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DANIEL TAN

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

National University of Singapore B. Arts (Arch)


Daniel Tan Singapore +65 92284726 dtgz_90@hotmail.com

EDUCATION 2011 - Present

Bachelors of Architecture

National University of Singapore School of Design and Environment Current Honours Standing: Second Upper

2009 - 2010

GCE A-Level

Catholic Junior College Mathematics (A), General Paper (A), Physics (B), Economics (B), Project Work (B), Chemistry (C)

2005 - 2008

GCE O-Level

Nan Hua High School L1R5: 10

SKILLS AutoCad, Sketchup, Rhino, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Indesign, Adobe Photoshop,Vray, Podium, Microsoft Office Programs

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EXPERIENCE National University of Singapore

01. 2015 - 04.2015

Teaching Assistant

Swan & Maclaren Architects Architectural Intern

05.2014 - 08.2014 05.2013 - 07.2013

DP Architects

12.2013

Architectural Trainee

Colin K. Okashimo and Associates Pte. Ltd

12.2011

Architectural Intern

AWARDS Dean’s List (Year 3 Semester 1) | Faculty of Architecture

2012

BCA Industry Built Environment Scholarship

2014

PUBLICATIONS Familiar Spaces, Untold Stories: Encounters with Ipoh

10.2012

Spain OEP ’12

09.2012

EXHIBITIONS ‘Landscape in a Box’ | Singapore Arts Museum 8Q

05.2013

Familiar Spaces, Untold Stories: Encounters with Ipoh NUS Museum, Singapore Gallery Lim Ko Pi, Ipoh

07.2012 03.2013

URBANATURE | Geylang Lorong 24

05.2012

INTERESTS Sketching, Calligraphy, Watercolour, Miniature model-making Football, F1, Electric guitar

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Content I

VERTICAL STREETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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THE URBAN FISHERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

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SCALES OF INHABITATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

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MUSIC CAFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

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A RETREAT IN NATURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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SUN TENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

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ARTWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


I. VERTICAL STREETS Architectural Design Studio VI Jan - May 2014


Typical bustling, chaotic street in Singapore, 1950s

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SITE Ghim Moh Link “MOVING FORWARD, LOOKING BACK” The desnsification of public housing in Singapore has led to the proliferation of high-rise housing structures and a gradual erasure of the shophouse and the “kampong” housing typologies. Much of the charm of the old housing typologies came from the intimacy between the house and the ground floor, which created a feeling of connection to the larger community instead of a restricted existence in an elevated pigeon hole above the community. The intimacy between the house and the communal spaces has also since been lost in current housing typologies in Singapore. Where once each family had generous amounts of interstitial spaces outside their homes to use in a myriad of ways, communal spaces now take the form of clearly prescripted programs. The design aims to revive the feelings of the communal characteristics of the street and the vistas it allows for within a dense built-up environment, and in this process reconciling the flavours of traditional housing with the need for a high housing density.

The ubiquitious, banal HDB void deck found today

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Senior Citizens

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Easy access while still maintaining privacy

Expanded to become

Adults (Parents)

Easy access while still maintaining privacy

Children

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Couples

Expanded to become

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Singles

Expanded to become

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Expandability | Residential architecture of the 21st Century aims to be more reflexive and less rigid. As people’s lifestyles change, architecture should change to suit them. As families grow, the house should likewise grow with the family, reducing the need for people to move from one house to another over the course of their lives, and allowing the house to be more reflexive to the changing needs of its occupants.

construction in Singapore, home owners can add or subtract more area from their house as they transit from one group to the other over the course of their lives. When a couple has children, they have the option of adding more rooms to their existing house to cater to the increased spatial demand within their family. When the children move out in their adulthood, the rooms can then be subtracted from the house.

A thorough research process was undertaken to understand the main groups of homeowners in Singapore and their various necessary functions in the house. The groups were single people, couples, families, and seniors. Using a simple modular structure of brick construction which also alludes to old housing

Several modules of 3 particular floor areas (36m2, 48m2, 64m2), which have been found to be comfortable for the various family units they are catered for, are designed and the system of their increment from one floor area to the other is created.

Structure

Several concrete cores hold up the ramp structure. The cores form the bases of the housing units and are expanded upon.

Function

Predominantly residential, the flexibility of the cores allows communal functions to be built at each corner to service the community.

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Teens

Expanded to become

Circulation

2 lift cores at each corner service the houses along the ramps.

Mechanical Services

Electricity, water, and drainage are brought along the length of the pipe and brought down to the ground floor through the lift core.


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Single

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Double

36 m2 1 Bedroom 1 Kitchen 1 Toilet

Family

48 m2 1 Bedroom 1 Kitchen 1 Toilet

64 m2 3 Bedrooms 1 Kitchen 2 Toilets

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Double

48 m2 1 Bedroom 1 Kitchen 1 Toilet

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Family

64 m2 3 Bedrooms 1 Kitchen 2 Toilets

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Elevations

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Site Plan

01 M&E 02 Courtyard 03 Main Pedestrian Entrance 04 Carpark Entrance

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2nd / 3rd Storey Plan 01 Eatery 02 Bicycle parking

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04 4th / 5th Storey Plan 03 Playground 04 Multi-purpose Rooms

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06 6th / 7nd Storey Plan 05 Bicycle Parking 06 BBQ Pits

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II. THE URBAN FISHERY Architectural Design Studio V Aug - Nov 2013


Imports

Preparation Fishing

CONSUMER Rearing

Culling

Harvesting

Cutting

Cutting

Packaging

01 Production Process of Fish

CONSUMER

CONSUMER CONSUMER

02 Production Process of Fish in situ

SITE Bishan Central “CONVERGENCE / DIVERGENCE OF EXPERIENCES” In the creation of a consumer experience of fish, an inherent problem is the polarity of consumer attitude towards the smell, sight, touch, chaos and wetness that is usually closely associated with fish consumption (eating + buying). The consumer attitudes has been condensed into 2 broad categories, namely a sanitised + filtered experience, and an unfiltered + raw experience, both differentiated by their respective relations to the production process of fish. The design thus strives to incorporate the two different attitudes, and explores the relations which allow the two to converge and diverge. From the research done on the production process, it was found that the polarities in consumer attitudes was a result of the production process behind them. The production process was then analysed and convergences and divergences in the two types of processes were found (fig. 1). This was then used to determine the program spaces within the building along the diagonal circulation path created through the site. Due to the relatively quick processing of fish from the culling/import area to the hawker centre and wet market, they were positioned in close proximity. This also allowed visitors within these areas to witness the culling and sorting processes through the building, giving a more raw experience of the production process. The restaurant and dry food store, due to their sanitised experience of the production process, are positioned away from view of the culling and import area. Access to these areas also takes place without the need for passing through the ‘unsanitised’ hawker and wet market areas, preserving the tenuous link with the production process.

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Site Response Situated in a big field straddling the shopping mall and the residential estate, a thoroughfare was created across the site to connect the 2 busiest parts of the site: the exit of the mall and the open area where residents tended to congregate

Unprocessed Fish Processed Fish Harvesting route

Restaurant / Store visitors Hawker / Wet Market visitors Wheelchair Access

Producer Circulation

Consumer Circulation

Production Consumption

Zoning

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Production / Consumption Circulation

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Hawker Centre

Wet Market


Event Space

Restaurant

Fishing Area

Loading Bay Culling Area

Fish Growout Tanks


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1st Storey Plan

01 Hawker Centre 02 Wet Market 03 Event Space 04 Loading Bay 05 Culling Area

06 Dry Food Store 07 M&E 08 Harvesting / Sorting Area 09 Fishing Area 10 Fish Growout Tanks

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2nd Storey Plan

11 Packaging Area 12 Seafood Restaurant 13 Al-fresco Seating 14 Main Pedestrian Thoroughfare 15 Fish Growout Tanks

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Longitudinal Section

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IV. THE SCALES OF INHABITATION Architectural Design Studio II Apr - May 2012

III. SCALES OF INHABITATION Architectural Design Studio IV Jan - May 2013


SITE Geylang Lorong 14 ‘‘THE ART OF INHABITATION” The design started out with an exploration of one’s “Art Of Inhabitation” as an architect - one’s definition of the ideal living spaces and what elements make up this ideal inhabitation space. This was then represented in a drawing which would form the starting point for the design process. SCALES | “The Art of Inhabitation” to me, existed as a series of scales, namely - 1) solitary scale, 2) communal scale, and 3) public scale - according to the levels of social interaction. and each individual’s comfort zone lies within one of these three zones. •Solitary scale (a room) - Living alone •Communal scale (a house) - Living in a community •Public Scale (a street) - Living with strangers The drawing aimed to capture the three scales and their interaction with each other. Between the solitary and communcal scale, there would be a symmetrical, open relationship whilst maintaining certain levels of privacy in the solitary scale. As the scales increased, the levels of interaction decreased, as the communal and public scale have an assymmetrical relationship with the users within each of the two scales being able to see each other yet remain detached from each other.

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Final Model Situated in Geylang, the design proposes caters to migrant workers who work in the vicinity

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Three strategies were used to illustrate these “scales of inhabitations� within the design.

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3) Circulation | Movement between the scales is linear, and the user has to travel through the sequence of scales in order to get to and from their home. Solitary >> Communal >> Public

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2) Aggregation | Starting with a singular room (solitary scale), the design evolved by aggregating a few rooms to create a cluster (communal scale). Several of these clusters were further aggregated to create a public area (public scale).

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1) Projection | The feeling of projection through the scales, whereby one can witness the layering of the different scales within one single view. This was a crucial influence on the form and placement of the structure, as the rooms were rotated and spaced apart in order to create a unique view through the 3 scales from each room.

Road Geylang


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Basic housing unit for 1 worker, 25m2 Private Scale

Housing units aggregated to form a small community Communal Scale

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Entrance to units through communal area, creating a higher likelihood of informal & spontaneous meetings

Curled around to create more intimacy & privacy

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Housing blocks angled and positioned to create views out from unit through the communal soaces to the street, allowing the different scales of interaction to be witnessed from within each unit.

Community Units aggregated to create a neighbourhood

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Ground floor food court creates opportunities for residents and outsiders alike to interact | Public Scale

Circulation pathways connect communal areas

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View of Communal Area + Circulation

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View of Interior Courtyard

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IV. MUSIC CAFE Architectural Design Studio II Mar - Apr 2012


SITE Kampong Glam | North Bridge Road “MUSIC AS THE CONNECTION BETWEEN SPACES� The site is situated on a vacant plot of land at the junction of Jln Pinang and North Bridge Road in Kampong Glam. The design incorporates an al fresco cafe and a music-themed bar run by a family of four who live in the block to the rear of the bar. Through this project, the relationships between the public and private realm, as well the connection between the cafe and bar, was explored and iterated extensively. MUSIC | The stage where performances are intended to take place from is the central focus of the building and forms the connection between the music-themed bar on the 1st storey and the al fresco cafe on the 2nd storey. By elevating it from the 1st storey and by terracing the cafe on the 2nd storey, both the cafe and bar had a visual and aural connection to the stage. In this way, the music from the stage became the connection between the cafe and bar.

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STRUCTURE | Louvres were used in place of walls in the cafe as they served a dual purpose of 1) restricting the view of the stage from the pathway outside, which would only be revealed upon entering the bar, 2) acting as reflectors to enhance the acoustics internal space. SPATIAL LAYOUT | The private block to the rear of the bar is monolithic, a contrast to the light, open spaces of the bar and cafe. The block contains the kitchen, store and public toilets on the 1st storey, and living spaces on the 2nd and 3rd storey. Access to the private block from the cafe is restricted to a single path along the edge of the party wall that is used when bringing food from the kitchen. The spiral ramp which encircles the stage brings the user into intimate contact with the stage before arriving at the cafe.


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1st Storey Plan

01 Preparation Area 02 Floating bridge linking private areas with restaurant 03 Performance Stage 04 Bar 05 Reception / Waiting Area

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2nd Storey Plan

06 Private Living Quarters 07 Ramp up from 1st Storey 08 Restaurant 09 Stairs leading to kitchen

Section

Longitudinal section showing the different private and public areas, their conversation as well as aversion from each other.

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V. A RETREAT IN NATURE Architectural Design Studio II Jan - Feb 2012


SITE

Macritchie Reservoir

“CONTRASTING VIEWS” VIEWS | Given the beauty of a site situated at the invisible threshold between the “tampered nature” of the Singapore Island Golf Course on one side and the “untampered nature” of the forests on the other, thve design aimed to frame and juxtapose the two contrasting natures. STRUCTURE | The structure was an important element in the framing of the views, with the gaps between the outer columns spaced apart at meticulously calculated distances in order to frame the intended views. The gaps between the columns decrease to the rear of the retreat, thus creating privacy from the shore. MEDITATION | The program of the design is a retreat from urban life, a place for meditation and reclusion. One accesses the retreat through a long narrow bridge, and enters the structure along the outer circulation path which encircles the private bedroom and toilet and ends at the mediation space on the 2nd storey.

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01 Bedroom + Toilet 02 Meditation Area 03 View Port 04 Skylight

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VI. THE SUN TENT Architectural Design Studio II Apr - May 2012

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SITE East Coast Park “PLYWOOD AS A SOFT MATERIAL” This design explored the potentials of plywood as a material. The aim was to deconstruct the idea of plywood as a hard material by creating a fabric-like effect. The design uses two modules, namely the ‘square’ module (Fig. 1) and the ‘cross’ module (Fig. 2). Throughout the process, a reoccuring problem was the need to create rigidity in a structure that had to have a soft, fabric-like effect visually. This led to numerous iterations, as the structure was studied through computer modelling and physical scale models. A final resolution was found through the overlapping of the the modules over each other, and binding them at the corners with cable tie. Also, the form of the structure gave it rigidity, with the twist of the structure in the middle creating important tensile forces that held the structure up. The result is a modular fabric-like structure that featured two shaded spaces, one facing the beach and the other facing the track - perpendicular to the sun path so as to allow for the maximum shade at all times of the day.

Fig. 1 The Square module

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Fig. 2 The Cross module

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Site Photo

View of constructed plywood installation on site

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VII. ARTWORK

“Auf Wiedersehen” 2015 A Farewell to Munich, home for 4 very special months Watercolour, Copic 0.05 felt pen

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“Do not go gentle into that good night� 2014 Interstellar-inspired watercolour Watercolour

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“STAHP | Iron Man” 2014 Boredom-driven sketchbook sketch Copic 0.05, 0.1 felt pen, Copic marker, Faber Castell PITT Artist pen

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“Life Goes On” 2014 Calligraphy + Pointilism Faber Castell PITT artist brush pen, ZIG 0.05 felt pen

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“The pen is mightier than the sword” 2014 Calligraphy + Pointilism Faber Castell PITT Artist pen, ZIG 0.05 felt pen

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“Rooney” 2006 What good is a footballer without his legs? Faber Castell 2B pencil

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Daniel Tan | Architecture Portfolio 2015  
Daniel Tan | Architecture Portfolio 2015  
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