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EVERGREEN THE DAILY

T H E S T U D E N T VO I C E O F WA S H I N G TO N S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y S I N C E 1 8 9 5 .

MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019

VOL. 126 NO. 51

AGRICULTURE

WSU’s Cosmic Crisp apple to hit market Dec. 1

COURTESY OF PROPRIETARY VARIETY MANAGEMENT

Research for the Cosmic Crisp apple began in the late 90s. The apple is collected during a gap between the harvest of other apple varieties and has a durable shelf life. The taste of the Cosmic Crisp may even improve over time postharvest.

After 20 years in the making, locally developed apple variety to debut with more crunch, longer shelf life By Cameron Sheppard Evergreen reporter

A

pple enthusiasts will soon be able to buy the anticipated Cosmic Crisp apple when the WSU-developed apple variety hits stores Dec. 1.

It is a project over 20 years in the making. WSU professor Bruce Barritt started research on the Cosmic Crisp in the late 90s. Kate Evans, WSU professor and horticulturist, took over the project after his retirement in 2008. Evans said the Cosmic Crisp is unique because of its ideal levels of

sugar and acid, which make it both tart and sweet. Kathryn Grandy, director of marketing and operations for Proprietary Variety Management, the company that won the bid for the rights to the Cosmic Crisp in 2013, said the apple has an impressive crunch when bitten into. Evans said the Cosmic Crisp is a hybrid between Honeycrisp and

Enterprise apples. “The process is as simple as taking pollen from Honeycrisp, and using the pollen on flowers of Enterprise apples,” she said. Grandy said there are currently around 12 million Cosmic Crisp apple trees in the state of Washington in small, medium and large orchards and farms. See Apple Page 8

CULTURE

‘If we don’t tell the story, the truth will not be heard’ Exhibit on Native American boarding school to be shown By Angelica Relente Evergreen reporter

DAISY ZAVALA | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Roberta Paul speaks at Terrell Library about her family’s experience in boarding schools and her grandfather’s trunk, which held many items with cultural significance. News | 3

In this issue: News tip? Contact news editor Daisy Zavala news@dailyevergreen.com

(509) 335-2465

At some point, a wooden crate that housed an upright piano became the ideal hiding spot for Jesse and Lydia Paul’s young daughters. “Grandfather Jesse and grandmother Lydia did not want their young children taken away to boarding school,” said Roberta Paul, Nez Perce Tribe member. Roberta said the crate prevented an Indian agent from taking away her grandparent’s daughters at that time, but eventually, they had to attend Chemawa Indian School when they were teenagers. The wooden crate is just one of the things situated at the bottom floor of Terrell Library. WSU’s Manuscripts, Archives and

Special Collections (MASC) will have an exhibit up until mid-March that showcases the experiences of some of Roberta’s family members awt Native American boarding schools. Roberta said this was the second time she showcased her items to the public. MASC has more of her family’s personal items on display compared to the first time she curated her exhibit. “If we don’t tell the story,” she said, “the truth will not be heard.” Roberta said Jesse’s trunk made her question a lot of things about her family history that were left unanswered for a while. “As a young child, I would go through the trunk and fondle things and say, ‘What is this,’ ‘What does this mean,’ ‘What are those photos of my ancestors,’ and I didn’t know who they were because my father didn’t talk about it very much because they See Exhibit Page 8

Sports | 5

Life | 4

First generation program

Howl-O-Ween heals

Volleyball wins in Utah

CAMP was selected as a finalist for an award recognizing their efforts to help students.

The Humane Society will host an event to provide surgeries for animals in need.

Cougs beat their first top 20 team in five sets since they beat No. 9 UW in Sept.

News | Page 3

Life | Page 4

Sports | Page 6


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019

Community Calendar Monday 10/28 Library district hosts Halloween edition fun. Starting at 5 p.m., the Latah County Library District will host Binge Break: Halloween Edition. Binge Break is an after-work, drop-in program for adults that involves crafting while watching television shows. This program will feature Victorian portrait votives. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own small, straight-sided jar or use one that is provided while supplies last. This program is free and open to adults, and located at the Moscow Public Library.

Thursday 10/31 Halloween party courtesy of community college. Beginning at 12 p.m., the Spokane Falls Community College Pullman Campus will host an annual Halloween party. Attendees have the opportunity to participate in a costume contest, games and a photo booth. Prizes, food and drinks will also be available. This event is free and located at the student lounge in the Math Learning Annex. To submit, email events to meditor@dailyevergreen.com. Preference will be given to events that are free and open to the public or are hosted by an RSO, and must include time, date and place.

DAILYEVERGREEN.COM

PAGE TWO

Daily Police Log Friday

Saturday

Theft Other SE Fairmount Road, 8:09 a.m. Officer responded for stolen concrete.

Other Law Enforcement Calls NE Cove Way & NE Valley Rd, 12:27 a.m. Officer contacted and warned a resident about a party spilling out onto the roadway.

F ra u d NW Parr Drive, 8:10 a.m. Officer responded for a gift card scam. M a l i c i o u s M i s c h i e f NE Colorado Street, 10:05 a.m. Tra f f i c V i o l a t i o n Report of a tail light broken out. NE Valley Rd & NE Providence Ct, 9:01 a.m. Officer responded. Report of a vehicle that made an J u ve n i l e P r o b l e m unsafe pass. Officer responded. SW Center St & SW Itani Dr, 11:03 a.m. Unable to locate. Officer advised of a juvenile had set Parking Problem up a skateboard ramp on the walking NE Colorado Street, 10:14 a.m. trail/sidewalk. Officer chalked and tagged possible abandoned vehicle. Ve h i c l e P r ow l NE Lake Street, 12:11 p.m. Other Law Enforcement Calls Report of a vehicle prowl. Officer SE Kamiaken St & SE Paradise St, 11:00 a.m. responded. Officer advised of an anonymous Tr e s p a s s i n g C o m p l a i n t report of a vehicle leak. SW Shirley Street, 1:41 p.m. Found Property Officers responded to the report of SW Lost Trail Drive, 11:31 a.m. someone trespassing. Subject left Report of drug paraphernalia found in willingly upon arrival. the garbage. Collected for destruction. Ac c i d e n t H i t a n d R u n W Walla Walla Highway, Colfax, 2:19 p.m. J u ve n i l e P r o b l e m NW Greyhound Way, 12:40 p.m. Officers located a motorhome suspected Officer responded for a missing student. of being involved in a hit and run. Student located. Theft Other Malicious Mischief SW Lost Trail Drive, 3:39 p.m. NE Providence Court, 2:17 p.m. Officer contacted the reporting party Report of an egged balcony and front in regards to a stolen dog. Dog was door damage. Officer responded. determined to not be stolen. S u s p i c i o u s P e r s o n /C i r c u m s t a n c e Pullman, 8:35 p.m. Officer responded for a cab driver giving his fares his personal phone number.

B u r g l a r y/ I n t r u s i o n A l a r m SW Capri Court, 4:37 p.m. Officers responded to a burglary alarm. Determined to be a false alarm.

In the Stars | Horoscopes Today’s Birthday — — Save, invest and grow prosperity this year. Steady coordination and communication strengthen your networks. Your artistic muses enchant you this winter before an interruption delays your travel or study plans. Summer financial changes reveal valuable new territory. Pull in a bumper harvest and conserve. Aries (March 21 - April 19) —— Cover all financial bases. Follow rules carefully and check procedures. File and process papers, forms and applications. Disciplined efforts pay off. Coordinate actions. Taurus (April 20 - May 20) — — Partnership yields benefits. One of you gets in where the other can’t. Collaborate and network. Share resources, data and talents. Work toward a shared dream. Gemini (May 21 - June 20) —½— Begin a new phase in your work, health and fitness. Words and action align for an energizing lift. Get farther than expected. Discover future options. Cancer (June 21 - July 22) — — Imagine perfection, especially with romance. Share creative ideas and possibilities. Have fun with family and your sweetheart. Allow for pleasant surprises. Weave dreams together.

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 22) — — You may need to get your hands dirty to make the domestic transformation you envision. It’s amazing what paint can do. Energize a creative idea. Virgo (Aug. 23 - Sept. 22) — — Prepare public statements and monitor breaking news. Imagination and creativity illuminate a profitable idea. Prepare, edit and issue comments and declarations. Make connections. Libra (Sept. 23 - Oct. 22) —½ — You’re getting into a profitable groove. Stay in action. Make a persuasive case and boost sales. Provide excellent value. Your work is in demand. Scorpio (Oct. 23 - Nov. 21) —½— Get creative and innovative. You can realize a personal dream. Go for what’s most authentic and honest. Increase integrity for greater workability. Take charge.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 - Dec. 21) — — Minimize noise and fuss. You can be especially effective behind the scenes. Let someone else take the limelight. Your greatest strength is love. Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) —— You’re motivated by a team cause. Share brilliant ideas, talents and resources. Leave nothing to chance. Express your compassion. Ride a wave together. Aquarius (Jan. 20 - Feb. 18) — — Revolutionize your attitude around a work assignment. Analyze the basic structure and make adjustments. Shift the context and consider possibilities from another vantage. Pisces (Feb. 19 - March 20) —½ — Keep building bridges to realize a dream. Learn from other cultures and perspectives. Design an educational adventure. Study options and possibilities.

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News

The Daily Evergreen @DailyEvergreen MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019 | PAGE 3

Program recognized for first-gen efforts

CAMP receives national award nomination for Latino organization By Loren Negron Evergreen reporter

The WSU College Assistant Migrant Program was recognized as a finalist for a national award given by the Latino education organization Excelencia in Education. CAMP Director Michael Heim said this was the first time CAMP received a nomination for the award. Heim said the Examples of Excelencia award recognizes programs that have track records of helping Latinx students succeed in higher education. About 170 programs were nominated nationwide. There were 12 finalists honored at the Celebración de Excelencia event on Friday in Washington, D.C. “I think that one of the main points that was highlighted for our program is that we do a good job at all of the work that would support students toward succeeding in their first year at the university,” he said. “We also had very high retention rates.” Established at WSU in 2006, CAMP works with first-generation students who have a personal or familial background in migrant or seasonal agricultural work. It focuses on student academic success, personal growth and student retention. “Most of our students are coming from families that have only done farm work,” Heim said. “When you have a student come to the university, it could be a cultural shock for students coming to a new setting.” Heim said the program empowers students to bridge academic success with personal success, helping them find balance in college and take advantage of opportunities and resources. “Being a first-gen and coming from an underrepresented community and also low-income and changing your environment and moving away from home, there’s connections that CAMP is able to provide for our students,” he said. Tanya Rivera, freshman speech pathology major, said the

ROLAND HUIE | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Freshman Tanya Rivera, member of the College Assistant Migrant Program, talks about the program and the impact it has on the children of migrant workers pursuing a college education. program helped her find a community of mentors and students who support her. Arriving a day before classes started due to a family emergency, CAMP members helped her move in and took the time to get to know her. “When you’re a first year here and you feel alone, you’re far away from home, I think everybody really supports each other, especially the mentors,” she said. “They want to see what you’re about, what your background is, where you’re coming from.” She said CAMP staff made an effort to get her to meet other CAMP student. “They really took the time to put themselves out there and help me before they helped themselves,” Rivera said. Rafael Pruneda, CAMP academic coordinator and retention

specialist, said CAMP accepts a minimum of 50 first-year students each academic year. Students or their parents had to work in an agricultural job for at least 75 days within the past two years to qualify for the program. They must also be first-generation students. Pruneda said CAMP students receive a wide variety of services, including free one-on-one tutoring, counseling and advising. They also participate in annual team building and leadership retreats. A $1,000 stipend is given to each student. “From the get-go, they are a part of our family,” he said. “We really stress that and let them know we are here and that they are not alone and that we are going to be able to provide that mentorship, that guidance, and also the academic piece of know-

ing that we’re checking up.” Heim said retention is a strong focus of the program. From 2013 to 2018, CAMP had a 98 percent retention rate. Pruneda said retention has been high due to the mentorship aspect of CAMP. He said CAMP builds trust and community for staff members to understand students’ backgrounds. “I think so many times our students come in resilient, but they’re broken down sometimes, feeling overwhelmed from not having the home, culture and their families around. We really offer that mentorship,” Pruneda said. While in the program, students attend a University 101 and University 104 class, he said. The classes are designed to help students navigate through college and prepare for their careers.

Students are also required to visit their professors at least eight times per semester. “We really mentor a family of scholars. We strive to help them,” Pruneda said. “The expectations set for them is at a high level. We want them to succeed and be high-performing.” Yissel Zazueta, CAMP tutor lead and senior human development and Spanish double major, said CAMP students have access to tutors from from 4-7 p.m., Monday through Thursday. They are required to attend at least two hours of tutoring. Some of the tutors and mentors are past CAMP students. “[CAMP] really impacts the first-generation students here at WSU. It includes them in a different way and make them feel like they have a home,” she said.

WSU National Society of Black Engineers holds forum Group hosts their first collaborative forum, discuss professionalism By Benjamin White Evergreen reporter

The WSU National Society of Black Engineers held its firstever fall forum to discuss leadership and professional competency, Saturday afternoon in Butch’s Den. The WSU chapter collaborated with the University of Idaho chapter and the NSBE Tri-Cities Professionals chapter. Alyssa Hampton, president of the WSU NSBE chapter, said the forum was focused on leadership development and connecting students with members of the professional chapters to open up opportunities for mentorship. This was the first event with other chapters the WSU NSBE has taken part in, so they were experimenting to see what worked and hope to hold more forums in the future, she said. “We’re building our presence here on campus, making sure we represent what it means to propel cultural competency in

professional environments,” Hampton said. Michael Benjamin, president of the NSBE Tri-Cities Professionals chapter, led the meeting in a recitation of the NSBE mission statement, which is “to increase the number of culturally responsible Black Engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.” Benjamin along with two other members of the NSBE TriCities Professionals chapter were part of a panel that answered questions from attendees looking to further their professional competency. Members also took part in roundtable discussions over introspective questions that dealt with leadership and professionalism. Hampton said the WSU NSBE chapter is looking to increase its presence on campus and partner more with both the University of Idaho chapter and the NSBE Tri-Cities Professionals chapter. “Not everything here is at your fingertips like it is in Seattle, so why don’t we work towards building a network of students and professionals for

LOREN NEGRON | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Panelists from the NSBE Tri-Cities Professionals answered questions about professionalism, internship opportunities and how to succeed as a minority in the job market. support, mentorship, internship opportunities?” she said. Matthias McFarlane, WSU NSBE programs chair, said NSBE is an organization that

does not look at him as a minority but is a space where he can escape from expectations based on his minority status. “It gives you the space to

do what you want to do, which is just achieve and succeed and keep pushing forward,” McFarlane said. “NSBE gave me room to do that.”


Life

Life Editor Zach Goff life@dailyevergreen.com

The Daily Evergreen @DailyEvergreen DAILYEVERGREEN.COM | PAGE 5

COMMUNITY

PAGE 4 | MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019

Howl-O-Ween event raises money to save pets Cougar History: library celebrates Butch’s birthday By Carolyn Clarey Evergreen reporter

Families and community members donned costumes in the dark of Friday evening for Palouse-Clearwater Environmental Institute’s 12th annual Animals of the Night. The outreach event is put on to educate people about various nocturnal creatures, specifically ones native to Washington and Idaho. Participants made their way through three areas, beginning with spiders and amphibians, moving through an area dedicated to mammals, before ending at a raptor demonstration. Biologist Jeremy Heft was one of the representatives for the Wolf Education and Research Center at the event. “The Wolf Education and Research Center has been coming to this event for many years now,” Heft said. “Wolves are usually a hot topic here in the Northwest; that’s why we exist as an organization.” Heft said though wolves are not technically nocturnal, they are represented at Animals of the Night because they are crepuscular, which means they are active during twilight hours. Representatives from WSU’s Wildlife Society, the Idaho CAROLYNN CLAREY | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE Department of Fish and Game and other local environmental organizations hosted tables in the mammal area and taught about University Archivist Mark O’English discusses how he highlights the Mascot’s anniversary to reconnect people to Butch’s bats, beavers, skunks and raccoons. Just beyond the mammal section, the WSU Raptor Club’s origin on Friday morning at the Holland/Terrell Library.

demonstration drew a crowd of onlookers. The group brought five owls to the event, including Kotori, a Western Screech Owl, said Rowan Doyle, club member and freshman biology major. Moscow resident Phyllis Van Horn said she has been a member of the Raptor Club since 2008 and she has attended Animals

WS U d i s p l ay r e m e m b e r s t h e 1 0 0 t h a n n ive r s a r y o f s c h o o l m a s co t

I think that a lot of students today don’t even realize that we had live cougars as recently as the 70s Mark O’English university archivist

of the Night with the group in previous years. Van Horn said anyone who is interested in birds of prey is welcome to join the club, as long as they are over 18 years of age. “It’s an exciting event because the people who come are very interested in conservation, in environmental issues,” Van Horn said. “They’re interested in educating their children and making them more sensitive to some of the natural things in our world.” Ben and Erin Doty brought their 2-year-old daughter Lorelai, dressed as an elephant, to the event. They said they particularly enjoyed looking at the owls the Raptor Club brought. “Anything nature-related we like to get her out toward, she’s really big into animals right now,” Ben said. After passing through all three educational areas, participants ended at a play area with touch tables and activities for children. Before leaving, they had the option of stopping at a bonfire with s’mores, tacos, beer for adults and apple cider for children.

Legal adults welcome at themed nights for Halloween Individuals 18+ may gain entrance to bars this Halloween season, depending on the night By Cameron Sheppard Evergreen reporter

CAROLYNN CLAREY | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Children interact with shelter dogs at the Howl-O-Ween event Saturday afternoon at the Latah County Fairgrounds and Event Center.

People bring their pets in support of the Humane Society; help animals receive life-saving surgeries By Emma Ledbetter Evergreen reporter

The Humane Society of the Palouse hosted their inaugural Howl-O-Ween fundraiser Sunday afternoon at the Latah County Events Center in Moscow to raise money for life-saving surgeries for animals. Pups of all shapes and sizes turned out to strut their stuff for a canine costume contest. The event also featured a howling competition, tricks for a treat competition and raffles throughout. Board member Sandra Kelly said the Humane Society of the Palouse used to do an Oktoberfest fundraiser, but it didn’t quite fit what they wanted to do as an organization. She said Howl-O-Ween is a combination of Oktoberfest and an old costume event they used to do. “Because we’re nerds, [we did] ‘Howl’-o-ween,” Kelly said. “And when it’s near Halloween, you got to dress up, right?” Kelly said the Humane Society is a no-kill shelter, so they only resort to euthanasia if an animal is extremely sick. Money raised from the event allows the organization to provide life-saving surgeries for ill and injured animals.

“We exist because of fundraising, we exist because of grant work, we exist because of volunteers,” Kelly said. “That’s why these events, while they’re fun and happy, [are] really helping us to continue being a Humane Society.” Various groups hosted tables at the event and advertised their dogthemed products and services. Maria Claveran, a representative from Costco, said she has been coming to animal shelter events like this in Pullman, Palouse, Lewiston and Clarkston for the past three years. “I enjoy pets and dogs so I love coming to this,” Claveran said. “My favorite [part is] seeing the dogs all dressed up.” Troy resident Melissa Tholstrup dressed her dog Mist as a witch for Howl-O-Ween. Tholstrup said she saw the event on Facebook and went because she wanted to support the Humane Society. Obsidian Van Zant attended the event with her family and two dogs, Cricket and Cheyenne. She said she was excited to be at the event because it benefits the good work the Humane Society does. Kelly said the Humane Society could not do what they do without the support of community members and sponsors, as well as their staff members. “We’re just an extension of the really good people on the Palouse,” Kelly said.

Fair brings people together Fall Vintage & Handcraft Fair allows community to support local business owners, come together, find holiday gifts for holidays By Eurus Thach Evergreen reporter

Local vendors gathered at the Fall Vintage & Handcraft Fair and presented their products to the community on Friday and Saturday at Beasley Coliseum. “It’s really about people that put their love and their passion into what they’re making and being able to bring that and share with people,” said SAM’s Apothecary Owner Sam Brown. This was Brown’s third year at the fair. He said that this event was a chance to learn more about the market and improve his business skills. Moreover, to him, the fair also brought the community members together. Carrie Edwards, a farmer in Colfax, said that in order to fit into the Fall Vintage & Handcraft Fair market, her products could not simply be about fresh flowers. The idea of drying the cut flowers and making timeless bouquets came to her when she was on the farm harvesting them. Edwards decided to display these products for her first time participating in the Fall Vintage & Handcraft Fair. “[I] meet and see a lot of people I know bump into people and watch other people bump into friends and families. It seems to be a very positive attitude,

not only with the people that visit, but also with all the people that are vendors who are very kind and friendly,” Edwards said. Meeting other vendors is also a fun highlight of the event, said Sharon Weber, the owner of Weber Woods and Quilts. Weber took her hobby and turned it into a business, she said. She has participated in the fair for 10 years. “I always [loved] sewing, and I always [say] that ‘When I retire, I am going to sew.’ And so I did for a while, and my husband came home one day. He said, ‘You know, you are going to find an outlet for this stuff,” Weber said. The most heartwarming moment of the fair came from the customers who enjoyed her products, she said. “I knew people and they come by and they tell that, ‘Yes, I bought something last year and I love it,’ and it makes you even feel better,” Weber said. Emily Ferguson, undeclared freshman and attendee of the event, said that the Fall Vintage & Handcraft Fair was an ideal place to get Christmas presents. “[There are] So many local businesses are here. It’s time to support them,” Ferguson said.

Looking for a Halloween outing in the Pullman bar scene? Here are some local events and specials celebrating All Hallows’ Eve. Rico’s Pub on Main St. will host their own Halloween party, in which adults, kids and dogs are invited. Attendees must be over 21-years-old after 8 p.m. The local brass-band Nuu Wave will perform at 9 p.m. Stubblefields’s is hosting a series of “Halloweek” parties, including 18 and up nights on Monday and Wednesday. There will be costume contests on Wednesday and Thursday night. Etsi Bravo on Main St. will host “Rave to the Grave,”, a Halloween-themed electronic dance music party on Thursday evening, featuring a live disc jockey. Co-owner Cory Preston, said the bar will also offer a specialized Halloween cocktail menu, with drinks priced at $6 dollars each. The cocktail menu will feature drinks such as “Resting Witch Face,” a gin, fresh ginger, lemon and raspberry cocktail. As well as “Creepin’ it Real”, made with rum, passionfruit, peach, lemon and fresh orange juice. Preston said he is not worried about the fact that Halloween is on a weekday this year, he still expects good business. COURTESY OF ETSI BRAVO “It’s one of those holidays where people come out no matter Rico’s Pub, Stubblefields and Etsi Bravo plan to host Halloween-themed events in the week leading up to Halloween. what day it is,” he said.

Animals of the Night unite Environmental institute hosts annual educational event; includes touch tables, Raptor Club, spiders, amphibians By Emma Ledbetter Evergreen reporter

Families and community members donned costumes in the dark of Friday evening for PalouseClearwater Environmental Institute’s 12th annual Animals of the Night. The outreach event is put on to educate people about various nocturnal creatures, specifically ones native to Washington and Idaho. Participants made their way through three areas, beginning with spiders and amphibians, moving through an area dedicated to mammals, before ending at a raptor demonstration. Biologist Jeremy Heft was one of the representatives for the Wolf Education and Research Center at the event. “The Wolf Education and Research Center has been coming to this event for many years now,” Heft said. “Wolves are usually a hot topic here in the Northwest; that’s why we exist as an organization.” Heft said though wolves are not technically nocturnal, they are represented at Animals of the Night because they are crepuscular, which means they are active during twilight hours. Representatives from WSU’s Wildlife Society, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and other local environmental organizations hosted tables in the mammal area and taught about bats, beavers, skunks and raccoons.

Just beyond the mammal section, the WSU Raptor Club’s demonstration drew a crowd of onlookers. The group brought five owls to the event, including Kotori, a Western Screech Owl, said Rowan Doyle, club member and freshman biology major. Moscow resident Phyllis Van Horn said she has been a member of the Raptor Club since 2008 and she has attended Animals of the Night with the group in previous years. Van Horn said anyone who is interested in birds of prey is welcome to join the club, as long as they are over 18 years of age. “It’s an exciting event because the people who come are very interested in conservation, in environmental issues,” Van Horn said. “They’re interested in educating their children and making them more sensitive to some of the natural things in our world.” Ben and Erin Doty brought their 2-year-old daughter Lorelai, dressed as an elephant, to the event. They said they particularly enjoyed looking at the owls the Raptor Club brought. “Anything nature-related we like to get her out toward, she’s really big into animals right now,” Ben said. After passing through all three educational areas, participants ended at a play area with touch tables and activities for children. Before leaving, they had the option of stopping at a bonfire with s’mores, tacos, beer for adults and apple cider for children.

Studio provides place for creativity, artistic experimentation with family members Wild at Art supplies space for children to bond with parents through spooky art By Rachel Koch Evergreen reporter

On Saturday at Wild at Art, an art studio in Moscow, Co-Owners Donald and Joan Stanziano hosted Kids, Cocoa & Canvas. The event involved children and their parents painting together, but with a Halloween-themed twist befitting the spooky season. “We’ve been doing this for years,” Donald Stanziano said. “We always like to do something around Halloween for kids and families because it becomes a family activity.” Donald Stanziano printed an image of a haunted house for participants to recreate by painting it onto a canvas, he said. He instructed the attendees to paint the background on the canvas first, let the paint dry and, lastly, paint the foreground. To speed up the drying process, Donald Stanziano provided hairdryers. “I’ve got a sequence,” Stanziano said. “I’m not doing a brushstroke-by-brushstroke approach to this.” Wild at Art also provided snacks, orange juice and hot cocoa for participants while they painted. One of the participants, Ashli Amos came with her daughter. “This is the first event [hosted by Wild at Art] we’ve been to,” Amos said. However, Amos added that she has visited the studio before. Julia Branan, Moscow resident, also attended Kids, Cocoa & Canvas. Branan’s only previous art experience comes from drawing at home and she has never taken any studio classes, she said. “I don't really do a lot of painting,” she said. “I’m more used to

drawing in pencil, so this allows me to try a new medium.” Nonetheless, her artwork drew in admirers throughout Wild at Art. Like Amos, Branan has been to Wild at Art, but has never attended Kids, Cocoa & Canvas. However, Branan sees herself coming back in future years, she said. “I like how it has a guide for you if you’re a little lost, but also you can be creative and do your own kind of thing,” Branan said. Kids, Cocoa & Canvas provides a friendly, welcoming space free from judgment, Stanziano said. “This is one of the safest environments for them to express their creativity,” he said. Many of the beginner-level projects available at Wild at Art are forgiving, Stanziano said. “You could paint a small coaster or trivet and simply put dots on it,” he said. “When it gets glazed and it gets fired it’s going to be shiny and lovely. People are going to say, ‘Oh, I didn't know I could do that.’” Co-Owner Joan Stanziano founded Wild at Art in 2005, her husband Donald said. Donald Stanziano added that Joan Stanziano started the business shortly after moving to Moscow from the Bay Area. “Her three kids, they weren’t all that winter sports-oriented, they were very artsy and there was no opportunity like this,” he said. “She thought, ‘This would be a nice opportunity, not just for my kids but for other families.’” What makes Wild at Art enjoyable for people is that it encourages conversation and creative expression, Donald Stanziano said. “You can paint whatever you want,” he said. “You can paint a dinosaur for all I care.” Wild at Art is open Wednesday through Saturday from 12 to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. at 118 E 3rd St. in Moscow.


Sports Editor K atie Archer Deputy Sports Editor Grace Arnis desports@dailyevergreen.com PAGE 6 | MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019

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WSU Volleyball balls out in Utah Cougar freshman middleblocker Magda Jehlárová dominates By Ryan Root Evergreen reporter

The No. 24 Cougar volleyball upset the No. 18 University of Utah Utes 3-2 Sunday afternoon in Salt Lake City. This marks WSU’s first victory against a top 20 opponent since playing the thenNo. 8 Washington Huskies in September. Freshman middle blocker Magda Jehlárová achieved a career-high in kills with 18. Coming into the match, Jehlárová was in the top 10 nationwide for total blocks and blocks per set. She had a total of eight blocks on Sunday. Utah (14-7, 6-4) led the match for the majority of the first set. It wasn’t until the score was tied at 23 that WSU (18-4, 7-3) leveled with Utah. Utah won the set 25-23. Jehlárová totaled seven kills in the first set alone. The second set was a complete shift of momentum for the Cougars. After the first 10 points split evenly between teams, WSU did not fall behind for the remainder of the set. WSU won the set 25-15, which was the largest final score differential of the match.

HSING-HAN CHEN | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

Freshman middle blocker Magda Jehlarova hit the ball against the Liberty University on Sep. 14 at Bohler Gym. Freshman outside hitter Pia Timmer and redshirt senior middle blocker Jocelyn Urias combined for nine kills in the set. WSU fell to Utah in the third set after an extended score of 26-24. At one point, the set

was tied at 24, but Utah’s backto-back kills got the team the win. In the fourth set, the team tied again at 24, but this time WSU came out on top 28-26. WSU was the victor in the final set with a score of 16-14.

Jehlárová made the matchwinning kill. Redshirt freshman setter Hannah Pukis tallied a season-high in assists Sunday with 62. She also had 12 digs, which gave her a double-

double for the match. The final hitting percentages were .294 for WSU and .230 for Utah. The Cougars will face the UCLA Bruins at 7 p.m. Friday in Bohler Gym.

College football week 10 AP Poll analysis AP Top 25:

The Pac-12 moves up in the poll. Could this be a move back to CFP?

1. LSU 2. Alabama 3. Ohio State 4. Clemson 5. Penn State 6. Florida 7. Oregon 8. Georgia 9. Utah 10. Oklahoma 11. Auburn 12. Baylor 13. Minnesota 14. Michigan 15. SMU 16. Notre Dame 17. Cincinnati 18. Wisconsin 19. Iowa 20. Appalachian State 21. Boise State 22. Kansas State 23. Wake Forest 24. Memphis 25. San Diego State

By Kuria Pounds Evergreen columnist

For the third straight week in a row, a top 10 team in the country has fallen victim to the “upset” team. The Associated Press released its poll for Week 10 and from the number of upsets that happened this past weekend, I knew the poll needed some changes. Here is what is right and what is wrong with this week’s AP Top 25 poll. Before I get started, I need to talk about the Big 12. The conference says that its “the most challenging path to the college football playoff,” but in a weekend like this, where all of the favored teams in the matchups lose, the conference definitely has a challenging path. Yes, Oklahoma, Iowa State, Texas and Texas Tech were all favored in their matchups and lost. For a conference that prides itself on that saying, it really shows how challenging the Big 12 is for a team to get to the college football playoff. What is right with the Poll: LSU is number one over Alabama. Good. LSU proved that they are a capable college football playoff team in their 23-20 victory over Auburn at home. Yes, Alabama won too, but they played Arkansas and the Crimson Tide were up 41-0 at halftime. That does not prove anything, Alabama is supposed to be whopping them that bad. I’m taking LSU’s number one ranking with a grain of salt since Alabama still has to play LSU and Auburn. Oregon and Utah are finally in the top 10. It took a 35-0 shutout by Utah and a close

RYAN PUGH | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

The Cougars play Utah on Sept. 29, 2018. The Utes move back into the Top 10 this week. 37-35 victory for Oregon to finally get them the national recognition the Pac-12 has been waiting for. I won’t speak on the WSU-Oregon game, for my fellow Cougars. Utah looked absolutely dominant on both sides of the ball; limiting the California offense while Zack Moss and Tyler Huntley exploded on offense. Notre Dame and Wisconsin fell so much. Thank God. Maybe it was the weather in both games, but both teams looked absolutely sloppy. Wisconsin’s offense could not get past Chase Young at all, and the D-line for Ohio State locked Heisman hopeful Jonathan Taylor at 52 yards. Meanwhile, in Ann Arbor, the weather was windy and rainy, and Notre Dame could not get their offense rolling. Michigan led 17-0 at the half. Ian Book

completed 8 of 25 pass attempts the whole game. Now, Shea Patterson completed 6 of 12, but the run game for Michigan led them to victory over Notre Dame at home. This is why Notre Dame should join a conference. Texas and Iowa State dropped from the rankings. Thank you so much. I already touched on this, but the Big 12 looked like a Division III conference on Saturday. Sam Ehlinger threw four interceptions against TCU en route to their third loss on the season, and because of how bad Texas’ offense looked, the defense had to compensate, and got gassed from being on the field for so long. The Iowa State defense could not stop Chuba Hubbard. Down 21-10 at home after Hubbard just ran through their defense,

which pretty much set the tone for the rest of the game. Even though the Cyclones did make a comeback, a late pick-six from Brock Purdy cost Iowa State the game. Both games are prime examples as to why the Big 12 looked horrible over the weekend. What is wrong with the Poll: Oklahoma should be out of the top 10 in general and should not come back into the college football playoff conversation. As of now, they are the Ohio State of last year. One bad loss and all of a sudden, their chances at a college football playoff bid disappears. Oklahoma should be at least number 11 or 12, because of how badly they looked in the first half, even though the Sooners did come back. The conference, like I said previously, looked

Notable matchups for this week: No. 23 Wake Forest faces NC State No. 16 Notre Dame plays Virginia Tech No. 8 Georgia travels to Gainesville to face No. 6 Florida No. 9 Utah plays Washington No. 15 SMU faces No. 24 Memphis No. 7 Oregon travels to Los Angeles to play USC horrible and the “leader” should fall with the conference more. Minnesota should be ahead of Baylor. Minnesota looked very good against Maryland at home, especially on offense. Minnesota is one of the most underrated teams not only in the Big 10, but in the country as well. Baylor did not have a game, and went up two spots? They should’ve stayed at the same ranking from the previous week, possibly go down one spot, because of how weak the Big 12 looks right now.


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MONDAY, OCT. 28, 2019 | PAGE 7

WSU goal not enough Football falls to Ducks

SERENA HOFDAHL | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

RYAN PUGH | DAILY EVERGREEN FILE

Freshman defender Rose Young dribbles the ball against Montana on Aug. 30 at the Lower Soccer Field.

Then-junior wide receiver Dezmon Patmon evades Oregon defense on Oct. 20 2018 at Martin Stadium.

Cougars have aggressive game against UCLA but can’t come away with win By Jaclyn Seifert Evergreen reporter

No. 19 WSU soccer fell to No. 18 University of California, Los Angeles, in a 2-1 loss Sunday afternoon at Wallis Annenberg Stadium in Los Angeles, California. Although WSU had an early lead in the match, UCLA later scored two goals in the second half to defeat the Cougars 2-1. The Top-25 matchup was aggressive as both teams looked to take home a win for their programs. UCLA (11-4-1, 5-3-0) most recently beat the Huskies in a 1-0 win on Thursday. The Cougars (10-5-1, 3-4-1) came off a 3-0 loss against the University of Southern California on the same day. The game looked promising for Washington State in the first half against the Bruins as they saw many opportunities on goal. Senior forward Morgan Weaver almost had a goal after a breakaway through the UCLA defense in the first 13 seconds of the game. WSU brought 11 fouls against the Bruins during the match. Both graduate student midfielder Averie Collins and sophomore defender Mykiaa Minniss received yellow cards in the second half. Minniss received a red card earlier this season on Oct. 13 against Arizona State in Pullman. It was 5-foot-10-inch freshman forward MacKenzie Frimpong-Ellertson who scored an important goal for Washington State to put the Cougars

on the board in the 33rd minute. After a well-placed cross from sophomore forward Molly Myers, Frimpong-Ellertson found the ball at her left foot on a one-touch finish for her third goal of the year and first in Pac-12 play. UCLA took 19 shots and 10 corner kicks against Washington State. The Cougars took nine shots and only two corner kicks against the Bruins. UCLA began the second half eager to get a goal against WSU. UCLA junior forward Ashley Sanchez scored for her team on an open one-touch finish tying the game 1-1. The goal was assisted by UCLA sophomore midfielder

WSU brought 11 fouls against the Bruins during the match. Maricarmen Reyes outran the WSU defense on a quick breakaway, finding Sanchez. It was Sanchez’s sixth goal of the season. In the 77th minute, graduate student goalkeeper Ella Dederick stopped Sanchez with a memorable save to keep the score 1-1. Only 10 minutes later, UCLA took the lead after redshirt senior forward Anika Rodriguez sent a well-placed through ball to UCLA freshman forward Mia Fishel to take the lead 2-1. Washington State will play in their last two home games of the season against the University of Utah at 7 p.m. on Thursday on the lower soccer field. They will also play the University of Colorado at 12 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. The Utah game can be viewed on the Pac-12 Networks. The Colorado game can be viewed on the WSU live stream.

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Cougars play close game against Oregon By Sam Grant Evergreen reporter

WSU football traveled to Eugene, Oregon, Saturday to take on the No. 11 Oregon Ducks looking for their first road win in the Pac-12. However, the game ended in 37-35 loss for the Cougars. The Cougars (4-4, 1-4 Pac-12) stopped Oregon (7-1, 5-0 Pac-12) on their first drive, making a statement on defense. WSU then ran the ball all the way down the field within the 10-yard line, settling for a field goal by redshirt sophomore kicker Blake Mazza, making it 3-0 Cougars early in the first quarter. The Ducks responded with a promising drive, finally being held up by the Cougars and settling for a field goal of their own, tying it up at 3-3. Oregon got the ball back again, this time scoring a touchdown off an 89-yard rush, missing the PAT after, making it 9-3 Oregon. The Cougars brought the ball down to the endzone, ending the drive with an interception

given up to Oregon early in the second quarter. Sophomore running back Max Borghi ended up earning his seventh touchdown as the Cougars took their offense to the endzone again, putting the game to 10-9 Cougars. Redshirt senior quarterback Anthony Gordon threw an interception in the second quarter, being returned for a touchdown, followed by a two-point conversion, making it 17-10 Ducks nearing the end of the second quarter. The Cougars bounced back in the following drive, taking the ball downfield in a quick drive that ended in a touchdown pass from Gordon to redshirt junior wide receiver Renard Bell, tying it up within a minute left in the second quarter. After a shaky start for the Cougars, the Ducks took the ball to the endzone for a short rushing touchdown, making it 24-17 Ducks in the middle of the third quarter. WSU responded by scoring another field goal courtesy of Mazza, cutting Oregon’s lead to 24-20. Oregon took the ball back in the following drive, going all the way to the goal line and scoring a rushing touch-

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down, putting the Ducks up 11 points against the Cougars in the beginning of the fourth quarter. The very next drive WSU took the ball downfield, scoring another touchdown from Gordon to graduate student wide receiver Brandon Arconado. The twopoint conversion after the touchdown was successful, which was also caught by Arconado, making the score 31-28. The Cougars stopped the Ducks on a pivotal drive, holding them to only a field goal and keeping the lead by Oregon to only six points in the middle of the fourth quarter. With a lead in sight for the Cougars, Gordon led his high-powered offense, hitting Arconado for another touchdown, giving the Cougars a 35-34 lead with one minute left in the game. Despite only having one minute left on the clock, the Ducks brought the ball right back down to the endzone, hitting a field goal, winning the game 37-34 over the Cougars. The Cougars will continue their road trip when they travel to California to take on Berkeley next Saturday.

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NEWS

Speaker addresses stigma around mental health By Andrea Gonzalez Evergreen reporter

The 41st annual Gabriel Cardenas Memorial Banquet featured keynote speaker Karla Blanco, who spoke about mental health stigma within the Latinx community in the CUB Senior Ballroom. The Gabriel Cardenas scholarship was made to honor the life of Gabriel Cardenas, who studied at WSU. The banquet concluded the weeklong celebration of Semana de la Raza.

Raza,” Pruneda said. It is always great as a community to recognize students and everybody in the community throughout the weeklong celebration of Semana de la Raza, Pruneda said. The hope is to have everyone come together for the event to enjoy themselves while being unified, he said. Karla Blanco, assistant professor and clinician at the University of Idaho, said education creates a pathway to make positive changes in the community and in the country. Education gives people a seat at the table to have a say in deci-

We undermine our own mental health because we think other people have it worse Karla Blanco

Rafael Pruneda, College Assistance Migrant Program academic coordinator and retention specialist, said thousands of dollars have been given to Latinx Chicanx students because of the endowment scholarship. “We should be embracing each other, being inclusive of others, and help people understand the celebrations that we’re trying to promote in La Semana de la

WSU celebrates its 41st annual Gabriel Cardenas Memorial Banquet

speaker

sions affecting communities, she said. Many things in people’s lives can be taken away, but nobody can take someone’s education, Blanco said. Many Latinx individuals don’t talk about their mental health because there is a stigma associated with mental health struggles, Blanco said. There is an assumption in the

HSING-HAN CHEN | THE DAILY EVERGREEN

Karla Blanco, assistant professor and clinician at the University of Idaho asks students to share their thoughts on the high rate of Latinos committing suicide at the CUB Senior Ballroom. Latinx community that people seeking mental health services are weak and crazy, but that is not the case, she said. “We undermine our own mental health because we think other people have it worse,”

Blanco said. Manuel Acevedo, director of Multicultural Student Services, said it is important for the Latinx community to have a sense of presence and ownership. He said he hopes the community will be

inclusive, welcoming and antixenophobic. Acevedo said a university education is a privilege, so students should “keep an eye on the prize,” which is graduating and supporting each other.

Apple | Continued from Page 1

Exhibit | Cont. from Page 1

“The industry is enormously better after sitting a few weeks excited,” she said. Evans said the harvest season They taste as for these apples is ideal for fruit fresh in June as growers because it fills a gap in they do in between the harvest season of December other apple varieties. This makes Kathryn Grandy it ideal for the efficient use of director labor for fruit producers. Grandy said the Cosmic post harvest. Crisp has a durable shelf life, “We can store this apple easand the apples may even taste ily for a year,” she said. “They

were gone,” she said. Jesse obtained the trunk after he attended the Carlisle Indian boarding school, Roberta said. Children at the school were taught English, math and reading. They were also required to learn a specific skill, and Jesse was assigned to learn wagon-making. She said after Lydia’s death, Jesse gathered some of Lydia’s belongings, packed them in his trunk and sent it to Titus, Roberta’s father. “These items are my connection to the lives of my ancestors and their stories,” Roberta said. The boarding school Jesse attended was established by Brigadier Gen. Richard Pratt, she said, who thought that immersing Native Americans in the “white man’s culture” could help them survive in the new world.

taste as fresh in June as they do in December.” Grandy said that Washington produces 65-75 percent of the nation’s apples, yet this is the first variety that originated from the state. Proprietary Variety Management is currently working on partnerships with other companies to incorporate the use of Cosmic Crisp apples in cider, pies and juices.

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“[It was] the stripping away of cutting their hair and taking them out of buckskin, putting them in uniforms, and making them not speak their language,” Roberta said. Tsitsistas tribe member Marsha Small said exhibits like this shine a light on the “atrocities” that occurred in the past. “We’re bringing the indigenous narrative into this,” Small said. She said she has been doing research on Indian boarding school cemeteries for 7 years. One of the most difficult things she faced was realizing that children as young as 2 years old were buried at that time. Roberta said having the exhibit speaks the truth and promotes representation. “We are still struggling, and we have to fight with all of our being to still be here,” she said. “We are still here.”

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