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DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Celebrations and Partnerships


CONTENTS

Celebrations and Partnerships in Diversity and Community Engagement

Celebrations

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Community Leadership Awards Texas Relays Heman Sweatt Symposium on Civil Rights Mayor Honors UT VISTAs Historic Alpha Phi Alpha Conference

Partnerships 20 17 27 29 31 33 34

UT Elementary School China Maymester The Project 2013 Longhorn Center for School Partnerships National Hispanic Institute African American Male Research Initiative Feria Para Aprender

CREDITS: Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement Erica Sáenz, Assistant Vice President for Community and External Relations Leslie Blair, Director of Communications Managing Editor and Writer: Leslie Blair Senior Designer: Ron Bowdoin Photographers: Brian Birzer, Leslie Blair, Bret Brookshire, Jeremiah Jenne, Shelton Lewis, Milagros Lopez, Thais Moore, Zen Ren, Erica Sáenz, Joshunda Sanders and Kirk Weddie Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved. The University of Texas at Austin, Division of Diversity and Community Engagement

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The University of Texas at Austin • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS


MESSAGE from Dr. Vincent Dear Friends: The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE) is dedicated to fostering the university’s commitment to diversity and its mission of serving the people of Texas. As one of the great public universities, The University of Texas at Austin is known as a leader for change—whether through cutting-edge research, implementation of best practices in higher education or the development of future leaders. Leading for change also characterizes the DDCE. We help other colleges and units on campus plan for diversity, we foster academic success among students from underrepresented populations and we advance equity and access in communities that have been traditionally underserved by the university. We hope you enjoy reading about just a few of our events and collaborations that promote diversity, equity, academic excellence and social justice, and we invite you to join us in our efforts to make a difference on campus and in communities state wide.

Best wishes,

Dr. Gregory J. Vincent Vice President for Diversity and Community Engagement W. K. Kellogg Professor in Community College Leadership Professor of Law

CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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Celebrations Celebrating successes, uniting diverse communities The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin takes pride in honoring outstanding community members and alumni who have made great strides in civil rights, social justice and education in the Austin area. We celebrate these accomplishments through our three community leadership awards events and the Sweatt Symposium on Civil Rights. These much-anticipated events are well attended by the Austin and university communities. Additionally, we sponsor many other celebratory events throughout the year that also connect community members with university faculty, staff and students. The annual Texas Relays celebrations are excellent examples of this as are our sponsorships of community nonprofit events.

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2012–2013 Community Leadership Awards Honor Outstanding Community Members and Organizations Presented October 3, 2012, at

The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center Community Partnership Award Con Mi MADRE Tejano Monument Inc.

Community Leadership Circle Award David Garza, Garza Design & Construction Dr. John Hogg, Austin Radiological Association

Special Recognition Jody Conradt, former UT head women’s basketball coach

Joe R. & Teresa Lozano Long Legacy Award The Severiano (“S.A.”) and Viola Garza Family, alumni of UT Austin and owners of S.A. Garza Engineers Inc.

The University of Texas at Austin • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS


Presented December 6, 2012, at

The Carver Museum and Cultural Center Community Partnership Award The Villager Newspaper

Dr. James L. Hill Community Leadership Circle Award Nelson Linder, president of the Austin chapter of the NAACP

Dr. June Brewer Legacy Award Wilhelmina Delco, former state representative

Special Recognition Edwin R. Sharpe, clinical professor, Department of Educational Administration, The University of Texas at Austin

Presented May 6, 2013, at

The Etter-Harbin Alumni Center Community Partnership Award Texas Health and Science University

Community Leadership Circle Award Nahid Khataw, board president of Interfaith Action of Central Texas Peter Shen, founder of the Greater Austin Chinese Chamber of Commerce and the Austin Chinese Arts Association Sonia Kotecha, director of volunteers for CASA of Travis County

Legacy Award Betty Hwang, chairwoman and CEO of Victina Systems International and ACC Board of Trustees

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Community Leadership Awards October 3, 2012 The Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center 1. Gloria Horner 2. Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, Jody Conradt, and President Bill Powers 3. Jamie Beaman, Cayetano Barrera, Homero Vera, AndrĂŠs Tijerina, Renato Ramirez and Ricardo Sanchez

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4. David Garza and Dr. John Hogg

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5. Erica SĂĄenz and Dr. Gonzalo Garza 6. Sandy Alcala 7. Isabella Hetherington, C. C. Garza Hetherington, S. A. Garza, Viola Garza, Tricia Garza and Rudy Garza

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Community Leadership Awards December 6, 2012 The Carver Museum and Cultural Center 1. Judge Harriet Murphy and President Bill Powers

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2. Brian Lammer, Hon. Sheryl Cole, and Patrick Francis

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3. Nelson Linder, Hon. Wilhelmina Delco, Tommie Wyatt and Dr. Ed Sharpe 4. Loretta Edelen 5. Mary Diehl catches up with a colleague at the Carver event. 6. Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, UT System Regent Printice Gary, Hon. Wilhelmina Delco and President Bill Powers

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Community Leadership Awards May 6, 2013 The Etter-Harbin Alumni Center

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7. Savy Buoy, Laura Soeur and Erica Estetter 8. A friend congratulates Lisa Ping-Hui Tsao Lin, co-founder of Texas Health and Science University. 9. Paul Lin, Lisa Ping-Hui Tsao Lin, Peter Shen, President Bill Powers, Sonia Kotecha, Nahid Khataw and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent 10. Flowers for an honoree 11. Labhu Lavani and Shanta Kotecha 12. Vince Cobalis and Chee Lin

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Texas Relays Celebrations Welcome Track Fans from Across the State Each spring, hundreds of track fans from across the state come to Austin for the Texas State Relays. DDCE and the City of Austin have partnered the past four years to welcome all to the city and to The University of Texas at Austin. This year’s welcome reception on March 27 at City Hall was even more special as student athletes from area colleges were honored. The tribute included outstanding athletes from Concordia University, Huston-Tillotson University, St. Edward’s University and The University of Texas at Austin. DDCE also cosponsored the 2013 Texas Relays Parade on March 29. It paid tribute to B. L. Joyce, the first African American band director in AISD and to Larry Jackson, founder of the Central Texas Black Cultural and Health Festival.

Honored student athletes from Concordia University, Huston-Tillotson University, St. Edward’s University and The University of Texas at Austin pose with Dr. Gregory J. Vincent (far left), City Manager Marc Ott (second from left), the Honorable Sheryl Cole (third from right) and former UT football player Quan Cosby (far right).

University of Texas at Austin student athletes Chalonda Goodman and Hayden Baillio with Women’s Athletics Director Christine Plonsky

CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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The 27th Annual Heman Sweatt Symposium on Civil Rights Each year the Heman Sweatt Symposium on Civil Rights reflects on past and ongoing work in civil rights, especially at The University of Texas at Austin and in the Austin area. The symposium culminates each year with the Evening of Honors where the Heman Sweatt Legacy Award is given to an individual who has done significant work in civil rights. This year we collaborated with the Austin Area Urban League to screen The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights at the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum. Young worked closely with Presidents Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon, and was able to make inroads in American political and business communities when other activists could not. We followed the film screening with a second event, a panel discussion on the Future of Black Life in Austin. We closed the 27th annual symposium with the Evening of Honors on May 3, celebrating the efforts of Pastor Joseph C. Parker with the Heman Sweatt Legacy Award. Through his law career, his ministry and his community service, Parker has impacted the lives of many in the Austin community. Though recovering from open heart surgery, Pastor Parker joined his family and the DDCE family for a joyous evening at the Etter-Harbin Alumni Center that included fellowship, music and dancing.

J. LaVerne Morris-Parker and Pastor Joseph C. Parker danced the night away.

President Bill Powers, J. LaVerne Morris-Parker, Pastor Joseph C. Parker and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent

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Symposium Events 1. Michael Deary and Charles Singleton greet Pastor Parker

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2. Anita Dabney, Natalie Madeira Cofield and Jeanette Peten

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3. (Back row) Col. Leon Holland, Dr. Alnita Rettig Dunn, Peggy Drake Holland, Lonnie Fogle and Fred Alexander. (Front row) Maudie Ates Fogle and Monica Alexander 4. Colletta Haskins, Leonard Haskins and Vera Williams 5.Gwen Greene and Wilhelmina Delco 6. Robert Caro, biographer of President Lyndon B. Johnson, at The Powerbroker screening 7. Bonnie Boswell, producer of The Powerbroker with husband Rodderick Hamilton and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent

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8. Janetta Parker and Sidney Zanders ham it up at the Evening of Honors. 9. Robiaun Charles (center) introduces Alice Maxie to President Bill Powers

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Mayor Recognizes UT Austin AmeriCorps VISTA Program On April 9, Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell joined more than 831 other mayors around the country in honoring the impact of the AmeriCorps VISTA and other national service programs during a Mayors Day of Recognition for National Service. During a ceremony in the Council Chambers at Austin City Hall, city leaders and distinguished guests celebrated hundreds of national service members who have been serving in Austin, supporting local nonprofits, protecting the environment and working with underprivileged youth. The group included 18 VISTAs from The University of Texas at Austin’s AmeriCorps VISTA program, which is led by University of Texas at Austin VISTA director Cheryl Sawyer. The event also served as a kick-off for a major partnership between DDCE and the City of Austin for one of the largest VISTA Summer Associates programs in the nation. The partnership supported 48 summer associates working in six Austin organizations and six Rio Grande Valley organizations from June 3 to August 9. VISTAs in the UT Austin program work in a number of units within the DDCE, in several City of Austin departments and in area nonprofits. “We are incredibly proud of the work the VISTAs in our program have carried out the past four years,” said Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, vice president for diversity and community engagement. “They have given enormous talent and energy to helping find solutions to challenges in areas such as education, health care, food insecurity and community revitalization.”

Mayor Lee Leffingwell

1. University of Texas at Austin VISTAs pose with DDCE staff members, Mayor Lee Leffingwell and Dr. Gregory Vincent, vice president for diversity and community engagement. 2. Ellen Ray, Anisha Vichare and Tina Lee 3. Cheryl Sawyer, Carrie Powell and Courtney Bailey CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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DDCE Sponsors Historic Alpha Phi Alpha Convention The general convention of the nation’s oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity for African Americans, Alpha Phi Alpha Inc., drew about 10,000 visitors to Austin in late June. Its theme was “Reinvesting,” a topic addressed by an array of esteemed speakers and guests during a public reception at the Hilton Austin Ballroom. The conference represented the first National Pan Hellenic Council organization conference in Austin. Dr. Gregory J. Vincent, vice president for diversity and community engagement and an Alpha member, played a major role in getting the Alpha convention to Austin. Vincent delivered welcoming remarks at the reception and was honored to deliver the fraternal luncheon keynote during the convention, where he noted the important roles Alphas had played at UT Austin and in the city of Austin. Local Alphas of note include Heman Marion Sweatt, the first African American to be admitted to the University of Texas School of Law; Dr. Larry Ervin, president of Huston-Tillotson University; James Means, the first African American letterman at UT Austin; and Dr. Exalton Delco and Dr. Charles Akins, outstanding educators, among others. In the wake of early summer Supreme Court decisions related to higher education and the Voting Rights Act, Alphas were asked to consider reinvesting in education and civil rights by Alpha Phi Alpha General President Mark S. Tillman and others discussed the importance of continuing to fight for equity not just for current Alphas but for future generations of African Americans. “We want to make sure our children receive all of the dividends of our investments, not just politically but also financially,” he said.

Dr. Charles Akins and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent Alpha Phi Alpha General President Mark Tillman and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent

CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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Partnerships Partnering for change, educating the future leaders of Texas With more than 250 collaborative community partnerships, the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE) has played a major role in helping the university expand its boundaries beyond the physical campus. These partnerships further the university’s efforts to share expertise and resources and allow the DDCE to help address long-standing systemic problems related to education, social justice, access, equality and equity. The DDCE also has partnerships with almost every college, school and administrative unit on campus, strengthening endeavors to educate and develop the future leaders of Texas.

You Can’t Spell Community Without UT It was one of the most enthusiastic parades ever as the entire student body of UT Elementary School paraded up and down E. Sixth St. on November 30, 2012, chanting “You can’t spell community without UT!” and “UT Elementary Garden!” Accompanied by teachers and parents, students carried cut-outs of bees, ladybugs, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower and kohlrabi as they marched. The parade celebrated a recent $100,000 grant from the State Farm Insurance Youth Advisory Board to support the creation of a new community garden that will serve the surrounding East Austin neighborhood. Land for the garden was made possible by the City of Austin and Cap Metro. Students will partner with neighboring businesses, households and local gardening groups to develop and grow the garden as a collaborative service project. In addition, the school will incorporate enrichment activities into the project that will focus on the areas of STEM, fitness, wellness and multicultural arts studies. 1. Third-grade students marched with giant cutouts of broccoli. 2. Younger students carried cutouts of bees and ladybugs. 3. Fourth- and fifth-grade students made posters for the parade. 4. Amelia Folks, State Farm Youth Advisory Board

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DDCE’s China Maymester Program A diverse group of 38 students, more than half of them firstgeneration college students, took the world by the horns in Beijing, China, during DDCE’s first-ever study abroad program that focused on social entrepreneurship. “We don’t create students who change the world by just sitting in the classroom,” said Dr. Leonard Moore, associate vice president for academic diversity initiatives and student engagement. That belief was at the core of the Beijing Maymester program developed by Moore and Dr. Ge Chen, assistant vice president for academic diversity initiatives, in collaboration with Giancarlo Taylor, International Office program coordinator. Moore and Chen wanted to give the students from diverse backgrounds the competitive edge needed in a global economy. For the International Office, the China Maymester represented an opportunity to bring more diversity to the study abroad programs and create a new model. Dr. Heather Barclay Hamir, director of study abroad, explained, “The Social Entrepreneurship Maymester led by Drs. Moore and Chen represents a successful model for increasing study abroad participation among underrepresented groups. With financial support from the Coca-Cola Foundation, our goal was to

attract talented first-generation college students through the combination of inspiring faculty leadership, degree-relevant curriculum, service learning, and automatic scholarships for students who needed financial aid. This is a new approach to fostering inclusivity and diversity in study abroad, and it was a tremendous success, thanks in large part to the strong partnership between DDCE and Study Abroad.” Coming from many different majors and walks of life, the students quickly bonded around adventures exploring Beijing, volunteering at the Dandelion School for the children of migrant workers and their study of social entrepreneurship as a way to solve social problems. By the end of the program, lifelong friendships were cemented and a new world perspective had taken hold among the students. As senior Melguisedec Nuno wrote in his final blog post about the experience, “It was sad to leave the country that I fell in love with. In only four weeks I developed as a person more than any other time in my life and in the process I became enamored with a culture so different to the one I was raised in. This program taught me of the necessity to be a global citizen in the 21st century. No longer will I see things through only my perspective and through the lens of my culture.”

UT Austin students with Dr. Leonard and Thais Moore and family on the Great Wall of China at Jinshanling

CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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China Maymester 1. The entire China Maymester group at the Summer Palace 2. Dr. Charles Lu and Dr. Leonard Moore 3. Wesley Nash, Brian Miller, Fabiana Latorre and Antonio Adams

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4. Taylor Turner and Dr. Jeremiah Jenne, director of IES (International Education of Students) in Beijing

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5. Melguisedec Nuno with students from the Dandelion School

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6. Our first full day in Beijing on our way to the Urban Planning Museum 7. Vanilla McIntosh and friend at Summer Palace

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8. Dr. Ge Chen, Jazmon Marshall and Dr. Aileen Bumphus

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9. Kolby Lee, Dandelion School development volunteer Jing Zhao and Savannah Terry 10. Greg Vincent and Josh Rosales don the latest in Beijing street wear. 11. Alex Curry and Neil Tanner tutor Dandelion School students.

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The Project 2013: What Starts Here, Changes the World One Community at a Time Each year students affiliated with the DDCE’s Longhorn Center for Civic Engagement partner with an Austin community for The Project, now in its fourteenth year. This year was the second year in a row that students worked with community leaders in the Dove Springs neighborhood, coordinating 1,714 volunteers to work at 18 sites on 82 different projects. UT Austin football great Vince Young and the Mendez Middle School cheerleaders rallied the troops to get everyone ready to work on Saturday, Feb. 26. Forty employees from five area Longhorn Steakhouse Restaurants, led by director of operations Gus Barbosa, made sure all volunteers got a tasty, filling, free lunch. The economic impact of the 9,170 volunteer hours to the Dove Springs area was $184,716! For the second time, DDCE partnered with the Texas Exes for The Project Worldwide. Approximately 1,000 volunteers from 54 alumni chapters from Alaska to Atlanta participated, providing volunteer services to meet local needs. Alumni from the Austin chapter worked alongside UT Austin students in Dove Springs. Once again, Project 2013 proved What Starts Here, Changes the World!

Casi Clarich, Texas Exes Hispanic Alumni Network

1. Project lead team members Mario Rodriguez and Disha Nath 2. Kira White on mulch duty at Dove Springs Recreation Center 3. Longhorn Steakhouse employees prepare free lunches for 1,800 volunteers. 4. Yvonne Loya, Vince Young and Dr. Gregory J. Vincent 5. School of Pharmacy students conducted health screenings for the Dove Springs community.

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LCSP Partners with School Districts to Prepare Students for College and Provide Dual-Credit Courses As college freshmen, students often struggle with time management and study skills. Many have breezed through high school, accustomed to studying little and being allowed to easily extend deadlines for projects and papers. Dual credit courses in chemistry (ChemBridge), mathematics (Math Masters) and writing (SPURS) offered through DDCE’s Longhorn Center for School Partnerships (LCSP) enable high school students to earn college credit from The University of Texas at Austin, but also provide the students the opportunity to hone time management and study skills. “Our program goals are two-fold,” said Dr. Kenya Walker, assistant vice president of Longhorn Center for School Partnerships. “We want to attract students to UT Austin, of course, but we also want to prepare underrepresented students for rigorous college-level coursework.”

Beaumont, Copperas Cove, Granger and Manor—are partners with LCSP. And, the dual-credit courses would not be possible without partnerships between LCSP and the College of Natural Sciences, the Charles A. Dana Center, and the Departments of Chemistry, Mathematics and Rhetoric and Writing, all at the University of Texas at Austin. Rita King, a teacher at San Antonio’s Edison High School and six-year veteran of ChemBridge, explained the program’s value. “Deadlines are set in ChemBridge classes—sometimes in high school, we slide deadlines to help students out. In this course, it doesn’t happen often. Quizzes and tests count a lot more than the students are used to; they realize that they can’t do extra credit and they learn to turn assignments in on time. They are learning what college is all about.”

School districts across Texas—from large districts like Austin, Dallas, Houston and San Antonio to smaller districts like 1. ChemBridge, Math Masters and SPURS students get to visit UT Austin each year. 2. Two ChemBridge students enjoy their visit to Austin. 3. ChemBridge teachers perform air quality experiments as part of their professional development. 4. Austin LBJ High School teacher Elizabeth Albee says she loves Math Masters because it taps into students’ potential. CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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National Hispanic Institute Develops Future Leaders One of the highlights of summer for the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE) is when the National Hispanic Institute (NHI) hosts the Great Debate on The University of Texas at Austin campus. Through a partnership with DDCE, every summer for the past six years the NHI has brought more than 200 rising high school sophomores to campus for a debate competition on issues that affect the Hispanic community. The debate teams are given the general theme for the competition months in advance, but learn about their topics only the night before the fierce competition. The competition builds and tests leadership and communication skills of these high school students.

Ernesto Nieto, founder and executive director of the NHI, which has involved 75,000 young Hispanics in its programs, started the institute more than 30 years ago as a way to foster the education and empowerment of Latino students and to strengthen the pipeline of future leaders. “As the Latino community grows, so do we have to expand the pipeline to supply future leaders. With the way the world is changing, we have to have highly prepared, high skilled, technologically knowledgeable young men and women attending the best universities in the country,” said Nieto.

1. Students from South Texas hang out in Jester West between competitions. 2. This Houston student carried a giant H into the opening Great Debate rally. 3. Two Laredo ISD students relax minutes after their first round of competition. 4. Ernesto Nieto, NHI founder and executive director 5. One of the final rounds of competition

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AAMRI Partners for Male Student Success The DDCE African American Male Research Initiative (AAMRI) is building a culture of academic excellence among young men while adding to the scholarly research on the African American male educational experience. Through AAMRI partnerships with the Gamma Gamma Boulé chapter of Sigma Pi Phi fraternity, The University of Texas at Austin chapter of the Student African American Brotherhood, the African American Youth Harvest Foundation, the W. E. B. Dubois Honors Program at Huston-Tillotson University and Communities in Schools, a model cascade mentoring program has been established. Monthly mentorship and professional development programs involving members of Gamma Gamma Boulé provide a solid foundation and career development for men—including student athletes—enrolled at UT Austin and Huston-Tillotson. These college students in turn, are mentoring students affiliated with the African American Youth Harvest Foundation and Communities in Schools. Topics covered by the Boulé chapter members have included transitioning from college to the corporate world, globalization, entrepreneurship, how to handle racial discrimination, networking, dressing for success, and balancing family and work, among others. The professional men have also stressed the importance of embracing situations where meaningful change can be created in one’s community. By mentoring the younger students, the college men have the opportunity to share their own success stories with the young men who aspire to be college students.

1. Members of the African American Male Research Initiative (from left to right) Martin Smith, Cameron McCoy, Dr. Leonard Moore, Neil Tanner, Devin Walker and Dr. Darren Kelly 2. Gamma Gamma Boulé member George Francis IV 3. UT Austin students Neil Tanner and Jeremy Bates 4. Dr. Darren Kelly opens a panel discussion by Boulé members, including Dr. Garret Scales and Carl Richie. 5. Gamma Gamma Boulé member David Talbot Jr. (center) greets Dr. Greg Vincent and students.

CELEBRATIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS • Division of Diversity and Community Engagement • The University of Texas at Austin

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Feria Para Aprender: Education Outreach to Latino Families

Each January, the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement and other units and departments at The University of Texas at Austin partner with CommuniCard, LLC during the Feria Para Aprender—the largest Spanishlanguage education fair in Central Texas. Since 2007 the fair has served more than 100,000 students in the Austin area. Approximately 10,000 students and parents attended this year’s Feria on Saturday, January 26 at the North Austin Events Center. Children left the fair with freebies including 20,000 books, 5,000 toothbrushes and 5,000 balls, while parents left with information about how to help their children succeed academically.

1. The Feria Para Aprender offered many different learning activities. 2. Parents discuss what it takes to be college ready at The University of Texas at Austin Admissions table.

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To learn more about the Division of Diversity and Community Engagement (DDCE) and our programs and initiatives, visit our web site

WWW.UTEXAS.EDU/DIVERSITY

To support the work of the DDCE visit

WWW.UTEXAS.EDU/DIVERSITY/GIVE


DIVISION OF DIVERSITY AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement advances socially just learning and working environments that foster a culture of excellence through diverse people, ideas and perspectives. We engage in dynamic community-university partnerships designed to transform our lives.

WWW.UTEXAS.EDU/DIVERSITY/

Division of Diversity and Community Engagement The University of Texas at Austin Flawn Academic Center, Suite 402 2304 Whitis Avenue, Mail Stop G4600 Austin, Texas 78712 • 512-471-2557

Celebrations and Partnerships  

From the University of Texas at Austin's Division of Diversity and Community Engagement come our annual look back at our major events and pa...

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