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Architecture Portfolio/ DANIEL GULLAN/


Architecture Portfolio/

DANIEL GULLAN/

Practices of Technique/

Practices of the Periphery/ BETWEEN PLACE & NON-PLACE/

Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

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Practices of Technique/ STUDIO WORK/ CHAMBERS STREET/ EH1

Elaboration Review & Exhibition/ March 2009/

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Site Map of Granton, Edinburgh

Plan of Tugendhat House - Mies van der Rohe

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Practices of the Periphery/

GRANTON/ EDINBURGH/ EH5

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BETWEEN PLACE & NON-PLACE/ In the contemporary age, a place is regarded as being somewhere defined by its fundamental social nature. Somewhere that is formed by its nearby relations or surrounding references and features. Collectively, it embodies a particular history and responds to a unique cultural context. Essentially, it may be said that the place is distinguished by its irreproducibility and the unique identity it holds in space and time. The periphery is a threat to that singularity of place. It holds a fuzzy identity, which is nowhere in particular. This indifference of the periphery is what causes it to be recreatable anywhere, anytime. The

INTRODUCTION/

CONCEPT & PROPOSAL/

PHOTO MONTAGE/

periphery brings to the attention that which usually remains unnoticed or ignored. It is this grey area, on the fringe of both place and perception that is to form the focus of the investigation: to consider how the opposition of place and non-place may be treated to create an intervention that reacts to both, within the site in Granton, on the outskirts of Edinburgh. The aim is to form an understanding of how the dual modalities of place and non-place are interwoven in a dynamic relationship and in turn, form the entangled grain of contemporary urban reality.

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Practices of the Periphery/ BETWEEN PLACE & NON-PLACE/

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The proposed intervention of the site is to act as a bridge, or connection between historical place and future place of the site.

knows what it wants to be but currently lies somewhere between the two, with some ambivalence.

The surrounding historical aspects to the site show the kind of place it used to be - a place defined by the necessary industry of the time. The large redevelopment of the site that has already begun on and around the site hints at the place the site is hoping to become. A very different place to the historical one it used to be, but a place nonetheless. The site appeared to be in a state of uncertainty about what it wants to be. It knows what it used to be and it

It is this ambivalence that means the site is largely ignored, treated most typically as a transient space with its few users unaware of what actually surrounds them. For many, it is cut across and used merely as a shortcut. The historical railway station (without which, the industry in the area could not have survived) and the expansive new development area are used as key focal

points for the design. The metaphorical and almost physical connection between these two focal points is then created via the expanding intervention within the site. It is this intervention that therefore connects these two places, by way of the creation of a non-place. At night, light also becomes a key factor in the site design, as the historical aspects of the site, being much less lit up than the new, slowly begin to fade into the background. This draws people through the intervention towards the bright horizon.


Site Map - Granton

INTRODUCTION/

CONCEPT & PROPOSAL/

PHOTO MONTAGE/

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Practices of the Periphery/ BETWEEN PLACE & NON-PLACE/

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INTRODUCTION/

CONCEPT & PROPOSAL/

PHOTO MONTAGE/

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BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


Practices of Place/ BLACKFRIARS STREET/ EDINBURGH/ EH1 The general focus of the investigation of this project is that which takes place. Traditionally, architecture has embodied sedentary space and the corresponding notion of being in place. However convenient and appealing this model may be, we will here question the privileging of the sedentary over the nomadic qualities of place. It is in this manner in which we will concern ourselves with how to give both material and programmatic expression to that which is on the move, to that which takes place, instead of that which simply is in place. Based on the site analysis in Edinburgh and the profiling of a foreign public, the way in which architecture can be used to negotiate the interchange between sedentary and nomadic aspects of place will be considered. An architectural resolution of a brief for a semi-public hostel for asylum seekers is required. Using the data gathered in the site analysis and public profiling should lead to the formation of a precise architectural program of the hostel facility.

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

The hostel is to be situated within a disused Church on Blackfriars Street in the heart of Edinburgh city centre. The building is listed on the ‘Buildings at Risk Register for Scotland’. Also taken into account in the design process for the hostel is the form of intervention assigned, in this case, that of IMPLANT. It is therefore essential to carry out a thorough site investigation, along side a comprehensive public profiling, in order to bring the two together, with the added factor of the Implant intervention. This was seen as a vital exercise in cultural cross-breeding where foreign and domestic practices of place are brought together in innovative architectural mergers.

Site Maps at varying scales

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


Concept Images: Implant, The Heart & Fire

Exploring the notion of the implant intervention gave rise to varying possibilities for objects or instances that could prove useful in providing vital inspiration for the programmatic design of the hostel. In this case it was the heart which used as a reference for the Implant. In relation to the public profiling, Somalia was the country which was looked at in depth and more specifically, the culture of the Somali nomads. Drawn from the gathering of this data was the decision to focus upon the camp fire which has great importance with respect to varying functions within the Somali nomadic hamlets. Shown to the right are initial circulation and zoning concepts derived from the profiling of the Somali nomads.

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

Circulation & Zoning Models

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/ The hearth is to form the focal point of the building, a sign of welcoming and life. It can also provide more private areas with the more intimate environment that would likely be created in a nomadic hamlet.

Hearth (Ceramics) Timber will be the most frequently used material used within the hostel, as it can be used to create a more warm, inviting setting than many other materials. Furthermore, the wooden, structural elements used in the gables, among the bedrooms should be left visible to the naked eye. This is to mimic the wooden, structural frame of the Aqal huts built within the Somali hamlets. Roof (Carpentry) In the Somali hamlets, woven mats are used as the enclosure placed upon the wooden frames. In Blackfriars hostel, woven screens could be used as spacial dividers. These would create an enclosure within the hostel of a slightly differing nature. Low seating could also be used to create an intimate atmosphere around the hearth on the uppermost, residential floor. Enclosure (Weaving) The ‘Mound’ was taken to relate to the outer surrounding of the Somali hamlets - created from thorny bushes found on or around the site of the hamlet. The link to Blackfriars is a more literal one - Stone Masonry. Certain parts of the existing masonry walls of the church should remain exposed to view, to fit into the final of the ‘Four Elements’ whilst also reaffirming the Implant nature of this design intervention.

Mound (Masonry, Structure)

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


Using the hearth as an initial conceptual reference provided inspiration for both circulation and intervention within Blackfriars Street Church. The circulation should occur throughout the whole building, yet on each floor should always return to the central core, that being the ‘heart’ of the building. In relation to the public profiling of Somalia, it became clear that much importance was placed on the fire within nomadic camps, which can be seen as a translation of the heart or core of the hamlet, providing life to the Somali nomads.

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

The series of development sketches on the following page spread gives an insight into how the idea of using the fire or hearth within the hostel, developed into much more than that, and culminated in the creation of a whole central core to the building which would serve as the Implant and would be fundamental to the life and activities throughout the hostel.

built up around it, with a key focal point at the core being provided for each floor, each with a different function which would relate back to the varying uses of the camp fire in nomadic hamlets. Those of, social gathering and welcoming, recreation and sleeping.

The lower image on the following page takes this to the next step and shows how with the implantation of the initial service core into the building, each floor can be

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

Ground Floor Plan [1:200]

Intermediate Floor Plan [1:200]

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CONCEPTUAL


First Floor Plan [1:200]

Second Floor Plan [1:200]

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


Shown on the left hand side of the page is a key sectional perspective looking into the Hostel building, as seen in its context on Blackfriars Street. On this page can be seen the Final Review presentation including photos of the model on its sliding stand.

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

KEY SECTION/

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Place/ BETWEEN THE SEDENTARY & THE NOMADIC/

Technology & Environment/ CONSTRUCTION FOR DECONSTRUCTION/ Ground Floor Plan

Key Construction Systems/ The central core is to provide the primary structure to the building. This would be by means of two large central columns. They are steel box frame columns 2.0x0.75m in dimension. Cross beams connected to these columns would in turn provide support for the roof structure. Further primary structure is provided by

two large steel I-beams placed diagonally from one wall to the adjacent wall. These can be seen in the First Floor Plan opposite and would provide any further needed structural stability to the upper floors. /Primary Structural elements are shown in red in all plans and sections on this page. Other structural support is required for the intermediate floor. This secondary structure

would be in the form of load bearing timber frame walls. /Secondary Structural elements are shown in blue in all plans and sections on this page. Any other walls within the building would also be timber frame. These, however, would be non-load-bearing timber frame walls. /These are shown in yellow in all plans and sections on this page.

Intermediate Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

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INTRODUCTION/

SITE ANALYSIS & INITIAL CONCEPTS/

CONCEPTUAL


Shearing Levels of Change/ In order to minimise the environmental impact of the Hostel, the building must be considered as a number of layers working in parallel together. This is summarised by Stewart Brand in the diagram above from How Buildings Learn (1994). When

Assembly for Disassembly/ This is something that should be a major consideration when it comes to designing a building. Taking this into account can vastly reduce the environmental impact of a building through use of materials and construction technique. In this case: Timber frame construction: Timber, as a material with a low embodied energy is a suitable choice for re-use after disassembly. Screws should be used rather than nails, preferably with cover strips to prevent damage to the wood. A standard dimension of timber should be used and careful attention should be given to joints. All of these factors will make deconstruction easy and re-using the timber will be a feasible option.

DEVELOPMENT/

PLANS/

As previously mentioned, the design of the Hostel is a series of layers each serving a different purpose. The significance of this in relation to assembly for disassembly is that combined with the appropriate use of suitable materials, this will greatly increase the ease with which those layers with a shorter life cycle are able to be replaced. The separate nature of each layer therefore becomes clear, however, this should be taken further to allow for disassembly within each layer. This refers to, for example, the way in which each layer is connected. As mentioned, the use of screws instead of nails allows for each individual layer to be disassembled as much as possible. Individual parts of a specific layer should also be able to be replaced if they are prone to high wear, without compromising the rest of the layer.

KEY SECTION/

the building is considered in this way as a range of sub systems it is possible to think of the way in which the building’s response will vary over a number of years, rather than just a matter of days.

This layered design form means that this is a highly adaptive strategy. All internal layers could quite easily be removed, leaving the structure, which could easily be incorporated into any subsequent uses of the building. The Services in the building are largely provided through the steel Structure of the building. These are obviously two very separate layers to the building, even though they are in this case combined into one. However, due to the vastly differing life cycles of each of these two layers sufficient access at certain key locations of the structure should be provided to the services, to allow for the replacement of mechanical components, for example, many of which only have a life cycle of 5-15 years.

TECHNOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT/

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Practices of Curation/ L’HOTEL DE VILLE/ PARIS/ 75004

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INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


The aim of the investigation focuses on the exploration of hidden relationships between the socius and materiality that make up the underlying pulse of metropolitan modernity in the present day. It is the ambition of the project to uncover everyday conditions of the urban environment that have remained unexplored as productive potential for architectural thought concerning the city of Paris. The project requires the architectural resolution of a brief for a semi-public archive facility to house the work of Walter Benjamin. The design process should draw upon ideas presented in Benjamin’s The Arcades Project as initial inspiration.

SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

The site and its surroundings at night

The site analysis was conducted during the study trip to Paris. The site investigations included a variety of both Site Specific and Contextually Specific data. That data includes information such as the surrounding urban fabric, routes to and from the site, the psychological experience of the place, modes of publicity and cultural fetishes among other things. All of the information gathered formed a valuable insight into the Modern site and would form a basis for the subsequent design process for the Archive Building.

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INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


Routes to and from the site

View from Rue de Fourcy facing South

Initial photo and sketches of the site

SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

The qualitative drawing serves as a synthesis of the site analysis performed in Paris. Included within it are elements of the site thought to be inspirational for the Archive project as a whole. Shown here are a selection of images highlighting the vastly contrasting nature of the site itself, and the surrounding area.

The image in the top right in particular emphasises the constant movement alongside the site compared to the stillness depicted in the central image. Also shown is a variety of images and diagrams overlaid upon a map of the site in Paris. Similar themes are displayed throughout these as in the surrounding photographs.

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INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

“The utopian dimension of the arcades is implicit in the womb-like protection which they offered to the pedestrians who used them. The glass roofing and the insulation from the discomforts of the street created the sensation of an ideal, fairy-tale world existing in parallel to the muddy and noisy world outside”.

Walter Benjamin wrote of the ‘womb-like’ nature of the Parisian Arcades, mentioning the protection they offered pedestrians. My own initial impressions of the Modern site showed a parallel to this description of the arcades. The site, an open corner in the centre of a busy capital city, already had a certain seclusion to it. This was in great contrast to the area immediately surrounding the site. Located directly next to busy main roads parallel to the Seine,

the site seemed almost oblivious to the constant flow of movement around it, depicted in the above images. This womb-like seclusion was a feature I felt must be maintained approaching the design of the Archive Building. The aim would be to blur the boundaries between Inside & Outside, a feeling often experienced throughout the Parisian Arcades.

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INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


The Design Seminar topic, the study of the Musée des Colonies, came under the heading of ‘Cubist Paris’. This in turn lead into a key feature of the Archive Building’s design. A typical characteristic of cubism is the breaking up of elements with abstracted rearrangement. Objects can then be viewed from a multitude of viewpoints giving greater context than a single viewpoint. Surfaces often seem to intersect at seemingly random angles. Translating this into an architectural language lead to the idea of folding up and peeling back parts of the site. I felt this

could relate back to the initial concept of the blurring between Inside & Outside. By folding, peeling and lifting certain areas of the site, voids would be revealed which would create certain areas within the site that could no longer be definitively labelled as Inside & Outside or even as Above or Below ground. Through much experimentation with maquettes, designs were developed for benches peeled up from the ground for the area in front of the building and also for the roof of the building, shown below.

SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/ The themes of Memory and Collection were also explored in some depth, primarily through the means of Photography. The Souvenir represents the way in which a person’s memories will not always remain as individual fragments of history. Eventually these memories will begin to merge together. However, with the vast improvements in photography, with cameras now more accessible, affordable and practical, people can begin to use photography as a way of archiving these memories. Using photography as a contemporary form of archiving allows these memories to be kept in an organised way. It is this form of archiving that I hope to bring to the building itself, allowing for a

more interactive experience for the public. This is created in conjunction with the Displaced Zone, from which the public can collect cameras for personal use around the city, after which the photos taken, their personal memories, are uploaded to the building facade itself. Benjamin showed a great fascination of the possibilities of communication that lay ahead of him in the future: “Fourier speaks of a transmission miragique which will make it possible for London to have news from India within four hours”. The displaced zone also acts as a form of tribute to Benjamin for what could almost be seen as a preemption of a large global network. The kind of global network we take for granted today.

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INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


To display the public’s photos on the facade of the building itself a metal mesh screen would be used, within which are embedded rows of LEDs which would light up individually, forming an overall image upon the building’s facade. This mediamesh ‘curtain’ has numerous advantages as the form of the facade. Light is allowed to penetrate the mesh and enter certain areas of the building, whilst simultaneously creating a superimposition of the image displayed on the facade, creating a constantly changing internal atmosphere. Through the use of the mediamesh, the building in turn appears as a living organism, reacting to its surrounding environment. Furthermore, the images displayed on the mesh would appear both on the inside and the outside of the building, addressing the previously mentioned Inside vs. Outside concept in which there is a blurring of boundaries.

“We must expect great innovations to transform the entire technique of the arts, thereby affecting artistic invention itself and perhaps even bring about an amazing change in our very notion of art.” - Paul Valéry SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/ Shown here are the three initial site variations in the context of the designated, Modern site. The design of the Archive Building developed using Variation 1 as a starting point. Using the method of folding up parts of the site can clearly be seen in this initial design. This was carried forward much further through the making of card maquettes and hand sketches (shown below).

From this point the design was greatly developed to ensure the incorporation of all elements mentioned on this page and preceding pages.

1

2

3

1

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2

3

INTRODUCTION/ SITE ANALYSIS/ QUALITATIVE DRAWING/ CONCEPTUAL DEVELOPMENT/ DISPLACED ZONE/


Model shown within site context

Displayed here is the final Archive building model. The images at the top of the page show the model in the larger site context. The images 1 to 4 to the right show the model from underground level (image 1) to completed model with folded metal roof (image 4).

1

3

2

4

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

Ground Floor Plan

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First Floor Plan

Lower Level Floor Plan

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

Section A-A

Section B-B

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SITE VARIATIONS & STRATEGIES/ PLANS/ KEY SECTION/ SECTIONAL PERSPECTIVE/ ELABORATION/

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Practices of Curation/ BETWEEN THE CRITICAL & THE COMMERCIAL/

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The image to the right, the photograph by French photographer Eugene Atget is used as a reference image for the Elaboration phase of the Archive project. Atget was known for his use of long exposure in his photography, creating soft light and edges with a drawn out sense of light. Due to this, many of his images had a mythical feeling to them. In parallel to this, Benjamin stated in The Arcades Project that he felt that the technical advancement of photography was actually a regression as oppose to a progression. His reason for this was that

the newer devices were more sensitive to light, which, when photographing faces in particular gave a much duller image. With the less light-sensitive apparatus longer exposures would be needed, and in turn, multiple expressions would appear creating a livelier and more universal expression on the final image. Both the photograph by Atget, and the comments by Benjamin provided inspiration for the superimposed images within and around the Archive building, from which would arise a constantly changing and interesting atmosphere.

Au Tambour - Eugene Atget

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Architecture Portfolio  

This portfolio shows a summary of work produced throughout the course of 2nd year studies in Architectural Design at The University of Edinb...

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