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DANIEL RAZNICK ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN CONTACT: 400 Groveland Ave #1110 Minneapolis, MN 55403 e: daniel@danielraznick.com m: 402.980.1514


HYBRID DRAWING HYBRID DRAWINGS

R AAPPSSOONNHHAAL LL L- 2- 020090 9


CONTENTS 4.

CENTENNIAL CHROMAGRAPH

12.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTER

22.

RIVERSIDE LEARNING RESTAURANT

24.

CRADLE TO CRADLE PAVILION

28.

ZERO ENERGY LAB

32.

NESTED SCALES

36.

RIPARIAN WETLAND CENTER

44.

RESUME

Please find an online version at: http://issuu.com/danielraznick/docs/daniel_raznick_full_portfolio For more images, projects, and info visit: http://www.danielraznick.com/


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CENTENNIAL CHROMAGRAPH RAPSON HALL INSTALLATION - 2013 with: VARIABLE PROJECTS AIA Minnesota Honor Award Winner, 2013 7.

INFORMATION SPATIALIZATION 6.

Centennial Chromagraph is a life-size representation of the history of the University of Minnesota School of Architecture. The project is an exercise in data spatialization: using computational design tools to generate formal and spatial constructions with large quantities of data—in this case, information sampled from the School’s 100-year history. The project is both a sculptural installation, constructed within the central courtyard of Ralph Rapson Hall as a centerpiece for this year’s Centennial celebrations, and an applied research project exploring the possibilities of data-driven design. It embraces an aesthetic tension between didactic representation and atmospheric experience, both conveying information and producing abstract effects of light and color. In this regard, Centennial Chromagraph resists either quantitative or qualitative readings, instead oscillating 1. RIB PART 1 between the two. 2. RIB PART 2 3. LAP JOINT

1. RIB PART 1 4. CROSS RIB INTERSECTION HOLES 2. RIB PART 2 5. PENCIL REMOVED AT COLLISION LOCATION 3. LAP JOINT 6. ASSEMBLED 4. CROSS RIB INTERSECTION HOLES RIB 5. PENCIL REMOVED7. ATPENCILS COLLISION LOCATION 6. ASSEMBLED RIB 8. COMPLETED ASSEMBLY 7. PENCILS 8. COMPLETED ASSEMBLY

Elevation

1.

3. 8.

2.

4. 5.


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FABRICATION AND COLOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE

The installation consists of 100 robotically-routed plywood ribs, joined together with 8,080 colorful #2 pencils. The curvature of the ribs expresses major historical eras and periods of the School, while the color of the pencils reflects the changing composition of the School’s degree programs over its first century.s of school leadership, the buildings the program has occupied, and the colleges architecture has belonged to—while the color of the pencils reflects the changing composition of the school’s degree programs over its first century.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE AND DECORATION

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

BACHELOR OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

MASTER OF SCIENCE

BACHELOR OF DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE

1 20 200 13 3 19 198 93 197 3 3 19 195 63 3 194 3 193 3 19 191 23 3

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2

3

4

1A PARENT COLLEGE

5 7 1B

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

1C BUILDING

1

HISTORICAL RANGES

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SECTIONAL RIBS

2

TRANSFORMATION TO SPLINES

6

ENGRAVINGS: HEADS OF SCHOOL

3

CONSTRUCTION CURVES

7

4

SURFACE GENERATION

PENCILS COLORED BY DEGREE TYPE, PROPORTIONAL BY YEAR


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FORM AND DATA The design process began with a mapping analysis of the School’s alumni archives. Computational design software was employed to visualize this data, in relation to class sizes, degree types, and geographic locations of the School’s graduates through time. The data mapping yielded two primary design strategies: spatial and chromatic. First, the installation’s curved form is derived from broad ranges from the school’s history: the tenures of its leadership, the buildings it has occupied, and the colleges it has belonged to. This information, chronologically mapped and diagrammatically abstracted through superimposed curves, drives the installation’s overall form. Second, a more granular data set of degrees granted by the School drives the distribution of color throughout the installation. The chromatic logic allows one to read the evolution of the School’s degree programs through time.


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NESTED SHEETS FOR FABRICATION

ELEVATION

PLAN


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HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTER HURON BLVD SE

GRADUATE DESIGN III - 2012 GATEWAY EXPANSION

As the University of Minnesota expands into the residential districts of Stadium Village, the urban conditions, and use of space will undergo massive transformations. It is essential that these transformations be sustainable, and that they prioritize sustainable use. SE FULTON STREET

Currently at the intersection of Essex and Huron, the entry-way to campus seems to be disregarded. The bustle from I-94 permeates into the residential zone, and the place itself has little if any identifying features. By siting the Center for Healing and Wellness on this intersection, the newly developed gateway can promote green public space as well as reflect sustainable attitudes of the future for the university – to live simply, healthily, and sustainably.

N NORTHWEST WINDS RESPONDED TO WITH PARKING PLACEMENT AND VEGETATION AS WINDBREAKS IDEAL SITE PLACEMENT ON SOUTH EDGE TO PRESERVE SOLAR ACCESS

W

E

YEAR ROUND PLANTINGS CAN BLOCK PREVAILING WINDS PLACE TERRACES AND GREEN ROOFS TOWARD SOUTH

WINTER SUN TO BE MAXIMIZED WITH SOUTH GLAZING STRATEGY

S

PROVIDE OPERABLE WINDOWS FOR NATURAL VENTILATION


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1

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Operable pull down shade

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Single pane operable glazing

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Interior aluminum curtain wall frame

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8� treated glulam louvers

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Exterior aluminum curtain wall frame

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Cor-ten panel window box

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DAYLIGHT ANALYSIS

The daylight analysis reflect the intent of dynamic conditions between the three zones. However, it also indicates a finer grain of specificity in how orientation at a micro scale creates unique instances of more intense light around the periphery of the circulation and gathering zones. The envelope responds to this allowing higher levels of daylight in open public spaces, and reduces it in less public spaces like the pharmacy and the cafe prep room.

SUMMER AFTERNOON SUN

SUMMER NOON SUN

WINTER NOON SUN

WINTER AFTERNOON SUN


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CLIMATE BASED DAYLIGHT SIMULATIONS

Task spaces have ideal daylight

Potential for glare limited to gathering spaces

USEFUL DAYLIGHT ILLUMINANCE +200 FC 25%

50%

75%

DATLIGHT AUTONOMY +200 FC

100%

25%

50%

75%

DAYLIGHT AVAILABILITY +50 FC

100%

25%

50%

75%

100%

2

3

4

6

7

8

9

10

11'-1"

1'-6"

8'-8"

10'-1"

2'-1"

2'-10"

6'-0"

7'-4"

3'-6"

4'-1"

3'-9"

2'-9"

5

4'-10"

4'-8"

5'-1"

5'-7" 1'-11"

5'-11" 1'-2"

6'-2" 8"

13'-0"

1

9"

PANEL OPTIONS

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DAYLIGHT RESULTS

SUMMER NOON SUN SUMMER MORNING SUN

WINTER NOON SUN


1650000 1620000 1590000 1560000 1530000 1500000 1470000

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15

20

25

30

35

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50 0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

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Energy Use

2,267,133 kBTU 84

Energy Use

kBTU/ft2

678,396

kBTU

163,926

lbsCO 2

CO 2 Use

1

CO 2 Use

503,146 lbsCO2 709lbsCO 2/person Energy Footprint (kBTU)

2

350000 Heating Equipment Hot Water Cooling Lighting

kBTU

200000 150000

Heating Equipment Hot Water Cooling Lighting

250000 200000 150000 100000

50000

50000

0

0 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Month

Month

Uses of Energy (kBTU)

Uses of Energy (kBTU)

Appliances

234608

Appliances

234608

Cooling

321547

Cooling

415073

Lighting

291444

Lighting

291444

Space Heating

1212754

Space Heating

246528

89159

Hot Water

89159

Grid Electricity

965220

Grid Electricity

342709

Grid Natural Gas

1301913

Grid Natural Gas

335688

Hot Water Sources of Energy (kBTU)

5

300000

kBTU

300000

100000

4

231 lbsCO 2/person

Energy Footprint (kBTU)

350000

250000

3

25 kBTU/ft2

Sources of Energy (kBTU)

Grid Renewable

0

Grid Renewable

0

Onsite Photvoltaic

0

Onsite Photvoltaic

716038

Onsite Wind

0

Onsite Wind

0

ROOM STUDY OPTIMIZATION 6

The meditation room allows for ideal solar and thermal conditions to aid in the harsh seasonal climate. In the summer, the louvers block most of the sun, the shades diffuse any light, and the air is cooled from above. In the winter the direct sun is welcome, warming the thermal mass floor aided by radiant tubes. The graph represents the moments throughout the year where glare would be experienced as in the perspective. When occupants can connect with nature and the sun in a calm, focused state of meditation.outdoor program placement, which gives a strong sense of orientation for the occupants.


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17 3 1

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6 4

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C 4

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1st FLOOR PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0”

7 8 9 10

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2

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4

5

6 11

A

12 6 7 8

B

9 10

C

13 11

D 12

2nd FLOOR PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0”

1

2

3

14

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5

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15 13

A

14

B

C

15

D

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3rd FLOOR PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0”

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6 16 17

A

B

C

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4th FLOOR PLAN 1/32” = 1’ - 0”


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RIVERSIDE LEARNING RESTAURANT GRADUATE DESIGN I - 2011 GATEWAY EXPANSION

An iterative conceptual modelling process was employed to investigate how architecture can respond to existing site conditions. The glazed wall is canted to face the river, and the dining room reaches toward the trees. The program include studio gardens and kitchens for the leaning center, a dining room (80 seats), and a staff kitchen. The experience of the restaurant connects people to the land that produces their food, and to the river as the building seemingly dissolves into the site.


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SITE PLAN


! *"#$ %&' /-$'%'&' +.$+, ,$($) ()

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ESTCODE

PLAN


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CRADLE TO CRADLE PAVILION C O PE N HA G E N , D E NM A RK - 2 0 10

PAVILION LIFE + AFTERLIFE By using William McDonough’s concepts in Cradle to Cradle on a seasonal pavilion, the first task was to ask: what is the pavilion’s afterlife?

section

Copenhagen has a rich culture of using public squares year-round. We began designing the summer pavilion with the intent that we could leave a permanent impression on multiple public spaces throughout Copenhagen after the summer pavilion’s life. The idea to deconstruct the pavilion into urban benches was made possible by the modular nature of the design. The dimension were based on human proportions for sitting, leaning, and viewing exhibits. Therefore, the transformation retained the usability and created a dialogue between the two forms

section

plan


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ART + MEMORY The pavilion serves as a gallery of local art exhibits. The light boxes display the art and act as a beacon to attract visitors to Højbro Plads. The Cradle to Cradle Pavilion aims to revitalize the public space with life and energy both day and night. The pavilion’s lifespan is short but it’s reborn form of urban benches would leave a permanent impression and reminder of the importance of public urban space in Copenhagen. What was once a temporal experience in now embedded in memory and ignited by the experience of the bench.


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ZERO ENERGY LAB TECH II STUDIO - 2012

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WITH VANESSA ABIN FUENTES AND PATRICK TRIGGS

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4 10

SUSTAINABLE ADDITION The Zero Energy Lab is the new home for the Center for Sustainable Building Research. The third floor of Rapson becomes an expression of thermal and luminous design. Optimization and passive strategies inform the design -creating spaces that are functional, enjoyable, and efficient. Form and circulation relates to the rigid symmetry of the original building, but responds to the asymmetrical Steven Holl addition with outdoor program placement, which gives a strong sense of orientation for the occupants. The program includes labs, offices, studio classrooms, and outdoor courtyards. The outdoor courtyards provide views and make each corridor in a symmetrical building unique.

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6 9

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Third Floor Plan

1

Lobby 871 sq.ft.

2

Classrooms 1981 sq.ft.

8

Site & water lab. 1019 sq.ft.

9

Daylight lab. 926 sq.ft.

South Elevation

West Elevation

3

10

Research 1930 sq.ft.

4

Director office 164 sq.ft.

Energy/Indoor lab. 990 sq.ft.

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Demonstration 1552 sq.ft.

5

12

Asst. Director 135 sq.ft. Bathrooms 1552 sq.ft.

6

Conference rm. 419 sq.ft.

13

Outdoor space 1552 sq.ft.

7

Materials lab. 970 sq.ft.


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north facing skylights allow for south facing pv

lab space is lit naturally and with localized task lighting

the trombe wall has a screen and overhang to shade during summer, and openings for ventilation

high transmissivity glazing

seasonal trombe wall shade

10� thermal mass


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DAYLIGHTING LEVELS IN FOOT CANDLES

Noon: March 21st

NORTH SECTION

Noon: June 21st

Noon: December 21st


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500 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

COMPARATIVEENERGY ENERGY USE INDEX COMPARATIVE BALANCE

MBTUs

MBTUs

MONTHLY HEATING AND COOLING MONTHLY HEATING AND COOLINGLOADS LOADS

heating peak day: Jan 6: 599 kBtu/h

J

F

M

cooling peak day: Aug 27: 170 kBtu/h

A

M

J

J

Month

WEST SECTION

A

S

O

N

D

3000 2500 2000 1500 100 500 0 -500 -1000

Baseline Heating Load Cooling Load PV Production

Improved

Final

HVAC Fans and Pumps DHW/Aux Load

Lighting Load Equipment Load


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NESTED SCALES CATALYST - 2012 WITH BEN NEWBY, MIKE STEPHENS AND HEATHER BRIERLEY

DIGITAL PROVOCATIONS In a week long intensive studio, Architecture as Catalyst, we investigated biological geometries derived from porous plants and digitally developed them to create the form of a screen wall installation. The design is informed by expressing the tooling of the cnc. The wall represents a pattern manifested at three scales: the surface, the module, and the system. A single hexagonal module, when tesselated, creates a seemingly random pattern. The hexagonal shape can be linked in any combination. The cnc router allowed for an opportunity to experiment with surface patterns generated by parametric tool paths.


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CNC EXPRESSIONS Computational design is explored through patterns of machining. Unforeseen results are discovered through experimentations of linking parametric patterns to CNC toolpathing. The nested scales result from the articulation of these effects on the pattern of the module and the pattern of the surface.


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RIPARIAN WETLAND COMMUNITY CENTER GD II STUDIO - 2012 Design Democracy Award, 2013 INDUSTRIAL TRANSFORMATIONS The Riparian Wetland Center embodies the transformation of the Mississippi River Bank from an industrial brownfield into a reclaimed natural system. As the Mississippi River Wetlands are reclaimed, the Riparian Wetland Center emerges as the remaining industrial ruin –a utilitarian box –discovered beyond the threshold of city and nature. The box is lifted off the newly created wetland inlet. Water flows around and underneath the building, and the site is connected to the building through the bridges that extend beyond the enclosure and transform into walkways leading to the wetlands. Once the site is transformed into a natural ecology, the intervention of the building expresses how industrial architecture can be transformed to suit the needs of people to experience wetlands, and how the building can coexist with nature and the river.


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1st FLOOR PLAN

2nd FLOOR PLAN Site Plan

STRUCTURE AND PROGRAM The box evolves with patterns of use on two realms: the utilitarian spaces house the ‘fixed’ program. Where use is maintained over time and flexibility is provided to respond to long term evolution. The box’s program is organized around a central atrium. It becomes the funnel for people from city to river. It is shaped by specific structure – providing for rapidly changing patterns of use to transform its space. The atrium is the building’s river, with tributaries to bring people from interior program to the site.

3rd FLOOR PLAN


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PARTI AND PROGRAM The connection between city and river is realized through the atrium. Its centrality and openness invites flexible public program. The utilitarian spaces are organized around it. They are not organized based on public and private use, but rather by their desire to be connected to specific areas of the site and adjacent spaces. The system of bridges and walkways in turn simultaneously support the circulation and the separation between public and private.

EAST/WEST SECTION


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Pinned Purlin Connection

Atrium roof members change between tube steel and doubled w-shapes if they are hanging stairs or bridges

Lateral Bracing Pinned Joist Connection

CMU Shear Wall Core

Site Cast Foundation Moment Connections at Column and Beam Cable Connection to support walkway and lateral bracing.

GENERIC + SPECIFIC The architectural systems are integrated, creating conditions between static and dynamic use, where the structural systems and the envelope fuse together. The articulation of structural forms generates a new perception of industry and river. Here, the tectonic imprint of man is fused together with nature in the same ways it fuses the program together.

NORTH/SOUTH SECTION


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GENERIC + SPECIFIC Some nights, the specific spaces evolve to allow for social public gatherings. The building’s skin is expressed both on the interior and exterior. Comprised of a variable aluminum panel system, the skin is envisioned as a wrapper. The perforations glow as a beacon from the exterior and activate the utilitarian spaces. Materials and forms of industries of the past are harmonized and reintroduced to each other in the skin as it becomes the activating feature of the building.

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ENVELOPE SECTION

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Insulated Glass Curtainwall Units Curtainwall angle with spray-in insulation Mechanically Operable Curtainwall Unit 30 mil Roofing Membrane 6” XPS Rigid Insulation Weather Resistive Barrier Concrete Composite Decking Parapet Flashing Cap 4” Precast Panel Shop Welded Aluminum Plate Connection Custom Cast Steel Stand-off System LED Lighting Component Envelope Bracing Clip - Welded to Beam @ 4’ o.c Wide Flange Beam 4 Gauge Steel C-Shape Structural Units 1/4” Aluminum Panel - Laser Cut Pattern Uni-Strut Connection System

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

4” Rigid XPS Insulation Weather Resistive Barrier Gypboard Interior Panel Mounted to Z-Furring Insulated Glazing Unit Aluminum Window Frame Aluminum Coping Finished Wood Floor Composite Decking 3” Reveal Cap on Interior Finish Track Lighting Mounted to Beam HVAC Mechanical Return Vent Above Drop Ceil Interior Partition Clad With Acoustic Wood Veneer Interior Glazing - Atrium Separation Atrium Glazing Deluge System Structural Rod Opaque Insulated Panel Mounted as Curtainwall


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3 2 4 6

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3 2

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5

EXPLODED ASSEMBLY 1 Z Clip supports insulation and finishTek-SVcrew 2 Custom cast stand-off support with LED attachment 3 Low gauge C-channel support system 4 Precast concrete panel 5 4’ x 8’ Variable Laser Cut Aluminum Screen Panel

FACADE DETAIL 1 1/4” (3 ga) Aluminum Panel with Laser Cut Pattern 2 Shop Weld 3 Aluminum Connection Plate 4 Zinc Coated Fastener 5 Tek-SVcrew 6 LED Lighting Element 7 Uni-Strut System 8 4 Gauge Steel C-Shape Structural Units 9 Z-Furring Connects Interior Finish to C-Shapes 10 Steel C-Shape for Cladding Mounting 11 Precast Panel Connection Clip


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DANIEL RAZNICK

400 Groveland Avenue #1110 Minneapolis, MN 55403

402.980.1514 daniel@danielraznick.com EDUCATION

Master of Architecture, Currently Enrolled, 2014 exp. University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, College of Design

Bachelor of Design in Architecture, 2011 University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, College of Design

Danish Institute of Study Abroad, 2010 Copenhagen, Denmark, January 2010 – May 2010

EXPERIENCE

Design Research Intern, Perkins+Will January 2014 – May 2014, Minneapolis, MN • Research in digital workflows to integrate environmental simulation and evidence-based design

Project Designer, Variable Projects March 2013 – August 2013, Minneapolis, MN • Design, fabrication, and assembly for the School of Architecture Centennial Chromagraph installation

Research Assistant, University of Minnesota School of Architecture January 2013 – November 2013, Minneapolis, MN • Planning, preparation, and presentations for Architecture as Catalyst 2013 and the Centennial Celebration

Architectural Intern, Meyer, Scherer and Rockcastle July 2012 – October 2012, Minneapolis, MN • Conceptual and schematic design for the Southwest Regional Library in Louisville, KY

SKILLS

Software Revit, Rhino, Grasshopper, DIVA, RhinoCAM, VRay, AutoCAD, Adobe Creative Suite, SketchUp, Sefaira, IES <VE>, Microsoft Office

Other Skills CNC Milling, Laser Cutting, 3D Printing, Model Building, Drafting, Sketching, Woodworking.

AWARDS

AIA Minnesota Honor Award Centennial Chromagraph, Variable Projects, University of Minnesota School of Architecture, 2013

Design Democracy Award University of Minnesota School of Architecture, 2013

Saul Parness Fund Fellowship University of Minnesota School of Architecture, 2013

Bill and Elizabeth Pederson Graduate Fellowship University of Minnesota School of Architecture, 2012

ACTIVITIES

Digital Assistant, University of Minnesota – School of Architecture July 2012 - Present • Creating software tutorials for students through online access and in-person sessions

School of Architecture Centennial Messaging Committee January 2013 - October 2013 • Planning and coordinating events and designs for the School of Architecture Centennial Celebration


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