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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway Adapted to Spectacle by Daniel Roche

Copyright Š 2013 Daniel Roche Cover art by Daniel Roche


Acknowledgements Woolf, Virginia. Mrs. Dalloway. London: Hogarth Press, 1925. All rights reserved. This script was developed at San Francisco State University for educational purposes only as a creative writing exercise in stage adaptation. Professional performances or productions must be authorized with written consent by the playwright and Hogarth Press.

Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Characters: Clarissa Dalloway Mrs. Dalloway Peter Walsh Septimus Rezia Richard Dr. Bradshaw Sally Seton Lucy* Miss Pym* Lady Bruton*

18, A young woman must realize maturity is a lifestyle. 50s, the perfect hostess. 20s or 50s Spectacles and plays with a pocketknife. 30s, WWI veteran: shattered by the crack of dawn. He wears a shabby brown coat - army boots. 20s, Septimus’ wife. 50s or 20s, love comes in gifts. 50s, human nature dressed nicely. 20s, wildly innocent until married. Housemaid. Owner of the floral shop. A virile elderly woman of great breeding.

*Could be played by the same actor. Setting: England. Time: The possibilities could waver between 1920s fashion to conceptual interpretation.

Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Act I. Scene 1. (Mrs. Dalloway’s home and furniture leaks across the street and drains into the nearby park and flower shop. Strewn within her house and across the city are stages: large, small, some with curtains, while others appear as picture frames. Several are masked by scrim. Two decrepit chairs rest together, out of place, but familial. Big Ben ominously oversees Westminster. He has hundreds of second, minute, and hour hands stretching in all directions: a willow tree of time.) (Cars honk, pigeons fly away, and people converse. Big Ben chimes. Silence.) (Mrs. Dalloway enters wearing a yellow hat and a yellow dress.) MRS. DALLOWAY Lavender irises complement the couch, white orchids complement the tablecloth, and the yellow roses complement, (Searches) they complement the month of June. This is a pleasure, my pleasure…an errand that practically runs itself. Besides, there are still hours of preparation to attend to. (Beat.) Oh dear, the doilies off. Lucy, hallway cabinet, top shelf, adjacent to the good crystal, not the set from India. There should be a box of linen. (Beat.) (Rearranges the doilies.) Just a moment, Lucy, some of them may be upturned. (Beat.) These simply don’t belong. (Beat.) There we are. (Beat. Picks them all up.) Lucy, doilies are in bad taste. They’re a trend that should have passed-away centuries ago. I’ve placed them by the fine China - burn them if you wish. (Beat.) I’m off to Mulberry’s to see the evening arrangements. (Mrs. Dalloway walks outside. Lights up on Living Room Stage - Bourton. Clarissa is wearing a similar hat and dress. She stands amongst flowers and a fountain. Both Mrs. Dalloway and Clarissa breathe for the first time.) MRS. DALLOWAY What a lark! What a plunge! Good morning my beautiful Westminster!

CLARISSA What a lark! What a plunge! Good Morning my beautiful Bourton! (Mrs. Dalloway flips through her mail.)

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CLARISSA The countryside knows how to manicure a handsome morning, does it not? The air tastes like wild daffodils and the tree branches are stages set for birds to perform. Why there, taking center stage, the English Yellowcrest - active and buzzing. It’s a bird that knows how to complement nature. (Peter enters from behind Clarissa. He stands young, robust.) PETER Musing among the vegetables? CLARISSA I’m absorbing the scenery. Have you seen Sally? PETER I’m sure she’s fishing for eels or swimming naked in the Windrush. CLARISSA She’s delightfully mad isn’t she? PETER Exquisitely batty. (Pause.) I apologize if I interrupted. CLARISSA You didn’t. PETER You look as if you prefer the company of cauliflower to men. CLARISSA It’s the flowers. They put me in such an ecstasy. I could lie down and die right here. PETER “Joy is not in things, it is in us.” Wilhelm said that. CLARISSA Richard Wagner… PETER It’s pronounced ‘Vagner,’ with a ‘V’ as in, “that is a very intelligent quote, Peter Walsh.” MRS. DALLOWAY Another letter, oh Peter, your words are dry sticks meant for kindling. (Living Room Stage lights down - Westminster. Mrs. Dalloway opens the letter. Peter steps forward. He has matured by twenty years.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER Dear Mrs. Richard Dalloway, the perfect hostess. MRS. DALLOWAY Honestly, Peter, beginning your letter with a tone. (Mrs. Dalloway folds the letter and returns it to its envelope. Living Room Stage lights up: Bourton/Westminster. Clarissa watches.) Lucy, I’ve changed my mind again. I prefer the silver rimmed China set as oppose to the gold. Gold feels tiresome for some reason. Mrs. Fellowes used gold during her bridge game last month. And please use a damp towel to remove the spots. Richard is a stickler for spots…in fact, Lucy, it’s best we simply re-wash the whole set. (Mrs. Dalloway begins to exit.) CLARISSA Dear Mrs. Richard Dalloway, the perfect hostess. (Mrs. Dalloway stops. Considers. She returns to Peter’s letter and opens it.) PETER I begin with the words of Alexander Pope who said, “our proper bliss depends on what we blame.” And as it stands, Clarissa, I blame India. It’s intolerable. Savage. The geckos scurry across my bed at all hours of the night. Curry may as well be added to the water as it’s in everything else. And the smell of the streets would make an English sewer blush. These brutes haven’t thought to put springs in the mattress. My back has dissolved into proper mush. I miss genuine tea. I miss chilled air. I miss England... (Mrs. Dalloway folds the letter and drops it on the ground.) MRS. DALLOWAY Lucy, there's some rubbish on the veranda. Could you be a doll and pick it up? (Mrs. Dalloway begins to exit. Peter advances.) PETER I was out of line. MRS. DALLOWAY It was years ago. PETER You were standing alone, in the garden, next to the three-tiered fountain. I thought it was to be a moment for our beginning. It was to be the start of Mrs. Clarissa Walsh. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 7


MRS. DALLOWAY Honestly, there’s no need to return to this PETER You never allowed there to be a real chance between us. MRS. DALLOWAY I should be going. PETER You could have said yes. You could have thought about it - taken a moment, a pause, to consider my proposal. MRS. DALLOWAY It would have been impractical, Peter. PETER I loved you. MRS. DALLOWAY I was eighteen years old. PETER Not exactly a child. MRS. DALLOWAY We would have been a poor fit. PETER Or perhaps I couldn’t afford the right fit? The respectable street, the proper dress, the correct situation? MRS. DALLOWAY I required freedom and you tended to attach yourself. PETER “Love is the only gold.” Alfred Lord Tennyson. MRS. DALLOWAY You have a habit of smothering. PETER And Richard Dalloway set you free? MRS. DALLOWAY Yes he did.

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PETER You love him? MRS. DALLOWAY I do. He’s sensible, secure, (searches) patient PETER - because there's no need to be loving, caring, affectionate. MRS. DALLOWAY Richard is all of those things. (Beat.) In his unique manner of (searches) we have warmth. Plenty of warmth! PETER He is the finest spouse to complement the perfect hostess. MRS. DALLOWAY You're being daft. PETER But you have to admit he provided you with the perfect golden cage to flaunt his lovely canary. (Beat.) Certainly much more than I could ever provide. MRS. DALLOWAY I'm going to have to ask you to leave. PETER The moment I arrived in New Delhi I stopped loving you. MRS. DALLOWAY We’re both married now. A wedding ring brings all former lovers to a halt. PETER You still think about me. MRS. DALLOWAY We’ve been friends for a lifetime, you send me letters almost weekly - of course I still think of you. We’ve had wonderful moments together. PETER I seem to only recall the hurtful ones. MRS. DALLOWAY At my age, I try to remember only those that make me smile. (Pause.) PETER Our walk in St. James Park? My lost spectacles? The youth in pink? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY I haven’t thought about that in…You toppling over the bench, spectacles flying through the air, and landing right on the face of that little rascal! PETER “Little girl. Excuse me, little girl. May I please have my spectacles back?” MRS. DALLOWAY “No, sir. These are my spectacles, sir.” PETER “Little girl, I’m afraid you’re mistaken. I believe those are mine.” MRS. DALLOWAY “No sir, I’m blind as a bat without them.”

PETER “No sir, I’m blind as a bat without them.”

PETER (Laughing.) As she proceeds to skip straight into a nearby tree! MRS. DALLOWAY What makes children lie through their teeth like that? (Peter backs away into the Living Room Stage.) PETER Mrs. Richard Dalloway, that is a lovely question. (He gets on one knee in front of Clarissa.) We’ve been friends for years CLARISSA Please stand up PETER I may not be rich CLARISSA You’re being impractical, Peter PETER ”Love is the only true gold” CLARISSA Stand up, don’t be absurd -

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PETER Clarissa Hart, I’ve seen you for what are - your vulnerable beauty and I (Scrim lights down. Lucy enters.) LUCY Ma'am? (Pause.) Mrs. Dalloway? MRS. DALLOWAY Lucy? LUCY Rubbish? MRS. DALLOWAY (Beat.) Rubbish, yes. No, I’m terribly sorry, not here or there - I don't require your assistance. (Mrs. Dalloway picks up the letter and places it on the table.) MRS. DALLOWAY I should be gone for twenty minutes or so. Does the staff need anything? LUCY Mrs. Walker would like you to make a decision regarding the main course. MRS. DALLOWAY I'll speak with her when I return. Be sure to bat down the curtains. If they remain dingy, buy new ones, but they should be installed no later than four p.m. And let’s cover the couch; if we can ward off the attack of dust bunnies for even a few hours it’s a battle won. LUCY Yes Ma'am. Act I. Scene 2. (Mrs. Dalloway exits. Lucy throws a velvet sheet over the couch.) REZIA We are at the front door. I'm going to open it. SEPTIMUS Stop - I can’t. What will I see?

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REZIA You will see the sun, Septimus…bright, blinding even. After that will be the tree line of the park…glowing, verde smeraldo. Last will be the street - covered in good people. My Septimus, are you ready to step outside? SEPTIMUS Yes. (Beat.) Not yet. (Beat.) We should wait for nightfall. REZIA We have to see Dr. Bradshaw. SEPTIMUS It was only a sentence. It was words put together ended by a period. It may have been a poor choice of words, but they’re gone now, Rezia. My lovely Rezia. And I promise you they will never leave my lips again. REZIA You said you want to hurt yourself. SEPTIMUS But don't you see, if you weren’t in the room to hear me that sentence would have fallen through the cracks in the floor. I’m being punished because it fell on your ears. (Beat.) I was entrenched for a moment. It happens to us all. REZIA I’m opening the door. SEPTIMUS Wait. (Pause.) Tread softly. (Rezia draws open The Park Stage curtains. Septimus covers his eyes. Rezia takes his hands and pulls them down to his side.) REZIA See, a sunny day. There’s nothing to be afraid of. (Rezia walks Septimus out. Septimus freezes.) SEPTIMUS That child. REZIA Yes, she plays on the streets. SEPTIMUS She uses barbed wire for a jump rope.

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REZIA No, please focus, mio tesoro. Look, across the street - a cricket match! SEPTIMUS It slices her hands. Drops of blood splatter across her dress REZIA Septimus, a man walks his white dog! It looks like a tiny bear! SEPTIMUS She happily counts each hop, four-sey, five-sey, six-sey as razors grate her bones. Chunks of flesh fly off her body. She giggles, Rezia, she giggles REZIA Septimus! (Breathes.) Dr. Bradshaw’s medicine. He said you are to see what’s in front of you...only what’s in front of you. If you think, it will make you sick. Please listen to the doctor. See without any of your thoughts. For me. (Rezia steps out from the Park Stage and into the park. The sun bursts. She spreads her arms and twirls.) This warmth reminds me of the Junes and Julys of Italia. I can feel my home warming my skin. Take my hand. Come on. (She takes Septimus’ hand. They walk together.) My sisters and I would wake up just before the sun did. We would run outside to find flowers to decorate Mamma's hats: garofani, tulipani, and allium blu. We would sing, “oggi il sole dorme sul vento freddo.” ‘Today the sun sleeps on the cool wind.’ SEPTIMUS Hold. (Sniffs.) I smell gas. (Checks wind.) REZIA You are imagining again. SEPTIMUS If the wind changes directions it will wreak havoc on the reinforcements. We shouldn’t push forward. June is too unpredictable of a month! (Rezia soothes Septimus.) REZIA There’s a café with people happy and smiling.. They’re saying it was the war to end all wars. They’re saying there’s hope again. The world will never repeat itself…Septimus, pay attention, see the women wearing beautiful hats. Do you see them? The red, violet… Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Mrs. Dalloway and Miss Pym Enter. Miss Pym stands behind the floral counter.) SEPTIMUS Yellow… REZIA The most elegant yellow. (Septimus and Rezia take a cautious step forward. This continues.) SEPTIMUS She smiles a false smile. MRS. DALLOWAY Good morning, Miss Pym. MISS PYM Good morning, Mrs. Dalloway, you’re looking like a summer carnation in full bloom. MRS. DALLOWAY You’re a rosebud, Miss Pym, years of blossoming still ahead of you. MISS PYM I’m wilting and you know it. I can hear it in your voice. But thank you for trying, dear. (Beat.) (She displays several elaborate flower arrangements.) To woo all of Westminster. Crescent arrangements, triangular and oval, as well as Hogarth’s curves at your request. MRS. DALLOWAY They’re breathtaking! MISS PYM You have excellent taste. The colors are all the rage in the Queen’s gardens. Just yesterday I strolled through lilac irises and they appeared to be exploding in full bloom. The mother of pearl orchids looked ablaze MRS. DALLOWAY - I could die with excitement! MISS PYM And, of course, the roses of maize…they could light the night sky. (Beat.) The talk of your gala has spread like fire across the city. They say that even the prime minister will make an appearance. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY Richard sent an invitation, but we haven’t received a reply…as of yet. SEPTIMUS - How can they hear each other? MISS PYM I spoke with Mrs. Walker and she said the main course was flown in from Bareilles, France? MRS. DALLOWAY Sanglier. Two hundred kilograms. SEPTIMUS There’s such a great distance between them. MISS PYM (Pulls out a masterpiece flower arrangement.) A wild boar of that size requires a special centerpiece. A gift from ‘Mulberry’s Flowers’ to the Dalloway’s! MRS. DALLOWAY Miss Pym, you’ve outdone yourself! SEPTIMUS They’re trying to converse across No Man’s Land. REZIA …Never mind the people, focus on the flowers. (Sounds of WWI slowly rise.) SEPTIMUS Every word they speak crawls forward with its head down. MRS. DALLOWAY Are these bloody crane bills? MISS PYM Wood crane’s, dear. REZIA Septimus, stay with me. See primrose, you love primrose MRS. DALLOWAY Thank you. (Mrs. Dalloway takes one of the arrangements.) MISS PYM You’re very welcome, my dear… Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Planes fight through clouds.) SEPTIMUS Oh God, I can taste sulfur in the air… REZIA Here Forget-me-nots… MRS. DALLOWAY The help will be by in the next hour or so to take the rest… (No Man’s Land is riddled with sounds of machine guns and grenades. Screams of men.) SEPTIMUS My eyes water, my throat burns… MISS PYM The rest shall be waiting… REZIA Bello! Orchids, your favorite! Septimus. Septimus, please, stay with me. SEPTIMUS The winds have changed. The winds have changed! Dig deep, Evans! Faster! Cover up, cover up, Evans. The cloud comes! (A car backfires. Septimus screams and falls to the ground. He curls up and cries. Silence. Mrs. Dalloway and Miss Pym stare at the street. Pause.) MRS. DALLOWAY That must be the Prime Minister’s car. MISS PYM No dear, the Prime Minister’s car is blue, not gray. REZIA Septimus. Stand up. MRS. DALLOWAY Are you certain, Miss Pym, I could have sworn it was a cool gray with only a hint of blue? MISS PYM I’m afraid you are mistaken; it’s baby’s breath sapphire with a trace of periwinkle. I’m confident about this, dear. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Septimus slowly crawls towards the Park Stage.) REZIA Septimus, people are beginning to watch us. SEPTIMUS Today we crawl. It’s too dangerous to walk. MRS. DALLOWAY I suppose you could be right… MISS PYM I know I’m right, dear, I know my colors. MRS. DALLOWAY My memory could have been upturned. MISS PYM It’s an unfortunate side affect of our old age, dear. MRS. DALLOWAY Old age? You speak for yourself, Miss Pym. REZIA People are pointing fingers, my Septimus. SEPTIMUS My roots are entrenched in this pavement! MRS. DALLOWAY Dear, look at me, acting like a snapping weed. Gray, blue, we were in the presence of the Prime Minister. How exciting! Am I right? MISS PYM Yes I suppose, for an old bat like myself, I do have to leach onto these tiny triumphs to make my life more tolerable. SEPTIMUS Trees are not to be cut down. Nature cries, weeps, for us. (Rezia tries to shush Septimus.) REZIA Please, your voice. SEPTIMUS We need to crawl to remember where we came from and where we shall return. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY The tiny triumphs, yes, of course. Well, I should be going - thank you - my staff will arrive in the next - but you know that. It was a pleasure. Thank you. I hope your day is - you’re a rosebud. I should leave. Goodbye. (Mrs. Dalloway exits. She nearly trips over Septimus.) MRS. DALLOWAY Pardon me. (Gasps.) Oh dear. SEPTIMUS "Fear no more the heat o’ the sun. Fear no more." (Beat.) You dig deep until you remember the moment. MRS. DALLOWAY I’m sorry? REZIA Please forgive him. It’s a game he plays – we play together. This is my…husband. MRS. DALLOWAY I’m afraid I don’t understand SEPTIMUS - when we’re first born, roots dangle from our bodies. They feed us happiness and ambition, the longing for human touch and hope…but as we get older, we choose to pull out these roots. One by one until there is nothing. No connections to the ground or each other and so we float. Aimlessly waiting to fall. (Septimus waves a hand near Mrs. Dalloway’s feet.) You have one single root left. And it’s hanging by a thread. You see, I’m the same. (Septimus waves a hand over his body. He crawls to the Park Stage.) REZIA Septimus, Dr. Bradshaw waits. SEPTIMUS Human nature can wait. I need rest. The smoke is coming. (Sally enters smoking a cigarette.) We can hide for now. (Sally pulls up flowers from the ground. She uses scissors to cut off the heads of each flower. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 1


Septimus exits. Rezia closes the curtains behind him.) REZIA The doctor says it’s a short dizzy spell from the war. MRS. DALLOWAY I don’t understand, the war ended years ago. REZIA Yes, the doctor says it’s nothing. A different (searches.) perspective and he will be cured. MRS. DALLOWAY I’m sorry for his ailment. (Rezia curtsies. Exits.) Act I. Scene 3. (Mrs. Dalloway begins to exit. Stops. Sally Seton blows a plume of smoke at Mrs. Dalloway who lightly coughs and exits. Lights up on the Living Room Stage - Bourton. The river Windrush flows.) SALLY (Humming Septimus’ Song). Blue. (Cuts.) Red. (Cuts.) Yellow. (Cuts.) Blue. (Cuts.) Red. (Cuts.) Purple. (Cuts.) (Clarissa enters.) CLARISSA (Gasps.) What are you doing? SALLY I’m making art. CLARISSA That is not – No, why are you SALLY Blue. (Cuts.) CLARISSA Stop this instant. SALLY Red. (Cuts.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA I said stop it! SALLY (Pause.) Yellow. (Taunting. Cuts.) (Clarissa attempts to take the scissors away. Sally dashes out from behind the scrim taking a single flower with her.) CLARISSA Hand over those scissors. SALLY What scissors? CLARISSA I’m not playing games. (Sally shows her empty hands.) SALLY I have no idea what you’re referring to. (Clarissa steps out from behind the scrim.) CLARISSA I’m serious! Stop being a harlequin! SALLY There's no need for name-calling. Honestly, Clarissa, calling me a harlequin. You know I’m a decent girl…when I choose to be. CLARISSA You’re thinking of a harlot! (Stomps her foot.) You’re being obtuse! SALLY One more. CLARISSA Sally Seton! SALLY Yellow. (Cuts.) There. That should be enough. (Sally hands over the scissors. Clarissa snatches them away.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Miss Clarissa Hart, the protector of the tulip. If you cared as much for people as you do about flowers, I would think you would suitable companionship. CLARISSA That’s not your concern. SALLY No matter, my masterpiece is complete. CLARISSA Masterpiece? How many have you… (Sally walks offstage and returns with a large bag.) Clarissa grabs the bag and opens it.) CLARISSA This is a massacre! Why would you do such a horrible thing? SALLY I couldn’t sleep, so I went for a walk along the river. CLARISSA And that somehow justifies this butchery? SALLY No, it started with making a bouquet for breakfast when I became dreadfully sad. (Beat.) It was the river. I pitied it. CLARISSA You felt pity for the river? SALLY You can be so self-centered sometimes. Look at it - really look at it. Can’t you empathize? (Pause.) CLARISSA It’s a river. SALLY Precisely. (Beat.) It flows endlessly, no change, no choice. It pretends to meander, but it fools no one. It’s trapped. No matter what it does, it’s confined to this single course of action. And you know the most tragic part? CLARISSA I haven’t the foggiest. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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SALLY Try. CLARISSA It’s far too (searches.) watery. SALLY Clarissa! CLARISSA I’m at a loss. (Kneels down. Touches the water.) SALLY It has no color, no voice. The world famous Windrush is anemic and tortured. While not centimeters away are these brilliant flowers flaunting, no, shouting at top of their voice, "Pink, Purple, Red" and the only thing this poor river can say back (pause.) “asparagus.” Poor soul. CLARISSA So you kill the competition is that it? Make everything drab so the river feels better about itself? I can’t believe I’m debating the rights of the Windrush. SALLY No, these flowers are my gift. They’re a moment of voice. You see as I was kneeling down on the verge of tears, I threw a carnation in. A blue one. And I hear the Windrush say, “thank.” I threw two carnations in, purple and blue, and the Windrush said, “thank you.” So I reasoned an entire garden might be worth a soliloquy. CLARISSA I want no part of this. SALLY Do you have a better idea on how to get the Windrush to speak? CLARISSA You’ve gone too far. SALLY No, I’m being affectionate. These things are crucial when you follow them. It’s how I became a good listener. CLARISSA This is absolute SALLY Shush. Did you hear that? CLARISSA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Hear what? SALLY The river. She's speaking. CLARISSA I don’t hear anything. SALLY You don’t hear the river? CLARISSA Yes, I hear the river, but no, she’s…it’s not speaking SALLY There it is. (Pause.) “As. Para. Gus.” CLARISSA Have a good day. SALLY Surely there's some mercy in that yellow dress. Place yourself in the Windrush’s position, wouldn’t you want an opportunity to have one moment to pour your heart out? CLARISSA As an eighteen-year-old young lady, I don’t have time to play your games. There are far more important things to attend to. Such as (searches), well (searches), things that need attending. (Beat.) Maturity is not a handout, it's a choice, one I made years ago. SALLY Oh, yes, of course, your sister! Was that when you made your choice “to become mature”? Surely you haven’t always clamored to be picturesque. (Clariss puts the bag down.) I heard your aunt mention it in passing. She was killed, is that right? A tree fell or she fell – your aunt tends to mumble. CLARISSA I prefer to – SALLY - not discuss it. Of course not. For you to open yourself up, well, that would certainly be the end. CLARISSA And what would you know – SALLY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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My parents don’t bicker they explode. They make the walls shake every night and the only place I’ve ever found peace is when I hide underneath my bed. When they find me I have no choice. I runaway. (Beat.) See, my deepest, darkest, secrets tossed out for the taking. Easy as that. (Pause.) CLARISSA My sister, Sylvia. It was a willow. There was wind. (Pause.) A June breeze. (Pause.) Nothing more. (Sally begins to exit.) Where are you going? SALLY There’s no point in secrets if you won’t share them. CLARISSA But. Wait. (Searches). What of the flowers? SALLY The crops need fertilizer. CLARISSA You can’t fritter away lilacs! SALLY Than what do you suggest? CLARISSA We could replant them. Or reattach the heads to the stem with string or glue perhaps? (Sally exits.) (Sighs.) Fine. They're doomed. SALLY (O.S.) Sorry? CLARISSA They’re doomed. They’re already dead. (Sally enters.) SALLY Yes. They are. CLARISSA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I suppose we may as well try. (Sally rushes to Clarissa.) SALLY You want to hear the Windrush speak? CLARISSA It will be a proper funeral in the least. SALLY Brilliant, take up the bag. OK. Stand here. No here. We have to wait for the proper time. The sun must be at the right angle. Through the trees – no move here. It must bounce off the water and land on us, proper. (Sally stands behind Clarissa and covers her eyes.) It’s almost time. Allow your body to relax. Allow your shoulders to fall. Breath deeply in. Exhale. Now (Pause) the Windrush will tell us all the world’s secrets, but only if we’re willing to share our own. You must imagine yourself opening up, no façade, or mask, no performance. You are Clarissa Hart, naked, and without constraint. The flowers must soar high. Are you ready? CLARISSA I am. (The sunlight cuts through the tree branches and reflects off the water. Big Ben chimes.) SALLY Set them free! (Clarissa opens the bag and releases the flowers that fly in all directions. Rainbows drizzle across all of Bourton. Septimus' song hums. Sally uncovers Clarissa’s eyes. Clarissa twirls in the torrent of colors.) Can you hear it? Can you hear what it's saying? CLARISSA I do. SALLY What is it? What do you hear? (Peter enters.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA It’s saying. (Beat.) It’s confirmed, my heart has found… (Peter clears his throat. The colors fade.) PETER Your aunt Helena has requested CLARISSA Peter! We - I didn’t hear you - we didn’t. I’m sorry. What is it? PETER I was sent to fetch you for lunch. (Peter exits. Sally leans in to Clarissa.) SALLY There's whom you're supposed to be with and there's love. It's rare the two are the same. CLARISSA Which do you choose? SALLY Neither. I prefer with the Windrush. Flow on and on and on and let it all work itself out. (Sally laughs and runs behind the scrim. Clarissa stays and watches Mrs. Dalloway enter.) Act I. Scene 4. MRS. DALLOWAY Lucy, could you retrieve my medicine? I feel my heart palpating out of sorts. (Beat.) When I was a young lady, my aunt always said, a hostess may never succumb to illness prior to a party. Heart, body, and soul may be writhing in pain, but until the final guest retires you must remain (Richard enters with the pills. Clarissa exits behind the scrim. Living Room scrim light fades: Westminster.) RICHARD - grinning, greeting, and loving every moment. MRS. DALLOWAY Richard, I didn’t hear you come home! (Mrs. Dalloway stands and leans in for a kiss. Distracted, Richard stares at the bottle of pills.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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RICHARD Only briefly, I’m needed at a committee in a few. Are these drugs working? (Notices Mrs. Dalloway leaning forward.) Right, of course, how silly of me. (Richard hesitates and then gives Mrs. Dalloway a light kiss on the cheek.) Your heart acting up again. MRS. DALLOWAY There was a moment when I felt upturned, but I feel fine. RICHARD One or two? MRS. DALLOWAY The doctor said three in certain emergencies. RICHARD This is an emergency then? MRS. DALLOWAY Guests arrive in less than five hours. (Mrs. Dalloway attempts to move past Richard. They shuffle in each other's way.) RICHARD Prior to their arrival, perhaps we should phone Dr. Bradshaw MRS. DALLOWAY - I'm in perfect health. RICHARD But surely a check-up won’t ruin MRS. DALLOWAY - it's unnecessary. RICHARD What are you looking for? (Mrs. Dalloway and Richard freeze. They face each other.) MRS. DALLOWAY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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A glass. For water. RICHARD For the pills - yes, right. (Richard turns around and pours a glass of water.) RICHARD There’s really no need to push forward if you’re MRS. DALLOWAY - For the last time, I’m not going to cancel due to a couple of backward ticks. I’m in perfect health. RICHARD I’m aware this quaint party is important to you, but we a repeat of last spring… (Mrs. Dalloway swallows the pills.) MRS. DALLOWAY This is not a quaint party, Richard. RICHARD You were bedridden for two months, Clarissa. MRS. DALLOWAY The Prime Minister will be joining us. RICHARD Clarissa. MRS. DALLOWAY Richard. (Pause. Clarissa gives Richard the glass of water.) RICHARD I'm concerned. MRS. DALLOWAY That's why I love you. (Mrs. Dalloway leans forward. Richard hesitates then kisses her on the cheek.) Which committee are you attending? (Richard sets the pills on the table.) RICHARD It’s in regards to the Armenian situation. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY Was that the woman you showed me? The one dressed in rags? The poor thing. RICHARD Indeed. MRS. DALLOWAY Her cheekbones nearly brought me to tears. RICHARD If only this new Turkish government had a thimble's worth of your empathy, Clarissa. During negotiations they’ve been cold and unwilling to face the truth. They’re denying the whole thing happened. MRS. DALLOWAY How could they? England knows what happened. They can’t deny what we see. RICHARD The House placed the mass murders in clear black and white photographs, on the table, directly in front of their ambassador. (Beat.) He referred to it as “a military exercise.” MRS. DALLOWAY Exercise in regards to what? RICHARD He would only add, “Our affairs.” MRS. DALLOWAY That’s nonsense, but speaking of affairs, for tonight RICHARD I suppose it’s a sovereign perspective. He claimed us westerners will never comprehend the inner workings of the east. MRS. DALLOWAY Yes, well, that is unfortunate. I spoke with Lucy regarding the curtains RICHARD One point five million Armenians brutally massacred and all for a Turkish “military exercise” in “our affairs.” MRS. DALLOWAY Miss Pym concocted this centerpiece to complement tonight’s main course! RICHARD That was gracious of her. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY I never would have considered putting hyacinth next to iris. And placing baby’s breath as the center - she is a talent. RICHARD The Dalloways have relied on her expertise for decades. MRS. DALLOWAY Yes, about that. I’m little concerned I may have lightly offended her earlier this morning. RICHARD Clarissa, Miss Pym is MRS. DALLOWAY Offended is a strong word. I may have ruffled her feathers. (Beat.) But in all fairness, wouldn’t you describe the Prime Minister’s automobile as gray, not blue? RICHARD I believe it’s silver. MRS. DALLOWAY Don’t be silly. RICHARD It appeared silver this morning. MRS. DALLOWAY I saw it this morning as well and I can assure you it was not silver. Possibly a slate gray, or perhaps a xanadu, but certainly not silver. RICHARD It’s what I saw. MRS. DALLOWAY Then maybe new spectacles are in order. RICHARD Does the specific color have any real consequence, Clarissa? MRS. DALLOWAY I'm sorry? RICHARD If Prime Minister Law’s automobile were gray would it have any more significance than green or red or rose? MRS. DALLOWAY This is not a joke. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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RICHARD The Prime Minister drives a brilliant pink car! MRS. DALLOWAY You laugh, but color gives things a clear definition. It allows for strong statements and personality to be displayed openly. It’s very important, Richard. Crucial, if you follow these things. (Big Ben chimes.) RICHARD The time…The Armenians require England’s rescuing. (Richard leans forward Mrs. Dalloway hesitates and then kisses him on the cheek. Richard grabs his coat and begins to exit.) MRS. DALLOWAY Yes, the Armenians are of the utmost importance. (Beat.) Will you be home for a late lunch? RICHARD I thought we would attend Lady Bruton's gathering. MRS. DALLOWAY Lady Bruton is having a gathering? RICHARD Yes, I trust you received an invitation? MRS. DALLOWAY I checked the mail this morning and there was nothing for me, at least nothing of note. (Richard checks his coat pocket and removes a letter. Mrs. Dalloway takes it.) It’s only addressed to you. RICHARD I’m sure yours is on its way. MRS. DALLOWAY The afternoon mail comes at 2p.m. The gathering begins at 1p.m. RICHARD The help must have jumbled the invitations. (Beat.) You’re more than invited. MRS. DALLOWAY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Of course. Why would I require my own invitation? We’ve only been married for thirty-three years. RICHARD It was a trivial mistake, I assure you. MRS. DALLOWAY It says, “My Dearest Mr. Richard Dalloway,” not “My Dears Mr. and MRS. Richard Dalloway.” This is your invitation, not ours, and certainly not mine. RICHARD Clarissa, darling, join us. You know Lady Bruton is always extraordinarily amusing! We’ll laugh about the whole miscommunication over afternoon cocktails. (Mrs. Dalloway sets the invitation down.) MRS. DALLOWAY It’s no matter. I’m needed here. Lucy requires my assistance. RICHARD Very well. (Beat.) I’m late. (Beat.) Clarissa, I have the utmost faith that your little party is going to be sublimely handsome! MRS. DALLOWAY Little? (Richard leans in to hold Mrs. Dalloway.) RICHARD And I trust to see you Lady Bruton's. 2p.m. sharp. (Prior to embracing Mrs. Dalloway, Richard is distracted by her dress.) What’s this? (Beat.) Oh dear, it appears as if you have a slightest tear. You may want to mend that before a serious scandal arises. (Beat.) See you this afternoon. MRS. DALLOWAY Until this afternoon. (Mrs. Dalloway watches Richard exit. She hums while she adjusts the flowers, straightens the tablecloth, checks for dust, and moves furniture.) Lucy, I’ve changed my mind about the tablecloth. I believe we should stretch the summer colors: pull on yellows, oranges, and reds. After a clear day like today, the guests will have sunshine on the mind - we should commit more to warmth. (Beat.) I want this house to exemplify genuine heartfelt welcome. Everything must be meticulously in position. Unease Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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could be millimeters away. A straightened living room straightens the soul. A flawless wife enhances her husband. (Beat.) These napkins are wrong, Lucy! They’re insulting! Lucy? (Beat.) Perhaps, it’s the furniture. Perhaps it should be replaced. How thoughtless, Clarissa, how completely thoughtless, you silly, stupid, Clarissa. This is a social engagement and cedar is clearly a lonesome wood. (Calms.) I could refurnish this house by this evening and still make good time for my lunch date with Lady Bruton. (Beat.) My lunch date? It's not mine at all. It's his. If I was ever invited it was as accessory. (Mrs. Dalloway picks up the invitation.) My dearest Mr. Richard Dalloway. ‘My dearest, one and only, Mr. Richard Dalloway, you alone are cordially invited to dine in the company of scholars, politicians, knights, and lords. (Living Room stage lights up. Clarissa enters from behind the scrim. She watches Mrs. Dalloway.) Although I’m aware of your marriage to the Clarissa, I’ve recently received word that your wife’s dress is inappropriately torn, in which case under no circumstance is she to attend my lunch. Furthermore, I find her complete lack of depth utterly embarrassing. How she manages to live to day to day is beyond me. Why, she’s incapable of arranging the most simple of evening parties. And clearly she knows nothing of the real world!’ (Beat. Picks up a dish.) Lucy, how many times must I tell you? Gold clashes with yellow! (Mrs. Dalloway lifts the plate over her head. Clarissa touches Mrs. Dalloway’s arm and it lowers. Mrs. Dalloway drops the plate from her side. It shatters. Pause.) Lucy, I’m awfully terribly sorry, there was a minor mishap. When ever you have a moment. (Clarissa escorts Mrs. Dalloway off. Sally escorts Peter on, from behind the scrim. Lucy enters and sweeps the broken glass.) Act I. Scene 5. PETER I’m a human mistake. SALLY Clarissa needs time. PETER The moonlight was set just…and the sound of the babbling water was…the fountain had three tiers on purpose! I calculated every detail of the proposal and she still said…How could this have happened? SALLY She was startled PETER Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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- I was a fool to ask. SALLY Peter you’ve been friends for ages PETER Friends, yes, but anything more is clearly one-sided. (Beat.) “Mrs. Clarissa Walsh.” “We’ll be having brunch with Peter and Clarissa Walsh.” Even the surname sounds fantasized. There are too many ‘S’s. SALLY Mrs. Sally Walsh. Peter and Sally Walsh. (Beat.) I’m afraid there are still too many ‘S’s. PETER I'm leaving Bourton. SALLY That’s unnecessary. PETER I'm a walking embarrassment. SALLY Perhaps it was too soon. Nothing more. You took a chance and she said – PETER - No. SALLY Earlier. Tomorrow, ‘maybe.’ A year from now, a ‘yes?’ You took a chance. PETER “A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing.” George Bernard Shaw. As it stands, Sally, I carry the honor of being unloved and the usefulness of humiliation. SALLY Come along. PETER Where are we going? SALLY The water will make you better. (Lucy exits. Sally, barefoot, escorts Peter on, from behind the scrim. The Windrush flows.) PETER Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I’m not particularly interested in getting my feet wet. SALLY It’s a wonder you haven’t killed yourself. Our feet need a daily drink of water. That’s what keeps our hearts ticking. PETER I would prefer to keep my shoes on. SALLY Shoes! (Beat.) Shoes are a complete waste! PETER You have something against shoes? SALLY I don’t believe in them. PETER I never realized footwear was an ideology. SALLY They cut us off from what’s important. We’re supposed to trample across the grass, skip along the dirt, and hop across wet rocks barefoot. If you hide your feet behind shoes you cut off the roots! PETER Than I choose to remain rootless. SALLY If you wish to remain in my company, you will remove your footwear. (Sally dips her feet in the water.) PETER You aren’t serious? (Sally turns away from Peter.) SALLY You will think clearer once you take them off and this extends to all articles of clothing. I’m quite brilliant in the nude. (Peter removes his shoes.) PETER You're belligerently absurd. Roots, water, drinking. I should be packing my luggage and venturing to the nearest train. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Peter dips his feet in the water.) SALLY How does it feel? PETER Wet. (Beat.) SALLY There's nothing amazingly special about her you know. Well there is, but her exceptional qualities are almost in an average sort of way. She's amazingly standard. PETER You don't believe that. SALLY No, I don't. I was only consoling you through your rejection. PETER I think of her as a glowing potential. She's a boundless possibility. I asked her to take a chance on me. But clearly she doesn't want to be with a pathetic intellectual who has no future goals, no fortune, no inclination to play social politics. No, her eyes are set purely on status and a golden cage to tidy her feathers. She would gladly die knowing she's the perfect hostess. SALLY I don't believe she's that shallow. PETER No? SALLY Clarissa is a constant struggle. She's trying to search for purpose while projecting a regal pose, shoulders back, (touches her lips) and lovely pursed lips out. She's completely unsure but must, for whatever reason, act in complete and utter control. I would love to see her drop her pose. (Peter lays down.) PETER "Such a one do I remember, whom to look at was love." PETER Tennyson.

SALLY Tennyson. (Sally lays down. She holds Peter's hand.)

SALLY Peter Walsh, you are the type of man that will have a brilliant future with women. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER Right now I feel as a child stuck in sand. SALLY Which makes you what every woman wants - a lost cause. (Beat.) She does care for you. PETER She does care for me. I believe that. But now I know Clarissa Hart loves what I can never provide. Security. (Rezia opens the Park Stage Curtains. Septimus enters followed by Dr. Bradshaw. Rezia closes the curtains and follows.) Act I. Scene 6. DR. BRADSHAW Lucia, as you can see our sessions are starting to take their toll. REZIA He seems better after you speak with him. But he is still on or off. DR. BRADSHAW In his state, he must be put into submission. The ‘on’ as you said, is a choice, and I’m more than happy to force that choice. When was his last solid episode? REZIA On Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon, we rode the bus to Hampton Court. He was my husband then. (Rezia holds up Septimus up. Living room scrim lights up: Westminster past. As they stroll behind the scrim his shoulders straighten and he walks tall, independent. Septimus speaks as he once did.) Septimus look at the daffodils in the park! SEPTIMUS Floating lamps, Rezia, they're nature's floating lamps! (Beat.) Do you see the gentleman in the gray hat? REZIA I do. SEPTIMUS He asked me if I could pass a message to you. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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REZIA What message? SEPTIMUS "Those hours, that with gentle work did frame REZIA - Septimus SEPTIMUS ...The lovely gaze where every eye doth dwell, / Will play the tyrants to the very same / And that unfair which fairly doth excel: REZIA - You’re making me blush SEPTIMUS For never-resting time leads summer on / To hideous winter and confounds him there; / Sap cheque'd with frost and lusty leaves quite gone, REZIA - People are beginning to stare SEPTIMUS I want them to look. (Beat.) Beauty o'ersnow'd and bareness every where: / Then, were not summer's distillation left, / A liquid prisoner pent in walls of glass, / Beauty's effect with beauty were bereft, / Nor it nor no remembrance what it was: / But flowers distill'd though they with winter meet, REZIA - Stand up Septimus! SEPTIMUS .../Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet! (Beat.) That was his message. He said you stole his heart with your smile and only your hand in marriage could settle his loss. REZIA He didn't! SEPTIMUS I told him yes. REZIA No! SEPTIMUS But on one condition. REZIA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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What condition? SEPTIMUS On the top of every hour, he must yell his love for you, in your native tongue: (Big Ben chimes.) I' benedico il loco e 'l tempo et l'ora che sí alto miraron gli occhi mei, et dico. Rezia, when I met you before the war, I felt... (Septimus voice fades back to being broken as the Living Room Scrim lights dim: Westminster Present.) REZIA We exited the bus and walked near the river. We watched the birds. We watched the people. I looked at Septimus and he was the man I first saw. Strong, courageous, alight. But then he seemed fascinated by the water. The sun was setting and something clicked... SEPTIMUS This is when we kill ourselves. REZIA He was silent on the bus ride home. DR. BRADSHAW Yes, during our session, we discussed how childish his desire for suicide was. (Beat.) Didn't we Septimus? REZIA I married him in hope to start a family, but how can I when my husband‌ DR. BRADSHAW - acts like a child. (Rezia pulls Dr. Bradshaw aside.) REZIA I hate him for being sick. I see perfect strangers on the streets and I want to run up to them and tell them how unhappy I am. But as soon as I take a step forward and open my mouth, Septimus says a kind word and then another and another. And I think, maybe he's better now. Maybe this is the end of if. DR. BRADSHAW Unfortunately it will take more time, but as you can see, Lucia, with the assistance of a short session, Septimus is now more than capable of maintaining a decent pose. His back is more straight, his shoulders are tight, and his ideas are contained. He appears just as he should appear: upright and unremarkable. The apogee of a solid citizen. (Beat.) Septimus? (Pause.) Septimus? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 3


SEPTIMUS Yes? DR. BRADSHAW How do you feel? SEPTIMUS Parched. REZIA I'll fetch you water. You should sit. (Rezia holds Septimus' shoulder and leads him to a chair. Dr. Bradshaw stops her.) DR. BRADSHAW No Rezia, his discomfort is merely the byproduct of our session. Septimus must showcase independence. (Rezia lets Septimus go. He stumbles.) SEPTIMUS Water, Rezia. REZIA Dr. Bradshaw? (Dr. Bradshaw concedes. Rezia fetches a glass of water.) DR. BRADSHAW Septimus, you're feeling weak because we forced your mind to return to a solid foundation. You see, your thoughts over the course of months, years perhaps, have learned to escape from their cage and fly freely, which clearly we can't have. What we did during our session today was stomp those thoughts to the ground and lock them in their proper place. We essentially pinned down your mind. (Septimus guzzles the water.) SEPTIMUS More. REZIA Dr. Bradshaw? (Dr. Bradshaw nods. Rezia fetches another glass of water.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 4


REZIA Will he return to who he was? DR. BRADSHAW I will do better than who he was. REZIA He smiled when we first met. DR. BRADSHAW The techniques I prescribe will make him more focused, less idle, and more open to community. We are social animals, Rezia, that require constant attention. If you wish to see an example of my work, look no further than my wife. (Living Room Scrim lights rise. Septimus sees Peter.) SEPTIMUS Evans. REZIA That woman in your office - she was your wife? DR. BRADSHAW My very lovely Mrs. Bradshaw. REZIA She hid her face when we walked in. From what I could see she looked almost... DR. BRADSHAW Efficient, meticulous, earnest? (Beat.) Six hours of piano a day, three hours of reciting my tenets, a short private session, and all on less than four hours of sleep. My wife is my most prized patient! REZIA Will my husband be happy again? DR. BRADSHAW You must understand, melancholia is a selfish disease. I treat it as I would a common cold. Happiness comes once the disease is eradicated. (Septimus crawls towards Evans.) SEPTIMUS I thought I lost you in Veneto.

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REZIA Septimus, what are you doing? SEPTIMUS Where are your wounds? (Septimus inspects Peter.) DR. BRADSHAW What is this nonsense? (Rezia attempts to pull up Septimus.) REZIA Septimus, the doctor is here. SEPTIMUS Evans, where were you hit? DR. BRADSHAW Who is this Evans? What is he talking about? REZIA He was his leader, commander in the war. I only met him once, a shy man. He died just before the truce. DR. BRADSHAW The war? How ridiculous! The war is over! REZIA I had hoped your sessions would make them stop. DR. BRADSHAW They will, young lady, and immediately. (Beat.) Septimus, this is Dr. Bradshaw. End this tomfoolery at once! Stand up. Come now, stand up, back straight, shoulders locked. SEPTIMUS We need to dig further down. We're too exposed here. There's not enough forest cover. DR. BRADSHAW I know you can hear me, Septimus. My voice is the voice of rightful reason. You will listen to it. This charade will end in ten seconds! Ten, nine, eight... SEPTIMUS (Shushes.) I hear them coming, Evans. DR. BRADSHAW Evans is dead! Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Living Room scrim lights up: Bourton. Peter sits up.) SEPTIMUS What are you doing? PETER My feet are numb. SEPTIMUS The enemy is coming. Stay down! DR. BRADSHAW I'm afraid sometimes you must be physical to break a patient from their self-absorbed fantasy. (Dr. Bradshaw attempts to pick up Septimus. Septimus pushes him away. Sally sits up.) PETER We should be getting back to the house for supper. I'm sure Clarissa is looking forward to more of her silent treatment. SEPTIMUS Please stay down. SALLY Did you dream? PETER Dreams are all rubbish. SALLY Tell me! SEPTIMUS This isn't a sacrifice. It's suicide! Get down! (Septimus crawls after Peter.) SEPTIMUS It was a minor daydream, nothing worth noting. SALLY What did you see? (Dr. Bradshaw again tries to restrain Septimus.) DR. BRADSHAW Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Listen to reason, Septimus! SEPTIMUS Evans, please don't do this. PETER I was in a forest. I was with man...I've never seen him before. He was yelling about somethinga-rather. Nonsense, I suppose. I walked with my arms out to the side like this. I could hear footsteps in front of me. Then... (The sound of a gunshot.) SEPTIMUS Evans! (Septimus covers his mouth and hides.) PETER Nothing more than rubbish. (Peter and Sally exit. Living Room Scrim lights down: Westminster. Dr. Bradshaw picks up Septimus and places him in a chair.) DR. BRADSHAW Have you finished playing war? Have you finished your self-centered fantasy? (Septimus gathers himself.) SEPTIMUS War? What war? DR. BRADSHAW Is this the sense of humor you were discussing, Rezia? REZIA He isn't smiling. SEPTIMUS What war are you referring to? DR. BRADSHAW The Great War of course! The war you fought in! SEPTIMUS Right, yes, of course. That was the little shindy of schoolboys with gunpowder. DR. BRADSHAW Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I beg your pardon? SEPTIMUS The minor mishap between a handful of countries. It was hardly worth noting. DR. BRADSHAW Neither of us are finding this to be comical. You of all people know millions of honorable people died fighting against SEPTIMUS - a runny nose. DR. BRADSHAW I beg your pardon? SEPTIMUS Human nature caught a cold. It removed a handkerchief from its coat pocket, folded it several times, and blew. On the handkerchief were millions of dead honorable people. Plague, famine, war, these are all no more than Monday morning bug. DR. BRADSHAW And what of the politics, liberty, justice! SEPTIMUS The Great War was human nature having a runny nose. Europe happened to be the handkerchief. DR. BRADSHAW Rezia, has he spoken like this before? REZIA No. DR. BRADSHAW Septimus is sprinting fast, downhill, on a dangerous path. I can't stop him unless I know how grave his sickness truly is. Again, I ask for your honesty, has he spoken like this before? REZIA I may have heard him mention it here or there. SEPTIMUS Millions of our sons, mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, neighbors, friends died because we didn't take proper care of ourselves. DR. BRADSHAW Enough! SEPTIMUS The ignitable Human Nature is trying to snuff the match. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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DR. BRADSHAW What is Human Nature to you, Septimus? Are we beasts? Monsters? Perhaps human nature is made up of bloodthirsty savages? SEPTIMUS (Laughs.) In your world, yes. But in mine, you are Human Nature, Dr. Bradshaw. DR. BRADSHAW Your husband's mind has returned to chaos. SEPTIMUS You hide your tears behind spectacles, your wrinkled skin behind a buttoned suit, blistered feet in shined shoes: You are rootless. We are one major disaster away from being naked, hunched over under a tree, and scared of a crack of thunder. That is where we came from and where we secretly desire to return. We take cold steps forward but always wishing to go back from whence we came! DR. BRADSHAW Rezia, I will make the preparations to take your husband to my clinic in the north. REZIA When? DR. BRADSHAW As soon as possible. REZIA I don't know if we can afford to stay long. DR. BRADSHAW He is my patient now. A challenge such as this will be my pleasure. Free of charge. REZIA I'll prepare our bags immediately. DR. BRADSHAW My clinic doesn't permit family or friends. REZIA I won't leave my husband alone. DR. BRADSHAW I implement an intense program and I'm afraid those close to my patients have a tendency to corrupt my methods. REZIA How long will he be away? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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DR. BRADSHAW Six months. Minimum. REZIA You can't do this. DR. BRADSHAW For the betterment of society he must go. REZIA He may be ill, but he's mine. DR. BRADSHAW Do you want your husband to get better, Rezia? REZIA You said isolation was a disease! Community is important! DR. BRADSHAW There are certain individuals that meet the exception. Septimus' ego has chosen to function under a complete disregard to society, which has resulted in pure vanity. Worse yet, he is unable to distinguish between the present and the past. The past, under his circumstance, is dangerous to recall. I'll return this evening to escort Septimus from the house. REZIA Please don't do this. (Dr. Bradshaw begins to exit.) DR. BRADSHAW He has a sickness, Rezia, and I refuse to let it become infectious. This is for your safety as well. (Dr. Bradshaw exits.) SEPTIMUS Rezia, come here please. (Rezia sits next to Septimus. Clarissa and Mrs. Dalloway enter. Clarissa escorts Mrs. Dalloway to the couch. Mrs. Dalloway carries her torn dress and a sewing kit.) I'm not going to leave you Rezia. CLARISSA You are a beautiful woman Mrs. Dalloway. SEPTIMUS I was lost. And for that I apologize. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA I'm sorry I fade from your present. SEPTIMUS But I'm here now. CLARISSA You should never forget me. REZIA I need you to hold me. I need you to care for me as if I'm the one that is sick. MRS. DALLOWAY I become black and white when you leave me. I need to be gray. I need you here by my side at all times. SEPTIMUS Come along, we need rest. (Septimus escorts Rezia behind the Curtained Stage.) (Clarissa holds Mrs. Dalloway as she begins to sew her dress. Peter enters carrying a letter. He stands in front of the door, hesitates, exhales, and then knocks.) Act I. Scene 7. MRS. DALLOWAY I don't have time for an interruption. (Beat.) Lucy! (Peter knocks.) I'm not in! (Lucy enters. Peter knocks.) LUCY Of course, Ma'am. (Beat.) Coming! (Lucy opens the door.) PETER Good afternoon, I'm here to see Clarissa. LUCY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I'm terribly sorry, sir, Mrs. Dalloway is not in. (Peter walks in.) Sir! PETER Mrs. Dalloway will see me. Oh yes, she will see me. LUCY Sir, please, she is not home at the moment. (Peter walks towards Mrs. Dalloway.) PETER She will see me. After five years in India, Clarissa will see me! MRS. DALLOWAY I know that voice. CLARISSA It sounds much older. PETER Clarissa. Clarissa! (Peter stands before Mrs. Dalloway. They freeze.) LUCY I'm sorry, Ma'am, he rushed past me. Shall I phone the police? (Mrs. Dalloway stands.) MRS. DALLOWAY Thank you, Lucy. LUCY Ma’am? MRS. DALLOWAY That will be all. (Lucy curtsies. Leaves, stops, returns.) LUCY Ma'am? MRS. DALLOWAY What is it? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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LUCY Mrs. Walker is deeply concerned about the main course MRS. DALLOWAY Thank you, Lucy LUCY She insisted that I MRS. DALLOWAY You may leave us. (Lucy curtsies and exits. Pause.) PETER Clarissa, it's me - it's Peter. (Pause.) Peter Walsh. MRS. DALLOWAY Yes, of course it is. (Beat.) Of course it is! Oh my, I know who you are my dear Peter Walsh! How heavenly it is to see you again! (Peter kisses both of Mrs. Dalloway's hands.) PETER You seem surprised. I trust you received my letter? MRS. DALLOWAY I read it this morning! You look CLARISSA - Thin and withered. You have dry skin and you're teeth are showing hints of amber. And, honestly, you’re still carrying that silly knife of yours! MRS. DALLOWAY Exactly the same! You haven't changed a bit. PETER The house looks spectacular and you, you are as handsome as ever! You are beauty, Clarissa, and "beauty is truth, truth beauty!" Keats. MRS. DALLOWAY Enchanting, Peter! CLARISSA Although, his voice is a flood. That stare - remember that stare. Instrusive. His hazel eyes have always embraced the view. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER It feels grand to breath civilization again! I could bask in the June sun all day. MRS. DALLOWAY You must be spent. PETER India has taxed the nerves. MRS. DALLOWAY Please sit, my dear Peter. Tell me about your adventures. Tell me about the magic of the east! PETER I should warn you, "a smile abroad is often a scowl at home." PETER

CLARISSA Tennyson.

Tennyson. MRS. DALLOWAY Don't tease me. I want to hear it all!

PETER To begin, for every automobile in London there's an oxen in India. Entire cities are made of tiger's eye, and the drab desert splashes against the greens and reds pouring out from the jungles! MRS. DALLOWAY And the people? Have they learned what sophistication is? PETER The people are romantic. They live on vivacity, Clarissa. MRS. DALLOWAY I imagined they would be too busy fetching water from a well. CLARISSA (Shushes). Let him finish. I want to hear this. PETER There's no denying they are centuries behind us, which is exhausting, but there are moments of vivacious spice, where it honestly feels like a superior culture. MRS. DALLOWAY Superior? You’re sense of humor hasn’t PETER Everything about them is in the public domain. Their beauty, their wretchedness, there is no reserve. There is no privacy. It's all shared in the open.

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MRS. DALLOWAY It sounds like a territory that is utterly confused. CLARISSA It sounds romantic. PETER And how is life in Westminster? CLARISSA Entirely uneventful and bland MRS. DALLOWAY Wonderfully exciting! As I'm sure you've seen, London has completely healed from the skirmish in Europe. It has truly returned to its former charm as if the war never happened! Of course, there's still a flake of reminder here and there, but all talk is of England's future. PETER And of your party this evening? MRS. DALLOWAY You've heard! PETER There’s talk of it on every corner. MRS. DALLOWAY We're expecting all of prominent Westminster to arrive, including, possibly, the Prime Minister himself! PETER It sounds exquisite. (Beat.) MRS. DALLOWAY Surely you're invited! Peter, I would cancel the whole function if I knew you weren't attending. PETER I would be honored to be in the company of my dear, old friend, Clarissa Hart. (Peter takes Mrs. Dalloway’s hand.) MRS. DALLOWAY Hart? I haven't been called that – (Peter retracts his hand.) PETER Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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It was a slip. I'm afraid I look at you and even now my mind wonders back to when‌you are still my lovely friend. I meant nothing of it, Mrs. Dalloway. (Mrs. Dalloway stands and begins to arrange flowers. She does not face Peter.) MRS. DALLOWAY Right. (Mrs. Dalloway smiles.) CLARISSA I remember this smile. Three decades of dust may have fallen on it, but here he is...my Peter. PETER That's a charming centerpiece. MRS. DALLOWAY It is, isn't it? It was a gift. PETER It looks wonderful. Are those irises? MRS. DALLOWAY They are! PETER And daffodils? MRS. DALLOWAY Yes! PETER Absolutely gorgeous. (Peter plays with his knife. Mrs. Dalloway continues to arrange the flowers.) CLARISSA How I must bore you, Peter. You've spent your life traveling the world and I've ventured down the street. You probably think my life is frivolous cursed with monotony. I chose safety for a husband - a conservative. No art or poetry or music only politics. But on the inside I'm still here, Peter. There are still pieces of Clarissa Hart. MRS. DALLOWAY I just can't believe my dearest Peter Walsh is meters away. PETER My fondest memories are standing right here in front of me. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA I may have buried myself but I never completely left. My passions were simply subdued with age and marriage. I am still young, a child even. But I had to choose between you and Richard....and there was Sally‌ PETER Do you still garden? MRS. DALLOWAY Not here, I'm afraid. I'm so busy, incredibly busy, with the house. Besides the sun has difficulties reaching the back patio. And Mrs. Mulberry's is but hop-skip away. Besides I much prefer walking the streets of London than the countryside of Bourton. PETER Bourton. MRS. DALLOWAY The country is sweet for a short time, but I've learned to appreciate paved paths and the sounds of the city. (Beat.) Although there are moments when I miss the openness of the fields. Do you remember the walks we took together in the evenings? The time we ventured as far as PETER I haven’t forgotten Bourton. (Pause.) CLARISSA Of course not. PETER How is Richard? MRS. DALLOWAY Richard? PETER Yes, your husband Richard Dalloway, how is he? CLARISSA He's good. Fine. Remote MRS. DALLOWAY He's keeping busy as always...currently he's attending a committee. PETER May I ask what it's in regards to? MRS. DALLOWAY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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It's of some importance in the east. Men and women are being asked to leave their homes. It's dreadfully sad.

PETER Good for him. The world needs more committees. Why try to actually solve issues when we can dissect them for years? CLARISSA Your sarcasm is ugly. MRS. DALLOWAY Perhaps you would like something to drink? (Mrs. Dalloway stands.) PETER Aren't you going to summon your help? MRS. DALLOWAY I'm more than capable of fetching a simple tray. Besides the staff is busy enough as it is. (Beat.) Do you still take milk and one lump of sugar? PETER I do. CLARISSA Thirty years of running away and there's so little change in him. (Mrs. Dalloway stirs the tea.) PETER Are we going to discuss this, Clarissa? CLARISSA I would prefer not to. MRS. DALLOWAY What is there to discuss? PETER I'm in love. MRS. DALLOWAY In love? PETER I'm in love with a girl in India. I proposed to her. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY I recall hearing talk of it some months ago. CLARISSA There were mornings I refused to wake. PETER She's the wife of a major in the Royal Army. I'm here to assist with the divorce. MRS. DALLOWAY I hope it's not too difficult. CLARISSA I feel ill. MRS. DALLOWAY I wish you the utmost joy and happiness. Marriage is a great blessing CLARISSA - Is this a fever MRS. DALLOWAY - I'm sure she's a lovely woman. How old is she again? I heard rumors but‌ PETER Twenty-five. MRS. DALLOWAY Twenty- five! She's no more than a child. Fresh from the womb. Hardly a few sentences from her first words.

CLARISSA I was once young. You found me attractive. Your eyes embraced me.

PETER Clarissa, I believe my tea has been stirred enough. (Mrs. Dalloway stops stirring.) Could you face me? (Pause.) I want to know why. CLARISSA I wanted...I thought I wanted...no, I did want. I did. MRS. DALLOWAY Why what? PETER Why you said 'no' to me. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY It was so many ages ago. PETER For me it could have played out moments ago. I'm on one knee giving my heart to you and you say, "Don't be absurd." CLARISSA Why do you do this to yourself, Peter? PETER Am I absurd to you, Clarissa? Am I your joke? “There's Peter Walsh the catastrophe returned from his escape to India.” (Clarissa comforts Peter as a mother to a child.) CLARISSA No, of course not. PETER Am I a misfit? Am I that unremarkable? CLARISSA Please, Peter, you have always been in my thoughts. PETER Tell me the truth, why did you say 'no?' CLARISSA It's no use. PETER Did you not love me? CLARISSA It's no use. This is the end. PETER Please tell me the truth, Clarissa! CLARISSA I can’t. (Peter weeps. Mrs. Dalloway pats Peter's hand. Pause.) MRS. DALLOWAY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Peter, it was a scene played so long ago. I hardly consider it worth rehashing. CLARISSA (To Mrs. Dalloway.) When did you did you become this? When did you become a thorn? MRS. DALLOWAY I've been married to Richard and you're about to be married. Our romantic past together faded...it dissolved. CLARISSA (To Mrs. Dalloway.) You restrain yourself, lie, for what? Proper values? A proper impression of yourself? Can’t you see he’s tortured? MRS. DALLOWAY You see, we're both happy now. PETER Are you happy? CLARISSA We’re a veil of happiness. Nothing more, nothing less. (Clarissa exits.) MRS. DALLOWAY Very happy. Always. PETER Richard must smother you with adoration. MRS. DALLOWAY There are moments when he's (searches.) romantic. Yes. (Lucy enters. Peter stands and wipes his eyes.) LUCY I apologize for the intrusion, Ma'am, but I'm afraid Mrs. Walker is adamant that you make a decision. MRS. DALLOWAY Mrs. Walker will have to wait until my dearest friend Peter PETER No, I should be going. MRS. DALLOWAY Peter, please stay. LUCY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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She said the meat requires a full six hours to cook. PETER Clarissa, (bows.) Mrs. Dalloway, thank you for the tea. MRS. DALLOWAY Peter please wait. LUCY Unless of course as she says, “you want gamey snodgrass.” PETER Goodbye. (Peter exits. Mrs. Dalloway chases after him.) Peter! Peter, remember my party tonight! Remember my party! (Beat.) Lucy, prepare an additional plate for Mr. Walsh. We will need to send him a formal invitation. Phone all of the hotels in the area to find him. I want my letter in his hands straightway. LUCY Of course, Ma'am. (Lucy takes the dress. Mrs. Dalloway and Lucy exit. Living Room Scrim lights up: Bourton. Sally climbs on Big Ben. She hums to Septimus' tune (See Act II): "Ee um fah um so, Foo swee too eem oo." Clarissa enters.) Act I. Scene 8. CLARISSA Sally? Sally, where are you? SALLY Clarissa, this is God speaking. CLARISSA What are you doing on the roof? SALLY I feel safe up here. CLARISSA It's dangerous! SALLY That is largely a misconception. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA If you take one misstep the flowerbed is the only thing to break your fall.

SALLY Oh, but wouldn't that be a lovely way to die? Soar through the air and just before my noggin' splits wide open - bushel violets keep me company. CLARISSA Come down this instant. SALLY Why don't you come up? CLARISSA I'm perfectly content here. SALLY No you're not. CLARISSA I haven't the proper balance. SALLY What a horrible thing to say. (Beat.) You know, I've been sleeping on the roof the past few nights and I've discovered it's much more agreeable under the stars than under a ceiling. See, under a ceiling I'm only pretending to be safe. It could come crashing down at any moment. The stars, on the other hand, have every intention of staying put right where they are. CLARISSA And how would you know what the stars want? SALLY I ask them. CLARISSA Of course you do. SALLY How else am I supposed to know what they want? CLARISSA Extraordinary. SALLY Yes, I have been told I have French blood in my veins. (Beat.) I could help you find your balance if you would like? But I understand if you're too much of a boring stickler to ever take a chance in her life. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 6


(Clarissa wraps her summer dress around her legs. She begins to climb. Sally laughs and claps.) SALLY So the thorn is starting to dull? CLARISSA I am a Hart. My family carries a rich history of exploring lost worlds and conquering new lands. SALLY I never would have suspected. CLARISSA Yes, well, now you know. There I am. (Clarissa loses her balance - shrieks. Sally pulls her in. They momentarily embrace.) SALLY You weren't jesting about your balance. CLARISSA Where shall I sit? SALLY Here. (Mrs. Dalloway enters. She rearranges furniture, straightens plates, dusts, etc.) Do you know what I love? CLARISSA I don't want to hear about love. I'm tired of it all. SALLY It's nothing to be tired of. Sick of, yes, done with, of course, but not tired. CLARISSA What do you love? SALLY Your arms. CLARISSA My arms! They're twigs! I'm a narrow pea-stick figure. SALLY Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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You're a stem. And this is… (Sally inhales and holds up Clarissa’s face. Mrs. Dalloway watches.) CLARISSA My ridiculous little face SALLY - that is waiting to bloom. CLARISSA I'm beaked like a bird. SALLY An English Yellowcrest. CLARISSA I'm unremarkable. (Sally places a flower in Clarissa's hair.) SALLY The hidden Clarissa Hart...more beautiful than most, but only when you search for her. (Beat.) Will you hold my hand? CLARISSA

MRS. DALLOWAY Of course.

Of course. SALLY Will you keep me warm? CLARISSA

MRS. DALLOWAY

I will.

I will. SALLY

Will you kiss me? CLARISSA I beg your pardon? SALLY Have you never kissed before? CLARISSA Yes, but no, I mean not. I have (searches) I (searches) mean it's not as if we - I have thought about you, but I simply... Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Sally kisses Clarissa.) MRS. DALLOWAY My first real kiss. (Peter enters.) PETER Star gazing are we? MRS. DALLOWAY His voice sounds like running one's face against a granite wall. CLARISSA I don't wish to speak to him. SALLY I'll distract, you stay. (Beat.) Peter, could you be a dove and help me down. Mrs. Helena asked that I fetch dessert. PETER Clarissa, will you be joining us? (Pause.) Why am I treated with the cold shoulder when you’re the one that said ‘no?’ SALLY Come on, leave her be. (Sally and Peter exit. Pause.) CLARISSA Again you watch us, this. MRS. DALLOWAY Had that not, after all, been my first love? CLARISSA It was, but not your last. And yet thirty years on and this is what you always return me to. I forever fall in Sally's arms. MRS. DALLOWAY It's my memory. I may see it as many times as I wish. CLARISSA You have others you know. MRS. DALLOWAY There is only one first. The others get lost in the shuffle. CLARISSA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Where is your first kiss with Richard? Peter?

MRS. DALLOWAY It's not like one’s feeling for a man. It's completely disinterested, and besides, it has a quality, which could only exist between women. Between women just grown up. It's protective being by each other’s side. CLARISSA Safety in soft arms? MRS. DALLOWAY It springs from a sense of being in league together, a presentiment of something that binds us. CLARISSA And what of marriage? MRS. DALLOWAY We spoke of marriage as a catastrophe. CLARISSA So now you don't love Richard? MRS. DALLOWAY I do. Of course I do! CLARISSA But it's Sally you return to. MRS. DALLOWAY There was a time when I reminisced about Richard. I knew I was going to marry him when he first introduced himself. He kissed my hand and said, my name is Richard Dalloway, it's a pleasure to make your acquaintance. CLARISSA And that was the moment I died. MRS. DALLOWAY You didn't die CLARISSA - perhaps I was buried? Suffocated? Drowned to unconsciousness? MRS. DALLOWAY No. It was simply a moment of rebirth.

Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Intermission.

ACT II. Scene 1. (It's early afternoon in Westminster. The hustle and bustle of the morning has waned. The pigeons softly coo while the human traffic wafts and trickles. The dining table is set for Lady Brutan's gathering.) (Septimus enters humming. He sings.) SEPTIMUS Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo (He weaves in and out of the stages. The past and present light up and dim with every few steps he takes.) Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo And sways and grates and moans in the summer breeze. Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo And slips and falls and cries in the summer breeze. Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo And we wonder why we pull our roots. And we wonder why we mourn our touch. (Big Ben chimes. Septimus sits near the park bench. He continues to hum. Peter enters. He plays with his knife.) PETER "Remember my party. Remember my party," she says, as a perfect hostess would say. "My dearest Peter, you look exactly the same!" I am the same. I ceased to age the moment you said SEPTIMUS Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER I will marry Daisy. We will find our love for each other and raise children, so they may carry forth and marry, love, and breed. And so on and so forth. SEPTIMUS Look in my eyes with thy sweet eyes intently. PETER I've seen the world while Clarissa… SEPTIMUS And we wonder why we pull our roots. SEPTIMUS While Clarissa throws her silly parties with an endless supply of uninteresting people. I can already hear the dullness in their laughs, "Crossley automobiles?" (laughs vainly). But of course, “the prime minister may be in attendance!” I refuse to leach onto these tiny triumphs to make my life more tolerable. SEPTIMUS And we wonder why we mourn our touch. PETER No, I won’t attend. She reeks of desperation during these things. Her hands cupped in front and that rehearsed smile, "How heavenly it is to see you again!" SEPTIMUS Ee um fah um so Foo swee too eem oo (Peter moves to Septimus.) PETER Excuse me. SEPTIMUS And sways and grates and moans in the summer breeze. PETER I'm sorry to interrupt, but... (Septimus gestures to wait.) SEPTIMUS And slips and falls and cries in the summer breeze. (Pause.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER What is that you’re singing? SEPTIMUS It’s an ancient love affair. PETER It's lovely. SEPTIMUS It's nonsense. (Beat.) I know you. PETER I don't believe so. SEPTIMUS There are some gaps, but... (Septimus stands and attempts to inspect Peter.) SEPTIMUS Your face is off. Your clothes tailored. Posture weak. Mannerisms are... PETER - Please stop SEPTIMUS - Upturned perhaps. (Smells.) No, you’re not him. He would never grow old and yet remain a boy PETER - Sir, please stand back SEPTIMUS But the smell…(deeply sniffs.) Evans. (Peter postures with his knife.) PETER Keep your distance! (Septimus stops. Laughs.) I will use this if I must! (Beat.) Why are you laughing? SEPTIMUS Your knife. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER What about it? SEPTIMUS It was purchased. Not earned. Put it down. (Septimus opens his hands.) I’m not a threat. (Septimus sits.) You're too old to have served. Where were you when the war begun? PETER I've been abroad, helping bring civilization to India. SEPTIMUS Then you have no clue how shattered the world has become. PETER I followed the war closely in the newspapers, as well as listened to every update that came over the airwaves. SEPTIMUS The civilian regales. PETER You were in it, then? SEPTIMUS I was. PETER May I ask you SEPTIMUS Only if you put the knife away. (Peter closes his knife. Place it in his pocket.) PETER Was it exciting? SEPTIMUS Oh yes, wonderfully exciting. Delightful. PETER Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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And you fired your rifle? (Septimus aims an imaginary rifle. Shoots). Did you kill the enemy? SEPTIMUS There were no enemies or heroes for that matter, only paths crisscrossing and overlapping. We were boys playing on a deadly playground and not a teacher in sight. PETER I can only imagine the fireworks. SEPTIMUS They filled the night sky to the horizon. PETER If I were young enough to be drafted I believe I would have made a grand officer. SEPTIMUS Evans was a grand officer. PETER This Evans is one of your old army chums? SEPTIMUS He was. But he became the fate of human nature. PETER I beg your pardon? SEPTIMUS He is where we all secretly want to be. PETER I’m afraid I don’t understand. SEPTIMUS Evans chose to buried alive in some place foreign. It’s what we all want, isn’t it? The choice? PETER Right. (Beat.) It was a pleasure. (Peter begins to leave.) SEPTIMUS Leave the knife. (Peter stops. Turns.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER (Pause.) Oh, that’s an army joke? (Smiles.) Have a good day. SEPTIMUS You amuse yourself with my tragedy. Leave the knife. PETER I may not have fought, but I made sacrifices all the same. (Beat.) London was forced into darkness during the air raids. It was pitch black every night. The only sounds I heard were whimpers and prayers SEPTIMUS It must have been frightening. PETER Terrifying. SEPTIMUS Leave the knife. PETER I won't. I can’t. (Beat.) You're a soldier, you lived through God only knows, and you have your stories, but I’m (Pause.) fixed in this one event that plays out over and over again. This knife allows me to pretend to be somewhere else. It’s my foreign place. Surely you understand? SEPTIMUS I know you never seen war because your eyes have color and your voice doesn't quiver. Your jaw doesn’t clench when you pause. You should be thankful. PETER I am thankful. And happy. So very happy. And yet I can't let go. SEPTIMUS You see this is one of my better hours. My nerves are...A conversation such as this would typically drain me of sanity. PETER The war ended seven years ago. Surely you get on about these things. SEPTIMUS Get on about these things? PETER You’re a soldier, stand up, dust off your trousers, and march forward. Never look back. Never mind the broken pieces. Sweep them up and toss them out the window. "You can never plan the future by the past." Edmund Burke. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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SEPTIMUS "What's past is prologue." William Shakespeare. PETER The self-educated sort. SEPTIMUS There was a time in my life when I read voraciously. PETER Why did you stop? SEPTIMUS I became a man. (Beat.) Do you still love this perfect hostess? Clarissa, is it? (Clarissa enters. She meanders and occasionally watches Peter and Septimus.) PETER You heard, did you? At this point, I have no feelings for her just questions. I’m going to be married to a beautiful young, young, woman. CLARISSA I did consider your proposal, Peter, after I gave you my answer. SEPTIMUS Do you still love her? CLARISSA Briefly, mind you, but that summer in Bourton...I was young and when Richard arrived, I couldn't... SEPTIMUS You should be with her before human nature has its way. Stumble once and human nature gets on you. PETER What does human nature have to do with any of this? SEPTIMUS It's our given attraction to fall. Yes, en masse we cry out for survival, but behind each of our doors is itch for resolution. PETER I’m afraid you’ve (Peter turns to Clarissa.) CLARISSA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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You thought you wanted to be with me, but I know you, Peter. Secretly you enjoy reaching for what you can never have. You take joy in misfortune. REZIA (O.S.) Septimus? SEPTIMUS My innocence approaches. REZIA (O.S.) Septimus, where are you? Septimus, please stop hiding.

SEPTIMUS (Singing.) Ee um fah um so Fo swee too eem oo. (Rezia enters.)

Septimus! Oh, thank God! (Rezia embraces Septimus. She then hits his chest.) I woke and you were gone! You left me! I can't be alone, Septimus! SEPTIMUS I'm with you now. (Peter pulls out a shilling.) PETER Please take this. REZIA We're not beggars. PETER This is not pity. It's for his words and song. REZIA If someone should see? SEPTIMUS And if some one should see, what matter they? (Rezia takes the coin. Rezia and Septimus exit.)

Act II. Scene 2. (Living Room Scrim lights up: Bourton.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER I have to confess. CLARISSA You're speaking to me now? I presumed our conversations were long buried. PETER You were the first to wear the cold shoulder, Clarissa. You shunned me - I'm only a victim of response. CLARISSA I didn't intend to ostracize you, Peter. I needed time and you kept pushing for answers. PETER Whether the intention was there are not, the affect was felt. CLARISSA Do you wish me to apologize? PETER I wish you to say 'yes,' or at the very least, ‘I’m considering it.’ CLARISSA My answer is the same. PETER You love me? CLARISSA Yes. PETER But you won't marry me? CLARISSA Love and marriage are two separate things. (Peter stands. Clears his throat. He plays with his knife.) PETER I've been following you on your walks into town. CLARISSA You've been stalking me? PETER No, not stalkin - that sounds sinister. Trailing you, perhaps, but lovingly so. You hadn't noticed? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA Of course not. What sane person leaves the house knowing they're being followed? PETER I saw watched you (Pause.) and I saw you, Clarissa. I saw you as Clarissa Hart. CLARISSA Peter, what does that even... PETER I saw you….I know who you are – truly. (Pause.) You fall apart when you walk alone, did you know that? You crumble, deteriorate when you think no one is watching. You shed Clarissa, after Clarissa, until you're this beautiful bare stem. And you look happy. Relieved to be unnoticed. (Clarissa tries to leave. Peter stops her.) I watched you stand in front Hatchard's bookshop. You starred at your reflection for what felt like hours. People poured into my line of vision, but my eyes held onto you. I never let you drown. But as my gaze struggled to keep you in sight - you closed your eyes. You stepped back into the crowd and then gave a tiniest of smile as the passers-by washed over your body. It was that moment I thought, “that is my Clarissa. There she is. She wants the to be lost in a sea of people.” CLARISSA Let go of my arm PETER After you walked away. I stood in front of Hatchard's CLARISSA I wish to leave – PETER I had hoped your reflection may still be there, but there was only CLARISSA Peter, this is not a game – PETER An open book CLARISSA Let go of me – PETER It was Shakespeare – Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA I'll cry out – I will scream! PETER Do you remember what it said? (Shakes Clarissa.) It had a brown jacket. It was torn weathered. Do you remember? CLARISSA No. PETER Do you remember, Clarissa? (Clarissa screams. Peter lets go of her arm.) What did it say? CLARISSA "Fear no more the heat o’ the sun" PETER "Fear no more the heat o' the sun / Nor the furious winter's rages." Fear no more, says the heart in the body; fear no more. (Pause.) If you wish, I will forget about the proposal. I will forget I saw you. On my word, will never play out again. (Peter exits. Clarissa sits on the ground, cries. She picks up a flower and pulls off the petals one at a time. Living Room scrim fades: Westminster.) Act II. Scene 3. (Richard knocks on the front door. He knocks again.) RICHARD Lady Brutan? LADY BRUTAN (O.S.) Is that the pleasure to my eye, Mr. Dalloway? RICHARD It is Richard, yes. LADY BRUTAN (O.S.) You're early. RICHARD Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I apologize. LADY BRUTAN (O.S.) I easily forgive men of your charming repute. Please let yourself in. (Richard enters. He removes his coat. Wipes his forehead with a handkerchief.) Lunch will be served shortly. Make yourself at home, dear. (Richard meanders. Touching furniture. Smelling the flowers.) Delightfully warm today, isn't it? RICHARD Almost intolerable. LADY BRUTAN (O.S.) Almost, but not quite. Did I ever tell you of my safari in Northern Rhodesia? I baked for weeks, but it was much more of the sensual type. (Richard opens a music box. It plays Septimus' song.) CLARISSA You were so timid when we first met. You attempted to be composed amongst the guests but you looked limp...awkwardly meandering. LADY BRUTAN (O.S.) Richard? Northern Rhodesia? RICHARD Yes, I recall you mentioning it, but only in passing. (Clarissa stands and faces Richard.) CLARISSA I introduced you to everyone as Mr. Wickham. You politely smiled and gave a nod, until hours later my mistake built up and you burst out with, "My name is Dalloway!" I was mortified while Sally roared with laughter. From then on she referred to you as 'my name is Dalloway.' (Lady Brutan grandly enters. Richard closes the music box and kisses Lady Brutan's hand.) LADY BRUTAN I was at the edge of the empire being led by a young tracker, a Mr. Chuma. He had gorgeous back muscles - glistened in the sun and perched like an antelope. And his smile, if only you can imagine (deeply inhales, exhales.) Earl gray tea or perhaps a cocktail? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 7


RICHARD Earl gray, please. CLARISSA We discussed literature over dinner. You said no decent man ought to read Shakespeare’s sonnets because it was like listening at keyholes. I thought you were a romantic then - a very reserved romantic...simple...but a romantic nonetheless. LADY BRUTAN I was there for the lions’ season. You see lions can smell a woman from miles away - regardless of the specie. And they have a particularly keen nose for great breeding. (Beat.) One cube or two? RICHARD One, please, thank you. CLARISSA You were different from Peter. You were more proportioned. LADY BRUTAN Mr. Chuma, of course, warned me of possible encounters and sure enough three days in, there ws a pride in full form. It was a feline orgy. The roars could heard from miles away. (Fans herself). There I was, a loving widow, alone in the African bush with only Mr. Chuma for company. Let me tell you, Mr. Dalloway, that was an intolerable heat. RICHARD As always, Lady Brutan, your stories are wildly entertaining. CLARISSA But then we married and over the years we... (Dr. Bradshaw knocks on the front door.) LADY BRUTON You may enter! DR. BRADSHAW Good afternoon, Lady Bruton. (Dr. Bradshaw kisses Lady Brutan's hand.) LADY BRUTAN Good afternoon, Sir William Bradshaw. (Dr. Bradshaw greets Richard.) DR. BRADSHAW Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Richard, how goes the country? RICHARD Slow, but prosperous. How go the patients, Dr. Bradshaw? DR. BRADSHAW Gradual, but always improved. LADY BRUTAN Gentlemen, please sit. Dr. Bradshaw, may I offer you tea or an afternoon cocktail? DR. BRADSHAW I'm here for two reasons: one to gaze at the mature beauty before me, and two, to enjoy one of your famous cobblers. LADY BRUTAN You are a man of proportion. (Lady Brutan mixes Dr. Bradshaw a drink. She pours herself a hefty glass of scotch.) RICHARD I can't get over how magnificent the portrait of the general is. I could write a novel of your family history. LADY BRUTAN It can wait, it can wait, my history although rich is also boxed up at Aldmixton. My past will not be leaving me anytime soon. DR. BRADSHAW Nonetheless, the world deserves to know the name of Brutan for centuries to come. LADY BRUTAN (To Dr. Bradshaw.) He has the appearance to entice my gaze and the words to make my knees crumble. If I were in my prime, Mr. Dalloway, if I were in my prime. (Fans herself.) We should cheers to convincing an old woman she's still in full bloom. (They give cheers. Sip. Lady Brutan gulps.) So, quickly, please let's get the tediousness out of the way. (Beat.) How are the wives? DR. BRADSHAW Making astounding progress. Just yesterday she played the piano for seven straight hours. LADY BRUTAN And Clarissa? RICHARD Clarissa is Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA Pulled. Stripped. Resigned. RICHARD - Grappling with another one of her parties. I trust you both received invitations? LADY BRUTAN I'm sure the help put it around here somewhere. CLARISSA Why do you choose to not see me as I am? DR. BRADSHAW Yes, Mrs. Bradshaw immediately wrote a reply using her newly mastered skill of calligraphy. CLARISSA You choose not to hear me as I am. (Lady Brutan claps her hands. Clarissa picks up the music box and stands inches away from Richard. Richard is lost in thought.) LADY BRUTAN Wonderful, we may now move on to a more robust conversation. Gentlemen I invited you here for a purpose. I intend to write a letter to the Times and I require your assistance with the proper diction. DR. BRADSHAW What is the letter concerning? (Voices become softer.) LADY BRUTAN Emigration. I feel we should take the young people from respectable families and place them in Canada with a fair prospect. They’re young, their roots are malleable, and England needs to expand. DR. BRADSHAW Is emigration the answer? LADY BRUTAN Is there another suggestion? (Voices become softer.) DR. BRADSHAW It's all about the proportion of the young mind. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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LADY BRUTAN No, no, we ship them off and let them fend. It will develop independence, concentration, backbone. (Voices become softer.) DR. BRADSHAW Sending off an entire generation will not make England prosper. LADY BRUTAN This generation is already lost to emotion and lust. They need maturity and maturity comes with work ethic. Throw them out into the world. They’ll learn to survive. (Clarissa opens the music box. Septimus' song plays. Dr. Bradshaw and Lady Brutan are silent. Still.) CLARISSA What did you think of me when we first met? RICHARD I thought you were handsome. Fetching. We felt appropriate together. CLARISSA Did you feel passion? RICHARD In so many words. CLARISSA Was there touch? RICHARD Always. Some. In the beginning, but such as marriages go, there's a level of solace that sets in. And these things tend to dim. (Mrs. Dalloway enters. She begins to clear the table and make final preparations. Richard watches her.) MRS. DALLOWAY Lucy, I require your assistance to push the chairs against the walls. RICHARD But, I remember when we kissed. It was my first, in fact. I was so terrified I would make a mess of it. But you said Peter was your first and CLARISSA Was there love? Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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RICHARD Yes, of course, there was love. Always! CLARISSA Some. In the beginning, but such as marriages go? I learned to love you as I love shelter in a storm. After so many years I simply assembled your little gestures - a kiss on the cheek, a tiny compliment, you brushing up against me in bed...I saved these gestures in hope that one day I wake up see them blossom into my you as a young romantic again. I hoped to hear you say ‘I love you.’ RICHARD Love can be said in so many words. 'Thank you' for one. 'My dearest' in another. CLARISSA Richard, do you love me? RICHARD I do. CLARISSA May I hear you say it? (To Mrs. Dalloway.) RICHARD Clarissa, I do still so very much… LADY BRUTAN (Snaps.) Richard? Richard?!? (Clarissa slams the music box close.) RICHARD Yes, Lady Brutan. LADY BRUTAN Did you hear that Mr. Peter Walsh returned to us? RICHARD I didn't. From India, is that right? DR. BRADSHAW I heard he was in trouble with some woman. Typical Peter. He falls madly in love and then manages to make a mess of all things. LADY BRUTAN Once again he has returned to our secure shores battered and unsuccessful. To help him is Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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impossible.

DR. BRADSHAW Prior to him running off to India, I offered advice, free of charge, but he told me he would have none of it. He said something about a scene in repeat or some nonsense. LADY BRUTAN If I recall, he had quite an infatuation for Clarissa? RICHARD It was a lifetime ago. CLARISSA And it’s meaningless now, because I chose you, Richard. LADY BRUTAN So you know the complete history of Peter and your wife? CLARISSA There was nothing to tell. RICHARD 'History' is bit overstating. It was a summer fling, no more. And it was prior to me even knowing my Clarissa. What does the past matter? (Beat.) I apologize Lady Brutan, but why are you so interested in my marriage? LADY BRUTAN A widow can hope can't she? DR. BRADSHAW Richard, are you feeling well? You appear feverish. RICHARD It's this heat. CLARISSA Never mind these people. LADY BRUTAN Perhaps some scotch would lift your spirits? CLARISSA I married you. RICHARD No, I'm terribly sorry, but I should be on my way. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA I love you, Richard. Please say it back. (Richard stands. Dr. Bradshaw assists.) RICHARD I have to leave. LADY BRUTAN But you just arrived. CLARISSA Richard DR. BRADSHAW Please stay, Richard. We're just getting started. RICHARD Something slipped my mind, I need to run an errand for Clarissa – CLARISSA -Please say itRICHARD for this evening, CLARISSA I love you RICHARD before this evening. I'm sorry. CLARISSA I love you. RICHARD I’m terribly sorry. (Richard kisses Lady Brutan's hand. Shakes hands with Dr. Bradshaw. Mrs. Dalloway finishes making all preparations for the party.) MRS. DALLOWAY Lucy, I could use your assistance with the finishing touches. LADY BRUTAN Have I told you of my adventures in Asia? With my dealings in the cobra pit? DR. BRADSHAW Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I'm afraid I haven't the pleasure. LADY BRUTAN Bring your drink. (Dr. Bradshaw and Lady Brutan exit.) Act II. Scene 4. REZIA Let's bring in some light. (The curtained stage opens. Septimus and Rezia sit in chairs. Rezia weaves a hat: ribbons, artificial flowers, and tassels are strewn about. Septimus mumbles.) Septimus? (Pause.) Septimus? SEPTIMUS I'm here. REZIA Could you hand me the blue ribbon? SEPTIMUS Who is the hat for? REZIA Mrs. Filmer's daughter was married. SEPTIMUS What is the name of Mrs. Filmer's daughter? (Rezia holds up the hat.) REZIA Mrs. Peters. She's an awful woman with a spiteful tongue, but Mrs. Filmer gave us grapes morning, so I want to pay her back. (Beat.) I'm worried this may be too small. SEPTIMUS Is that true? REZIA Is what true? SEPTIMUS Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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The grapes. REZIA Don't be silly Septimus, they're right there next to you. (Septimus reaches out and touches the grapes. He places one in his mouth. Savors it. Septimus speaks as he once did.) SEPTIMUS It's real. (Chuckles.) I can taste it. (Laughs.) There may not be a god, but there are grapes! (Septimus pulls up Rezia and dances.) REZIA You're frightening me, Septimus! (Septimus takes more grapes.) SEPTIMUS Have one! My tongue baths in the juice. Please eat it. How does it taste? REZIA Delicious. SEPTIMUS It is delicious. It is. Life is delicious! (Beat.) This hat...my lovely Rezia, this hat is far too small. An organ grinder’s monkey would wear this hat! (Rezia chuckles.) If you place it on Mrs. Peters she will appear as a pig at a fair. (Rezia laughs.) You say she has a spiteful tongue? REZIA Very cruel! SEPTIMUS As cruel as Helen’s betrayal? REZIA Crueler! SEPTIMUS Then we shall make her the most beautiful hat to balance her ghastly tongue. (Beat.) What have Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 8


you got in your work-box? REZIA Ribbons, beads, tassels SEPTIMUS Dump all of it out. We'll let chaos choose the design! (Rezia dumps her workbox.) There. Pink rose. (Rezia hands Septimus pink roses.) Yellow tassel. (Rezia hands Septimus yellow tassel.) White ribbon. (Rezia hands Septimus white ribbon.) SEPTIMUS That's it. Keep it just as it is! (Rezia places pins here and there.) Be careful. Adjust the rose to the left. Flip the tassel over. There. REZIA Bello. SEPTIMUS Will it hold? REZIA It will hold for the moment. SEPTIMUS Just look at it, Rezia. This may be our greatest triumph. REZIA You joke, Septimus. It's only a hat. SEPTIMUS No, we will have made the most repulsive woman, beautiful. (Peter enters carrying a letter. Septimus gasps.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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REZIA What is it? SEPTIMUS Nothing. REZIA I need to fetch my sewing kit. Don't touch it. The pins are barely holding. (Rezia exits. Peter reads from a letter. Clarissa follows as she writes.) PETER To have gotten this letter by seven...she must have sat down and written it directly after I left. (Scrim lights up; the past.) CLARISSA My dearest Peter Walsh, you are cordially invited SEPTIMUS - Evans (Septimus approaches Peter.) CLARISSA - to attend the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dalloway as we celebrate the month of June. (Peter holds the letter to the light.) PETER Are these teardrops? CLARISSA It was heavenly to see you this morning and your company tonight would bring great affection to an old friend. Yours very truly, Clarissa Dalloway. PETER I upset her. When I kissed her hand, cried in front of her, she saw, for a moment, (Pause.) regret...there was envy...how we would have changed the world had we been married. She saw it! SEPTIMUS I know you hear me, Evans. PETER I can see her quietly weeping as she mends her dress. The desperation, "Remember my party, Peter." She begs for the past...for me. (Beat.) Or this is a painful nudge. She’s gloating. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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CLARISSA My dearest Peter Walsh, you are cordially invited to attend the residence of Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD DALLOWAY as WE, husband and wife, celebrate the month of June... SEPTIMUS Why do you toy with me? PETER I hear her handsome voice SEPTIMUS I cared for youCLARISSA Poor Peter. Poor, poor, Peter Walsh. The charming young man turned failure. It seems there's always a misstep in front of him. (Beat.) Lucy, I intend on sending Peter a pity invitation, so I’ll require the tope writing paper, not the cotton. SEPTIMUS I was weak before the war and you took me in your arms and you protected me PETER Or perhaps...perhaps, this is CLARISSA - nothing more than an invitation to a dinner party. Nothing more, Peter. SEPTIMUS You knew who I was...what I was. PETER Before our summer in Bourton, in the city, we rode the omnibuses. It gave us an excuse to be alone together. We had a theory as all young people do. Heaps of silly theories. (Clarissa joins Peter. Lights change to the past.) CLARISSA Peter, I don't feel like I'm here, here, or here. I feel like I'm everywhere. PETER Clarissa you're falling apart - leaving fractions of yourself all over London. CLARISSA This isn’t in jest. SEPTIMUS You saw through my shyness. CLARISSA Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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When I meet someone, anyone, I pull off a piece of myself and give it to that person for them to carry off. The more people I meet, even strangers, the more I can feel myself being pulled apart. I can feel the strain. SEPTIMUS I gave you all I had and I thought we were‌I thought we had‌but then you turned to me and kissed my forehead. The enemy was there and you knew, you knew, but you dropped your gun and walked away from me, to them, with arms opens. You left me behind, broken. CLARISSA We give ourselves away with each encounter. SEPTIMUS I have so little left. CLARISSA Only the unseen parts remain.

SEPTIMUS Only the unseen parts remain. (Peter kisses Clarissa for the first time. He places his hand on Septimus' head. Big Ben chimes. Scrim lights down; Present. Peter and Clarissa exit. Rezia storms in through the curtains. There's pounding on the door.)

Act II. Scene 5. REZIA You cannot come in! DR. BRADSHAW Mrs. Warren Smith, open this door at once! REZIA My husband is better! He's cured! DR. BRADSHAW He is a sick man, Mrs. Smith! REZIA You cannot have him! DR. BRADSHAW There's no choice in the matter! (Rezia curls up on the ground and leans against the door. She quietly cries. Dr. Bradshaw pounds away. Mrs. Dalloway enters. Mrs. Dalloway hums Septimus' song.) Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche 8


MRS. DALLWAY Coming! (Opens the front door.) Richard? RICHARD I left my keys and...well...I thought I would...I needed to bring you these. (Richard pulls out a bouquet from his back.) They're roses. Red and white. I remember they're your favorite? MRS. DALLOWAY They're lovely! (Richard enters.) RICHARD I have something to tell you. I apologize, it's been far too long since I last‌ (Richard takes Mrs. Dalloway's hand.) MRS. DALLOWAY Don't be sorry, darling. RICHARD Clarissa I... (Pounding on the door.) MRS. DALLOWAY Just a moment, darling. We can't have the guests waiting at the front door. RICHARD Yes, of course. (Mrs. Dalloway opens the door. Dr. Bradshaw enters.) MRS. DALLOWAY Sir William Bradshaw! DR. BRADSHAW Good evening, Mrs. Dalloway. Richard. RICHARD Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Dr. Bradshaw. MRS. DALLOWAY No Mrs. Bradshaw? DR. BRADSHAW I'm afraid she came down with an illness in the last hour. MRS. DALLOWAY You look quite pale yourself. Is everything all right? Richard, could you fetch the doctor some tea? DR. BRADSHAW Water, please. I require water. MRS. DALLOWAY Sit down. What happened? DR. BRADSHAW (Gulps the water.) Earlier there was a minor mishap with one my patients. It was nothing, but I need a...just a moment please... (Richard pulls Mrs. Dalloway away.) RICHARD Yes, of course. (Beat.) Clarissa, please I must say this. (Pounding on the door.) MRS. DALLOWAY I’m sorry, I am the hostess. RICHARD Clarissa, please! MRS. DALLOWAY Surely it can wait? (Pounding on the door.) RICHARD But it can’t. (Mrs. Dalloway opens the door. Peter enters.) MRS. DALLOWAY Peter! How heavenly you were able to make it! Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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PETER Good evening, Mrs. Dalloway. Richard, how are you? RICHARD Peter, it's good to see you. I trust you had safe travels? PETER I’m alive and for not that’s enough. SALLY (O.S.) Mrs. Clarissa Dalloway, protector of the tulip! CLARISSA It can't be. MRS. DALLOWAY Sally Seton? (Sally enters, pregnant, luxuriously dressed. Clarissa rushes in.) SALLY Seton? I haven't been called that in years. It's Mrs. Brown now, Love. CLARISSA - Yes you married. It slipped my mind MRS. DALLOWAY And you're carrying. SALLY Don't fret...it's nothing. This is actually number five. Most likely another boy. (Beat.) Peter! (Sally hugs Peter.) PETER I heard you were tamed - Married, children, Manchester is it? SALLY Yes, my husband owns several cotton mills there. (Beat.) ‘My name is Richard Dalloway.’ (Sally and Richard hug.) MRS. DALLOWAY This is angelic...it is delicious you've come. You look CLARISSA - rich, happy, chained, blindly content. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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MRS. DALLOWAY Fulfilled. SALLY I was in the city and when I heard Clarissa was having a party, I felt I couldn't NOT come...must see her again. (Beat.) And who is this? MRS. DALLOWAY Sir William Bradshaw. (Dr. Bradshaw stands and kisses Sally's hands.) DR. BRADSHAW How do you do? SALLY A pleasure. (Beat.) I mean this in all good kindness...you don't look well, Sir Bradshaw. DR. BRADSHAW Yes, I fear I may be coming down with something. Please excuse me. (All guests mingle at the party. Dr. Bradshaw slips into the past. Rezia jumps on Dr. Bradshaw. He pushes her off and approaches Septimus.) REZIA Septimus, he's coming! (Septimus begins to climb Big Ben.) DR. BRADSHAW You're making a fool of yourself, Septimus! Come off the roof! SEPTIMUS This is all that remains! SALLY Peter, tell me about Burma! PETER It's exhaustingly humid! Compared to the Indians the people are a loincloth away from utter savagery.

SEPTIMUS Ee um fah um so. Foo swee too eem oo. (Dr. Bradshaw tries to climb after Septimus. Septimus continues to hum the song.)

SALLY

DR. BRADSHAW Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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I imagine their humanity, if they have any, is cruel and disassociated.

You're a sick man, Septimus. I can help you heal. But you must come down! PETER

Plainly so. (Richard pulls Mrs. Dalloway away from the group.) MRS. DALLOWAY Richard, the guests. RICHARD I‌ MRS. DALLOWAY Yes? (All face Richard and Mrs. Dalloway in silence. Richard takes Mrs. Dalloway's hand.) I am happy. And this is happiness. This is happiness, Clarissa. MRS. DALLOWAY I feel the same, Richard. This is happiness. (Beat.) I should attend to the guests. (Richard, hesitates, kisses Mrs. Dalloway on the cheek.) RICHARD Off you go then. (Pounding on the door. Mrs. Dalloway greets the guests as they arrive. They are shadows. Richard silently mingles.) MRS. DALLOWAY Mrs. Walker, how heavenly it is to see you...Mr. and Mrs. Philips, a pleasure...please help yourself...The Whitbreds, it's been ages... MRS. DALLOWAY Lady Clarke you're a hyacinth is disguise! Mrs. Parkinson! You look splendid! Lady Lovejoy. Miss Alice. Heavenly.

CLARISSA I don't feel like I'm here, here, or here. I feel like I'm everywhere. Pulled apart piece by piece by piece by piece...

SEPTIMUS Human Nature, you wish to steal what remains of me? Then I'll give it to you! Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Septimus jumps. Rezia screams.) DR. BRADSHAW Coward! (Dr. Bradshaw returns to the present, He gulps glass after glass of water. Dinner music and light conversation slowly fade in. Septimus' song. A siren in the distance. The shadows mingle.) SALLY And the Burmese, have they given in yet to civilization? (Peter shakes his head.) PETER Do you hear that? SALLY The ambulance? PETER There is no such sound in all of Asia. That sound is the greatest triumph of our civilization. SALLY Speaking of triumph, Clarissa appears to be in her element. PETER She was destined to be the perfect hostess. SALLY She's more than that, Peter. (Clarissa is falling apart.) MRS. DALLOWAY Mrs. Barnet you're going to have to tell me where you purchased your dress...Miss Alice I was terrified the invitation was lost... Sir John and Lady Needham...Miss Weld Lord Laxham...Prime Minister, it is an honor!

CLARISSA Piece by piece by piece by piece piece by piece by piece by piece piece by piece by piece by piece piece by piece by piece by piece piece by piece by piece by piece. (Clarissa crumbles completely. All sounds fade.) PETER

It is Clarissa. For there she is. Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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(Big Ben chimes.) Lights out. End of play.

Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway by Daniel Roche

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Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (Stage play)  

An entire lifetime in a single day adapted to the stage.

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