholstery, these fabrics provide the perfect backdrop to summer. From £63 per metre (zimmer-rohde.com).

C I N E M AT I C S C O P E

DESIGNED FOR LIFE

Take your home to the movies, with Mylands’ new ‘Film, TV & Theatre’ paints, which commemorate the London-based brand’s work with the British film industry – it has contributed to sets for James Bond, Harry Potter and much more. The palette of 20 colours is bold and daring, just like the heroes and villains of the big screen. We love (from top) ‘FTT07’, ‘FTT13’ and ‘FTT10’. From £22 for one litre (mylands.com).

Practicality is key when choosing fabrics for the most-used areas of your home. That’s why we’re fans of the new range by Baker Lifestyle at GP & J Baker. It’s childproof, dog-proof – life-proof, in fact. The durable collection includes robust plains, velvets and tweeds suitable for both heavy-duty upholstery and drapery. All available in more than 25 colours, including these dreamy blues. From £19.50 per metre (gpjbaker.com).

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FOUR OF THE BEST P L A C E S T O F I N D G AT E S Best for bespoke wrought iron The Great Gate Company This family-run company can make custom gates in historic, bespoke and contemporary styles, with durable powder-coated and galvanised finishes. Leafield Industrial Estate, Corsham SN13 (thegreatgate company.co.uk) Best for laser-cut designs Laser Cut Screens Using specialist techniques, Laser Cut Screens creates bespoke designs in a range of materials including natural and distressed metallic finishes or Corten steel, and can be painted in any gloss or matt RAL colour. (lasercutscreens.co.uk)

D E S I G N D E TA I L S

GATES AND RAILINGS

WORDS: CLAUDIA BAILLIE PICTURES: EMILY FREER

How do you go about choosing a new gate? From security to sizing and materials, here’s everything you need to keep in mind When choosing a gate, functionality is key, so first you should decide its main purpose. ‘A front gate is usually just a visual deterrent,’ says Paul Hensey at Green Zone Design (greenzonedesign.co.uk). ‘You don’t actually want to lock people out. A side or back gate, however, needs to be sturdy and secure to prevent people entering a private garden.’ If keeping children or animals safely in is a priority, opt for a solid design. ‘It also helps if there are no footholds or gaps where kids could get stuck,’ adds Hensey. ‘Position locks high, or choose a mechanism that can only be operated by adults.’ Consider the width of anything that needs to fit through it, such as prams and bins, as well as how much privacy you require. Finally, think about what the gate will be hung on: if the original gate is missing or needs replacing, the gateposts may need an upgrade too. Next, it’s time to think about materials. ‘Do you want the gate to be a focal point, or do you want it to blend into its surroundings?’ asks garden designer Catherine Clancy (catherineclancy.com). ‘This will help dictate the material.’ If you have wooden fencing, for example, it makes sense to choose the same timber. Certified woods such as oak or balau are durable choices, as are treated softwoods such as pine, which can be painted in a bespoke shade. ‘A gate painted the same colour as the front door can provide a wonderful visual link,’ says garden designer Andrew Duff (andrewduffgardendesign.com). A period property will often suit more traditional metalwork; most specialist manufacturers can copy a specific historic design. Incorporating patterns or motifs taken from the architecture of the house will help to create cohesion. Salvaged gates are also an option: ‘a metalworker will be able to alter the size to fit,’ says Andrew.

Best for wooden gates The Garden Trellis Company Founded in 1992, this company stocks inexpensive wooden gates and offers a bespoke service from design to installation. Gates can be finished with stain or paint in a wide variety of colours. 355 Old Road, Clacton-on-Sea CO15 (gardentrellis.co.uk) Best for salvaged gates English Salvage This Herefordshire specialist stocks a wide range of reclaimed gates in cast iron, wrought iron and wood, as well as salvaged gateposts, railings and decorative finials. North Road, Leominster HR6 (englishsalvage.co.uk)

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D E C O R AT O R I N D E X O L I V E R G U S TAV

We talk to our favourite interior designers about their work and ask them to share their styling tips

WORDS: EMMA LOVE

Who is he? Oliver Gustav is an interior architect, a gallerist and product designer. In 2007, he began doing fashion show set design for the likes of Louis Vuitton; four years later, he launched his interior design studio (right) in an old stable building near the Amalienborg Palace in Copenhagen. In 2016, he opened a second studio at the gallery space in the new 11 Howard hotel in New York. He sells a curated edit of bespoke pieces by designers and artists from Faye Toogood to Vincenzo De Cotiis. ‘Being both a gallery and interior practice comes naturally to me; it’s a way of combining what I love,’ he explains. ‘I represent a handful of interesting artists that speak to my DNA – some are very famous and others are rookies in whom I have spotted a special talent.’ What’s his style? For interiors, Gustav contrasts modern pieces with rare finds and curiosities, and a palette based on grey tones and monochrome surfaces (he adds in sepia shades for a softer touch). ‘You will notice monochrome spaces in my projects. I always try to unify the colours of the walls and ceilings to make a peaceful environment. I love the industrial – be it old or new, distressed or simple.’ He’s also someone for who texture is essential. ‘I balance soft and edgy to create an aesthetic full of beautiful contrasts.’ What are his recent projects? Gustav, who usually takes on three large projects a year, has almost exclusively worked on residential projects (below, right). ‘I mostly work with private clients because I want to help them realise their dreams. I listen, interpret and get inspiration, but I always

‘I want to help private clients realise their dreams. I listen, interpret and get inspiration, but always stay true to myself’ stay true to myself: if a project doesn’t look like a match, I will step away. I don’t like to compromise.’ Recently, he has started to branch out into the commercial world – designing Zeleste restaurant in a listed, 17th-century building in Copenhagen (far left). What is he currently working on? A beach house on the coast near Copenhagen. ‘It’s an 18th-century house that is in a very sad condition. We are using paint on the walls that has an amazing, cloudy-like texture. The house has very blue, Nordic light, but it will be softened through objects.’ He says ‘When you’re working on projects, you need to think about the light. For example, in London it’s very different from Los Angeles, and the type of light has an impact on the design.’ olivergustav.com Turn over for Oliver Gustav’s advice on choosing art ➤ JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 47


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D I P Y O U R T O E I N T O PAT T E R N

Love bold print? Here are three new up-and-coming brands creating graphic cushions that will brighten up any room Nina Kullberg This brand’s linen cushions come in a mix of bold, elegant patterns that are perfect for mixing and matching. Our favourite is the ‘Zebra’ cushion, which now comes in blue and green. From £69 (ninakullberg.com).

How to choose the right masterpiece for your home Beginning your collection I would say never buy a piece purely because it’s an investment – only buy when you feel it’s something that you can’t live without. Think about designers and artists you admire, and start there. Also, give yourself a budget – and stick to it – and a focus for the collection. I tend to buy modern, minimalist, monochrome pieces or very heavy, figurative paintings because I like the mix of old and new. Where to buy I go to all the big art fairs, such as Frieze, Art Basel and the Venice Biennale. They are useful for inspiration and a great way to discover new galleries. In time, you start to find your own secret places. One of my favourite galleries in Copenhagen is Christian Andersen. The owner has a strong eye and the guts to show artists who aren’t traditionally commercial. In Paris and New York, I like Galerie Perrotin, which has a handful of amazing artists. What to avoid I’m not fond of artists whose work is mass-produced. If you are buying furniture from an up-and-coming designer, go for something that is unique or a limited edition. The object itself is more interesting and it becomes a true collectors’ piece. A while ago, I found a young Danish designer called Kevin Josias who was made an offer by one of the big furniture companies to produce his iridised glass ‘Humphrey’ lamp. Instead, we collaborated and I produced it for him in a limited edition run of 18. To support talent and hand-crafted, small batch production like that is good. Presentation To protect precious paintings, use roller blinds or a UV filter on your windows. Sometimes one big piece is all you need, but alternatively you can mix art mediums and make a collection look cohesive by using similar frames. For larger collections, it can be wonderful to rotate pieces every other month. 48 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

Line Dot Studio Inspired by MidCentury graphics, this south-London studio screen prints its cotton pillows by hand, with patterns that show geometric, colourful flair. From £50 (linedotstudio.com).

FA N T A S T I C A L F L O O R I N G Herringbone and chevron parquet patterns are bang on trend at the moment, but high-end flooring purveyor Element 7 has taken the look one step further. Its ‘Da Vinci’ range of playful, ‘undirectional’ wooden parquet gives clients the ability to be even more creative with pattern. The carefully oiled wooden planks are perfect for making a design statement – and they are splashproof, so they can also be used in kitchens. Take a look for yourself at the brand’s new showroom at The Tower, Chelsea Creek, London. From £300 per square metre (element7.co.uk).

WORDS: EMMA LOVE, ELIZA HONEY

D E C O R AT O R I N D E X : E X P E R T A D V I C E OLIVER GUSTAV’S INSIDER GUIDE TO ART

Feathr With work from artists all over the globe, this Scandinavian company sells cushion covers that are small, original artworks for your sofa. ‘OhLaLa Blue’ (right), from £49 (feathr.com).


What happens when a quintessentially British wallpaper brand meets a ceramic studio producing hand-painted rhinos, pelicans and vines in South Africa? An explosion of pattern… What with the walls of Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament being lined in its wallpapers, it is tempting to typecast Cole & Son as a national treasure of a brand, the embodiment of traditional English design. But the 1875-founded manufacturer continues to seek out unexpected creatives and cultures to collaborate with – and its latest crossover is possibly the most exotic yet. Two years ago, the brand’s then-creative director, Shauna Dennison, stumbled across a small decorative art gallery in New York’s Upper East Side where she became bewitched by the hand-painted ceramic figurines created by Ardmore, a pottery studio based in South Africa, that mixes flora and fauna to great flamboyant effect. ‘Shauna was struck by their playfulness, but also

by the sophisticated narrative on the more detailed pieces that explored African traditions and culture,’ the company’s new head of creative, Carley Bean, says. ‘She thought immediately how well they would translate into wallpapers.’ Cole & Son approached Zimbabwe-born Fée Halsted, who founded Ardmore at her farmhouse home in 1985 and has grown the collective ever since, inviting inventive and nimble-fingered locals to the pottery to apprentice. Made from terracotta, then

It is impossible not to be charmed by the riot of rhinos, dancing acacia trees and elaborate urns finished with American Amaco paint (perfect for painting fine detail on clay) and a transparent glaze, the objects have earnt something approaching a cult following – pieces can now be found in New York’s Museum Of Arts And Design or Basel’s Museum Of Cultures, and have been described by Christie’s auction house as ‘modern day collectibles’. Last year, Ardmore became the first South African studio to collaborate with Hermès, which produced a series of silk scarves inspired by the designs of team member Sydney Nyabeze.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: ROGER DE LA HARPE/AFRICA IMAGERY

STYLE SAFARI


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F R O M P O T T O PA P E R BEHIND THE DESIGNS We take a closer look at five of the wallpapers from the ‘Ardmore’ range

JABU This design is named after Jabu Nene, one of the studio’s star painters whose paintbrush brings sculptor Somandla Ntshanlintshali’s dynamic rhino-embellished vessels (pictured below left) to life. The horns are spectacular, and note the background pattern which echoes a Zulu tribe woven basket.

K H U L U VA S E S Carafes adorned with creatures ranging from parrots to antelopes – or even just a single crocodile whose jaws are the spout – are Ardmore’s most coveted creations. The animals’ gymnastic feats on this wallpaper are entertaining enough to diminish the need to hang any pictures on your walls.

S I N G I TA

To produce its own collection, the Cole & Son pattern design team visited Ardmore’s headquarters by the Drakensberg mountains several times to explore the pottery’s archive, identify recurring motifs, and witness the creative process of designing, throwing, sculpting and hand-painting each piece. Cole & Son’s designers redrew the sculptures from scratch to turn them into two dimensional wallpapers. ‘Then we played with scale and layout digitally, before hand-painting the final pattern,’ explains Bean. ‘We wanted to include bold, daring colours to offer a very different look, but also not overlook the earthier tones of rural South Africa. We were very sensitive to doing the ceramics justice.’ It is impossible not to be charmed by the riot of rhinos, dancing acacia trees and elaborate urns with handles fashioned from leopards’ tails. ‘The Ardmore artists and I have toiled away for 31 years, creating fanciful ceramics that have provided an income to feed many a family,’ says Halsted. ‘It’s an honour that Cole & Son wanted to use our designs. Working with them has been such fun.’ Indeed, since the collection’s launch, some ceramicists at Ardmore have thrown pots inspired by the wallpapers’ graphics, which delighted Bean: ‘It’s fabulous. It feels as if this collaboration has come full circle.’ (cole-and-son.com). Wallpapers from left ‘Savuti’, £80 per ten-metre roll; ‘Acacia’, £80 per ten-metre roll; ‘Safari Dance’, £80 per ten-metre roll, all by Cole & Son

‘We knew we wanted a dense, Henri Rousseau-inspired jungle scene for one wallpaper,’ says Carley Bean, Cole & Son’s head of creative. The foliage that trims many Ardmore pots inspired this design, which translates as ‘Place of Miracles’ in Shangaan and is the name of a wildlife reserve in South Africa. Spot the occasional animal, drawn by artist Alex Sibande.

NARINA A Narina Trogon is a bird native to South Africa’s KwaZulu Natal region. The Cole & Son team noticed that a tessellated pattern inspired by its feathers was used to decorate the bases of Ardmore’s sculptures. This wallpaper is one of the subtler designs in the collection, available in green, orange and neutrals.

S AV U T I The aim of this design is to offer a portrait of one of Africa’s regions best-known for wildlife, the Savuti. For inspiration, Cole & Son’s designers drew on three Ardmore pieces: the baboon teapot, hornbill bird vase (right) and chameleon vessel.

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M Y C U LT U R A L L I F E SONIA SOLICARI

We ask a style icon to share what they are reading, watching, listening to and more Former V&A curator Sonia Solicari has recently taken over the helm at The Geffrye, Museum of the Home (6) in Hoxton. The museum showcases period furniture, textiles and paintings, and is a treasure trove of interiors inspiration and social history. As director, she will oversee ‘Unlocking the Geffrye’, the building’s £18million transformation plans (@ssolicari; geffrye-museum.org.uk).

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The last exhibition I saw and loved was ‘Emma Hamilton: Seduction and Celebrity’ at the National Maritime Museum (View of Merton, 3). The 5 show managed to be both salacious and thoughtful, which is quite a feat. I’ve begun building up my own collection of 19thcentury ceramics since leaving the V&A. There are lots of playful pieces from the Victorian period. I also collect vintage costume jewellery. I like wearing something with a bit of history. A free day in London would start with an all-day breakfast at Maries Cafe on Lower Marsh Street, followed by a browse in Liberty and Treadwell’s bookshop, before heading to the British Museum for a look at its Victorian jewellery. Dinner would be at The Gay Hussar in Soho (4). Technophile or technophobe? I’m currently mapping ut the digital future of The Geffrye, so my passion for all things technological is growing quickly. My favourite place in the world is Tokyo (1), especially during cherry blossom season.

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: DAVID WESTWOOD © NATIONAL MARITIME MUSEUM, LONDON, ALAMY, EM FITZGERALD

My all-time favourite piece of music is Si Maritau Rosa, an Italian folk song, which also features in Pina Bausch’s Viktor – it is desperately melancholy. But the song that makes me feel instantly happy is the theme from Fame; it reminds me of being five years old and leaping off the sofa with my sister. I’m currently listening to the Best of Joan C Baez (5). We’ve seen a resurgence in artists using their popularity as a platform for social protest – Baez was one of the first. The book that has influenced me the most is Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure (2). It’s the most tragic and shocking novel I’ve ever read. The Saturday Book – an annual miscellany, published from 1941 to 1975 – is full of brilliant writing and it’s been the source of inspiration for many of my curatorial projects. I’m currently reading The Comfort of Things by Daniel Miller – an anthropological study of 30 households on an ordinary London street. It reveals how objects become meaningful to our lives and has made me reassess the role of possessions in our understanding of what makes a home. My favourite film is Gone With the Wind (7). I love Vivien Leigh films. The scene when she tears down the green velvet curtains to make the most outrageous and defiant outfit is a reason to invest in soft furnishings.


WORDS: AMY BRADFORD PICTURES: PER KNUDESEN

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H I S T O RY O F A B R A N D C A R L H A N S E N & S Ø N

The furniture brand that’s synonymous with Danish Modernism FOUR THINGS TO KNOW CARL HANSEN & SØN

In 1908, when the Danish cabinetmaker Carl Hansen opened a small furniture workshop on the Danish island of Funen, he couldn’t have guessed that just over a century later it would be one of the most revered design brands in the world. Or that it would still be based in the small town of Gelsted – all whitewashed churches and half-timbered cottages – and run by his own grandson, Knud Erik Hansen. When Knud Erik took the helm in 2002, Carl Hansen & Søn was not quite the international powerhouse it is today. The company had worked away discreetly, hand-

Four out of five of the brand’s best-selling designs are by Hans J Wegner, and all are chairs. The most popular is the ‘CH24’ (‘Wishbone’) dining chair, but the ‘CH445’ (‘Wing’) armchair (right) and Ole Wanscher’s ‘OW149’ are also on the list.

Once a small Danish furniture workshop, it’s now one of the world’s most revered design brands

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crafting Danish classics such as those by Hans J Wegner, whose longstanding collaboration with the brand began in 1949. It was Carl Hansen’s son, Holger, who took a chance on Wegner, then a young unknown; it would be Carl’s grandson, Knud Erik, who recognised that Wegner’s designs were assets that could propel the manufacturer to global success. As well as other mid-century Danish luminaries such as Ole Wanscher, Kaare Klint and Frits Henningsen, the company has also worked with contemporary talents, including Austrian trio EOOS and Danish textile designer Naja Utzon Popov. In 2014, Japanese architect Tadao Ando unveiled his sculptural ‘Dream’ chair, a tribute to Wegner. This year, the company is reissuing Wegner’s ‘CH23’ dining chair, that has been out of production since 1950. Along with the ‘CH22’, ‘CH24’ and ‘CH25’, it completes the designer’s original quartet of beautifully crafted seats. It’s fitting that on the tenth anniversary of his death, they should all be together again (carlhansen.com). From top Hans J Wegner and a room featuring his designs. ‘Dream’ chair by Tadao Ando. ‘CH24’ chair by Wegner. ‘Kiri’ rug by Naja Utzon Popov

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The company has opened a number of showrooms around the world in recent years, including stores in Los Angeles in 2015, Milan and London last year, and, this February, New York. The latter is designed as a loft-style apartment rather than a normal showroom.

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Each ‘Wishbone’ chair takes weeks to make and involves 100 production steps. But an experienced craftsman, such as Benny Hammer Larsen, who has worked at Carl Hansen for over 20 years, can weave its intricate seat in just one hour.

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The company buys timber from sustainably managed forests – mainly in Denmark, but walnut and cherrywood comes from America – and uses almost every bit, recycling what remains in local heating plants.


Style | A R C H I T E C T U R E

MEET THE MASTERS

These books detail the work of some of Europe’s visionary architects

THE MAIN EVENTS

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Three architectural occasions to look forward to this summer 1 Europe’s biggest architecture festival The London Festival of Architecture (1–30 June; londonfestivalofarchitecture.org) returns again this summer, bigger than ever. Highlights include lectures from architecture superstars David Adjaye and Daniel Libeskind, and an array of activities and events open to all in the spectacular Dulwich Pavilion, designed by emerging practice IF_DO.

WORDS: JAMES WILLIAMS PICTURES: ALAMY

2 Now in its second year, the non-profit Architecture Fringe, Scotland (1–24 July; architecturefringe.com) features a varied programme of special events, exhibitions, installations and public debates in both Glasgow and Edinburgh. Under the theme ‘Occupying the Post-Industrial City’, six cultural groups will explore new solutions for Glasgow’s buildings through architectural experiments. 3 The Museum of Modern Art New York will exhibit a major retrospective, ‘Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive’ (12 June–1 October; moma.org). The exhibition will feature some 450 works by one of the most prolific architects and intellects of the 20th century.

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Alvar Aalto: Architect (£40, Merrell) This new visual Aalto biography documents the extraordinary career and personal life of one of the greatest Scandinavian Modernists. Explore his furniture collections including the ‘60 Stool’ for Artek and ‘Vase’ collection for Iittala, alongside his most famed building, the grand Finlandia Hall in the Finnish capital Helsinki. Mackintosh (£8.99, Taschen) Scotland’s greatest architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, was an avant-garde pioneer who brought mixes of Japanese, Art Nouveau and a new way of thinking to the architecture profession. Part of the ‘Basic Architecture’ series, this new edition chronicles Mackintosh’s major works, including the famous Glasgow School of Art and castle-like Hill House in Helensburgh, as well as showcasing his intricate furniture designs made in collaboration with his artist wife Margaret Macdonald.

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Carlo Scarpa (£29.95, Phaidon) The Italian architect is relatively unknown outside the architecture world, but ask anyone in the industry and they would agree he was an architectural pioneer for his time. This new reissued paperback monograph examines his incredibly poetic use of materials; from the sweeping red staircase of the Banca Popolare in Verona to his sleek use of concrete and wood at the Olivetti showroom in Venice.

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KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY Aram Store takes destination shopping to another level with this month’s launch of a brand-new space dedicated to MDF Italia in the heart of London’s Covent Garden

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or over 50 years, Aram Store has stood as one of London’s leading design names – a reputation that is in no small part a reflection of the relationships the company builds with the brands and designers it showcases. Take MDF Italia. Aram has long worked with the Milan-based furniture design and manufacturing company, an association that has become stronger over time – not least because of the vision and values that both brands share. Both are family-run (MDF Italia was aquired by the Cassina family in 2013), and are passionate advocates of quality and innovation in design. The relaunch of MDF Italia at Aram Store is in many ways a natural progression of this.

From May, visitors to Aram’s flagship retail space in the heart of Covent Garden will be able to browse products from MDF Italia’s collections over a brand-new, 100-squaremetre dedicated display area. The hand-

Like Aram, MDF Italia is passionate about championing innovation and quality in design picked selection – curated by Aram Store – will feature a comprehensive collection of dining, lounge and storage furniture of both newly-launched and existing favourites from the MDF Italia catalogue.

Founded by designer Bruno Fattorini in 1992, MDF Italia works with some of the world’s leading design names (including Rodolfo Dordoni, Jehs+Laub, Jean-Marie Massaud and Nendo) whose pieces for the company all encapsulate its trademark expression of simple, sophisticated and intelligent design. The ‘Tense Material’ dining table (opposite) is a case in point. Designed by Piergiorgio and Michele Cazzaniga in 2009 and launched at the Milan Furniture Fair the following year, its pure, clean lines belie the technical innovation that allows a tabletop that is only 3.5cm thick to be manufactured to up to several metres in length without apparent additional support. The monochromatic


ELLE Decoration | P R O M O T I O N

HOOKED ON CLASSICS THREE MDF ITALIA UPDATES

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Neuland Industriedesign’s ‘Random’ bookcase is being launched in new colours and modules in 2017, adding even greater flexibility and standout to what is widely seen as an icon of modern design.

Opposite page ‘Sign Filo’ steel wire chairs by Piergiorgio Cazzaniga, £1,537 each. ‘Thea’ sofa by Lina Obregòn & Carolina Galan, £4,610. This page, above ‘Aiku’ chairs by Jean-Marie Massaud, £534 each. ‘Tense Material’ dining table in brass by Piergiorgio and Michele Cazzaniga, £4,697 Top right ‘Random’ shelving by Neuland Industriedesign, £1,929. ‘Sag’ stool by Nendo, £298 Right ‘Random’ shelving and ‘Thea’ sofa, as before. ‘S Table’ dining table by Xavier Lust, £2,739. All MDF Italia at Aram Store

original is now available in three new finishes – wood, stone and brass (above) – which will surely only add to its status as a modern classic. Similarly alluring is Cazzaniga’s ‘Sign Filo’ side chair (opposite). Launched this year, its deceptively simple profile is carefully engineered from 45 metres of steel wire in four different diameters, with every single one of the 226 points on its 16 shoulders and 12 cross-wires sealed and finished by skilled hands. Such a complex, considered approach to what, at first glance at least, might often appear to be a model of pared-back design is characteristic of MDF Italia. Consider the ‘Aiku’ series of chairs (above), launched in 2016. The design, by Jean-Marie Massaud,

draws inspiration from Japanese haiku, with the three core elements of its look and finish a nod to the verse structure of the poems that inspired it. Similarly, Lina Obregòn and Carolin Galan’s upholstered ‘Thea’ seating system (opposite, top), uses different seams to reference tailoring detail, while the curved base of Nendo’s ‘Sag’ stool (top right) appears to float lightly, almost as a piece of folded fabric, but is in fact moulded in high-density polyurethane to be highly shock-, scratch- and age-resistant. Simple, thoughtful and as beautiful to look at as they are to use – discover all of these pieces and more at Aram Store. Aram Store, 110 Drury Lane, London WC2; aram.co.uk; 020 7557 7557

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Modular furniture isn’t new, but the ‘Thea’ sofa (above and opposite) is further enhanced by a six-strong range of functional accessories that allows it to adapt and transform – over the course of a day or years – according to your needs.

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An ELLE Decoration International Designer Award winner in 2008, Xavier Lust’s ‘S Table’ has become something of a design icon – a reputation set to continue now that it’s also offered with white, grey and black marble tops.

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Do adjust your set From live sports and hit movies to catch-up services and box-set binges, there are more home entertainment options today than ever before. Here, tech guru Tom Bailey explains how to get exactly what you want without paying for services you don’t need Illustration BABETH LAFON

What do I get for my money with expensive packages from Sky and Virgin? Essentially, you are paying for access to the latest films and exclusive live sports coverage such as Premier League football matches. In return for signing up to a pricey annual contract, the provider will install a fancy set-top box with access to 250+ channels and 50+ HD channels. You will be able to store, pause and rewind TV, and watch your favourite shows on mobile devices. The most advanced paid-for package, Sky Q (from £22 a month), adds next-generation features such as 4K Ultra-HD broadcasts and touchscreen remote controls. What if I don’t need all that? If watching the season premiere of Game of Thrones is not a matter of life and death, there’s no need to fork out costly monthly fees. Freeview, the replacement for the UK’s old analogue TV service, offers up to 70 channels and 15 HD channels through a TV aerial. There are no contracts or fees (besides a TV Licence). All TVs made after 2010 have a Freeview tuner built-in; older TV sets may require the addition of a plug-in Freeview box (£50 for a no-frills model). What in heaven’s name are BT TV and EE TV? When you sign up to a broadband contract with BT, EE or TalkTalk, you can add in a TV service. You get a set-top box that combines Freeview channels through a TV aerial with on-demand TV through broadband. BT TV and Talk Talk are perfect for sports fans, as both offer Sky channels (£22 extra per month for BT; £16 extra on Talk Talk). EE TV offers pay-per-view access to Sky. What if I don’t want to bolt an aerial/dish to the side of my beautiful home? Thanks to the magic of technology, you can opt to watch TV online via apps such as BBC iPlayer and ITV Hub. Smart TVs – by that we mean TV sets that connect to the internet – offer seamless access to most popular catch-up services. They also act as a portal for on-demand subscription services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. ➤

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Style | T E C H N O L O G Y

W H AT A B O U T MUSIC?

DO ADJUST YOUR SET What’s so great about Netflix and Amazon Prime Video? These vast libraries of on-demand films, TV episodes and box sets are a binge-watcher’s paradise. You can access them on a mobile device or a smart TV. A broadband connection speed of just 3MBs per second should be adequate. Both Netflix and Amazon offer rolling one-month contracts, costing a minimum of £5.99 a month, that can be cancelled at any time. Plus, if you have signed up to Amazon Prime delivery (for free next-day delivery on all eligible items), you get Amazon Prime Video included in your £79 annual fee. What if I don’t have a smart TV? It’s simple to turn an ordinary TV set into a ‘smart’ one by plugging a Wi-Ficonnected media streaming device into its HDMI port. Google ‘Chromecast’ (£30) connects your laptop or phone to your TV screen, and can play content from Netflix (if you have

a subscription), plus shows from BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, All4 and more. Amazon ‘Fire TV Stick’ (£35) provides access to all of the above, plus Amazon Prime Video (again, as long as you have a subscription). Sky’s ‘Now TV’ box (from £14.99) has the added benefit that it offers pay-to-view daily or monthly passes to Sky’s live TV channels without the need for a Sky dish. Is Apple TV a good choice? Useful if you’ve purchased a lot of films, TV shows and music in the iTunes Store, the Apple TV box provides access to all of this on your television. Simply plug it into an HDMI port. It’s not great for watching live TV, but is pre-loaded with apps such as BBC iPlayer and Netflix. You can also display content from your iPhone or other Apple device, from websites to home videos, on your telly using Apple TV’s AirPlay (the brand’s name for mirroring) – simply connect your phone/tablet/laptop to the internet and press the logo that looks like a TV screen with a triangle at the bottom.

Should I take out a TV, broadband and calls package? It’s cost effective and less hassle when something goes wrong thanks to over-the-phone tech support and the ability to quickly replace any faulty boxes. However, you will have to commit to a 12- or 18-month contract. What if I’m still unsure about all this? Check which TV services are actually available in your area by inputting your postcode into a price comparison website. If you’re not a big fan of movies and sports, stick to a Freeview box or upgrade to a smart TV. That way, you can expand your TV-viewing empire with premium services when you feel like it.

What’s the best multiroom sound system? Multi-room wireless speakers offer style and convenience, allowing you to replace assorted hi-fis and radios with one sleek system. You can match the number of speakers to the size of your home, and control the music in each room using a smartphone or tablet. Broadly speaking, there are two types of wireless speaker: Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Bluetooth speakers are best suited to a single room. They have a limited range (30 metres) and you may find that your music is interrupted by your phone ringing. The main advantage of a Wi-Fi system, such as Sonos, is that it allows you to simultaneously play different songs in every room that contains a speaker. The Sonos system is hugely popular because it delivers rich, room-filling sound and compatibility with 30 popular streaming services. It’s affordable, too. Start with an entry-level ‘PLAY:1’ speaker (£159) and add up to 31 more throughout your home. On the downside, if party guests want to connect their own phones to your Sonos, they have to download the app. Competitors such as the Samsung ‘R-series’ (from £149) and Bose ‘SoundTouch’ system (from £170) don’t have that issue, as they have both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity. Neither can quite match the Sonos for sound quality, though.

HOW TO DISPOSE OF OLD TECH From tablets and TVs to food processors and coffee machines, almost all electronic devices contain potentially toxic heavy metals. Consequently, they should never be thrown out with your household rubbish. Instead, you should safely dispose of them in accordance with Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) regulations. To make it easy for consumers, larger retailers are obliged to offer a ‘take back’ service when they sell a new electrical item. For example, when you buy a new TV in a store, you have 28 days

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to bring back your old one. Online retailers offer a similar service but may charge a fee for collection. You can also take old electrical items to your nearest e-waste Approved Authorised Treatment Facility (your local council will provide details). Charities including Oxfam recycle old mobile phones, while Apple’s Renew programme lets you recycle out-of-date Apple products in return for a gift card towards your next purchase. Alternatively, you can donate old devices to social enterprises such as the Turingtrust.org.uk or Computeraid.org. E D


Style | C O L O U R

POWDER PINK PANTONE 705CP

®

Forget ideas of giddy girlishness, this new neutral is perfect for interiors

Over recent years, pink has led the kind of double life usually reserved for comic book heroes. By day, it is caught up in the politics of feminist debate. By night, a softer shade has stolen our hearts. Pale pinks are traditionally considered the pinnacle of girlishness. But this has only been the case since the mid-century: before then, if pink was twinned with any gender, it was male rather than female. It was seen as a faded version of red, a militaristic hue – while blue recalled the Virgin Mary and was considered daintier and more appropriate for girls. Now this seems almost unthinkable: for better or worse, pink has become a politicised shorthand for women and women’s issues. It was the colour adopted by the Women’s Marches earlier this year, even while another strand of feminism deplored the pink tax and the monotonous confetti of pink paraphernalia dumped over little girls from birth. However, this particular shade of pink – perhaps because it contains subtle dashes of grey and yellow – has the advantage of feeling like an architectural and neutral shade, rather than a divisive one.

This particular pink has the advantage of feeling like an architectural and neutral shade, rather than a divisive one The term ‘powder pink’ dates back to 1900, when a magazine rhapsodised about fine French flannel blouses available in this shade. Now, a century later, it has been embraced by millennials. The starter pistol was Apple’s rose gold iPhones and Pantone’s anointing of ‘Rose Quartz’ as its colour of the year in 2016. Whatever the reason for its success, brands and social media alike are awash with images celebrating powder pink (there’s an entire ELLE Decoration Pinterest board dedicated to the shade). Because it is neutral, it makes an appealing all-over wall colour. Farrow & Ball has two options – the dustier, softer ‘Peignoir’ and the cleaner ‘Pink Ground’ (both £43.50 for 2.5 litres), while Benjamin Moore’s ‘Tissue Pink’ is a perennial favourite (£58 for 3.79 litres). For those looking to accessorise, Scandinavian companies Hay and Normann Copenhagen are a good place to start. The latter has embraced powder pink on everything from rugs (‘Oona’, £399.90) to candlesticks (‘Nocto’, £14.90). Given this glut of popular pink for the masses, perhaps there’s no need for the colour to lead a double life after all.

WORDS: KASSIA ST CLAIR PICTURE: GETTY

More paints to try ‘Rose Damask II’ chalky emulsion, £18.56 for one litre, Francesca’s Paints (francescaspaint.com). ‘Cheriton Bloom’ emulsion by Hemsley, £27.99 for 2.5 litres, Homebase (homebase.co.uk)

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RUGS: ART FOR YO U R F L O O R We’ve picked out the six biggest trends in rugs at the moment. Plus, all you need to know about buying vintage – because some styles never go out of fashion

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T E X T U R E TA K E S OV E R

Forget flat rugs. This year’s designs have a new dimension

The current desire for added texture is driving innovation. Classic Swedish brand Kasthall has created the ‘Field’ rug, with a relief pattern that’s produced using different heights of bouclé (looped wool). Meanwhile, at Italian brand CC-Tapis, design wunderkind Faye Toogood experiments with traditional quilting, applique and stitching techniques for her ‘Quilt’ rug. And at Dutch company Danskina, the ‘Burrow’ rug by design director Hella Jongerius uses simple hand-knotting techniques to create three-dimensional texture. 1 ‘Burrow’, £601 per square metre, Danskina (danskina.com) 2 ‘Field’, £2,167, Kasthall (kasthall.com) 3 ‘Faceted’, from £1,254, Rosenthal (rosenthal.de) 4 ‘Kaya’, £800, Floor Story (floorstory.co.uk) 5 ‘Sottoportico’, from £2,027, Portego (portego.it) 6 ‘Semis’, from £2,820, Danskina (danskina.com) 7 ‘Isotopie’, from £853 per metre, La Manufacture Cogolin (manufacturecogolin.com)

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WORDS: ELIZA HONEY PICTURES: KARL ANDREN, FRANCIS AMIAND

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Style | S H O P P I N G

These rugs prove that browns and greys are anything but boring

Classic patterns and pared-back colours that work in any interior – that’s the beauty of the latest ranges from Front and The Rug Company. German designer Michaela Schleypen’s ‘Men’s Suit’ collection for Front takes inspiration from men’s tailoring, with houndstooth and tartan reinterpreted as abstract hand-knotted rugs. At The Rug Company, restrained elegance is the mood of the moment; from British furniture designer Tim Gosling’s Art Deco-style designs in grey and beige, to Lebanese fashion designer Elie Saab’s florals that have an ethereal shimmer. 1 ‘In Bloom’ by Elie Saab, from £1,700, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com) 2 ‘Empire’ by Tim Gosling, £1,170 per square metre, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com) 3 ‘Tartan’ by Michaela Schleypen, £19,850, Front (frontrugs.com) 4 ‘Brushstrokes’ by Elie Saab, from £1,700, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com) 5 ‘Lace Leaves’ by Elie Saab, from £1,700, The Rug Company (therugcompany.com)

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SEEK A HIDE

Cowhide rugs are cool again! But this time, modern pattern is key

Banish visions of 1970s chalet style – cowhides have been given bold geometric designs and a lick of bright colour. Brooklyn-based designer Brit Kleinman hand-dyes every one of the hide rugs for her own brand Avo. We love her ‘Painted Plains’ collection, which looks striking whether used as wallhangings or rugs. For an even wilder array of hides, try Texas-based product designer Kyle Bunting. He is widely known as the first designer to create decorative hides, and his collections are still the most extravagant money can buy. 5

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1 ‘Geometric’ by Avo, £2,210, Alice Lily Interiors (alicelilyinteriors.com) 2 ‘Sunburst Dash’ by Avo, £2,210, Alice Lily Interiors (alicelilyinteriors.com) 3 ‘Troika’, from £399, Made (made.com) 4 ‘Intersection H.1’ by Avo, £2,210, Alice Lily Interiors (alicelilyinteriors.com) 5 ‘Element III’ by Kyle Bunting, £1,189 per square metre (kylebunting.com)

PICTURE: JUTTA STEGERS

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THE NEW NEUTR ALS


Style | S H O P P I N G

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T H E M O D E R N C A N VA S

Artistic expression and comfort combine in the latest designs

Many brands are translating classic and contemporary drawings and paintings into rugs. With ethical rug designer Deirdre Dyson’s training in fine art and painting, her nature-inspired designs have a beautiful painterly quality. As does the new ‘Untitled’ collection by James Tufenkian, which also takes its cue from nature, reimagining materials with loose, abstract brushstrokes. Rug designer Christopher Farr has long embraced the concept of rugs as art, creating pieces designed by renowned artists. We particularly love the Bauhaus-style designs of Josef and Anni Albers. 1 ‘Homage to the Square: New Gate’ by Josef Albers (edition of ten), £6,000, Christopher Farr (christopherfarr.com) 2 ‘Caverns Blue Steel’, £600, Tufenkian (tufenkiancarpets.com) 3 ‘Tree Bark’, £3,715, Deirdre Dyson (deirdredyson.com) 4 ‘Lily Pond’, from £1,020 per square metre, Deirdre Dyson (deirdredyson.com) 5 ‘Red Meander’ by Anni Albers, £9,000, Christopher Farr (christopherfarr.com)

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GEOMETRIC: HIGH-END T O H I G H -S T R E E T

The trend for bold pattern shows no sign of slowing down. Here’s our pick of the best

1 ‘Leo’, from £600, Habitat (habitat.co.uk) 2 ‘Purlin’ by Case, from £382, Heal’s (heals.com) 3 ‘Abstract Rectangle’, £450, The Conran Shop (conranshop.com) 4 ‘Blue Marine’ by Eileen Gray, £1,665, Aram Store (aram.co.uk)

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FOUR OF THE BEST P L A C E S T O B U Y V I N TA G E Esti B Esti Barnes is a rug designer who hails from Turkey and trained in textiles in Istanbul. Her showroom in Design Centre Chelsea Harbour is a good spot for sourcing vintage Turkish flat-weave rugs. She has recently launched a collection of vintage kilims, reworked for contemporary tastes (topfloorrugs.com). Beldi Rugs While owners Emma Wilson and Tamsin Flower don’t operate a bricks and mortar showroom, their online shop is a good place to find modern and vintage Moroccan rugs. Give them a call if you’re looking for something special, including Beni Ourain rugs in bespoke sizes (beldirugs.com).

We asked Souad Larusi of the eponymous rug showroom to explain the varieties of designs and what to look for when buying (larusi.com)

KILIM A generic term for rugs that are woven rather than knotted – they do not have pile. They work well in all interiors, particularly when pile is not appropriate, such as under the dining room table.

them. The results are wild, impulsive and reminiscent of contemporary paintings; they are hardy and can be used anywhere. Their painterly use of shape and colour makes them ideal as wall hangings, too.

BENI OURAIN Characterised by the predominant use of white and dark brown or black wool with diamond shaped or lattice patterns. The thick designs are woven in a loose manner with the Berber knot that allows them to remain supple.

FIVE TIPS FOR BUYING VINTAGE 1 Make sure the rug lays flat without bulges. Many are made with low-grade wool, which is chemically enhanced to look soft. The chemicals strip the wool’s natural lanolin which gives it durability and are also bad for the skin. A tell-tale sign is wool that’s a darkish buttery beige. 2 Check the selvedge (this is the edge that prevents a rug from unravelling). If it is broken or weak, the rug will fall apart. 3 Inspect the pile. Check that it is more or less even, and not eroded in large parts. 4 Have the rugs washed, aired and restored. There’s nothing worse than purchasing a piece that is still dirty or falling apart under the pretext that it is vintage. 5 Be warned – some pile rugs and kilims have patterns in colours that may not necessarily be colour fast.

AZILAL They usually have an un-dyed beige background with patterns reflecting the weaver’s tribal life. They tend to be of a small to medium size (much smaller than Beni Ourain rugs). Made in a low pile with a looser structure, using a symmetrical knot, they’re not durable enough for heavy traffic areas such as hallways. BOUCHEROUITE These rugs are made of recycled materials. Because of the low-cost components, weavers give themselves a freehand when designing 72 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

Altai Collecting special rugs is a practice that runs deep in this Italian family-run operation. Raffaele Carrieri started the rug-selling business and now, two generations later, the Altai collection has a world-class showroom in Milan. The vintage pieces, especially the authentic Beni Ourain designs, are exquisite (altai.it). Emily’s House This lovely byappointment-only showroom is set up in a beautiful townhouse overlooking London’s Green Park. Its Danish owner Katrien Vermeeren’s collection, from boucherouite designs to vintage Caput (striped Turkish rugs), is worth the effort of paying her a visit (emilyshouselondon.com).

PICTURE: CHRISSIE MACDONALD

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V I N TAG E


Whether you have a big garden or dream of a home overspilling with succulents, it’s time to flex your green fingers. And we have the ideas, inspiration and expert tips to get you started

BALCONY IN BLOOM

Floral designer Charlie McCormick tells us how he turned his London balcony garden into a green oasis

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURE: JASON INGRAM

Around the sides of the balcony I have planted evergreens that help to screen us from our neighbours. I also like to have a bit of colour: the purple agapanthus, for example, is great because its flowers last a long time and it doesn’t need much water. I also have a fig tree and an apple tree planted in big pots to add height and texture, with roses and honeysuckle climbing through them. On the upper level of the terrace, above the seating area, I grow vegetables. mccormick.london

CHARLIE’S TOP TIPS 1 It’s worth testing the quality of your soil. It will help you to select plants that will flourish. 2 Height is good in a garden. Not only does it add more texture and interest, it provides shade to the terrace and other plants. 3 Scented climbers are a winner, because they please several senses.


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

THE INDESTRUCTIBLES

Killed every plant you’ve ever owned? Buy one of these. They positively thrive on neglect, able to cope without being watered for up to a month A L O E While these

succulents need bright light, they can be allowed to dry out between waterings. They also grow slowly, so you won’t have to keep repotting them.

Any fans of Britain’s favourite flower would do well to swing by Devon between 17 June and 30 July, when one of the country’s largest collections, the RHS garden Rosemoor, is in full bloom for its annual six-week Rose Festival. The borders, arches and beds erupt with blousy roses in every hue, plus there’s a floral-themed craft and food market, rose-petal and rhubarb cake served in the Garden Kitchen, and late-night openings when live music and Pimm’s will accompany a wander round the gardens at dusk (rhs.org.uk).

Buy this Create the illusion of owning a meadow in bloom with a photographic print of one of Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf’s projects – they can be hung indoors or out. From £191 (pietoudolfcollection.com). TWO GUIDES FOR GREEN FINGERS SowHow: A Modern Guide To Grow-Your-Own Veg To the amateur, traditional gardening books can seem impenetrable – too laden with Latin names. Not so this handy guide, which will escort you, via colourful infographics, diagrams and step-by-step charts, from seed to success. Follow the instructions to home-grow everything from leeks, beets and tarragon to cucamelons, plus there are excellent sections on storage and troubleshooting – we’re bookmarking the page on how to win the war against snails (Pavilion, £12.99). The Gardener’s Garden This is perhaps the most comprehensive compendium of gardens old, new, near and far – and it has now been released in a smaller, more portable (and therefore almost half the price) edition. The 250-plus gardens it contains range from the big-scale and bucolic (Great Dixter), to Modernist (Chile’s Jardín Los Vilos), painterly (Monet’s Giverny) and petite (Colonial Williamsburg). The glorious quality of the photographs is not diminished, and they are well captioned with landscaping tips and plant listings (Phaidon, £29.95). 76 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

SPIDER PLANT

(chlorophytum comosum). As long as you give this household favourite a reasonable amount of light, you can pretty much forget about it. J A PA N E S E A R A L I A

(fatsia japonica). These tough-leaved plants can withstand changes in temperature. Although they don’t mind drying out a little between waterings, they need a lot of light. K E N T I A PA L M

(howea forsteriana). Another tough-leaved plant that doesn’t mind being around children and large pets. It can also take reduced light levels. M O T H E R - I N - L AW ’ S T O N G U E (sansevieria

trifasciata). These really robust plants can be kept in darker spots in the house, don’t mind drying out between waterings and also remain compact, which makes them ideal for use in hallways. FERN ARUM

(zamioculcas zamiifolia) These compact plants are happy to dry out and can take a dark location. Plant picks from At home With Plants by Ian Drummond and Kara O’Reilly (Mitchell Beazley, £20), out now

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, RHS/JIM WILEMAN, RHS/JASON INGRAM

BED OF ROSES


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

The outside space at garden designer Dan Pearson’s Waterloo studio is flanked by a high wall. We find out how he turned a barrier into a blessing The sun pours in over the wall that divides the garden from the school next door and the shadow splits the space in two. This gave us a range of conditions to play with. We put a terrace at the wider end of the plot to make room for a table. Against the wall, we placed three oversized planters with thamnochortus insignis, a grass-like South African plant that moves gently in the breeze, and minty pelargoniums (geraniums) to brush past on the way to the front door. The thinner end of the garden, where we have the bulk of the planting, is divided by a path that leads to the bicycle racks – a terrace planted with cornus ‘Gloria Birkett’ provides privacy. For the paving, we chose a pale Jura limestone, which bounces light around. danpearsonstudio.com 78 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

DAN’S TOP TIPS 1 Clad a tall wall with climbers to make up for limited planting space on the ground. 2 In an enclosed courtyard, include a still water feature. It becomes a focal point and the reflective surface brings the sky into the garden. 3 Use soft planting and green foliage to screen bins or bike racks.

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: JASON INGRAM

T H E WA L L E D G A R D E N


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

THE URBAN JUNGLE

Landscape garden designer Jinny Blom has created a wild escape in the garden at her London home. Here, she tells us how to embrace the exotic

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: RACHEL WARNE

The garden faces out over woodland, so I wanted to create a space that linked to the longer view. I also wanted a slightly exotic outdoor space, so chose two big leafed trees – a Paulownia and a Catalpa – which are under-planted with echiums, roses, irises in a dramatic shade of black and purple agapanthus. I was trying to create the look of a well-mannered jungle! I have no lawn, so the terraces are completely surrounded by planting in quite moody colours. I also decided to add a pond, because I love all of the wildlife water brings and I’ve always had a pond in my gardens. This time I made it very structured. It splits the space, so that you have to cross a bridge to get into the deep jungle. ‘The Thoughtful Gardener: An Intelligent Approach To Garden Design’ by Blom is out now (Jacqui Small, £35); jinnyblom.com

JINNY’S TOP TIPS 1 Use lots of easy self-seeding plants such as Nigella. They help to tie the wider planting scheme together. 2 Plant a grape vine on a wall or a pergola. Home-grown grapes are delicious and the leaves are great for wrapping fish to cook on the barbecue. 3 Buy the biggest pots you can and plant lots of Agapanthus africanus.


S P L I T- L E V E L PA R A D I S E

TA M I R ’ S T O P T I P S

Tamir Addadi Architecture extended this house in London. Tamir tells us how, with the help of gardener Joan Scanlon, he created these idyllic terraces

1 Limit the number of elements in your garden so that the plants become the main focal point. 2 Even if a space is small, splitting it into two can increase the ways the garden can be used and enrich the experience. 3 Use a white gravel mulch on your soil to prevent weeds from growing and to deter snails and slugs.

Our brief was to bring more light into the house and make the outside space feel bigger than it actually is. To do this we painted the walls and steps white and created two separate areas: one at the top of the steps and another outdoor seating area next to the living room, which is framed by sliding glass doors. In this way, the garden becomes an extension of the internal space. The clients wanted a low maintenance garden with as much foliage and flowering interest as possible. We used plants which were shade tolerant, such as hellebores and anemones, mostly in a cool colour palette (blues, lilacs, whites, with the odd flash of something warmer). In the sunniest corner of the garden, we added Mediterranean-style plants, including lavender, for scent. tamiraddadi.com; spacelift.uk.com 82 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: TAMIR ADDADI ARCHITECTURE

Sourcebook | P L A N T S


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

S T R E T C H O F H E AV E N

Garden designer Chris Moss explains how he turned the narrow garden at his London home into the perfect retreat

CHRIS’ TOP TIPS 1 Repeat plants as much as possible throughout the garden to give continuity in colour and help the space to flow. 2 Never be afraid of scale. Use large topiary and oversized pots, even if your garden is a little on the small side. 3 Keep outdoor furniture simple. In my garden, I have a pair of ‘Luxembourg’ chairs from Fermob – a design classic. 84 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: MARCUS HARPUR

The first thing I did to the garden was to replace the lawn with flower beds and carve out a seating area in the middle section. A curving pathway makes the narrow garden feel wider and looks softer than a straight path. It’s framed by a combination of strong evergreen box plants and herbaceous perennials, such as thalictrum and sanguisorba, which change with the seasons. Closer to the house, at the edge of the steps, there is a row of box spheres (topiary balls) and above that, bamboo. I’ve removed all of the bamboo’s lower leaves so that it feels like it’s towering above – it makes a great screen to provide privacy from the neighbours. The bricks that form the terraces and the paving have been painted black. It’s such a great colour against the vibrant green of the plants. chrismossgardens.com


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THE ROOFTOP OASIS

Architects Christoph Zeller and Ingrid Moye added a garden to the very top of their Art Deco townhouse in Mexico City. Here, Ingrid shares its secrets

INGRID’S TOP TIPS 1 Using the same flooring material indoors and out generates an impression of larger, continuous spaces. 2 Large sliding glass doors or picture windows provide a closer connection with the garden. 3 Create a varied topographic landscape using plants of different heights to make the garden look more interesting.

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: CARLOS GARZA, OMAR MUNOZ

We liked the idea that this house is in the middle of the city with a hidden oasis at the top. It was important that the outside and the adjoining room felt like one continuous space, so we used white marble pebbles on the garden path to match the marble on the bedroom floor. Within the box-like lines of the garden, we created curved flower beds and pathways to emphasise natural shapes, only using plants native to Mexico which can cope with being exposed to strong sun. We were inspired by Mexico City’s mountainous landscape to create a topography that combines texture, dense planting and shaped hills. Alongside the plants (ferns, grasses, ivy, orchids and jasmine), there are several types of trees, including palm trees and fruit trees to add height and variety. zellermoye.com

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THE INDOOR GARDENER

PERENNIAL DELIGHT Clementine Orillac, founder of interiors company Baan, has created a sheltered garden room that allows her to enjoy the outside all year round When Clementine transformed a former repair garage in Ivry-sur-Seine, two kilometres from Paris, into her home and workshop, key to the layout was creating this calmly decorated ‘winter garden’ room that would blur the boundary between indoor and outdoor living. ‘As I spend most of my time in a city full of buildings, I wanted to add greenery to the concrete environment and make my garden feel bigger than it is,’ she explains. ‘I used to live in Asia, so I love to mix jungle-like greenery –

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: SERGE ANTON/LIVING INSIDE

THE CALMING ‘WINTER GARDEN’ ROOM BLURS THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR LIVING bamboo and banana trees – with flowering climbers.’ A relaxing, simply designed space, which is used when it’s either too hot or too cold to be in the real garden, this sheltered spot comprises a table for mealtimes, a wooden ceiling light and a single bed that is layered with batik-print cushions. ‘The room is an extension of both the house and garden that can be used all year. I wanted to conjure up that feeling of already being outside, which is why I’ve kept the furniture to a minimum,’ says Orillac. ‘It’s somewhere peaceful, where I can lay back on the pillows and drink tea, surrounded by the scent of jasmine.’ baan-baan.com Turn over for Clementine’s tips on how to get the look ➤


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

HOW TO GET THE LOOK 1 Keep furniture and decorative accessories in your garden room to a minimum, so that the eye is drawn out. 2 You can never have too much greenery. Build up your range of plants and choose more exotic species to create a jungle. 3 Use natural materials, such as wood, cotton and other soft fabrics to make your space feel comfortable and relaxing.

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: SERGE ANTON/LIVING INSIDE

‘I WANTED TO CREATE THE FEELING OF ALREADY BEING OUTSIDE, SO I’VE KEPT FURNITURE TO A MINIMUM

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Sourcebook | O U T D O O R S

THE INDOOR GARDENER

GREENHOUSE PROJECT Minimal outside space hasn’t stopped the creative couple behind green-focused lifestyle blog Haarkon from embracing plant life in their Sheffield home ‘We don’t really have anything in our home other than plants,’ says Magnus Edmonson who, with his photographer girlfriend India Hobson, set up the Haarkon blog. ‘We’re constantly moving them around as they grow and the light changes. Rather than being something static, they feel like part of our home.’ Shelves by the window are jam-packed with light-loving cacti and succulents, and a study corner is pepped up with spider plants and peace lilies. ‘It’s nice

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: HAARKON

‘WE ARE CONSTANTLY MOVING PLANTS AROUND. RATHER THAN SOMETHING STATIC, THEY FEEL LIKE PART OF OUR HOME’ to have a desk surrounded by greenery,’ says Hobson. The couple’s collection of pots is constantly increasing (they also have a patio where they keep hardier succulents). Their most recent addition is a cutting from a cacti collector they met in North Yorkshire. ‘Our biggest purchase is an umbrella plant, which was as tall as the ceiling before we cut it back. Usually they grow outwards, so people are fascinated by the fact that ours shot upwards,’ says Hobson. Four years ago, the pair began a greenhouse and gardens tour, visiting new spaces on their travels for work. ‘There’s something magical about greenhouses that captures our imagination,’ explains Edmonson. haarkon.co.uk Turn over for the couple’s pick of the best green spaces ➤


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1 Clapton Tram, London This photography studio and home in an old tram depot has housed many magazine shoots. Spider plants and all types of greenery hang everywhere you look. A huge skylight gives it an incredible feeling of light and air (claptontram.com). 2 Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Take a journey through different architectural styles of greenhouse, starting with Victorian arches and ironwork (rbge.org.uk). 3 University of Oxford Botanic Garden This is quite a small green space, but it really moved us. If you go on an early Sunday morning it’s quiet and still. Because it’s a research garden, everything that’s planted is there for a reason beyond just being enjoyed (botanic-garden.ox.ac.uk). 4 Eden Project, Cornwall Everything here is on such a huge scale; you forget that you have a roof over your head. These boidomes are the closest thing to being in a real jungle (edenproject.com).

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‘THERE’S SOMETHING MAGICAL ABOUT GREENHOUSES THAT CAPTURES OUR IMAGINATION’

WORDS: EMMA LOVE PICTURES: HAARKON

HAARKON’S TOP FOUR G R E E N S PA C E S T O V I S I T


Sourcebook | P L A N T S

SECRET GARDENS TO VISIT IN THE UK Thanks to the Open Garden Squares weekend (17–18 June; opensquares.org) and The National Open Garden Scheme (ngs.org.uk) we can explore green spaces usually closed to the public. Here’s our pick of the ones not to be missed SERGE HILL GARDENS, HERTFORDSHIRE OPEN 18 JUNE

A coup for gardening connoisseurs awaits: the opportunity to visit the garden of one of the industry’s heroes, Tom Stuart-Smith (whose projects include the gardens of the Royal Academy Keeper’s House, Windsor Castle and The Connaught hotel), as well as that of his parents. The Barn is a signature Stuart-Smith work in progress – expect modern ground tanks of water, naturalistic planting and wild flower meadows. A field away, his parents’ Regency House, Serge Hill, is a traditionally landscaped haven (left) complete with haha, climbing roses, and half an acre of vegetable plots, with greenhouses that are bursting at the seams with produce (ngs.org.uk).

Wander through the William Morris Society’s museum in Hammersmith and pick up a drawing of the garden’s original 1880s plan en route to seeing the extensive, sculpture-studded sanctuary for yourself. You’ll find flora, wild strawberries and ferns – all sources of inspiration for Morris’ much-loved textile and wallpaper designs (opensquares.org).

HILL HOUSE, MONMOUTHSHIRE O P E N 1 6 J U LY

Over in Wales, this 17th-century farmhouse, whose surroundings are being restored by owners Susan and John Wright, is opening for the first time. It’s a masterclass in making a garden feel bigger. Note the outbuilding’s flank painted with an idyllic blue sky and a landscape of rolling hills (ngs.org.uk). 96 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

THE RIVER CAFÉ, LONDON OPEN 17 JUNE

Visit the famous London café’s vegetable garden, where chefs have grown seasonal produce to cook with since the restaurant opened on the banks of the Thames in 1987. Gardener Simon Hewitt will take an escorted tour round the beds of Italian salad leaves, broad beans and sweet peas. While you are there, be sure to grab a bite to eat – we recommend the tart quince paste served with a Piemonte cheese (opensquares.org).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: ANDREW LAWSON, COURTESY OF THE WILLIAM MORRIS SOCIETY

KELMSCOTT HOUSE, LONDON OPEN 17 JUNE


BREAKING BO U N DARI ES By treating the interior and exterior as one entity, this Johannesburg couple have maximised space in their compact bungalow and created a home that makes the most of the South African weather

Words TRISH LORENZ Photography GREG COX/LIVING INSIDE Styling SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX.CO.ZA


‘BLURRING THE LINES BETWEEN INSIDE AND OUT ALLOWED US TO CREATE THE ILLUSION OF HAVING MORE ROOMS’


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his stylish and petite 225-square-metre 1950s bungalow in Parkhurst, Johannesburg, belongs to landscape and furniture designer Christo Vermeulen and his partner, urban designer Nico Venter. Parkhurst is close to the city centre and adjacent to a large park that runs along a small river. Shops, restaurants and cafés line its pretty main street. ‘It’s a great place to live,’ says Nico. ‘It has a friendly village feel; you know your neighbours.’ The couple bought the house in 2012. It was, Christo says, ‘a complete dump,’ but they spent two years living there before undertaking the renovation. ‘We wanted to get a feel for the house, its nature, positioning and secret spaces before embarking on the work,’ says Christo. The project opened up the formerly dark rooms to create an open, light-filled home that embraces the surrounding gardens. Today, the interior is simple and contemporary. A concrete floor extends almost the entire length of the house: it feels silky and surprisingly warm underfoot. White walls amplify the natural light and the largely monochrome scheme is softened by brass, aged wood and leather. Plants can be found everywhere: trailing from a kitchen shelf and blooming on the dining table. The home is compact but feels larger, in the main thanks to Christo and Nico’s refusal to limit living spaces to the inside of the house. ‘Our approach was not to design a house and then design a garden. We viewed the entire property as our home and divided it into interior and exterior rooms,’ says Nico. ‘Blurring the lines between inside and out in this way allowed us to stretch the space and create the illusion of having more rooms.’ Outside there are six courtyards, and each has a particular time of day that suits it best. One to the east is designed for shade in the afternoon, when the summer sun is at its hottest. There’s an outdoor shower at the back of the house that’s perfect for a late-night soak under the stars, and the scented herb garden is the couple’s preferred place for meditation or a morning coffee. But the fire pit in the front garden is their favourite spot. ‘We sit there and have a glass of wine whenever friends come to visit,’ says Nico. ‘We have privacy but there’s still a connection to the bustle of the street. It’s like our own private café!’ musecontracts.co.za

Office The original teak parquet flooring has been stained a darker colour. The desk is a vintage find from South African shop Modernist. For a similar transparent polycarbonate chair try Made In Design Living room This sofa is from South African brand Weylandts, but Ikea’s ‘Söderhamn’ sofa is similar. It is paired with a ‘Zara’ leather armchair from local company Soho Concept and a bespoke coffee table designed by homeowner Christo’s company Muse Contracts. The sideboard is a vintage piece Stockist details on p175 ➤

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Kitchen The black cabinetry is from Inside Living in Johannesburg – British Standard sells similar designs in the UK. The dining table is the homeowners’ bespoke creation – an Ironwood base topped with powdercoated steel. It sits on a graphic monochrome rug from Irug – try Ikea’s ‘Lappljung Ruta’ Stockist details on p175 ➤


PLANTS CAN BE FOUND EVERYWHERE, TRAILING FROM KITCHEN SHELVES AND BLOOMING ON THE DINING TABLE


THE HOME’S LARGELY MONOCHROME SCHEME IS SOFTENED BY BRASS, AGED WOOD AND LEATHER

Bedroom A bespoke bed with a leather headboard and stone bedside tables by Muse Contracts are complemented by a ‘Jagged Stripe’ rug by Sixth Floor from South African store Superbalist Stockist details on p175 ➤


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D E S I G N D E TA I L INDOOR/OUTDOOR LIVING

Homeowners Nico and Christo share their top tips Don’t limit your living spaces to just inside the house. Design your home from the boundary edge of your garden to its innermost rooms. Live in a home before renovating so that you understand how you use the space and where the connections between outside and inside can be made. Use similar materials, colours and textures inside and out, along with the same style of furnishings, to blur the distinction between the two. Use subtle focal points – plants or furnishings –at short, mid and distant horizons to draw the eye outwards towards the views of the garden. Don’t forget the space above your head. We used large skylights to give us glimpses of the tree canopies, blue sky and passing clouds.

Bathroom The monochrome scheme continues here, with a claw-foot bath and two sinks by South African brand Itile. For similar tiles try Fired Earth Gardens A bespoke fire chimney by Muse Contracts keeps this seating area warm well into the night. The outdoor furniture is from Big Blue – try Barbed in the UK Stockist details on p175 E D

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An all-white palette can be warm and welcoming, as this elegant French family home reveals Words NELL CARD Photography BIRGITTA WOLFGANG /SISTERS AGENCY


Living room The ‘Noa’ sofas and the large white rug are all from Maison Sarah Lavoine. They are arranged with a ‘PK22’ armchair by Poul Kjærholm for Fritz Hansen and a ‘Noguchi’ coffee table by Isamu Noguchi for Vitra (available at John Lewis). The leaf-shaped brass floor light is by Italian designer Tommaso Barbi (try 1st Dibs) Stockist details on p175 ➤


his apartment is the epitome of Parisian chic, thanks to a radical overhaul by Marie De Andreis, owner of children’s fashion brand Zef. She first viewed the space with her husband, Raphael, in 2014. ‘It was all very dark with old wallpaper and carpets, and very heavy curtains,’ she recalls. Now, the renovated interior is the antithesis of the old: a bright, white, gallery-like space, warmed by accents of wood. It was the property’s location – nestled on the right bank of the River Seine – and its captivating views that initially attracted the couple and their three children, Chiara (18), Inés (16) and Joseph (seven). It took Marie and Raphael just four months to transform the four-bedroom, 19th-century home. The couple rearranged the 200-square-metre space, turning what was the living room into the kitchen and dining room, and knocking down the hallway wall to allow natural light in. The layout is unconventional for a Parisian apartment in that there is no central corridor connecting the main spaces. ‘I wanted a bright home, so I just looked for sources of daylight and went from there,’ explains Marie. ‘The rooms are square and the volumes harmonious – there’s an easy flow throughout; you don’t feel enclosed here.’ The removal of the old carpets revealed the apartment’s hidden treasure: an original 19th-century parquet floor. It has been sanded, resealed and restored to its original grandeur, as have the marble fire surrounds and ornate cornicing. ‘For us, it was important to retain the building’s integrity,’ says Marie. The architecture needed no embellishment, so Marie simply painted everything white. ‘The decoration is in the furniture, the pictures, the lamps and objects – it doesn’t come from using strong colour on the walls,’ she says. Cleverly, the couple’s mostly white furniture is outlined in black, from the piping on the sofa to the border on the blinds. This gives the pieces a striking presence in the pared-back scheme. ‘There are no rules,’ says Marie. ‘Everything in the apartment, I’ve bought with my heart. It all has soul, which makes my home feel cosy, even though it’s completely white.’ zef.eu

Top A vintage console table and wicker chair, both purchased at the flea markets in Paris Above An armchair from the 1950s is overlooked by a reading lamp from Maison Sarah Lavoine. The abstract blue-and-red artwork above is by Hungarian painter Simon Hantaï Stockist details on p175 ➤

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‘The decoration is the furniture, the pictures, the lamps and objects – it doesn’t come from using strong colour on the walls’


Kitchen/dining room The ‘Tulip’ table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll and the kitchen cabinets were sourced from Darty. The wooden room divider is by Czech designer Jindrich Halabala Hallway A ‘RAR’ rocking chair by Charles and Ray Eames sits opposite a high-backed chair in the style of Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The monochrome rug is from Maison Sarah Lavoine Stockist details on p175 ➤


‘The rooms are square and the volumes harmonious – there’s an easy flow throughout; you don’t ever feel enclosed here’


D E S I G N D E TA I L W O R K I N G W I T H W H I T E

Homeowner and stylist Marie shares her secrets Why white? I am a stylist and compare my approach to interiors to that of fashion. Beauty becomes much more evident if a person wears black or white. The same can be said of materials. Wood, marble, silver, glass: they all look much more stunning against a white or black background. What shade of white? The paints in the apartment are not special, and I didn’t spend forever deliberating over which white to choose. It is important to vary the finishes, though. The ceilings and the woodwork are just a little bit brighter, and all of the doors have a satin finish, while the walls and ceilings are matt. Isn’t white high maintenance? I have always painted my apartments in white. It’s much easier to live with than you might think. Even with small children, I didn’t worry about the walls becoming dirty or scuffed. It does not require endless retouching, and can always be repainted if required.


Bathroom This large marble-clad space (once three box rooms) leads to the bedroom and office. The ‘Victoria’ basins and ‘Stella’ taps are from Leroy Merlin (try Lefroy Brooks) Stockist details on p175 ➤


The home’s beautiful original features, from the 19th-century parquet to the marble fireplace surrounds, required little additional embellishment

Bedroom The ‘Pacha’ sofa is from Caravane. It is flanked by two wall lamps found at a flea market in Paris (the ‘AJ’ by Louis Poulsen is similar). The bed is topped with a cover from Jaipur, India Stockist details on p175 E D


Inspired by the pristine beauty of Marie de Andreis’ Parisian apartment, we show you how to elevate a white look using marble Photography OLI DOUGLAS Styling AMANDA SMITH-CORSTON

From left ‘Mimica Venato’ matt porcelain tiles (on wall), £59.99 per square metre, Mandarin Stone (mandarinstone.com). ‘Tubular’ brass lamp, £79.99; white carafe, £19.99, both by Hubsch, Haygen (haygenshop.com). ‘Miss Marble’ storage jar by Lorenza Bozzoli, £280, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Marble’ mirror by Studio Pepe for Menu, £450, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com). ‘Cafu’ stainless-steel vase by HolmbäckNordentoft, £150, Georg Jensen (georgjensen.com). ‘Marble Light’ pendant lights by Studio Vit for &Tradition, from £149 each, Twentytwentyone (twentytwentyone.com).


Mini ‘Globe’ round vase by AYTM, £34.99, Haygen (haygenshop.com). ‘Marbleous’ dark grey marble tray by Friends and Founders, £235, Viaduct (viaduct.co.uk). Marble fruit bowl, £105; ‘Forte’ white marble bowl by XL Boom, £182, both SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Knockout’ side table by Friends and Founders, £798, Nest (nest.co.uk). Blue vase by Scholten & Baijings for Hay, £59, Monologue (monologuelondon.com). ‘Strata’ marbled bowl, £240, Raw Material (studiorawmaterial.com). ‘Fairlight’ ash bowl by Bird and Branch, £145, SCP (scp.co.uk). ‘Grasil’ candleholder by ATYM, £119.99, Haygen (Haygenshop.com). ‘Hillstar’ parquet flooring, £148.14 per square metre, Woodworks by Tedd Todd (woodworksbytedtodd.com) E D

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OPEN ALL SEASONS Big skylights, Japanese-inspired wooden screens and a welcoming approach to greenery make this Copenhagen home feel at one with its surroundings Words AMY BRADFORD Photography BIRGITTA WOLFGANG/SISTERS AGENCY Styling PERNILLE VEST


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t’s hard to imagine this serene Japanese-inspired Copenhagen home as an ‘ugly duckling’, but it has undergone quite a transformation since Jan Gleie and Barbara Hvidt moved in a decade ago. When they first saw it, it was a 1970s bungalow that nobody wanted. ‘It was only after the estate agent called to say that the price had been reduced that we gave it serious thought,’ Jan recalls. ‘But after ten years spent in a small flat in London, we decided to embrace the possibilities of open-plan living in Denmark.’ Jan and Barbara were just the people to change this home’s fortunes. Both photographers, they work together as Hvidt/Gleie and also have their own independent careers as tastemakers: Jan is a film director for brands such as Canon and Mercedes, and Barbara is a co-founder of luxury childrenswear brand Soft Gallery. The couple began by removing all the wooden walls and ceilings, replacing them with white surfaces to bounce light around. The house has a big garden and is screened from the street by trees, so they added skylights in the kitchen and hallway to allow more views of their

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leafy surroundings. But the house wasn’t big enough for their family – son Siggi (13), daughter Nola (11) and dog Rio – so they considered their options. In the end, a Lego model of the house provided the unlikely impetus for a full-scale renovation. ‘I made a downscaled model of the house and added a second storey to it,’ reveals Jan. ‘We showed it to Barbara’s architect sister, Malene Hvidt, and we decided we would build it together.’ The three took influences from Japanese architecture, as well as the work of American architect Ray Kappe, and Indian architect, Bijoy Jain – known for his designs that are closely linked with nature. ‘As we built upwards, we kept all the skylights and lifted the roof, so it seems to float on a series of thin “ribbon” windows,’ says Jan. Jan describes the house’s open structure as its biggest asset. The layout makes the family feel more connected. ‘Wherever you are, you can see upstairs, downstairs, the garden and the street at the same time,’ he explains. ‘Every day, it gives us new perspectives. There isn’t a single day when it doesn’t enhance our wellbeing.’ jangleie.com; softgallery.dk; spaconandx.com


MANY OF THE OBJECTS IN THE HOUSE HAVE BEEN SOURCED ON TRIPS ABROAD – FROM NEW YORK AND AFRICA TO VIENNA AND JAPAN

Kitchen/dining area The Corian kitchen is a bespoke design by Copenhagen firm CPH Square. Its pure whiteness is warmed up with wooden bar stools. The cherrywood dining table is by designer Anders Heger, with leather chairs by Charlotte Perriand (‘Les Arcs’) Living area Dutch furniture dominates this space. The ‘Airport’ sofa was designed by Arne Jacobsen for Fritz Hansen. The ‘X-chair’ lounge chair, with a woven cane seat, is by homeowner Barbara’s grandfather Peter Hvidt, one half of the design duo Hvidt & Mølgaard Stockist details on p175 ➤


Stairs This staircase is made of lacquered steel and was designed by the homeowner’s sister, Malene. She also helped to design the pink marble stool behind the sofa Atrium The double-height hallway allows light to filter downwards to the ground floor, while the glass structure helps to muffle noise from downstairs Snug A bespoke built-in sofa and a 60s Eames chair with its original olive-green fabric Office Table by Hungarian-born Modernist Marcel Breuer Stockist details on p175 ➤


‘WHEREVER YOU ARE IN THE HOUSE, YOU CAN SEE UPSTAIRS, DOWNSTAIRS, THE GARDEN AND THE STREET AT THE SAME TIME’

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THE HOUSE’S OPEN-PLAN LAYOUT, BALCONY AND GARDEN ATRIUM ENSURE THAT IT FEELS CONNECTED WITH THE OUTDOORS FROM EVERY ANGLE

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Atrium The roof is made of thick pine, which contrasts with the ‘Patchwork’ terracotta floor tiles from Dahl Studio. The rattan sofa is a secondhand find and the ‘Butterfly’ chair is a reissue of a 1930s design by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy Bedroom The day bed is from Jasper Morrison’s ‘Crate’ collection for Established & Sons. Jan and Barbara have covered their bed with a vintage Japanese bedspread, bought on a trip to New York. The ‘Prism’ bedside table is by Frederik Paulsen for Copenhagen gallery Etage Projects Balcony The wire ‘DKR’ chair is by Charles and Ray Eames for Vitra and the table is by Danish design duo Friends & Founders. The blue ceramic sculpture is by Danish artist Maria Lenskjold for Etage Projects Stockist details on p175 E D


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DIS E RE C L AI ME Wor

d P h o t s G LO R I A Rest o g ra ored phy M AT TIO GIO to th N RG I O I e ori P OS gina SEN TI – a m l vision o aster f of m Mexican ergin g ins architec t ide a nd ou Luis Bar ra t – th is ho gán me is a des ign t reas ure

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ack in the 1940s Luis Barragán, Mexico’s most famous architect, bought a vast plot of land, mostly covered by lava from the active Popocatépetl volcano to the southeast of Mexico City. He had a utopian idea: to transform the undeveloped area into a new residential district, the ‘Jardines del Pedregal’, inspired by the work of artists such as Diego Rivera and sculptor Mathias Goeritz. This house, the largest private dwelling designed by Barragán, was commissioned by the Prieto family, who moved here in 1951 — subject to an agreement that they would bring nothing from their previous home except a suitcase. They lived here for more than six decades. Three years ago, the house was bought by César Cervantes, a former art collector who is committed to restoring this, and other homes in the Jardines del Pedregal. ‘The house had been for sale for some time. I was worried it might end up in the wrong hands and that Barragán’s work would be lost,’ he says. ‘I decided to sell my artworks and devote myself to this new undertaking. I completed the purchase in December 2013 and moved in four months later. I wanted to live in the house while work was under way, so that I could supervise it.’

The restoration took 20 months, with 80 workers on the site. A quarter of the original furniture by Barragán had disappeared. The wooden floors were carpeted and several changes had been made to the original structure – the open fire had been replaced by an electric version and a partition had been erected to separate the living area from the dining room. Even the original lavastone formations – an integral part of Barragán’s architecture – had disappeared beneath plaster and more than 40 layers of paint. ‘I scoured antiques shops and flea markets to find the original pieces,’ says César. Pink (the architect’s signature colour) is used on both the house’s exterior and interior. Its appearance changes according to the time of day, from delicate pastels to the fiery hues of sunset. Flashes of palest green, sweeps of a sandy hue and flagstone flooring continue the blending of the interior with the outdoors. ‘I preferred to leave the walls bare, with no pictures,’ says César. ‘I wanted to give centre stage to the plays of light and shade created by the large windows. My pieces of artwork are now the ceramic lamps designed by Barragán and made by potters in Oaxaca, the rudimentary wooden chairs that recall seats found in rural haciendas, the tables made from Ahuehuete (swamp cypress), the studded leather sofas and the palos locos (native trees used by Barragán for landscaping) in the garden. Living in such beauty is a dream. A privilege.’ Exterior The splendid pink walls of this home change colour throughout the day, from the palest fleshy tones of dawn to near orange at sunset Hallway Homeowner César Cervantes in the flagstonefloored vestibule that connects the house’s vast rooms ➤


Dining area A small wooden seat designed by Barragán rests in front of the fireplace. Artisans from Oaxaca crafted the ceramic pot. The table and dining chairs are also original pieces by the Mexican architect – Barragán furniture can be found on 1st Dibs Stockist details on p175 ➤


Garden This sun-drenched spot to the side of the dining room is furnished with vintage finds purchased from flea markets ➤


Kitchen ‘Bertoia’ chairs by Harry Bertoia for Knoll are arranged around the bespoke table. The walls are decorated with majolica tiles in the architect’s favourite colour – try Marazzi for similar Stockist details on p175 ➤


Bedroom The pastel shades on the wall have been restored to their original brilliance. Little Greene sells Barragán style shades – try ‘Angie’, ‘Carmine’ and ‘Light Peachblossom’. All of the pieces of furniture in this room are original items designed by Barragán for this house Stockist details on p175

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UNDER THE CANOPY Sunny terraces and a soaring ceiling clad in oak lend this updated 1950s Swedish home a sense of natural wonder Words HANNAH BOOTH Photography ANDREA PAPINI/HOUSE OF PICTURES Styling ALEXANDRA YDHOLM


Terrace The outdoor table and chairs are by Fermob. The barbecue is by Weber Living area The Perspex ‘Eros’ chair by Kartell sitting next to the door is from Heal’s and the black three-leaf clover stool is a flea-market find. For a similar antique Chinese coffee table, try Orchid Furniture Stockist details on p175 ➤


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cathedral-like wooden ceiling mirrors the scale of the surrounding evergreen trees, visible from this home’s balcony and terrace. ‘The house feels like a natural extension of its surroundings,’ says its owner Peter Grimvall, who lives here with his wife Annouk Ruffo Leduc and their son Oscar (four). Built in 1958 in Malmö, a city on the southern tip of Sweden, the building was originally an unremarkable bungalow with a small 1970s extension. It has been completely transformed by Swedish architect Gustav Hultman. He kept the four external walls and constructed a new L-shaped upper floor. Part of this hangs like a mezzanine over the kitchen, with the rest opening up to create the nine-metre-high ceilings above the main living area. The ceiling, stairwell and first-floor walls are all clad in oak veneer panels. They help to manage the voluminous space. Without this warming coat of wood, the building could feel cold and lofty. To marry the house’s original and contemporary areas, the sleek cladding is mirrored by square oak parquet (a popular style in the 1950s) on the ground floor. Peter and Annouk have also recreated the house’s original large square windows upstairs, encasing them in teak to contrast with the lighter oak.

The interior features a mix of Scandinavian design classics from the 1950s and 1960s, such as Hans J Wegner’s ‘Wishbone’ chairs for Carl Hansen & Søn, and modern pieces from Ikea. Some of these have been cleverly hacked – the ‘Sinnerlig’ dining table has had its cork top removed and replaced with the same oak veneer panels used on the ceiling. The cork hasn’t been wasted: it’s now used as a pinboard in Oscar’s bedroom. But on warm mid-summer days the couple love to be outdoors. As well as an oak-clad terrace beyond the kitchen, there’s also a balcony off of the main bedroom and a sunny fruit and vegetable patch to the side of the house, which is planted with strawberries, rhubarb and blackberries. ‘Using the same wood inside and outside the house ensures a continuity of design,’ says Annouk. ‘We feel as though we are living closer to nature.’

TO MARRY THE HOME’S ORIGINAL AND CONTEMPORARY AREAS, THE CLADDING IS MIRRORED BY OAK PARQUET ON THE GROUND FLOOR Kitchen A large oak island, complete with cupboards, sink, open shelving and a black worktop, was custom-made by a local carpenter. The patterned carpet is an antique Chinese find (try Frith Rugs for similar) Details On the side wall, there is an elegant collection of Asian artefacts and artworks, from wicker dishes to ceramic pots and prints (try Orchid Furniture). You can find a similar Japanese teapot and bamboo steamers at John Lewis Stockist details on p175 ➤


SWEDISH DESIGN CLASSICS SIT WITH EASE AND INTEGRITY ALONGSIDE MODERN PIECES IN THIS HOME

Dining area An oak veneer top has been added to the ‘Sinnerlig’ table from Ikea: it is surrounded by ‘Wishbone’ chairs from Carl Hansen & Søn and a ‘Trip Trapp’ highchair from Stokke. Northern Lighting’s ‘Acorn’ pendant lights are available from Cloudberry Living Stockist details on p175 ➤


D E S I G N D E TA I L WAY S W I T H W O O D

We take a look at this home’s tricks with timber Use wood cladding to create warmth. It brings a natural softness to large, potentially clinical spaces, such as a room with a double-height ceiling. Keep everything else minimal. Use too much wood and it can overpower an interior. Keep the remaining walls white to balance the look. Create seamless continuity between inside and out. Oak is a hardy wood and can be used on terraces and balconies as well as interior walls. Care for your wood. External wood needs to be oiled once a year; it’s a bit of effort, but it’s worth it to avoid water damage and prevent cracking and warping. Mix your woods for variety. Use lighter oak on a wall, vintage parquet on a floor, and darker teak, cherry or maple on window frames to create a tonal effect that will add extra character to your home.

Snug The leather sofa is the ‘Tiki’ by Fogi and the two ‘Bowl’ coffee tables are by Danish designer Ayush Kaslin for Mater, available from Heal’s Stockist details on p175


Tina Seidenfaden Busck, founder of Copenhagen design gallery The Apartment, shares her passion for the timeless, artistic rugs by Swedish pioneer Märta Måås-Fjetterström Words CLARE SARTIN Photography HEIDI LERKENFELDT/CPH EDITORIAL Production MAJA HAHNE REGILD


Portrait Tina Seidenfaden Busck stands in front of a tapestry by Märta Måås-Fjetterström This page Original rugs and tapestries by Märta Måås-Fjetterström are artfully arranged around a ‘Double Desk’ by Belgian design duo Muller Van Severen ➤


rom the hand-knotted rugs which have kept Berber tribes warm during cold winters in the Atlas Mountains to the intricate tapestries which have graced European castles for generations, textiles have always been used not just to keep us warm but to decorate and tell stories. And, in the small Swedish town of Bastad, home to the Märta Måås-Fjetterström museum and textile mill, a new story is being told. The historic venue, once the workspace of pioneering textile designer Måås-Fjetterström (1883–1941), was recently transformed by this inspiring exhibition curated by Tina Seidenfaden Busck, founder of Copenhagen-based interior design gallery and shop The Apartment. Tina’s intention was to give visitors to the museum an insight into the incredible craftmanship that created these pieces. ‘Although several of the rugs on display are more than 80 years old, my focus has been to show how contemporary they remain,’ says Tina, who has strategically scattered a selection of cutting-edge pieces by the likes of Belgian design duo Martin Van Severen and London-based Michael Anastassiades amidst the textiles. ‘The theme of the exhibition is wall hangings, because I think they are an easy, modern way to add cosiness and warmth to any room.’ The museum and mill are still home to 15 weavers, who work to Måås-Fjetterström’s designs (including the 700 sketches for patterns that the designer never produced in her lifetime). But the Swedish visionary’s legacy is not stagnant; the mill also produces new patterns by artists Barbro Nilsson, Marianne Richter and Ann-Mari Forsberg. Why is there such a renewal of interest in rugs? ‘Colours and fabrics are back in favour after years of a more minimalist style. I think we are drawn to the time and effort that is involved in making them. They touch something nostalgic in us,’ says Tina. mmf.se; theapartment.dk


This page An Italian day bed from the 1950s sits in a cosy spot, screened from the rest of the room by wall hangings. The side table is by British design duo McCollin Bryan and the ‘Cilindro’ footstool is by Azucena (available at The Apartment) Detail, left A vintage wicker chair and an ‘Alzabile’ floor lamp by Azucena Stockist details on p175 ➤

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Above A ceramic floorlight by Danish artist Cathrine Raben Davidsen sits at the top of the stairs Opposite Handmade pillows from The Apartment and a ‘Snoopy’ table lamp by Achille & Pier Giacomo Castiglioni sit on a bench designed by Ilse Crawford for De La Espada. The ‘Tree in the Moonlight’ floor light for Nilufar and ‘Beauty Mirror’ are both by Michael Anastassiades Stockist details on p175

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URBAN OASIS The industrial look doesn’t have to be cold. Textures, houseplants and an abundance of natural light give this Berlin apartment a sunny disposition Words KERSTIN ROSE Photography CORA BÜTTENBENDER Styling JOCHEN POHLMANN


Kitchen The unadorned patio doors frame views of the verdant terrace, which are reflected inside with pot plants. The cupboards were custom-made in plywood. New versions of the ‘AA’ Butterfly chair by Jorge Ferrari Hardoy are available from Made in Design Stockist details on p175 ➤


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ochen Pohlmann and Mathias Riedel exchanged their comfortable Hamburg home for this rented industrial shell in Berlin and instantly embraced its stripped-back style. Their new home is encased in concrete, with exposed steel columns standing sentry throughout. But the atmosphere here is ethereal rather than cold: abundant natural light dissolves the apartment’s hard industrial edges and large glazed doors offer glimpses of the terrace and treetops beyond. Jochen, a fashion stylist, was drawn to this building by the combination of materials that had been used in its construction. ‘It is nothing more than what it claims to be,’ he says, ‘a piece of nature consisting of cement, sand and water’. His partner Mathias was happy to take a back seat during the design process – even when Jochen made the decision to leave the concrete walls, floors and ceiling as he found them. The partitions in the bathroom and guest cloakroom have been painted grey and white, with darker tones of charcoal grey and black used to frame the kitchen, living area and bedroom. Elsewhere, Jochen

THE COUPLE EMBRACED THE STRIPPED-BACK STYLE OF THIS CONCRETE SPACE AND PERSONALISED IT WITH THEIR LOVE OF ARTISANAL OBJECTS has added his own materials to the mix: the plywood cabinetry in the kitchen, for instance, is custom-made. Much of the furniture in the apartment came from the couple’s old flat in Hamburg, and is arranged with treasures that Jochen finds when travelling for work. He has been known to drag entire suitcases full of china from one continent to the next – an insane amount of plates and bowls. Handmade clay teapots (some of them very old) decorate the open shelving units. Both he and Mathias have a passion for artisanal craftsmanship, yet their collections do not overwhelm this home. ‘Less is more,’ says Mathias, whose influence clearly curbs his partner’s enthusiasm for acquiring new objects. ‘We negotiate about what is displayed each time Jochen brings something home,’ he adds.

Dining room The circular black hemp rug is from South Africa – Design Vintage’s ‘Phantom’ carpet is similar. The dining table from Porro is teamed with ‘Iuta’ chairs by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia, while the ‘Offcut’ stool by Tom Dixon provides a pop of bright red in the scheme Detail Mathias Riedel and Jochen Pohlmann (near left) created a reading area in the corner of the living room with a green velvet ‘Platano’ armchair by Philipe Marques and a vintage marble table (try 1st Dibs) Stockist details on p175 ➤

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D E S I G N D E TA I L TRICKS OF THE LIGHT

Homeowner Jochen’s top tips for brightening an urban home Be creative with natural light. Use it to guide you around the space. You don’t need dividing walls, but do create clear edges to visually define rooms. Use a palette of non-colours – grey, white and black. They are calming and create space for creativity and imagination. Neutral walls allow decorative objects to shine. Don’t be afraid of the dark. Try using a charcoal grey or even a shade of black to make a room appear larger, warmer and more magical. Use high-quality paints. The pigments create sharper colours, and you usually need fewer coats, so less paint. These colours were mixed especially for us using Flamant (flamant.com) and Farrow & Ball paints (farrow-ball.com).


Living room The ‘Simplex’ sofa by Antonio Citterio for B&B Italia is styled with a ‘Grasshopper’ lamp by Greta Grossman, reissued by Gubi, available at Skandium Kitchen For a similar wooden console, try ‘Long Rustic Bench’ by Orchid Furniture Stockist details on p175 ➤

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Bedroom A large sliding door separates this space from the en suite. The linen is by Society Limonta and the lamp on the bedside table comes from HĂŠritiers. For similar bathroom furniture, try Duravit Stockist details on p175

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THE CONCRETE HAS BEEN PAINTED A DARK CHARCOAL GREY TO SET A SERENE TONE IN THE BEDROOM


HOTELS • R ESTAUR A NTS • GA R DENS • GETAWAYS

ESCAPE THE MODERN RETREAT

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: SVEN HAUSHERR/CEECEE CREATIVE

Swap poolside lounging for a week in the woods on Germany’s Baltic coast, staying in one of the two Newhaus holiday homes designed by Berlin architect Herbert Hussmann. House Pine and House Sand are both equally magnificent – B&B Italia sofas, Minotti reading chairs and in-house saunas – and perfect for a relaxing escape. Waking up to the dappled light of a woodland morning will help to sooth many an urban worry. From £190 per night (newhaus.de).


Escape | N E W S

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THREE MORE MODERN C O U N T RY S I D E C A B I N S

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Black&Bright, Isle of Møn, Denmark Among the traditional 19th century farmhouses on the island is this sleek, black cabin, purpose built by Copenhagen-based architect Jan Henrik Jansen for holidaying in all year round. A woodburning stove keeps it cosy – but on a fine day, the floor-to-ceiling windows allow views across the sea to the horizon. From £685 per week (urlaubsarchitektur.de).

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURE: KENNET HAVGAARD

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La Marmote Albergo Diffuso, Italy This is a cross between a hotel and a small holiday village: check in to one of La Marmote’s lodgings which are spread throughout the pretty mountain town of Paluzza. As well as traditional chocolate box chalets, there’s Da Velio (above right), an eco-shed which runs off of solar energy and has amazing views of the Alps. From £34 per night (albergodiffusopaluzza.it).

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Boxwood Retreat, Sussex, UK Surrounded by mature chestnut, pine and oak trees, this six-person sanctuary with a steeply pitched roof is a contemporary take on the forest grottos of traditional fairy tales. But with the luxury of underfloor heating throughout. From £800 for a week (boxwood-retreat.co.uk).

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Escape | N E W S

NORTHERN POWERHOUSE We’re mad for Manchester. Here are three reasons to visit now! The grass is greener. The City of Trees movement, which aims to plant a tree for every person in the city (that’s three million) over the next 25 years, is now well underway (cityoftrees.org.uk). There are new hot hotels. Top of the mini-breaker’s list should be The Principal (right): a glorious Gothic revival building designed in 1891 by architect Alfred Waterhouse (also the brains behind London’s Natural History Museum). It has been transformed by 3D Reid Architects and interior designer Michaelis Boyd, but the original Victorian tiling remains, as does the domed stained-glass ceiling above the lobby (doubles from £119 per night; theprincipalhotel.com). Meanwhile, on the riverside is five-star The Lowry, housed in a vast glass building. It has a clutch of extremely chic newly refreshed suites (right) by interiors practice Arney Fender Katsalidis. Expect to find lighting by Flos and Santa & Cole, fabrics by Rubelli and abstract artworks by Mancunian painter Alan Rankle (doubles from £169 per night; thelowryhotel.com). It’s bloom time at the Whitworth. There’s no better month to check out the GROW project at the Whitworth Museum (far right). Wander around The Art Garden in the gallery’s grounds. Funded by sales of Jo Malone’s charity candle, the lovely ‘Peony & Moss’ (£46; jomalone.co.uk), it has been designed to celebrate texture, colour and scent, and plays host to a programme of wellness events (whitworth.manchester.ac.uk).

I T ’ S F E S T I VA L S E A S O N ! It’s not all about Glastonbury. Borrow a tent or book a luxury yurt for these alternative cultural weekenders

A FRIEND, A BOOK & A GARDEN FESTIVAL, Northamptonshire, 1–2 July The Baroque Boughton House hosts the Garden Museum’s fourth literary festival. Gardener Dan Pearson and co-founder of Maggie’s Centres Charles Jencks are both participating (gardenmuseum.org.uk). ALSO FESTIVAL, Warwickshire, 30 June–2 July A genius idea: combine philosophy and debate with plentiful wine, music and fun. Listen to Oxford University researcher Dr Bergljot Gjelsvik answer questions on the myths of mindfulness, then enjoy a candlelit banquet (also-festival.com). 166 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: TIM WINTER, WILL PRYCE

CURIOUS ARTS FESTIVAL, Hampshire, 21–23 July Described as ‘high jinks for the high-minded,’ this festival has talks by The Sunday Times art critic Waldemar Januszczak and poet Lemn Sissay, plus a midnight bat walk (curiousartsfestival.com).


Escape | N E W S

RIVIERA BLISS

WORDS: CHARLOTTE BROOK PICTURES: BENOIT LINERO

We will forever associate the Côte d’Azure with glamour: from the old-school 1960s jetset to the bottomless-bubbles of 1990s St Tropez discos. But Hotel Les Roches Rouges advocates a simpler way of taking time out on the Riviera. Designed by Paris interior architecture firm Festen, the focus is on small, locally-sourced pleasures: terracotta ceramics by Ceramiques Du Beaujolais and Le Labo bathroom lotions. Being outdoors is encouraged here – finish the day with a swim in the gorgeous natural seawater pool carved into the coastal rock, which lies below a garden full of verbena, mimosa, fig trees and myrtle. There is also a rooftop restaurant serving catch of the day, plus bikes to borrow, fishing boat trips, sets of Provençal ball game pétanque, and an outdoor cinema showing classic French and contemporary movies in the open air. From £307 per night (hotellesrochesrouges.com).

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LIVE LIKE A LOCAL

EIXAMPLE AND GRÀCIA, BARCELONA Whether you’re looking to explore Gaudí’s architectural masterpieces or just soak up the bustling atmosphere, this sun-soaked city has it all Words CHARLOTTE BROOK

PICTURE: ALAMY

THE NEIGHBOURHOODS The humming district of Eixample is lined with elegant boutiques and dotted with fantastical Gaudí-designed buildings, such as Casa Battló (below), while its backstreets are scattered with studios and independent bars. Behind it lies Gràcia, the leafy ‘village’ where creatives and professionals live, eat and gallery-hop. Both districts offer the perfect mix of Catalonian culture and fun. ➤

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LIVE LIKE A LOCAL WHERE TO STAY Having launched the original Ace Hotel in New York, Barcelona-born Inés Miró-Sans dreamed of running a similarly cool hotel in her hometown. Casa Bonay (1) is now open for business, with 67 stylish bedrooms, open-air showers and a bar (right) that fills every night with local creatives, whose pieces decorate the interior (from £112 per night; casabonay.com). Around the corner stands Casa Mathilda (2), a home-from-home hotel situated in a converted early 20th-century house with a stained glass door and airy interiors, designed by local Barbara Aurell (from £91 per night; casamathilda.com).

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WINE AND DINE Go for an ice-cold beer and plate of patatas bravas at Gràcia institution Cafe del Sol (5), or a ‘gintònic’ at trendy Elephanta (6) (elephanata.cat). For fine dining, reserve a table at Solomillo (7), which showcases the best of both contemporary Spanish design – Andalucian black marble countertops, ‘Carloa’ chairs by Spanish designer Andreu World – and cooking (restaurantesolomillo.com). Finish your evening by having your tarot cards read in Les Gens Que J’Aime (8), a cool, candlelit jazz bar (lesgensquejaime.com).

4 BREAKFAST AND LUNCH First thing in the morning, follow the groups of chefs making their way to the Mercat de la Concepció (3) – the 1888-built wrought iron and glass warehouse, which is one of the city’s oldest markets and is as popular with gardeners seeking seeds as it is with 3 home cooks buying Andalucian olive oil, La Floreta tomatoes and still-warm ‘integrale’ granary loaves. Afterwards, head to Gut (4) for lunch. Don’t let the name put you off, this relaxed restaurant, set in a simple, whitewashed space, furnished with old schoolroom chairs, serves light and delicious dishes of fresh octopus and confit tomato (restaurantgut.com).


Escape | G E T A W AY

12 CULTURE AND ART Admire the façade of Palau de la Música (12) or, even better, pop in to see a show and gaze at the stainedglass skylight (palaumusica.cat). More low-key venues include Galeria H2O (13), which specialises in design and furniture (h2o.es), and Palau Robert (14), the neoclassical home which is now an exhibition centre. Spend an afternoon meandering around its sculpture-studded lawns (palaurobert.gencat.cat). ES

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PICTURES: ALAMY, MANOLO YLLERA, MERCÈ GOST

11 SHOP The well-loved art, literary and political book publisher Malpaso has opened its own bookshop in Barcelona. Libreria Malpaso (9) sells both edgy and traditional fiction and non-fiction editions, all beautifully bound, and hosts regular evening salons, when refreshments from its next door bar are served (malpasolibreria.com). For a design hit, head to furniture-makers AOO (10), which feels more like an artist’s open house than a shop (aoobarcelona.com). Or stop by Jaime Beriestain (11), a concept store and café where you can pick up colourful furniture (right), as well as clementine marmalade and beautifully packaged candles (beriestain.com).

INSIDER TIP For some time away from the crowds, rise early for a stroll around the emerald lake in the 70-acre Parc de la Ciutadella (15), just south of Eixample. Follow with a cup of the city’s best coffee at Satan’s Coffee Corner (16), run by Marcos Bartolomé, the fifth generation of his family to sell delicious coffee in the city. E D

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ELLE Decoration | A D D R E S S

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PICTURE: GREG COX/LIVING INSIDE (PHOTOGRAPHY) SVEN ALBERDING/BUREAUX.CO.ZA (STYLING) NOTE: COLOURS MAY APPEAR DIFFERENT IN PRINT. ALWAYS CHECK SWATCH CARDS

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ADVERTISING FEATURE

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Product featured: The Chilmark sofa/sofa bed shown in Linen Cotton Pewter from £1,053 and £1,265

NEW SCANDINAVIAN ONLINE STORE New online store dedicated to Scandinavian and Nordic design. Created by an interior designer based in Switzerland, this online shop offers a selection of in-trend home decor with a wide range of decorative objects, textiles, lighting, small furniture as well as bedroom decor and accessories for children. A variety of eclectic brands are available, among them Bloomingville, ferm LIVING, HAY, Madam Stoltz, House Doctor, Meri Meri and many others. Delivers all across Europe. www.solskenshop.com instagram: @solskenshop

AILANTO DESIGN Ailanto Design is a new fabrics and wallpaper company founded by Amanda Ferragamo. The designs stem from her love of drawing and Italian nature. Ailanto was born in in the foot hills of the Pratomagno region, where Amanda has lived for most of her life surrounded by her large family. The company is dedicated to producing unique designs, each one hand drawn with particular focus on bold colours. Using only the best quality linens and velvets for upholstery and curtains the fabrics and wallpapers are printed in the UK and Italy. www.ailantodesign.co.uk Pinterest, Instagram & Facebook: @ailantodesign


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ST YLISH INTERIORS Create your dream living space with our inspiring collection

BRITE LITE TRIBE Now you can have that neon sign of your dreams. Brite Lite Tribe creates inspired, affordable custom neon signs for interiors and events. Visit britelitetribe.com and use the sign customiser to design a personalised neon art piece for your space. Available in a variety of colours and fonts, these handcrafted LED neon signs are child-safe and earth-friendly.

EDWARD BULMER NATURAL PAINT This Spring, Edward Bulmer Natural Paint brings your home to life with a collection of 72 beautiful and wholly natural paints. The colours work as well in modern spaces as period homes, with a palette of unique and unrivalled colours they create extraordinary depth and a response to light which synthetic paints just cannot replicate. Call 01544 388535 or order your complimentary colour chart www.edwardbulmerpaint.co.uk

BRYONIE PORTER Bryonie Porter is an independent company producing unique and high quality papered furniture. We specialise in commissions, as well as having a great range of products for sale on-line, including some fabulous children’s furniture, so please visit our website, www.bryonieporter.com, 07939 522767.

J&S RECLAIMED WOOD

DAVID STUDWELL

J&S Reclaimed Wood Custom Furniture of Vancouver, Canada rescues antique lumber from heritage building demolitions and derelict old barns to build quality handmade furniture. The coffee table pictured is made from 101 year old oak timbers with a hand-tooled brass base. www.jsreclaimedwood.com email: contact@jsreclaimedwood.com Call: 778 317 3027.

David Studwell often uses figures that are synonymous with certain eras, in particular the swinging sixties. Marilyn Monroe, Steve McQueen and Elizabeth Taylor all feature in his work evoking a strong sense of nostalgia and bringing elements of the past into the present. He has exhibited in London and also the USA, and been published. Featured here is ‘Elvis 1,’ a limited edition silk screen (57 x 46cm, £300). Visit www.davidstudwellgallery.co.uk or email davidstudwell@hotmail.com


Advertising Feature | S U M M E R

EDIT

SOPHISTICATED RUSTIC

HÜGGE

THE GIN TROLLEY

Inspired by all things rustic, shabby, tatty and vintage, Sophisticated Rustic specialises in creating stylish furniture with a time forgotten look and feel. Operating from their workshop by the Suffolk coast, they offer distressed painted furniture and unusual vintage accessories for the home.

Influenced by iconic Scandinavian looks and feel, the HÜGGE celebrates white textures, clean lines, smart accents, functionality and simplicity. With a 100-night sleep well trial, free delivery and great prices you can try it at Harrods Bed Studio.

Whether it’s a Martini or a G&T, make and serve drinks in style with this luxurious bar trolley. Made from high gloss laminated birch ply and diamond polished acrylic, The Gin Trolley is a beautiful statement piece for storing your juniper spirits that will be the talk of your next dinner party. Comes complete with a 22 piece luxury cocktail set and a craft gin collection worth over £600.

www.sophisticatedrustic.co.uk Follow us on Instagram: @sophisticated_rustic

www.huggemattress.com paul@huggemattress.com

Quenchhomebars.com / 01483 740455

JALU

THE SALCOMBE TRADING COMPANY

MARTHA OAKES

Unique, contemporary floor lamps that provide a striking feature during the day and ambient light at night. Perfect for outdoor living spaces: patios, gardens, roof terraces, and pool-sides. Hand cast to order in the UK, they are tactile and weatherproof. The modular Holix (pictured) allows you to vary height, colours and light patterns.

Preferred Partner of Skagerak, Denmark. Offering a distinctive and eclectic mix of high quality furniture along with all you need to eat, drink, cook and enjoy your home and garden. Specialising in Scandinavian and the Best of British design.

San Francisco-based artist and textile designer Martha Oakes takes her original, watercolor painted patterns and transforms them into unique decor for the home. Her expanding line includes linen pillows, tablecloths, bedding and more. All items are produced in local, familyrun factories in San Francisco, California.

www.Jalu.co.uk 07930 506864

www.salcombetrading.co.uk @salcombetrading

www.marthaoakesdesigns.com @marthaoakesdesigns

TEAL & GOLD

DAVID VILLAGE LIGHTING

DECORATIVE ART

The home of stylish homeware, gifts and accessories. We specialise in unique products sourced from the latest designers worldwide. Our bestselling geometric mugs, bowls and cups are available in stunning pastels. Exclusive 10% off online with code TEALGOLD17

The new Moooi Perch collection, now available at David Village lighting. All the best lighting brands on-line and in our showroom. Artemide, Flos, Foscarini, Louis Poulsen, Moooi, Mutto and many more. Lighting Design Service available.

A simply stunning addition to any interior. Each unique Gorgonian Sea fan is encased within a handmade waxed box frame with glass. Available online or for a bespoke service contact direct.

www.tealandgold.com

info@davidvillagelighting.co.uk www.davidvillagelighting.co.uk

www.hannahbrowninteriors.co.uk info@hannahbrowninteriors.co.uk

JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 179


Classifieds | N E W

DESIGNER

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

www.thefrenchhouse.net | 020 7859 4939

“We bring you the mystique of the East” 07838 142008

www.ottotiles.co.uk

LU X U RY FU R NIT U R E

padukltd.com DORGLAZE ® VISION PANEL KITS FOR DOORS

NORTH 4 DESIGN LTD T: 0208 885 4404 / NORTH4.COM

180 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

| Furniture | Lighting | Accessories |

www.aurumhome.co


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

ClassiямБeds | N E W

DESIGNER

beautifully hand-crafted contemporary door handles in stainless steel and solid bronze

#doorjewellery

pushpull.co.uk

M O D E R N G L A S S L I G H T I N G , M A D E I N N E W YO R K

W W W. N I C H E M O D E R N .C O M / E L L E

JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 181


Classifieds | A – Z

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

LIGHTING & BATHROOMS

What makes an Albion bath unique? Our exclusive bath material creates a difference you can feel. With over 50 models available, we’ll have a size for bathrooms big or small. Request your brochure on: 01255 831605 or go to: www.albionbathco.com

ALBION

Handmade bathrooms directly from our factory

pedigree lamps, mongrel prices

www.pooky.com

Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour samuel-heath.co.uk Made in England

182 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z INTERIORS, KITCHENS & FLOORING

www.woodworksbytedtodd.com

JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 183


Classifieds | A – Z INTERIORS & DANISH FURNITURE

184 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017

TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260


TO ADVERTISE HERE, PLEASE CALL THE CLASSIFIED TEAM ON 020 3728 6260

Classifieds | A – Z OUTDOOR FURNITURE, FABRICS & ART

Designed for beautiful outdoor spaces Corido design and manufacture unique pieces of Grade A Teak Garden Furniture which is sustainably sourced, and ergonomically sound. Each item in our extensive range is crafted using time-honoured woodworking techniques to create stunning benches, tables, chairs, dining sets, sun loungers and more...

D E S I G N E R | B E S P O K E M A N U FA C T U R E R | D I S T R I B U T O R

www.extex.co.uk

corido.co.uk | 020 8655 6242

SHOWROOM UNIT 7 & 8 GATEWAY BUSINESS PARK COULSDON CR5 2NS

+44 (0)1634 718871

JUNE 2017 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK 185


THE LAST WORD At ELLE Decoration we’re all self-confessed interiors fiends. Here, we reveal our current home obsessions, plus the products and projects we’ve been testing and tackling this month

#TeamED has been in Milan for the annual furniture fair. Catch up on the highlights with Editor-in-Chief Michelle Ogundehin’s #EDtrends moodboards. To see them all, follow @elledecorationuk on Instagram

Greenery is everywhere. From plants and trees to the colour itself – we love the Verde marble spotted on walls and tables.

50s colours, from mustard yellows to dirty pink, olive and burgundy reigned supreme in Milan – even on the buildings.

Green fingers ‘I’m currently in full seedling planting swing, with sweet peas, tomatoes and corn growing in a small greenhouse on my windowsill. Each seed is placed in its own biodegradable pot until it shoots up to three inches tall. By the time you read this they will have grown big enough to take up home in my flower beds, supported by a trellis to help them climb’ – Photography Director Flora Bathurst Deputy Editor Ben Spriggs tracks down big brand style at an accessible price on the UK high street

At last year’s Milan furniture fair, lots of the major brands showed oversized circular mirrors, which I totally lusted after. Since then I’ve been searching for something similar here in the UK without success. Until now that is. Imagine my joy to discover this goldframed beauty on the high street for a fraction of the price of the Italian versions I spotted. Oh, and the fact it’s called ‘Patsy’ is rather fabulous too! £195, Habitat (habitat.co.uk). 186 ELLEDECORATION.CO.UK JUNE 2017


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