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Contents Contents ..................................................................................................................................................................1 History of the Pennsylvania Dutch............................................................................................................................3 Lancaster, PA dining is home to Pennsylvania Dutch style cooking......................................................................4 Growing up and dinning Lancaster County ......................................................................................................5 Shartlesville Hotel Meals Served Country Style. ..............................................................................................6 Noteworthy restaurants Dinners and hotels....................................................................................................8 The dining experience......................................................................................................................................8 Pennsylvania Dutch Dinners...................................................................................................................................10 Main Course.......................................................................................................................................................11 Bott Boi ..........................................................................................................................................................11 Dutch Spiced Pot Roast ..................................................................................................................................11 Getulte Rinderbrust .......................................................................................................................................11 Hasenpfeffer (Rabbit Stew)............................................................................................................................11 Hog Maw .......................................................................................................................................................12 Leber Kloese (Liver Dumplings)......................................................................................................................12 Zitterting (Souse) ...........................................................................................................................................12 Ponhaws.........................................................................................................................................................13 Side Dishes and Condiments...............................................................................................................................13 Apple Butter ..................................................................................................................................................13 Apple Fritters .................................................................................................................................................13 Pickled Beet Eggs also known as Red Beet Eggs.............................................................................................14 Schnitz un Knepp ...........................................................................................................................................14 Spaetzle..........................................................................................................................................................14 Pennsylvania Dutch Pickled Relish .................................................................................................................14 Chow-Chow....................................................................................................................................................15 Pennsylvania Dutch Sauerkraut .....................................................................................................................15 Amish Potato Salad ........................................................................................................................................16 Breakfast.............................................................................................................................................................17 Apple Dumplings ...........................................................................................................................................17 Scrapple..........................................................................................................................................................17 Amish Bread.......................................................................................................................................................17 Making the Amish Friendship Bread Starter..................................................................................................18 Desserts..............................................................................................................................................................19 Fasnachts (also known as Fauschnauts")........................................................................................................19


Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish Pies ..................................................................................................................19 Schnitz Pie......................................................................................................................................................20 Mincemeat Pie ..............................................................................................................................................20 Green Tomato Pie ..........................................................................................................................................21 Shoofly Pie .....................................................................................................................................................21 Whoopie Pie ..................................................................................................................................................22 Pennsylvania Dutch Meat ..................................................................................................................................22 Butchering the Meat .....................................................................................................................................23 Curing and Smoking the Pennsylvania Dutch Meat .......................................................................................23 Pennsylvania Dutch Vegetables..........................................................................................................................24 Farming and Gardening as a Way of Life............................................................................................................24 Harvesting and Persevering the Vegetables.......................................................................................................25 Serving the Vegetables...................................................................................................................................25 Corn Fritters...................................................................................................................................................25 Dried Corn......................................................................................................................................................26 Corn Pie..........................................................................................................................................................26 Peas with Knepp.............................................................................................................................................26 Creamed Celery..............................................................................................................................................26 Fried Oyster Plant...........................................................................................................................................27 Potato Cakes...................................................................................................................................................27 Riced Mashed Potatoes..................................................................................................................................27 Parts of the content in text, ePub, DVO, HTML, PDF Cook Book was taken from “Pennsylvania Dutch Cook Book of Fine Old Recipes” Copyright 1960 Culinary Arts Press PO BOX 1182, Reading PA 1923 through

Published with notice but copyright was not renewed8 None. In the public domain due to copyright expiration

1963

http://books.google.com/books?id=lNcgAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA1190&lpg=PA1190&dq= %22+Pennsylvania+Dutch+Cook+Book+of+Fine+Old+Recipes %22&source=bl&ots=CtcZYRmtDM&sig=z7Z9fwAT7_uCmhmNZ2v8KMK9_BE&hl=en&sa=X&ei=gWdoUZj3Bc40QGun4GgAg&ved=0CHgQ6AEwCTgK#v=onepage&q=%22%20Pennsylvania%20Dutch%20Cook%20Book %20of%20Fine%20Old%20Recipes%22&f=true


History of the Pennsylvania Dutch In the early years of the eighteenth century, nearly all the first settlers in eastern Pennsylvania came from the Palatinate in Germany. They selected pieces of land, built log houses and began to clear and cultivate the soil. Though these good people came from Germany, they came to be known as "Dutch." These same settlers developed a language, a mixture of their mother tongue in the old world and that spoken in their new homeland, America, which came to be known as Pennsylvania Dutch instead of Pennsylvania Deutsch.

In those early days, the good Frau (wife) had brought with them the recipes of the traditionally famous German cooks. Life was hard and at first the land yielded but little return. There were few roads and the towns were far apart. It was not always possible to secure the prescribed ingredients and it became necessary to develop new recipes to utilize the plainer foods in the creation of tasty dishes. Necessity was again the mother of invention and these good women became famous for their fine cooking until now Pennsylvania Dutch cooking is renowned throughout the world.

As you drive through the beautiful farming country of eastern Pennsylvania you will see rich green fields, carefully fenced in, solid and well-kept farmhouses, and freshly painted barns mute testimony of the thrift and industry of these solid citizens. You will see behind many a farmhouse, if you look closely, an old-time stone oven and to this worthy oven is due some of the reputation which made famous the name of "Dutch" cooking. It was customary to build these ovens wide enough to admit a large log. They would then heap the base of the oven high with wood and build a roaring fire. When the fire had burned low and the coals were red hot, they would take out the fire and set their food to cook the result was an inimitable flavor which is not always easy to recapture. It was, therefore, necessary to alter slightly some


of the recipes contained in this cookbook and adapt them to the use of the modern gas range or electric range. If the cook will follow carefully the simple recipes as given, this cookbook should prove a veritable gold mine of good, wholesome and tasty dishes and dishes made famous by the fine cooks of eastern Pennsylvania.

The very names Schnitz and Knepp, Ponhaws, Shoo-fly Cake or Fastnachts seem to conjure up the aroma of a good old-time Pennsylvania German dinner, the sort that is still served in the famous hostelries of Shartlesville, PA, Moselem Springs, PA and countless other places in the so called "Dutch" belt where the good hotel keepers, famous for their generous helpings, heap the table high with from thirty to forty dishes and invite you to eat as much as you are able further tempting you with the plain, delicious wholesomeness of their offerings.

One of the most noteworthy and one of the quaintest niceties of the Pennsylvania Dutch is the celebrated custom known as the "Seven Sweets and Seven Sours." Tradition has it that the Frau (housewife) used to set the table with precisely seven sweets and seven sours and it is the custom for the guests to look for, and even count to see that there are exactly seven sweets and seven sours. It often becomes a matter of much gayety to chide the hostess should there be a shortage. This custom adds to the always abundant variety and interest of the table and is a delightful aid to appetite and digestion.

Lancaster, PA dining is home to Pennsylvania Dutch style cooking. The names alone often get a second glance – dried corn, whoopie pies, schnitz und knepp – but these unusual delicacies are an everyday affair in Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Made from scratch with tender loving care, treats like apple dumplings and shoofly pie are staples in local bakeries, and no Pennsylvania Dutch restaurant is complete without an offer of chicken pot pie and a side of chow chow.


Visitors to Lancaster, PA can sample these and other homemade Pennsylvania Dutch favorites to get a taste of the cooking traditions passed from generation to generation – and kitchen to kitchen – among the locals of Lancaster County. Growing up and dinning Lancaster County Growing up my family used to vacation every summer in Lancaster and it will always be a very special place to me. I can say I have many fond old memories of different restaurants, as the resort we stayed at (now the Lancaster Host Resort & Conference Center) included all meals. The food was amazing there at least and we would pick-up soft pretzels from and Amish girl standing on route 22, back then there were $.75 for a very large one. The Shartlesville Hotel Meals Served Country Style this was the place to eat. You never heard of it. It is not one of those oh-so-quaint little restaurants down on Roadside Drive where they serve the real food, the absolutely real food, the old style German, Dutch, and American food absolutely nobody's discovered it, you know, and the waiters were in native costumes, and oh, well, you know all about those.

It was that you should have made a note of the once know Shartlesville Hotel, at the west end of the town of Shartlesville, Pennsylvania. Shartlesville is seven miles west of Hamburg, PA on route US 22. That places it around fortyfive miles from Harrisburg, PA and thirty-five from Allentown, PA, if you must have it located more generally, Google it. The hotel itself was an unimpressive-looking building on the south side of the road; opposite it is a sign simply stating…


Shartlesville Hotel Meals Served Country Style. The Shartlesville Hotel shut its door after the former husband sold it to Pat Bowman. Jonathan Zweizig and Tracy owned the SH for a number of years. They maintained its tradition and the rivalry with "The Haag" upon purchasing it from the Kauffman family. The Kauffmans owned the Shartlesville Hotel for eons. They settlement on the restaurant two days after their wedding. The First weekend in business was Mother's Day and they served over 800 people. This was a family style resturant and the whole family mother, grandmother, mother-in-law, father-in-law and sister-in-law all helped out. The locals kept us in business during the winter and the tourists came to the restaurants by the bus load during spring, summer and the fall right until 12/24 to see Christmas Village. The Hotel was across the street from Roadside America another tourist haven.

Today there are a smorgasbord restaurants dinners and hotels in the Shartlesville is in Berks County, which means that it is in the heart of the Pennsylvania Dutch country. That section of Pennsylvania is the second finest piece of farmland in the world, according to the result of scientific surveys. (The first finest is a portion of Southwestern Belgium.) Here the road ribbons up and down over rounded hills, from each of which you catch flashes of miles of peaceful valleys in full cultivation, streaked and splotched with dark groves of trees among which are small white stone farmhouses and enormous barns, each with its decoration of my stictircle-and-inscribed-star design counter spells against a possible hex. And here live, love, and labor the Pennsylvania Dutch, with the accent on the labor. Farming is, for men and women alike, as much like hard work as anything in this world.


Now, as was once explained by a lady of the district, them what works hard eats hearty. Moreover, the racial tradition of the inhabitants is against prandial skimpiness. Since 1683, when Pastorious settled in Germantown, the immigrants to this fair territory have been drawn from such trencherman's paradises as the Rhenish Palatinate, Wurttemburg, Bavaria, Alsace, and Saxony. (Don't let "Pennsylvania Dutch" fool you. They called their language German, which is, of course, Deutsch; only they pronounced it "Deitsch" in their Low German dialect; and "Pennsylvania Deitsch", or Dutch, they became at once.) With the combination of a national appetite, famous even in the slothful, wedded to the natural carnal desires induced by mighty labor in the fields it would be only natural for the daily table to creak under its load of good things. When a farmer eats, “he” eats. When a Pennsylvania Dutch farmer eats, he eats for two. What’s more, he wants his groceries where he can get at them with a simple and inspired reach. He is too hungry to be bothered with waiting for courses, even if his flushed womenfolk had time from their kitchen duties to be running back and forth from the table during the whole meal. So with beautiful simplicity the entire dinner is plunked down on the table at once, smoking and steaming hot. A little grudging room is allowed at the sides for the plates and silver ware; but the rest of the cloth is hidden under platters and dishes and bowls, each with its cargo ready and waiting. All the diner has to do is go to it.

Haag's Famous Hearty Country Style Breakfast this all you can eat hearty country style breakfast includes 15 or more dishes!

Fifteen plus dishes from the following list is a typical Pennsylvania Style Dutch Family Style Breakfast at Haag's Hotel (i.e.Bacon, Ham, Sausage, Eggs, Pancakes, Home Fries, Toast, Tapioca Pudding, Apple


Sauce, our Famous Sugar Cookies, Butter Cottage Cheese, Apple Butter, Shoofly Pie, Choice of Juice, Coffee, Hot Tea, or Milk. Cream Chipped Beef available upon request.Scrapple - Seasonal.)

Noteworthy restaurants Dinners and hotels Authentic Pennsylvania Dutch food is served at the following restaurants: http://www.familycupboard.com/ <a href=http://www.familycupboard.com/> Family Cupboard Restaurant, Bird in Hand, PA. </a> http://www.bird-in-hand.com/places-to-eat/bird-in-hand-family-restaurant-smorgasbord/ <a href=â&#x20AC;?http://www.bird-in-hand.com/places-to-eat/bird-in-hand-family-restaurant-smorgasbord/ â&#x20AC;?> Bird-in-Hand Family Restaurant & Smorgasbord </a>

<a href= http://www.dienners.com/ > Dienner's Menu </a> http://www.dutchwayfarmmarket.com/restaurant.php http://www.goodnplenty.com/ http://www.hersheyfarm.com/ lititzfamilycupboard.com http://www.millerssmorgasbord.com/ http://www.oregondairy.com/ http://www.eatathometown.com/menu.htm http://www.shady-maple.com/smorgasbord/ http://www.edenresort.com/restaurants-and-lounges/champagne-sunday-brunch

The dining experience Here is a very unique dining experience for you eat at long tables, elbow to elbow with yourselves and others. Most are large rooms with low-ceiling and cheerful with many windows, but if you hope for


quaintness you will be disappointed. A border of red roses, four inches wide, runs around the wallpaper near the ceiling and forms the only concession to any hidden yearning for color which may exist in the inhabitants. The tables are the plainest sort of deal, with chairs to match. The chinaware is the unbreakable kind beloved of lunch wagon pearl-divers; the silver is the usual restaurant breed. Nothing, in brief, is present which could interfere in any way with the instant and present business of feeding. You’re seated, now, ready for the fray. Service as the effete understand it there is none. Four or five pleasant faced girls of the neighborhood move about the room; their duties are to ask if you want coffee and to bring it if you do (no room on the table for coffee-pots of the size necessary), to replenish platters or bowls showing signs of emptiness, and to itemize the desserts when you have indicated, perhaps by lack of interest and glazed eyes, that you have gone as far as you are able. What you want for your immediate dinner you reach for or call to total strangers farther down the table to pass to you.

What you can expect at your table carries: Chicken, stewed to tenderness and divided into its component parts for instant choice. Gravy in separate bowls. Pork sausage of local manufacture. Flat sausage-cakes, a trifle lighter in texture. “Lebanon bologna,” a beef sausage cut into thick half-slices and served hot. “Potato filling,” which is mashed potatoes filled with chopped onions, celery and (I think) some herbs, browned in the pan. Mashed potatoes. Sweet potatoes. Lima beans. Peas Chickpeas (a large variety, look¬ing something like hominy and with a distinct nutty flavor). Beets. Corn off the cob. “Chicken patties," which are flat noodles filled with minced chicken— raviola, in actual fact: a curious link with Latinity, for the dish is a local concoction. Ordinary noodles. “Egg salad"- Chopped egg in mayon¬naise and vinegar, a regrettable remi¬niscence of soda-fountain sandwiches, one in which I seem to detect a Leggett's serpent in this Eden.


Cole slaw. Mixed relish. Pickled cabbage. Mixed pickles. Applesauce (native and of a deli¬ciousness) Sliced tomatoes. Canned peaches. Canned cherries. Fruit salad (more serpiginous trailing). Large sweet rolls, white-iced, "Shoo-fly pie" - a brown and white crumb cake, faintly spiced. Doughnuts-big round feathery powdered local boys. There are also on the table (they’ve been reading the women’s magazines little mints, salted nuts, stuffed olives, and hard candies. Over this Gargantuan layout hover the girls, watching that no dish ever falls below a certain level, that the chicken-platters are kept heaped, and that coffee in big thick cups is provided for such as desire it. Also, as mentioned above, to tell you about the desserts. The desserts are stacked on an oak sideboard at one side of the room. They consist of six kinds of pie and four kinds of cake. You can have ice- cream, too, if you want it. There is no restriction whatever on the number of times you may attack any dish. The price per person is one dollar. Pennsylvania Dutch Dinners Pennsylvania Dutch food refers to the food prepared by the Pennsylvania Dutch (officially known as Pennsylvania Germans), who live in several counties of Pennsylvania as well as other States including Indiana, Ohio, Oklahoma, Iowa, Virginia, Kansas, and Florida. The Pennsylvania Dutch food is rich and buttery, but is made with ingredients that are not processed. Pennsylvania Dutch cooking is as simple, plain and wholesome as the people themselves-and as hearty. One of the most enlightening traditions that we have talked about before is the "napkin under the chin" school of eating is the old one that every company table should include "seven sweets and seven sours" all served forth at once, sometime made a


game to catch the host short all would start counting. The sweets might include currant or apple jelly, apple butter or applesauce, preserves such as quince, candied watermelon rind, or wild strawberry; and two or three pies such as schnitz, shoofly, cheese cake, or "funeral pie" made from dried raisins or sour cherries. The seven sours would embrace pickled onions, cauliflower or beets, Cole slaw with the famous Dutch sour cream dressing, chow chow, dill pickles, pickled cabbage, green tomato relish, meat jelly, and spice cucumbers. Sometimes, a secondary set of sours would appear according to season; such as ketchup, Dutch horseradish sauce made from the freshly grated root, mustard, and even fresh nasturtium seeds-these latter to be scattered in place of herbs over the salad (a good idea for our own green salads). The Dutch housewife used every edible part of the meat and it is from this thrifty economy that another of her most famous specialties is derived-scrapple (ponhaws).

Main Course Bott Boi This Pennsylvania Dutch food specialty is a stew, usually comprised of a combination of chicken, ham, beef, or wild game with home-made, square-cut egg noodles, potatoes, and a stock of onion, celery and/or carrots, and parsley. Bouillon is sometimes used to enhance the flavor. Also, baking powder may be used to add thickness. Dutch Spiced Pot Roast This is dish where beef is spiced with onion, bay leaf, cloves, vinegar, salt and pepper. After sitting for 24 hours, the meat is browned on both sides and boiled for 2 hours. It is then thickened with brown flour to make a gravy. Getulte Rinderbrust A beef fillet is seasoned with onion, parsley, salt and pepper. The fillet is covered with chopped meat, and rolled and tied. It is then cooked in a covered pot with one cup of water until tender. It is often served with gravy. Hasenpfeffer (Rabbit Stew) A traditional dish where rabbit meat is placed in a container and covered with vinegar and equal amounts of water. It is then seasoned with onions and other ingredients. It remains marinated for 2 days.


The meat is then browned in a frying pan in butter and some of the juice from the container. The meat then simmers for 30 minutes and served with Dutch sour cream. Hog Maw Hog maw (sometimes called "Pig's Stomach" or "Susquehanna Turkey" or "Pennsylvania Dutch Goose") is a Pennsylvania Dutch dish. In the Pennsylvania German language, it is known as "Seimaaga", originating from its German name Saumagen. It is made from a cleaned pig's stomach traditionally stuffed with cubed potatoes and loose pork sausage. Other ingredients include cabbage, onions, and spices. It was traditionally boiled in a large pot covered in water, not unlike Scottish haggis, but it can also be baked or broiled until browned or split, then it is drizzled with butter before serving. It is usually served hot on a platter cut into slices or cold as a sandwich. Often served in the winter, it was made on hog butchering days on the farms of Lancaster and Berks Counties and elsewhere in the Pennsylvania Dutch Country. It remains a traditional New Year's Day side dish for many Pennsylvania German families; in fact, many families believe that it is bad luck if not even a small piece is consumed on New Year's Day, as is the case with pork and sauerkraut. The stomach is purchased at one of the many traditional butchers at local farmers' markets. The original recipe was most likely brought to Pennsylvania from the Palatinate area of Germany, where it is called Saumagen and served with sauerkraut, another Pennsylvania Dutch food. Indeed, Saumagen is reported to be a favorite of former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, a native of the Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) Region. Leber Kloese (Liver Dumplings) Beef liver is seasoned and diced with salt, pepper, celery, parsley, and onions before being fried in butter. The meat is shaped into balls about 2 inches in diameter and wrapped inside the prepared dough to form the dumpling. The dumpling is then boiled in soup stock for about 20 minutes. Zitterting (Souse) Souse is pickled meat and trimmings usually made from pig's feet, chicken feet or cow's tongue, to name a few. The cooked meat or trimmings are cut into bite-sized pieces and soaked in a brine made of water, lime juice, cucumbers, hot pepper, salt and specially prepared seasonings. It is usually eaten on Saturday mornings, especially in St. Vincent and Barbados. In Trinidad and Tobago, it is served or sold at most social gatherings, such as parties, all-inclusive fetes and sporting competitions. It is then put into a mold before being served. AKA - Head cheese or brawn is a cold cut that originated in Europe. A version pickled with vinegar is known as souse. Head cheese is not a cheese but a terrine or meat jelly made with flesh from the head of a calf or pig (sometimes a sheep or cow), and often set in aspic. The parts of the head used varies, but the brain, eyes, and ears are usually removed. The tongue, and sometimes even the feet and heart, may be included.


Head cheese may be flavored with onion, black pepper, allspice, bay leaf, salt, and vinegar. It is usually eaten cold or at room temperature as a luncheon meat. It can also be made from quality trimmings from pork and veal, adding gelatin to the stock as a binder. Historically, meat jellies were made of the cleaned (all organs removed) head of the animal, which was simmered to produce stock, a peasant food made since the Middle Ages. When cooled, the stock congeals because of the natural gelatin found in the skull. The aspic may need additional gelatin, or more often, reduction to set properly. Ponhaws This was made from pork, sage, spices and grain, either cornmeal, oatmeal or buckwheat; and is not unlike the English custom of storing potted meats. After the scrapple had been prepared, it was stored in a cool place and set aside for future use. When served, it was cut in thin slices and fried in butter or bacon fat until crisp. Simple Shepherd's Pie - It doesn't get simpler than this easy ground beef casserole, otherwise known as a Shepherd's pie. A great country recipe, you'll love it. Amish Cabbage Casserole - Made with fresh cabbage, every bite brings the comfort of home. Amish recipes are always perfect for a simple, yet delicious dish. Amish Church Soup - This simple soup recipe is one of the best quick and easy traditional Amish recipes you can find Best Beef Bake - Though not an official Amish recipe, this beef casserole recipe uses simple ingredients, many of which could be pulled from your own garden or farmer's market. Amish Six Layer Dinner - Make an old-fashioned casserole with six layers of delicious flavor with this simple recipe. Homemade Amish Chicken Pot Pie - There is nothing easier and more comforting than this Homemade Amish Chicken Pot Pie. Jack Pot Casserole - Made with ground beef, cheese and noodles, this classic, easy casserole recipe will satisfy your family.

Side Dishes and Condiments Apple Butter This personal favorite of mine is actually more of a concentrated apple sauce than a variety of butter. Apple Butter gets its name from its thick consistency and well as the fact that it is often used as a condiment in lieu of butter. For instance, apple butter is delicious simply spread on bread. It is produced by the slow cooking of apples with cider or water until the sugar in the apples caramelize. Often, spices such as cinnamon and cloves are added for additional flavor. Apple Fritters Apple fritters are slices of apple which are breaded and deep fried in oil.


Pickled Beet Eggs also known as Red Beet Eggs These are actually hard-boiled eggs that are pickled with whole beets in a mixture of vinegar and sugar. They reach their peak flavor after being chilled for two to seven days. The eggs turn a pinkish color from the process. Schnitz un Knepp This item refers to finely cut dried apples, ham, and dumplings. Spaetzle This is a dish of tiny noodles or dumplings made with flour, eggs, water or milk, salt and sometimes nutmeg. The spaetzle dough is rolled and cut into slivers which are usually boiled (poached) before being tossed with butter and grated cheese or added to soups and other dishes. Spaetzle is served as a side dish much like potatoes or rice. It is often served with meat and accompanied by a sauce or gravy. The cooked spaetzle can also be pan-fried with a little butter and onions. Pennsylvania Dutch Pickled Relish Pickled relish has traditionally been served alongside rich-tasting meats in Lancaster County as well as throughout Pennsylvania Dutch Country. Historically pigs and steer were butchered in the winter months which provided meat at a later time. Since the Pennsylvania Dutch people did not have freezers during the 18th and 19th centuries, preserving meats became a problem. The solution was that the meat was smoked, cured and canned as a way to preserve the meat so that it can be enjoyed at a later time. This curing process gave the meat a salty, smoky taste. It was discovered that acidic and tart flavors worked well in contrast to the taste of the cured meats. As a result, unsweetened fruit, pickles in vinegar dressings, and sauerkraut were served side by side with the meat. Not only did it improve the taste but it helped with the digestion, as well. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, some of the dietary, culinary practices of the wealthier, urban society in Philadelphia eventually tricked down to Lancaster County. One of these practices was the sweetening of the syrups which were used to preserve the the fruits and vegetables. Although sugar in a refined form had traditionally been expensive,the prices went down dramatically after Puerto Rico and the Philippines came under the jurisdiction of the United States following the Spanish-American War. With the Amish and Pennsylvania Dutch love for vegetables and their success in farming, pickling relish became a popular way of preserving their produce as well as a tasty condiment.


As can be expected there are numerous and highly creative variations of pickled relish. In addition to traditional pickle relish, there is corn relish, tomato relish, pepper relish, and pickled red beets - to name a few. A particularly popular variation is chow chow. Chow chow is usually made in the late summer. Since it doesn't require the youngest, smallest vegetables, chow chow is a good way to make use of the leftover produce of the late season. Chow-Chow This is a mixture of different vegetables such as cabbage, carrots, beans, cauliflower, asparagus, and peas. The combination is pickled in a jar and served cold. The name is derived from the French word "chou" which means cabbage.

Chow chow is made by first by boiling a combination of lima beans, string beans, yellow wax beans, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, onions, corn, cucumber, red peppers, and green peppers until tender. The vegetables should not be mushy. In another pot, a combination of sugar, apple cider vinegar, mustard seed, celery seed, water and other spices are boiled until the sugar dissolves and the mixture become syrupy in texture. The tender vegetables are then added to the mixture and boiled for another five minutes. The final result is a brightly colored, subtly flavored, and complexly textured relish which is put into jars and sealed. Making chow chow as well as the other varieties of pickled relish is often a big event for the Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish family where traditionally the women of the household get together for the preparation, cooking, and jarring of the relish. Pennsylvania Dutch Sauerkraut Sauerkraut was developed primarily as a way of preserving cabbage throughout the year. The Amish and the German settlers in the Lancaster County region of Pennsylvania grew enough vegetables in their gardens and farms to last during the harsh, winter months. However, before the processes of canning and freezing were perfected, it was difficult to preserve the vegetables for any extended period of time. During the 18th and 19th centuries, there were many attempts to preserve the vegetables. Some of these attempts were somewhat successful. One way that was used to preserve vegetables such as carrots, beets, and cauliflower involved burying them underground. Insulated with leaves and straw to prevent freezing, the vegetables managed to last for a few months by this means. Potatoes and onions were stored in root cellars of farmhouses to help preserve their longevity. Sauerkraut was developed in Europe as an alternative way to preserve cabbage. Recipes were brought over from Europe by Germans who settled into the Lancaster County region of Pennsylvania.


The basic method of making this Pennsylvania Dutch dish involves first shredding the cabbage into a large crock. Then, each layer is salted. Next, the layers of cabbage are stomped firmly. This stomping serves to break down the strong fibers and release the natural juices of the vegetable. Boiling water is then usually added to the cabbage which is then sealed in the crock or in jars for about ten days as fermentation took place. During the fermentation process, the juice of the cabbage tends to expand and squeeze out of the crock or jar. When the container is opened after the 10 days, the cabbage at the top tends to blacken on contact with the air. That blackened layers is removed and disposed of. The finished product is then cold-packed in jars. It usually sets for four to six weeks before it is used. Like any food, there are variations on how it is prepared and served. Some Amish and Pennsylvania Dutch chefs steam the cabbage instead of using boiling water. Some add vinegar, butter, and/or sugar to the mixture. As for serving, it is usually added to meats such as roasts or spareribs and baked. Or, it can be eaten alone. Some people even like to add some sour cream to balance out the taste. Originally, mainstream American society frowned upon sauerkraut. It was looked upon as peasant food eaten only by farmers. However, by the 20th century, this tasty Pennsylvania Dutch staple became popular throughout the country among all levels of society.

Amish Potato Salad Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish potato salad is a popular side dish in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Traditionally, before the harvest produced an abundance of vital vegetables, potato salad was enjoyed as a hearty and filling part of the diet for the Pennsylvania Germans. The recipes vary but tend to be simple. Potatoes are cooked in the skins until soft. There are then peeled and diced. The potatoes are then gently mixed with chopped onions, celery, celery seed, and celery salt. Hard-boiled eggs are also usually diced and added to the salad. What makes the Amish potato salad so distinctive is the thickening dressing favored by the Pennsylvania Germans. There tended to be a little bid more variety that went into the making of the dressing. However, in general, the Amish potato salad dressing tended to consist of a combination of eggs, cornstarch, vinegar, cream, mustard, and salt. This combination was cooked until it thickened. Then, the dressing is removed from the heat, butter is added, and the mixture is beaten until smooth. The dressing is then integrated with the potato mixture. Traditionally, during periods when the chickens weren't laying eggs, flour was substituted in the dressing.


When fresh greens were out of season, cooked Amish potato salad served as both a supplement and complement to the family's diet.

Breakfast Apple Dumplings Apple dumplings are a popular Amish food usually served at breakfast. Peeled and cored apples are filled with cinnamon and sugar and then wrapped in dough. The dumpling is then baked until tender. Apple dumplings are also often served with ice cream and eaten as a dessert Scrapple In keeping with the Pennsylvania Dutch tradition that nothing should go to waste, if possible, is pretty much how scrapple originated. Because there is usually small scraps of meat left over after butchering, the Pennsylvania Dutch decided to transform these "scraps" into a meal instead of simply throwing them away. Scrapple is a loaf-like patty which is a combination of cornmeal and buckwheat flour simmered with pork scraps and trimmings. Spoiler Alert: To warn the squeamish, this includes scraps from the heart, liver, head, and other interesting parts of the pig. However, these ingredients aren't that much different from what can be found in a good old-fashioned American hot dog. The meat is seasoned with sage and thyme and other spices, depending upon the individual preference of the chef, as well as the traditions of the region where it is being prepared. It is then cut into slices and pan-fried until an outside crust is formed. Scrapple is usually served at breakfast alongside eggs, and eaten with apple butter, ketchup, or syrup.

Amish Bread


One of the most famous Bread recipes is the Amish Friendship Bread it has a story to it. In the past, the Amish mothers used to pass on the Amish friendship bread starter batter to their daughters on their wedding day, so that they could, in turn, pass the starter batter to their daughters. Thus the starter would be passed from one generation to the next. Unfortunately, this tradition has almost died out except in some very remote Amish enclaves lost forever. First, make a starter, follow our instructions and then make our delicious Amish bread recipe 10 days later. Making the Amish Friendship Bread Starter The Amish friendship bread starter is from an era when people made time to produce good food and maintained good friendships. It was during the time when people spent time making soap, candles and performing other traditional skills, but still had time to make this batter bread over 10 days. A time when modern technology didn't exist that was invented to save us time, but we spend so much time using it that we don't have any spare time! So step back into time for simple living and make Amish bread and rekindle relationships. The bread recipe usually produces five cups of bread starter, which must be either used to bake bread, given away, or used to start a new cycle. A common suggestion is to bake one loaf of bread, give away three cups of starter, and to save the remaining cup for the next cycle. The starter will last for years if fed every 10 days, and it will last for years this way, improving its flavor as it gets older. However, any starter that turns orange or pink in color and develop an unpleasant odor should be discarded. Amazing Amish Friendship Bread -Make this amazing bread for your family; they won't be able to get enough of it. Traditional Amish recipes never go out of popularity and this one is a classic. Amish Biscuits - Easy and down to the basics, these Amish Biscuits are great to add to your authentic Amish recipes collection Amish Cornbread - This Amish Cornbread is easy to make and will be the perfect side to any soup or stew. It melts in your mouth and will quickly become a favorite cornbread recipe in your house. Amish Breakfast Puffs - Whether you are looking for easy breakfast recipes or just love Amish recipes, this simple muffin is sure to please. Amish Country Corn Cakes - Sweet and crumbly, these are heavenly with melted butter or maple syrup. Traditional Amish Recipes have never been so sweet.


Desserts

Fasnachts (also known as Fauschnauts") This is a doughnut-like treat. Potato dough is deep fried and then coated in powdered or granular sugar. They are sometimes filled with fruit jam. Fasnachts tend to be either square-shaped (to represent the four gospels of the bible) or triangular-shaped (to represent the Trinity). Traditionally, Fasnachts are a Pennsylvania Dutch food dish eaten one day before Ash Wednesday since many people give up sweets for Lent. In fact, in Lancaster County, Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, is known as Fasnacht Day. Amish Sugar Cookies - Keep it simple with this recipe for Amish sugar cookies. A great Amish recipe that is perfect for any occasion.

Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish Pies Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish pies are a celebrated treat in Lancaster County. Inspired in part by the early German settlers' fondness for pastries and their English neighbors' expertise in making pies, pies have been an essential part of the region's menu. Regardless of the time of the year or the time of the day there are pies. The Pennsylvania Dutch pies are eaten at breakfast, lunch, dinner and they even eat them for midnight snacks. Pies are made with a great variety of ingredients from the apple pie we all know to the rivel pie which is made from flour, sugar, and butter. The Dutch housewife is as generous with her pies as she is with all her cooking, baking six or eight at a time not one and two. Although pie-making follows certain general patterns, recipes have been adapted to meet the taste buds of this health-conscious age. For instance, nowadays vegetable oil is often substituted for lard and the sugar content is often reduced in the pie filling. Many of the most common of the Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish pies contain the fruits and nuts which grow in such abundance in rural Pennsylvania. The pies are often characterized by the Pennsylvania Dutch taste for combining sweetness and tartness.


Some of the most popular types of pies which are common throughout the world but have a unique Pennsylvania Dutch flavor when made in Lancaster County include apple, rhubarb, sour cherry, gooseneck pumpkin, peach, pear, grape, raisin, huckleberry, walnut, and pecan. The pies can be prepared with or without a top crust. There are also a lot of Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish pies that are not commonly found outside Lancaster County or areas populated by the Pennsylvania Dutch. During your visit to Lancaster County, treat yourself to some of these local favorites. Schnitz Pie Since delicious apples are so plentiful in Lancaster County, apples pies have become one of the most popular of the Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish pies. Schnitz Pies are a particular favorite in the region. They are made by peeling and slicing the ripe apple. In fact, the word "schnitz" means to cut into pieces. The apples pieces are then laid outdoors under the sun or inside on racks above a heating source for about 24 to 48 hours until they are dried. The dried apple pieces are stored in dry containers throughout the year until they are ready to be used. When it is time for preparation, the dried apple pieces are soaked and slowly boiled in water until they are soft. The apples pieces are then mashed and mixed with lemon extract, brown sugar, and cinnamon. The mashed mixture is then baked in a pie shell until ready. Schnitz pies are traditionally served at lunch following the Sunday morning church service. The pies are also generally served at meals where potato soup or bean soup is on the menu. Amish Apple Pie - This traditional Amish recipe is as American as apple pie. An all-time favorite, there's a reason why dessert is our favorite meal of the day. Mincemeat Pie Unlike the fruit pies, mincemeat pies are a hearty meal in themselves. These pies which the Pennsylvania Germans learned from their English neighbors date back to medieval times when spiced meat dishes were commonplace. Despite these medieval English origins, mincemeat pies fit in well with the Pennsylvania Dutch cooking habits where home-butchering was common. With home-butchering, most of the meat was used in some way. Oftentimes, leftovers and scraps were dried, canned and stored in the attic or cellar. These leftover scraps were ideal for the mincemeat pies. Although there are many variations, mincemeat pies are generally made by first cooking the meat until tender at which time it is cut into very fine pieces. The meat is then mixed with a combination of raisins, apples, oranges, lemons, sugar, salt, cinnamon, cloves, and cider. Sometimes beef broth is added for moisture. This mixture is simmered for about 15 minutes.


The mixture is then poured into a pie shell and baked until ready. Green Tomato Pie It is believed that the tradition of making green tomato pie in the autumn derived as a way to supplement the menu when the annual supply of apples began to run low for the year. It is also believed that green tomato pies were prepared and served as a tasty way of using up the harvest's excess tomatoes. In any case, the pies are generally made by combining thinly sliced green tomatoes, brown sugar, cinnamon, lemon juice, cloves, and butter into a pie shell. The result is then baked until ready. The overall seasonings and spices are similar to those used in mincemeat pies. Shoofly Pie

Shoo Fly Pie - There isn't anything more classic than a Shoo Fly Pie recipe. You'll adore this traditional Amish recipe. Try a slice of Shoofly Pie. Here the filling is made up of molasses and custard spiced with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves. This sweet desert is a traditional favorite among the Pennsylvania Dutch as well as many visitors to the Lancaster County. This pie consists mainly of molasses, brown sugar, water,and butter. There are two common varieties. The first is the "wet-bottom" shoofly pie which consists of a layer of moist, gooey molasses beneath a crumb-like topping. On the other hand, the "dry bottom" shoofly pie is where the molasses is thoroughly mixed into the crumbs into a cake-like consistency. The name is commonly believed to come from the fact that the sweetness is so attractive to flies that they have to be constantly "shooed" away.

Shoofy pie is a hybrid between a dense cake and a syrupy pie. The pie is generally made of a mixture of molasses, flour, baking soda, eggs, and water. The mixture is poured into a pie shell and topped with crumbs consisting of flour, brown sugar, and shortening. The pie is then baked until ready.


Whoopie Pie Amish Whoopie Pie - This fantastic Amish recipe is great for all dessert lovers.

This is a baked good consisting of two small chocolate, disk-shaped, cookie-like cakes with a sweet, butter cream, whipped cream or marshmallow frosting sandwiched between them. Although this is a traditional Pennsylvania Dutch dessert and snack, many people believe that it first became common in the New England region after being introduced by migrating Amish sects. The name is thought to derive from the emotion that is provoked after one tastes the sweet, creamy confection. Amish-Style Strawberry Pie - This is one of the best, fast and easy pie recipes. Not only does it have an Amishinspired flair to it, it's very budget friendly.

Pennsylvania Dutch Meat Pennsylvania Dutch meat are in a world all of there our first had been created by the German settlers who immigrated to the area during the 18th and 19th centuries. These settlers had been raised in a lifestyle where meat and potatoes were a major part of the diet. Most farmers were very small and did not possess a lot of grazing land while in Germany. Therefore, they had been required to raise and breed smaller animals like hogs and chickens which took up less grazing space than beef cattle. Once they came to Pennsylvania Lancaster County and other areas, these settlers were able to acquire a great deal more land than they had in Germany. At the time land was still plentiful and cheap. As a result, the small farmer was able to raise beef cattle as well as hogs chickens and goats along with all the vegetable needed for the daily meals. The Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish farmers even tried to raise sheep. They got the idea from some of their English neighbors whose English traditions favored â&#x20AC;&#x153;muttonâ&#x20AC;?. However, the Pennsylvania


summers were generally hotter and more humid than in England and the sheep-raising was not very successful. Furthermore, the Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish people did not take to the taste of mutton, nor do I but spring lamb is another story. Nevertheless, the rich land and relatively-mild spring and summer climate were very beneficial to raising hogs and cattle and the small farmer thrived. Prior to the 1830's, these German farmers sent most of their butchered meat to the markets in Philadelphia and Baltimore. They kept only a small portion for themselves. Things began to change with the advent of the railroads in the 1830's. These railroads brought competition from the large cattle growers of the Midwest and West. These large cattle growers were able to undercut the smaller farmers of Lancaster County. With the increase of the large feed lots in the mid-west it is not profitable to sell their Pennsylvania Dutch meat to the markets of Philadelphia and Baltimore, the small, Pennsylvania farmer focused on selling their meat locally. Butchering the Meat Back in the old days each of the farmers butchered their own meat. Now in today health standards this is no longer allowed. It usually took all day to butcher the meat. In fact, neighbors and extended family members often dropped by to help in the process. Nowadays, commercial butchers do most of the butchering for Pennsylvania Dutch and Amish farms. Nearly every piece of meat was used by the Pennsylvania Dutch cooks. This was especially the case with pig meat. The loins and ribs of the hogs were prepared into chops and roasts; the fronts, sides, and hindquarters were smoked; large scraps were made into sausage; smaller scraps were seasoned and mixed with cornmeal to make scrapple. Moreover, the feet were boiled with vinegar and spices and made into souse. Finally, the fat of the pig was made into lard for cooking. Likewise, the beef and veal meat was served as well. Leftover meat was made into bologna or smoked and made into dried beef. Curing and Smoking the Pennsylvania Dutch Meat After the meat is butchered, it is usually cured. This is done by rubbing salt brine into the meat. After the curing is completed, the meat is taken into a smokehouse which is fired by hickory chips, green stumps, or fruit wood. It is extremely important to keep the fire in the smokehouse at the correct temperature so the smoke could adequately penetrate the meat. If the temperature is too high the meat would begin to cook; if it is too low, the meat would freeze. Depending upon the size of the cuts, smoking would take anywhere between 24 hours to a full week to complete. The meat is then wrapped in muslin and put into the attic.


Although the flavor of home-cured meats taste superior to that of the meat prepared in supermarkets, home-curing has largely become a thing of the past. People are just too busy to afford the time and care necessary to properly home-cure and home-smoke their meat. Therefore, just as commercial butchers have taken over that part of the meat preparation; most locals find it easier and cheaper simply to purchase their meats directly from the supermarket. Today now there is a growth back to the old way with outdoor and indoor smoker urban backyard farmer are taking up the challenge go not the supermarket but to the farms and butchers for fresh killed beef, hogs, chickens and turkeys. Bring the home and preparing them the rare old fashion way. I bought an Emson Indoor Smoker and Pressure Cooker that I have found to be faster and easier to smoke meats, (See my cookbook “Emson SMOKER Indoor Pressure Smoker & Cooker”) but here a few. RARE OLD RECIPES ON THE FINE ART OF CURING MEATS:

Pennsylvania Dutch Vegetables Farming and Gardening as a Way of Life To the Amish and Pennsylvania Dutch, vegetables are an important part of their way of life. To the farmer and gardener, the calendar revolves around the planting and harvesting of their vegetables and fruit. Those vegetable and fruit that wouldn’t use in the daily, weekly and monthly life were canned canning was a way of live for the Amish as supermarket and local grocery stores were for their “white” Americans. However, no matter all the scientific farming methods, the Amish farm has their long held folklore: • Plant lettuce in the dark of the moon • Plant beans when the horns of the moon turn upward • Plant cabbage on Good Friday • Plant cucumbers on the year's longest day • When you plant radishes, say "as long as my arm and as thick as my leg." • Never transplant parsley - it is bad luck • Begin sowing on Friday and end it on Friday • Spread ashes on Ash Wednesday • Anything planted in the name of God will grow Ah, but when you eat your vegetables: • Sauerkraut and bacon will drive all cares away • Be sure to eat dandelions or greens on “Maundy” Thursday • Raise your cucumbers carefully but if you make salad of them - throw it in the swill barrel.

Traditionally, the people of the region have been highly dependent upon the land and the harvest as a means of earning their livelihood. In fact, gardening and farming has become a big family industry in Pennsylvania Dutch country.


Amish and Pennsylvania Dutch families tend to be large with lots of mouths to feed. Therefore, it is a must to grow as much food as possible. To reach this goal, all members of the family participate in the farming chores: from planting to harvesting to preserving the produce. As a result of this hard work and dedication, the harvests are plentiful and the food lasts throughout the year until the next harvest. For the inhabitants of the region, especially for the Amish and the Mennonites, farming and gardening is a practical illustration of their long-held religious, spiritual, and moral values. Values such as the respect for life, devotion to nature, and the willingness to work hard have long been major tenets of the Amish and Mennonite people. It is no surprise, then, that the region is so well highly regarded for its abundance and quality of its Pennsylvania Dutch vegetables and fruit.

Harvesting and Persevering the Vegetables Although there is much work during the summer months, there is also much feasting as the vegetable grow, ripen and are picked. Most of the Pennsylvania Dutch vegetables are harvested in the months of June, July and August. However, some of the produce such as peas, onions and asparagus begin to appear in May and earlier. During late summer, the vegetables and fruit are canned and preserved. Many families have basements where canning shelves extend from the floor to the ceiling. Families also preserve their produce in frozen food lockers. Many Amish, who do not use electricity from public utilities and do not own large home freezers, often rent freezers from the local grocery stores.

Serving the Vegetables The Amish and the Pennsylvania Dutch cook their vegetables until they are soft. Only raw vegetables are served crunchy. In general the Pennsylvania Dutch vegetable dishes are served simply. Most regional vegetables such as string beans, peas, carrots, asparagus, and cauliflower are served salted and covered with brown butter. Sometimes they are served with a cream or cheese sauce. There are, of course, recipes that are unique to the Amish and the Pennsylvania Dutch region. Anyone visiting Lancaster County for the first or fiftieth time should sample these specialties whenever they get the chance. Corn Fritters Corn is a popular vegetable among the Pennsylvania Dutch. Among the many different ways it is prepared, corn fritters are a unique favorite to the region as well as to visitors.


There are two general varieties of corn fritters. The first consists of doughy little balls that are deep-fried and laced with corn. The second type is made by shaping a corn and batter mixture into pancakes which are then browned in a skillet. The second version tends to be more nutritious. Essentially, corn fritters consist of grated corn, eggs, flour, shortening, baking powder and salt which are combined and browned in a skillet or deep-fried. Dried Corn Sweet corn is often dried and canned as a means of preservation. When it is time to prepare, the dried sweet corn is soaked in warm water for about 1 hour until the corn becomes soft and the water is absorbed. Salt, sugar, milk or cream is then added and the mixture is boiled until the desired texture is achieved. Corn Pie A corn pie is where a combination of corn, potatoes, hard-boiled eggs are poured into a pastry-lined pan. Flour, salt and milk are added until the vegetables are covered. Then a pastry covering is placed on top and the pie is baked for about 40 minutes. The corn pie is similar to a chicken pot pie but without the chicken. It can be served as a stand-alone meal. Peas with Knepp Unlike Schnitz and Knepp which is a ham and apple dumpling dish, Peas with Knepp is a type of pea dumpling. It is made by first creating knepp dough out of flour, baking powder, shortening, milk, and salt. Meanwhile peas are boiled in a kettle for about 10 minutes. The knepp dough is spooned on top of the boiling peas and cooked uncovered for about 10 more minutes. Peas and Knepp are usually served with brown butter. Creamed Celery Creamed celery is traditionally served at the reception following a wedding among the Amish community. One of the main reasons for this is that Amish weddings usually occur in November and December in Lancaster County and celery is one of the only fresh vegetables available during those months. Since celery is not grown in great quantities in the region, it is considered a delicacy and eaten on special occasions rather than at daily meals. It is an Amish custom that when an Amish girl is planning to be married at the end of the year, the family plants an unusually large celery patch. Since Amish weddings are not usually formally announced until one or two weeks before the event, the planting of the celery becomes an informal announcement to the community of the upcoming blessed event.


This Amish as well as Pennsylvania Dutch vegetable dish is prepared by first cooking the celery along with water, sugar, butter, and salt until the vegetable is soft. The cooked celery is then heated in a cream sauce consisting of cream, brown sugar, and flour. Vinegar is also used to prevent the cream sauce from curdling. Fried Oyster Plant This Pennsylvania Dutch vegetable dish gets its name from the subtle oyster taste of the Salsify plant which grows in Eastern Pennsylvania. To make the fried oyster plant, the Salsify plant is steamed until soft. It is then sliced and dipped in eggs and cracker crumbs. Next, it is fried in butter until it is evenly browned on both sides. Salsify can also be sliced like a carrot, cooked until soft, and served in a soup. Potato Cakes Ever since the 1770's when the American wheat crop was threatened by the Hessian fly outbreak, potatoes became such an essential part of the diet in Lancaster County that they rivaled bread and noodles in popularity among the German settlers. Even today, potatoes are regularly served from breakfast through supper. And, like the other Pennsylvania Dutch vegetables, the Lancaster County region has developed its own unique ways of preparing the potato dishes. Potato cakes are prepared by first mashing the potatoes. Then, the potatoes are mixed along with eggs, flour, cream and onions. The mashed potato patties are then heated in shortening until brown on both sides. They are best eaten immediately after leaving the frying pan. Riced Mashed Potatoes Riced Mashed Potatoes are another popular Pennsylvania Dutch vegetable dish that every visitor to Lancaster County should try. It is made by cooking, in a small amount of water, potatoes that have been peeled and cut into chunks. When the potatoes become soft, milk and salt are added into the saucepan. Next, the potato chunks are mashed by hand with a manual potato ricer. Additional milk is added if the potatoes appear too stiff. As soon as the potatoes are formed into noodle-like strands, they are cooked some more in a covered skillet and browned with butter.

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