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FLAUNT

NO 148 THE EMPOWERMENT ISSUE


Sierra ADAIR, Tyler MONTANA ANDERSON, Brendan COMBS, Dakota HAVARD, Greg DUGDALE, Cassondra MORRISION, Michelle PECK, Anna STONER, Cassidy TERRY, Sophie THORNER, Ben TOLLEFSON, and a set of REBELLIOUS TEENS



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CONTENTS

40 THE LAST MONTANA SCAD sends off their “it guy” for New York 46 “GRIEVING” WIDOW He’s gone but she doesn’t miss him

60 GRAFFITI = LIFE The power of street 68 BRENDAN COMBS Gender means nothing when it comes to great design

82 PRETTY BOY The table are turning 90 BEN TOLLEFSON “Bright “doesn’t even begin to describe

102 MICHELLE PECK Illustrative mastermind 108 GIRL POWER Move over boys, we got this

116 IT’S NOT FOR YOU Lacy things with confidence 124 ‘CAUSE I SLAY Diversity is key

96 GREG DUGDALE The fashion industry needs to chill

54 DAKOTA HAVARD Pushing the boundaries

PHOTO BY DAKOTA HAVARD


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34 << MY STAFF

FLAUNT EDITOR IN CHIEF

WRITERS

HEADQUARTERS

LAUREN “LO” PITCAIRN

ANNA SUHR ARDEEN SAMUEL DANA CARIELLO LAUREN “LO” PITCAIRN

LOS ANGELES 1422 North Highland Avenge Los Angel es CA 90028 +1 323 836 1000 Fax: +1 323 856 7053 Info@Flaunt.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR DANA CARIELLO

PHOTOGRAPHERS STYLE COORDINATOR JORDAN DABNEY

FASHION EDITOR ARDEEN SAMUEL

COPY EDITOR ANNA SUHR

ASHLEY ROSALES BROOKE TURNER CARA KELLY GABRIELLE CHEIKH ISABELLE VON ARX JACOB WILDFONG KY LE ADAMS MATT SLADE NAIMAR RAMIEREZ NIKKI KRECICKI SIERRA SOLLENBERGER

NEW YORK 365 West 20th Street 17 - B New York, NY 10011 +1 212 465 9950 Fax: +1 212 675 3551

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JORDAN DABNEY LAUREN “LO” PITCAIRN

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ALESSA REUFFURTH ANNA NOEL MAKAR EMERSON PAVURI ISABELLA Y IDI JESS FARRAN JOHN ROSS WINTER LORRIE LANCASTER (Of Halo Models)

LISSA URENA MONTANA ANDERSON NIAMBI NELSON SANDY STIRRUP TARA TANIYA ROBERTS KENDALL JACKSON

FOUNDERS LUIS BARAJAS JIM TURNER LONG NGUYEN


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CONTRIBUTERS

GREG DUGDALE studies Fashion Design at The Savannah College of Design, knowing the fact that whatever life throws at him, anything can be accomplished is what empowers him on the daily.

CASSIDY TERRY is currently studySIERRA ADAIR experiences her passion every day at The Savannah College of Art and Design. Empowerment comes from her hometown surroundings - from mountainous forests, energetic seas to the dry desert at her disposal that endlessly influences her work.

ing jewelry design at The Savannah College of Art and Design. Empowerment rises from her ability to do whatever she wishes in life with confidence knowing she will be successful.

SOPHIE THOERNER is currently perusing jewelry design at the Savannah College of Art and Design who feels the most empowered feels the most empowered when she sees the excitement of her work through others reactions, expressions, and joy.

BRENDAN COMBS is a graduate from from The Savannah College of Art and Designs fashion department, currently working for Michael Kors. Empowerment comes in simple independence for him.

DAKOTA HAVARD spends his days CASSONDRA

MORRISION studies jewelry design at the Savannah College of Art and Design, feeling the most empowerment with her work involving her hands shaping and molding something that an individual to display on the body.

majoring in painting at The Savannah College of Art and Design. His empowerment in the ability to understand others and put himself in their shoes.

BEN TOLLEFSON finished his graduate degree in painting at The Savannah College of Art and Design, currently working at the SCAD Museum of Art as assistant curator. The complete control he has in studio over his work is what empowers his life.


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EDITORS LETTER

For this issue of FLAUNT we decided to go with the theme of empowerment. We decided to explore different themes and issues having to do with empowerment. From art to fashion we see evidence of people having empowerment through creativity. We feel that the artists and designers chosen to represent this issue, empower people and themselves in many different ways. From Brendan Combs’s non-gender conforming clothes to Montana Anderson’s extensive modeling during his time at SCAD, this very special issue of FLAUNT highlights what makes all of these amazing artists so amazing. As editor in chief I hope you enjoy this issue as much as I enjoyed creating it. Lo Pitcairn Editor in Chief FLAUNT Magazine


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THE LAST MONTANA

T YLE R MO N T A N A A N D E RSON MODEL, FASHION MARKETER, AND FUTURE CREATIVE DIRECTOR MONTANA ANDERSON SITS DOWN WITH DANA CARIELLO TO DISCUSS GRADUATION, CAREERS, AND FINDING YOURSELF.

PLAGIARIZED BY >>

DANA CARIELLO

PHOTOGRAPHED BY >>

KY LE ADAMS NIKKI KRECICKI CARA KELLY ASHLEY ROSALES

Dana Cariello: What empowers you? Tyler “Montana” Anderson: My confidence in myself. Growing up as a gay man in middle America was an interesting to say the least. One would think that it would harsh or rough – yes I experienced times where I would hear whispers behind my back or being under estimated in sports because I was gay. I’m empowered by fact that I had parents and family that supported me through everything. Some kids who come out in High School don’t get to experience the same thing I had, I am so thankful for that and it’s empowered me to be myself 100% of the time – no bull shit, no smoke and mirrors. I own myself and I actually love myself (but not in a conceded way). DC: What does “empowerment” mean to you? MA: Empowerment to me is giving myself my own power to change when I see needed. Empowerment to me is loving myself, not looking for acceptance in anyone else, or a relationship. Everything in this world is so temporary – I’ve come to terms that no matter how many times someone says they won’t leave, they do. Coming to this realization I am empowered to really focus on myself.

PHOTO BY kyle adams


PHOTO BY

DC: When do you feel the most empowered? MA: I feel the most empowered when I don’t let the little bull shit get to me. Some many people focus on the drama, the boy that doesn’t love them back, the boy that doesn’t want to kiss them, the friend who didn’t want to hang out because they were “tired.” The world will still turn and will not stop for a single thing. I’m most empowered when I just do me, walk with confidence, flash a smile and wave – even to that boy that is just playing games. DC: How did you get into modeling at SCAD (The Savannah College of Art and Design)? MA: My first modeling at SCAD was actually with my now best friend Josh McLeod when we came out with his first line of Victor + Alexander hang bags in 2013. It’s crazy cause I’ve basically been working with him for a 3 years with that brand and he has become one of my closest friends at SCAD who I consider a brother. DC: How did outside agencies find you? MA: This has been an uphill battle for a couple of year. With Savannah being so secluded I’ve had agencies be interested but due to the fact that I’m not able to be in NYC or LA to go to castings it’s a little bit harder to get jobs. I had an agency in ATL for two years but nothing really came of that. Which is discouraging. I spent a summer in NYC going from Agency to agency – all coming back with “Well if you were in New York.” But with graduation approaching I’m ready to hit the ground running when I get to NYC in June. DC: Tell us about the very first shoot you modeled. MA: If we are going off my very first print shoot – It was for South Magazine in 2013 shot by Nikki Krecicki. If you remember the one with Marc Jacobs on the cover. It was Camp Glam, and we shot in this amazing cabin in the forest. I wore Marc Jacobs everything and got to climb some ladders and what not! It was really cool. When it was released I bought 5 just to share with my family back home. DC: What was your favorite shoot? MA: My favorite shoot…UGH there are too many to choice from. But if I had to choose one it would be the shoot I did with Zoe Christou Welsh. Entitled “Last Train Home” - we shot at the Savannah Historic Train museum and it was highly editorial and was actually published in a UK Magazine 10TEN MAGAZINE. We’re planning on shooting together soon for another project. So I am so excited for that.

kyle adams


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PHOTO BY

DC: How does it feel to be closing this chapter at SCAD? MA: It is so scary, exciting, nerve – racking and really kinda sad. I’ve called this place home for the past three years. I’ve created relationships, memories and moments that will be with me forever. I love everyone that I have meet along this journey, I’m horrible with saying good bye so it’s going to be horrible when that time comes.

cara kelly

DC: Why do you feel you became the “it guy” in Fashion Marketing at SCAD? MA: This is a really good question. Good genes?! I love that you guys think that I’m the “It Guy,” I just love to model so I always say yes – If I’m really digging the concept. But to answer that question I like to think that it’s my personality, no body wants to work with someone who isn’t fun or dry. Sometimes shoots last for a couple of hours and you have to be fun on them! Also I think practice makes “perfect” I’ve been in front of the camera ever since I was a baby – my mom has been taking my pictures for years before I got to SCAD. So with that and studying magazines and varies blogs I’ve been able to watch and learn and bring it to the shoot.

DC: What feelings come to mind when you remind yourself you’re graduating? MA: I couldn’t give you a single feeling or emotions. I have all the feels. Some of my friends will be working and living in the same city as me after graduation, some will not be. Thinking about the fact that I’m not going to be able to just text them and say “hey I’ll be there in 5” or “I need cookies, come and buy some with me!” It’s just really sad. DC: Will you be pursuing modeling outside of college? I’m a people person and I hate change – so knowing that MA: Yes! Getting this body right so I can go to New York in in 4 weeks things are going to change is going to be rough. June and really hit the pavement running and start working and making money for doing what I love.


THE LAST MONTANA

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OPPOSITE PAGE sweater Kate Spade ($198) pants Marc by Marc Jacobs ($298) THIS PAGE swimtrunks Marc by Marc Jacobs ($148)

PHOTO BY

south magaziee


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DC: What are your plans after graduation? MA: Currently in the process of applying to jobs and waiting to hear back from them. But like I’ve said before I have plans to head to New York, work for a fashion brand or creative agency and model. DC: Career path? MA: My ultimate goal is to one day become a creative director for a fashion brand, magazine or lead at an ad agency creating images with depth and more meaning than just a pretty model and pretty clothing. I’m someone that loves to had a more intellectual element to my work so everything has a purpose, deeper than what you originally may think. DC: What will you be missing most? MA: I will miss being able to mess up on a project and not having to be actually ridiculed for it. In the real world your ass would get fired!! DC: Do you have a project you wish you’ve done? MA: Right now no I don’t, I’m currently in production getting ready to shoot a fashion film that I’m the creative director for. I’ve wanted to shoot this film for quite some time and to watch my idea come to life is really exciting. We’re expected to have it completed by the end of this quarter! DC: What has SCAD taught you that you’ll keep with you forever? MA: What hasn’t SCAD taught me! It’s not even the actual material in each of the courses but its honestly how projects and work is completed. We are big on group work in FASM (Fashion Marketing), which is how every single project in the real world is also completed. So just having that ability to learn how to adapt to other students working habits is something I will keep. DC: If you could leave behind a piece of Montana for FASM what would you leave? MA: Oh gosh…I don’t even know. Would they even want anything? DC: What piece of advice would you tell those just starting at SCAD? MA: Find what you love to do early on in your SCAD career, that way you can really focus on making that the best it could possibly be. This will be the only time you will be able to do a project that you love and have 100% control over. It just a grade – you can’t get fired from school this is the time to experiment and really find out what works and what doesn’t. Lastly make sure you focus on yourself, and create relationships that are healthy, surround yourself with others that have the best interest for you. Find yourself, find your passion, find what you love, possibly even find the special someone – but don’t let that consume your whole world. You are allowed to be selfish, you’re here to make a future for yourself, no one else is going to create it for you.

PHOTO BY

ashley rosales



MISS FORTUNE PHOTOGRAPHED BY Kyle Adams MAKEUP BY Arielle Arnold








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DAKOTA HAVARD

LONG YOU LIVE & HIGH YOU FLY MODERATED BY ANNA SUHR

PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAKOTA HAVARD


DAKOTA HAVARD

A Love Supreme, 2015

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DAKOTA HAVARD

Objects and Places, 2016


DAKOTA HAVARD

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Go beyond the artistic norm. Expand outside of your comfort zone. Do not contain yourself to what you know. These are phrases you hear so often in art school. Painter, Dakota Havard, embodies this innovation of experimentation. Among students, Havard stands out as a professional. Within a short interview, I witnessed how his creative work parallels his creative mind.

that same sort of abstraction, such as Pink Floyd, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, The Doors, and so on.

Anna Suhr: What empowers you?

AS: Whose work inspired you early on to become a painter?

Dakota Havard: I’d say that empathy is something that’s really powerful and empowering. The ability to understand others and place yourself in their shoes and in their life is a really crucial skill to obtain.

DH: I can’t say growing up in Alabama yielded itself to many opportunities to witness art or really learn about art. I was only ever really introduced to painters like Picasso, Van Gogh, and Pollock, but it wasn’t really until I’d seen Philip Guston’s work and read his conversations that I knew that I was what we’re calling a “painter”.

AS: That is so true. What does “empowerment” mean to you?

AS: Whose work are you most inspired by currently? DH: Elizabeth Murray is someone I’ve been intently looking at recently, as well as Eddie Martinez.

DH: Empowerment to me means sticking with not what you AS: Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years? know because nothing is true nor can be fully known but to stick to with what you feel to be wholly good, with no malice DH: Painting and just being present in the world. or bias. AS: Very nice vision! What ignites your creative spark? AS: When do you feel the most empowered? DH: Almost anything and everything. Apart of my whole DH: Well, I think it sounds both obvious and simultaneously work is that it’s been about the infinite and the “sublime” in cliche, but I feel most empowered when painting, specifically the mundane, and if we look at anything in the waking day, when making a mark or stroke, and putting forth those it is so much more vastly complex than we understand. Just unconscious thoughts and feelings and implanting them on the being present and realizing this about everything creates less of mark. a spark and more of a lasting current of creativity AS: What band fuels your “work music”?

AS: How do you ger around your “artist block”?

DH: My absolute favorite music to have in the studio is music DH: One always knows somewhere inside what they need or that is similar to the way I like work...I like music that follows want to create but it’s suppressed for some reason or another,


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DAKOTA HAVARD

but I think the solution is to constantly create work even if you don’t know why or what you’re doing. Just smash materials together, observe it, react to it, and deconstruct it to really get a grasp of what you’re doing and understanding your mind and your media.

AS: What experience do you have in artist collaboration?

AS: What does your creative environment consist of?

AS: I’d love to see that. What is your dream collaboration?

DH: Lots of cans, ashtrays, and paint everywhere.

DH: I would just like to work with an artist in doing something really large and mind expanding. Probably something with James Turrell or Robert Irwin.

AS: What is your design aesthetic?

DH: I’ve recently worked on a fashion collaboration which was fun I suppose. I painted the loose fabric, then it would be cut and sewn into the garments.

“i’m not sure if i have a design aesthetic.” DH: This is the hardest to answer because I never really consciously think about “design aesthetic” when it comes to creating my own space. I am aware and observant of the way aesthetic is gone about by culture. A lot of the time in modern culture “aesthetic” has a lot to do with popular culture and mediation, and I don’t tend to fall into that. I see it and react to it by not being a part of it I suppose. It’s hard. I’m not sure if I have a design aesthetic. AS: What skill or technique do you struggle with the most?

AS: I can totally see that! That would be amazing. How much time do you dedicate to a painting? DH: All of it. Even during time spent away from the studio, I’m always thinking of painting and what I’m doing, what others are doing, and how can I capture these complexities and infinite nuances in the objects and moments around me. AS: How do you know a piece is “finished”?

DH: One always knows when [a painting] is finished right DH: Probably writing and keeping up with thoughts and notes. away. If you do a mark and you think “well, wait now I have to I’m quite messy, so I’d absolutely lose them, but I’ve gotten add this”, then it’s obviously not done. Right when a painting is done, you’ll know, “whoa, thats it”. good at remembering.


Cop Interrupts Still Life, 2016


PHOTOGRAPHED BY Sierra Sollenberger PLAGIARIZED BY Anna Suhr




is a part of our being. Our overwhelming amount of creativity is bursting from our fingertips onto the walls. Cavemen used pigments, dyes, and blood to express stories, tales, and knowledge. It continues into modern culture. One of my favorites, Keith Haring started his career in the 80s underground in the subways with playful characters he named “radiant babies” and “barking dogs”. Art labels this as expression. Law labels this as vandalism. Art and cultural hot spots, such as Bushwick Brooklyn and Wynnwood Walls Miami, were transformed by artistic expression. Once filled with drugs, prostitution, and crime, these cities were crying for help and bursting with need. Art entered in and saved the communities. Art provided a creative way to express and fund a cleaner neighborhood. Rotating artists and projects stimulate change and an end to stagnant cultural growth. With designated walls for art, festivals such as Art Basel, and studios popping up on every corner, these cities have been saved and praise art as their savior. In the world of apparel, styles and trends for all levels of consumers were once determined solely by top high end fashion houses as a trickle-down industry. When designers such as Louis Vuitton and Marc Jacobs began sourcing inspiration from graffiti and the street, the art trickled up from the walls and on to the runway. With bold graphics and organic typography on the rise as emerging trends, do not be surpised to see more graffiti in your retail setting. Graffiti creates an endless supply of inspiration and continues to be reflected in the luxury world. It is a freeform of expression that is a reminder of how graffiti expands thinking, breaks boundaries of the norm, and




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TOPS AND BOTTOMS h&m ZARA shoes


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BRENDAN COMBS

B r e n da n C O MB S “MAGGIE SIMPSON WAS A LITTLE BADASS IN DISGUISE.” PLAGIARIZED BY LAUREN “LO” PITCAIRN

PHOTOGRAPHED BY MATT SLADE

Lauren Pitcairn: What does “being creative,” mean to you? Brendan Combs: Having the nerve to do something different. To love doing something so much that you feel lost without it. To have a voice in a dialogue, and be able to make people think, or look at differently.

LP: What makes you feel empowered? BC: Independence. LP: What do you like about your work? BC: I put an intense emphasis on wearability. When I design a garment, I can be as creative as I want, and typically most of my garments start out unwearable, but I edit into the garment to make it wearable. If I can’t see someone on the street wearing one of my pieces comfortably then its function is completely lost.

LP: How do you work? BC: It always begins with a song. I grew up surrounded by music, and it’s one of the most important points of inspiration to my process, one song can ignite an idea for a collection like wildfire. From that point I begin by sourcing imagery, fabrics, and begin sketching, and sampling. From that point the focus becomes the clothes, and finishing up the collection, and presenting it. LP: Name something you love, and why. BC: The Simpsons. Maggie Simpson was a little badass in disguise. LP: Name something you don’t love, and why. BC: Avocados. It’s the texture.



CLOTHING BY Brendan Combs



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LP: What is your favorite part about being a fashion designer? BC: It’s somewhat cliché, but everything. We’re a part of an industry where we don’t just work in fashion; we make it our life. I live for what I do, and love it just passionately as everything else in my life. I, naturally, have a curious mind so I want to know as much as I can about fashion, I involve myself in every step, because it’s so interesting to me. LP: What do you think of the fashion industry currently? BC: The industry has been fever pitching to its current state for a while now. It’s nice, honestly, to see an industry experimenting with different ways to adapt to a new generation, and how to stay relevant. The industry is beginning to shift from this idea of top tier labels that dictated what is luxury, to new designers who are in tune with the world in ways that is more real to the global dialogue being had, which is what fashion has always done. We visualize the zeitgeist of the times through clothing. I think, like most everything else in the world, we’re under a microscope in a way that we’ve never had to deal with before, and as a result we’re changing to accommodate what is obsolete, or what isn’t working for the industry anymore. There’s still a huge divide between this old way of doing things in the industry, and what is actually working now, and we’re seeing a lot of different companies struggle to survive because they simply aren’t a part of the global conversation. It’s like Diane Von Furstenberg said, “we’re going through a revolution…and revolutions are bloody.” LP: What is your dream collaboration? BC: I’d personally love to create a work with Ryoji Ikeda. His installations have been a strong source in inspiration to me, and art is such a higher plane in thinking than fashion, I’d love to be able to create a fully experiential moment that touches every sense we have, in ways that we haven’t already done so before. Other than that, my ultimate goal is to collaborate every season I produce a collection with a different artist in some way.



MAKEUP BY Jordan Dabney and Alessa Reuffurth




LP: Do you try to keep with the trends or create your own? 
What is designing to you? BC: I’ve never kept up with trends. I can happily say I’ve never looked at a trend report in my life, and don’t plan to either. If I’ve ever produced something that appeared to be “on trend” it was purely accidental. I think trends destroy the process because it removes creativity from the designer job description. Trends are for companies that mimic fashion, but aren’t actually are part of it. When I approach design, within the framework of fashion, I view it as a way to advance a garment beyond what it originally began as. Design allows clothes to become special. LP: Which designer do you most identify with? BC: There’s a few. I prefer to not really speak about whom I identify with. It’s the same as idols, it more of a personal, emotional experience with yourself. Besides, I find it strange that someone you’ve never met before can have such an impact on you, simply by what they choose to project themselves as to the world. It’s voyeuristic at best. LP: What work do you most enjoying doing? BC: Again, somewhat cliché, but the work I most enjoy doing is everything that comes with making a garment. I truly love getting my hands dirty. There will never be a time where I myself won’t want to not have a hand in every step from researching, sketching, sourcing, patterning, sewing, fitting etc.

LP: Describe your favorite part of the design process? BC: The initial idea, that first rush of something new in your mind, it’s the purest part of the process; it’s fresh and untainted by outside voices, or obstacles. It so cerebral, and a testament to the beauty of our brains; we can devise these thoughts into physical manifestations. Ideas are the most important part, without them the process itself wouldn’t exist. Everything else after that initial idea comes naturally.






PRETTY BOY PHOTOGRAPHED BY Isabelle Von Arx MAKEUP BY Jordan Dabney








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BEN TOLLEFSON

“I DISLIKE ARTISTS OR GALLERISTS THAT ARE ‘ABOVE’ OTHER ARTISTS. WE’RE ALL PART OF THIS COMMUNITY, DON’T BE A BOOGIE BITCH!”

BEN toll e f s o PLAGIARIZED BY >> LAUREN “LO” PITCAIRN PHOTOGRAPHED BY >> NAIMAR RAMIEREZ

Lauren “Lo” Pitcairn: What empowers you? Ben Tollefson: My work in my studio empowers me. It’s the one place where I get to make absolute decisions about what I want. I think this is why I paint: it’s a very solitary way to make art, but it’s empowering because there is no one dictating what you need to do. LP: How do you work? BT: I have a full time job, so I need to fit studio time into nights and weekends. I typically try to set a significant portion of time aside for the studio. My paintings take a long time to complete, so I usually have two or three that are in process, so I can go between them while the oil dries. As far as process, I’ve recently been creating collages that serve as sketches that inspire the paintings. LP: What’s your background? BT: I’ve been making artwork for a very long time. My parents put me in private art lessons in third grade since our public school didn’t have a great art program. I went to a small liberal arts college in Milwaukee WI, and after that, moved to Washington DC to work at The Phillips Collection in a museum outreach position. I was there for three years, and then came to Savannah to attend SCAD for the MFA Painting program. I graduated in 2014 and have been working at the SCAD Museum of Art.


BEN TOLLEFSON

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BEN TOLLEFSON

LP: Why art? BT: Art enriches life. It shows you things you’ve never seen before, and as an artist, one can breathe life into something from raw materials. This is incredibly exciting and gratifying. The art world also creates a community. People who love seeing and creating come together because of art. LP: What is an artistic outlook on life? BT: An artistic outlook on life is knowing that you’ll have to do a lot of crap during the day that is no fun, but you’ll always make time to create, which is fulfilling. LP: What memorable responses have you had to your work? BT: I had someone come to an opening reception for a show I did who stayed for about two hours just studying the works. I was so touched because he was nearly speechless when I spoke to him at the end of the reception. I also find it incredibly rewarding to be asked to participate in exhibitions. This means that curators are keeping their eye on you, and appreciate your work. LP: What’s integral to the work of an artist? BT: I think there are two very integral aspects of art making: one, to be working as much as you can. I find that inspiration comes in the studio, while I’m making work, rather than at random moments. The second aspect is to follow instinct and take risks, rather than do what audiences might expect of you. There is a lot of pressure to create work that will sell or that appeases certain taste, trend or theory. If an artist follows these pressures rather than their own instinct, you’ll be stuck making things you don’t want to. LP: How has your practice change over time? BT: I used to create acrylic paintings that had a lot more experimental uses of painting (washes, splatters, impastos, etc.). The older work dealt a lot with visual space, which was clearly defined. I’ve moved on to really refined, flat, hard-edged oil paintings. The recent work still deals with ideas of space and perception, but the paintings have a less logical sense of place. LP: What art do you most identify with? BT: Probably figurative work that place with space in an interesting way, regardless of time period. Artist I love that do this are Hockney, Francis Bacon, Rogier van der Weyden, Hans Memling, Dana Schutz. LP: What jobs have you done other than being an artist? BT: I’ve worked several barista jobs, administrative jobs, museum jobs, ceramic technician, etc.

LP: What do you dislike about the art world? BT: I dislike artists or gallerists that are “above” other artists. We’re all a part of this community, so don’t be a boogie bitch!




BEN TOLLEFSON

LP: What do you dislike about your work? BT: I often have to come to terms with the fact that I am making luxury items for people with a lot of disposable income. Paintings are expensive. I’m in an odd spot since I believe in the power of painting, and I do want to sell my work, but I probably won’ change any lives with my work. LP: What do you like about your work? BT: I like that I can discover something exciting when I go into my studio. LP: Name something you love, and why. BT: I love podcasts! They’re such an awesome way to get information while being entertained, but you don’t have to be active, like reading or watching. LP: What is your dream project? BT: A commissioned portrait of Lady Gaga! LP: Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. BT: Magritte, Bonnard, and Hockney. LP: Can you share a story of a time in your journey when you encountered a big set-back or experienced failure, and most importantly, what did you take away from that experience? BT: I’m currently working on two paintings that I’m really excited about. The first, a painting of sky writing with lyrics to Mariah Carey’s “Fantasy,” and the second, a double portrait of two faces collaged from a bunch of models. The models are so stunning in the photos I used, but when collaged together, they become really uncomfortable and uncanny! I’ve been obsessed with the idea of creating beauty or ugliness from “beauty” that’s forced upon us. LP: What’s the first artwork you ever sold? BT: My first sale (that I can remember) is probably a commissioned pen and ink drawing of a beach house! I had someone commission me so they could put the drawing on stationary.

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GREG DUGDALE

DESIGNER GREG DUGDALE AND MARKETER ANNA SUHR IN CONVERSATION

IF HE COULDN’T BE A DESIGNER HE WO MODERATED BY ANNA SUHR

PHOTOGRAPHED BY GABRIELLE CHEIKH

Anna Suhr: What empowers you?

I could have.

Greg Dugdale: What empowers me is the goal I created for myself when I realized that I wanted to become a designer. I was in high school. I said I would have my own label and line even if it takes me until the day I die to create it. I’m going to do it regardless. I can’t imagine what I would do with my life without designing. That was what I thought a couple of years ago when everything was perfect or at least kind of perfect. Now, there is a new meaning for what empowers me. That is my mom. She helped me get to where I am now; in so many different ways. I can’t even list them all. She passed away on February 26th of last year. She told me to keep doing what I want to do.

AS: When do you feel the most empowered? GD: I feel the most empowered when I have support behind me. So when my friends, family, and professors are with me, I’m 100% unstoppable. AS: What is your design aesthetic?

GD: My design aesthetic is innovative, creative, out of the box, bold, colorful, happy, and fierce. What my favorite thing to do when I design is to push myself as well as push fabric and designs passed their limits. I want to make sure that everything I design is different than what is out there. AS: I am so sorry for you loss, Greg. That is an amazing It’s extremely difficult to do that now because of the Internet. source of empowerment. What does “empowerment” mean So far I feel pretty comfortable that I have achieved it! to you? AS: I would agree you most definitely have. How do you GD: Empowerment means that what ever happens, I can see your aesthetic developing? make it work. When I feel empowered, it’s the best feeling


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OULD BE A SCIENTIST OR A STRIPPER.


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GREG DUGDALE

AS: Goodness gracious - two hours! What is your best working environment?

AS: (laughs) Amazing. You are given a weekend off and a million dollars, where do you go and what do you do?

GD: My best working environment is having a ton of space and some AS: You have been given your dream good music on or a movie playing in the background. Occasionally, pop, job, what is it? locking, and jamming on the side. GD: My dream job is working for AS: I love it. What design skill or myself, but hold the prepaid phone, technique do you struggle with the that won’t happen for a while. So my most? dream job is working in Paris, Italy,

GD: The moment I get the million dollars I would invest and save some of it. Then, I would go to Paris and London to shop around. Also, I would want to find a charity or some kind of event that benefits something and donate some money. I would definitely be going to the best gay bars that I can find.

GD: My aesthetic is constantly changing, but not too fast. It’s changed by how I edit my designs and utilize the new knowledge I have learned from classes and friends.

“I THINK THE INDUSTRY NEEDS TO CAL DOWN AND BE MORE CREATIVE.” Milan, London, and New York. I want to be the person sewing/ designing the garments that come down the runway. I would be finding the fabrics, pattern making, and draping the garment. Then, I would have a dance party to celebrate when the garments are finished.

GD: Sketching and flats are what I struggle with the most. My view point on theses two skills is I can show anyone a design and they can understand it with some explaining, but if they have worked in the industry for a while, then they should be a master at it and there would be no need for an explanation.

AS: What is a bold, creative designer like yourself wear as his go-to outfit? GD: My go-to outfit? That’s a tricky question. On the days I don’t care, I wear a t-shirt, sneakers, a baseball cap, and shorts depending if it’s hot outside or not. When I actually care a little, I will wear a matching outfit like a polo or button down, shorts or pants, and Sperry’s. When I really want to get someone’s attention, I would wear bonobo pants, button down shirt, my CMFS that would be a Clark boots or my Cole Haan shoes. I really like to mix it up. I’m still in that phase where I am trying to figure out what I want to wear, what looks good on me, and what doesn’t look good on me. I also have to figure out what clothes won’t show how much I sweat. I change my shirt about two times a day, or I will come home to use the hair dryer and put more deodorant and cologne on so I don’t smell like budussy. (Laughs) So that’s that.

AS: What is a typical day in the life of AS: What category (menswear, Greg Dugdale? womenswear, etc) of fashion do you GD: A typical day for me consists see yourself working in? of taking a shower, finding an outfit, putting on my cover up, attempting to GD: As of right now, I can see myself fix my hair how I like it, then going doing both. I like both equally. With to class. Then I have my lunch break, women’s wear I can be avant guard and sometimes I have to bring it to class creative. With menswear, the market is and eat it on breaks between classes way to picky and doesn’t want to go that are back to back. In the afternoon I outside their comfort zone. So I might usually get a Starbucks, not everyday, have a difficult time having guys but pretty close to everyday. After actually wanting to wear my clothes Starbucks, it’s back to work. On the without feeling too uncomfortable. weekend, I try to go to the beach or the gym as much as possible. I’m really AS: What is your favorite word? trying to bring all the boys to my yard, but I’m not having that much luck. GD: My favorite word is not just one I also don’t sleep for more than two word I have a few: budussy, CMFS, TTTKA, “work it”, fierce, innovative. AS: It sounds like you got it all figured hours depending on the week.


GREG DUGDALE

out! What is your dream collaboration? GD: I think the industry needs to calm their tits and actually slow down and GD: My dream collaboration would be more creative. There’s no love for be collaborating with Alexander fashion anymore or at least that’s how I McQueen or Viktor and Rolf. I don’t view it. What’s the point of designing if know exactly what we would be you constantly want to bang your head doing, but considering what they have against the wall because you screwed designed before, I think it would be up an order. There’s a YouTube clip pretty kick ass what we come up with. I watch from I Love Lucy where she gets overly excited about a coat. That’s AS: What is your most embarrassing what I want people to do with my moment? clothes.

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AS: What are a few mottos you follow to perk yourself up when you’re feeling down or lost? GD: Unbreakable Greg Dugdale inspired by Kimmy Schmidt. TTTKA (time to totally kick ass). If it’s worth it, you gotta work it. I can’t stop, and I won’t stop. AS: Do designers eat? GD: Hell yes. I might not follow a

LM THEIR TITS AND ACTUALLY SLOW GD: It depends on which moment you are talking about. I have a ton of embarrassing moments. I feel down the stairs at Ampersand and people laughed at me. This happened recently. Sometimes my hair looks like a tornado hit me.

AS: What step in designing a collection diet, but I have to have food otherwise there is in an inner demon in me that is your favorite? comes out and its not pretty. I go into GD: My favorite part of designing is full hangry mode. People have said it’s when the sketch comes to life. That is not too pretty to be around me when when I have started making the muslin I’m like that. (mock up of what the garment will AS: How do you find your customer? actually be) then comes final fabric!

AS: What fashion show (recent or in AS: If you couldn’t be a designer, what past years) do you obsess over? would you be? GD: The most recent collection would be Viktor and Rolf’s Fall 2015 GD: A stripper or a scientist. collection. It’s insane but amazing at AS: (Laughs) What do you do when the same time. you can’t design or produce anything? AS: What is your opinion on fast GD: Honestly go out to the bars find fashion? a boy to pump and dump and leave GD: I’m not the biggest fan of fast or just dance my ass off. I dance my fashion. It’s really harmful to the ass off more than finding a boy. I also environment and the workers. It has “pop, lock and jam”, go out and watch to stop, and people need to be more a movie, laugh so hard that I cry, appreciative with what they already explore somewhere and do something random, go to other buildings to work have. with friends and see what’s the 411 AS: What do you think of the fashion with them, Netflix or HBO shows, industry currently? concerts, or road trips.

GD: Some assignments want me to find a customer. My customer is everyone in the entire world. I don’t have any specific person I want to design for. I like every person of every color to be my customer. I want to see my designs on people when I walk on the streets.



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MICHELLE PECK

MICHELLE PECK

MODERATED BY ANNA SUHR

PHOTOGRAPHED BY JACOB WILDFONG


Sitting down and talking with a creative mind is always refreshing. But how does it feel to converse with a creative mastermind? Spend a moment with Messy Head Magazine graphic designer / print making fiend / branding genius, Michelle Peck, and you will find out. Anna Suhr: How did you connect with Emma and the Messy Head Issues? Michelle Peck: Not so strangely, we met through social media. After following The Messy Heads for a few months, we would consistently comment on each other’s posts and then shared numbers. Once she knew I went to an art school, we would share ideas and art with each other leading into this first magazine issue. AS: What a digital world we live in. What do the Messy Heads stand for? MP: “They aren’t perfect, and will never have to be, in fact they don’t care about being perfect at all. They would rather be beautiful on the inside, not the outside. Because really anyone can be a pretty face, but not everyone can have an interesting mind. A messy head never ever passes up an opportunity to do something they love or stand up for what they believe in for fear of getting judged.” AS: Would you describe yourself as a Messy Head? MP: I would describe myself as a Messy Head: thoughts never organized, always jumbled and wandering and hair that is knotted with dried lemon juice. AS: Who do you think embodies the true meaning of a “Messy Head”? MP: Emma [the creator] of course. But I also think we all are in some way. We are a lot more similar than we think we are. We are discovering and exploring this beautiful world. If you are doing that, I think you are a Messy Head. AS: How were you able to incorporate your art with the layout of magazine? MP: At first when Emma was collecting articles, images, and art for the magazine, she encouraged me to take pictures of my environment, things I love, and my own art to add wherever needed. She gave me a ton of creative freedom and we would constantly send each other screenshots and feedback. Having another person to react and oversee my work was refreshing, especially coming from another creative soul.


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AS: You and Emma seem to make a great team. Which spreads of the magazine were your favorite to work on? MP: The first spreads I ever made were the feature articles (Slab City, Cartia Mallan, High Creatives, and JCT Brand). They are easily my favorite because they were the first creative babies I had and set the tone for the rest of the magazine. Those came easy for me, and because feature articles include more context, imagery, and space, I found it natural to piece together each component without feeling constricted with space. Ultimately, my favorite spread? Probably the opening for High Creatives. AS: I loved seeing your artistic freedom in High Creatives... great work. Apart from the Messy Heads, where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10 years? MP: Ideally, I’ll be living on a boat working freelance as soon as possible. I can also see myself as a creative director at a magazine publication - that sounds pretty rad. AS: I know you were raised sailing and working on the marina in Connecticut. Is being on the boat your happy place? MP: Absolutely.

“BECAUSE REALLY ANYONE CAN BE ONE CAN HAVE AN INTERESTING MI


MICHELLE PECK

A PRETTY FACE, BUT NOT EVERYIND.”

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MICHELLE PECK

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AS: If you were given an extra day in the week, what would MP: Sitting outside or visiting the print shop and seeing my you do with your day? professor, Deb Oden. MP: Lay in the sun.

AS: What does your creative environment consist of?

AS: What band fuels your “work music”?

MP: The print shop is open, full of good tunes over the speakers, and makes me never look at clock on the wall. I’m too into my work. At home, I work on the computer. The classrooms are too cold for me, so I make sure to sit outside on the porch or in my comfy bed when working long hours.

MP: Fleetwood and Rihanna. Easy. AS: What work are you currently obsessed with?

MP: I am one to obsess over layouts in magazine or just anything that is well laid out. ID Magazine’s spreads are AS: What is your power food? especially rad. They can break all the rules of layout and still keep each page so interesting to look at. MP: Lately, brown sugar oatmeal. I do enjoy Reese’s Puffs when I remember to pick them up at Kroger. AS: What is your solution to “artist block”?


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GIRL POWER

GIRL POWER TWO UP AND COMING JEWELERY DESIGNERS SHOW US HOW IT’S DONE

EARRINGS Cassondra Morrison

PHOTOGRAPHED BY Isabelle Von Arx MAKEUP and hair BY Jordan Dabney


Cassondra Morrison was and raised in the small town of West plains, Missouri allowed her to be exposed to a creative world at a young age. This instinctive creativeness led to making jewelry which she realized quickly became her passion. Working with her hands and being able to shape and mold something that an individual can display on the body is something very personal. She enjoys learning new techniques and experimenting with processes. Figuring out how she can integrate these techniques into her work to create personal connection is what stimulates her life. Manhattan born, Sophie Thoerner, grew up in the city and moved out to Eastern Long Island at age 11. She is currently enrolled in the Savannah College of Art and Design, pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Jewelry. Along with jewelry, Sophie has a passion for architecture and has been greatly influenced by her architect father. This influence reflects her perfectly measured and planned out execution of her designs. Her aesthetic can be described as minimalist and edgy with a keen eye for detail. She describes her creative process as “incorporating 3D technical processes with traditional fabrication.” She explains, “I like to ensure my designs are meticulously measured and mathematically correct, while still maintaining my personal aesthetic.” Sophie feels most empowered by her friends and family. She describes empowerment as “self-actualization that drives you forward to achieve your ultimate dream.” She feels the most empowered when she sees the excitement of her work through others reactions, expressions, and joy. Witnessing this excitement and the yearning in someone else’s eyes to wear her jewelry allows her to see her ultimate dream come to life. Her work has been admired via Instagram by Spinelli Kilcollin, an idol of hers. There are big things ahead for this jewelry designer. Coming soon is her first men’s collection inspired by organic forms and driven by texture. Necklace Cassondra Morrison







Necklace and ear cuff (left) Sophie Thoerner


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IT’S NOT FOR YOU

IT’S NOT FOR YO U PLAGIARIZED BY Ardeen Samuel PHOTOGRAPHED BY Brooke Turner The movement of feminism and empowerment go hand in hand and it’s something we aren’t shy of these days. It’s one thing for someone to tell you be bold, be confident and love yourself it’s another thing to feel it. Lingerie is something we as women have worn for decades, it’s not something that’s new to us at all, what is new is the concept of wearing it whenever and wherever we want to even as outerwear. As a young lady growing up lingerie was always something women hid under their clothing the fact we now live in a society where it is okay for women to rebel against traditional norms. Gone are the days we live to please men. The matching black lace undergarments I put on in the morning? That’s for me, the tight dress that hugs my every curve? All me and let’s not forget about my stilettos that make me tower over you and elongate my legs ever so elegantly forcing you to stare...you guessed it, all me. As women it is about time we stand up for ourselves and do what makes us happy. We are one of the most powerful creations to walk this earth, so why not embrace it ?! Our bodies have the power to create and nurture life yet at the same time the softness of our skin, something about a woman in the nude is so beautiful. Being in the nude is us in our natural state, it symbolizes innocence, sensuality and sexuality. The color white symbolises wholeness, purity and completion it is a blank canvas. White lingerie on the female body was the ultimate pair for the shoot at hand. The model herself before receiving any kind of instruction took a look into the milky waters with flowers and beamed from ear to ear and said she felt like a queen. As women there is nothing I want more than for us to all feel empowered, and confident. Be the woman you want to be not who society tells you to be, be fiercely feminine and make no apologies.



MAKEUP BY Jordan Dabney


BRALET AND PANTY SET urban outfitters







‘CAUSE I SLAY PHOTOGRAPHED BY Matt Slade MAKEUP BY Jordan Dabney



BODYSUITS urban k JACKETS AND PANTS army fatigues






SHOES Ecote, steve madden, and diba



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