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Eastern News

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Two senators resigned during the second installment of the “Senate on the Road” program in Thomas Hall on Wednesday. Alex Boyd, a junior political science major who has been a member of the student government since his freshman year, said he resigned for personal reasons. “I have been on the fence about this for quite sometime,” Boyd said. “It wasn’t as enjoyable as it had been in the past.” Boyd said the main reason for his departure was he felt he needed to focus more on school and other aspects of his life. He said he also was not happy with the direction in which student government has been going. “I was a little upset about some of the way things were going,” Boyd said. Boyd said he alerted Speaker of the Senate Zach Samples, a sophomore history major, to his resignation on Monday, as well as some of his close friends in the Senate. Samples said he has no hard feelings between himself and the members who quit. “They quit for necessary reasons,” Samples said. “It was a necessary thing for them.” Alex Lais, a sophomore undecided major and co-chair of the University Development and Recycling Committee with Boyd, also resigned during the meeting, but said he has no hard feelings toward stu-

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Long climb to the top for Panthers

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Boyd, Lais resign from Student Senate By Kathryn Richter Staff Reporter

OC TOBER 27, 2011

Check this week’s edition of Fresh!

STUDENT SENATE

Senators leave for personal reasons

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dent government. “Student government is moving along really well, they’re doing amazing things,” Lais said. “The progress the group will make will be unbelievable.” Lais said the main reason for his resignation from the Student Senate was his involvement with other activities. “It’s not fair to the organization if I’m not there giving my hundred percent all the time,” Lais said. Lais said he was in the application process of other leadership opportunities. “I’m going for different type of leadership positions throughout the campus and the community right now,” Lais said. Samples said he will begin actively seeking new members within the next few days, but will give a strong focus to students who have previously applied for a Student Senate position, as well as non-Senate committee members. Joe Sherman, a senior kinesiology major and Student Senate member said the resignations of Boyd and Lais caught him off guard. “I definitely did not see it coming,” Sherman said. “I was a state of shock and confusion for the most part.” Sherman said right now he is just trying to figure out what is going on, but he feels that these resignations will not negatively affect the student government. “It’s definitely sad, but I don’t think it’s going to slow us down,” Sherman said. Kathryn Richter can be reached at 581-2812 or kjrichter@eiu.edu.

Serious business

SABRINA DUNC AN | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

John Mefford, a senior political science major, sits with Mike Ruybal, the student veterans coordinator, and Dan Hart, a senior biological science major, discuss future plans during the Student Veterans of Eastern meeting Wednesday evening at Jackson Avenue Coffee.

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Professor to discuss southern roots By Andrew Crivilare Staff Reporter

A visiting professor will address the American South’s association with a literary tradition lionizing dying civilizations today in the Doudna Fine Arts Center Lecture Hall. Michael Goode, associate professor and chairman of the department of English at Syracuse University, will deliver the lecture titled “The Sir Walter Disease: Reenacting American History After Walter Scott,” in affiliation with Phi Beta Kappa academic fraternity. Suzie Park, associate professor of English and president of the Eastern Illinois Phi Beta Kappa association, said this will be the 21st an-

nual Phi Beta Kappa lecture at Eastern, in spite of the fact that Eastern does not have an official chapter on campus. Goode said that Sir Walter Scott was a 19th Century Scottish author who wrote historical novels emphasizing the romantic aspects of cultures, especially the Scottish, during their demise at the hands of modernity. “In the eyes of some people the novels kind of glorify regional cultures at the moment of their twilight,” Goode said. “They produce identification and nostalgia for the culture about to be lost.” Scott’s novels had a Harry Potter-like following and were part of standard education across continents during the 1800s, Goode

said. “Walter Scott is not a name on the tip of the tongues of many people today,” he said. “It was really only in the early 20th Century that his literary star fell.” Goode said that while Scott never wrote directly about the South, his ideas had a profound effect on the Antebellum South, who saw themselves as civilized people being prayed upon by the modernized North. “The title (of the lecture) refers to the American South having a Walter Scott disease,” Goode said. “Their thinking of history was affected by Scott’s historical novels, it influenced their perception of self.” ROOTS, page 5

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‘Volpone’ adaptation incorporates gender switching, tricks By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

SETH SCHROEDER | DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Julie Zielinski, a junior theatre arts major, and Alexis Evans, a senior communication studies major, perform Sunday during dress rehearsal for “Volpone” in the Mainstage Theater of the Doudna Fine Arts Center.

Gender switching, tricks and deception were all themes incorporated into the opening night of “Volpone.” The Department of Theatre Arts presented “Volpone” by Ben Jonson Wednesday. The play was an adaptation from the 1606 production by Jonson. In t h e a d a p t a t i o n , t h e c a s t switched the genders of the characters, setting and time. The play is set in present day Venice, Fla., instead of its original setting of Venice, Italy. Volpone, a man in the original play, is conniving and greedy while plotting to trick many people out of their money. However, in Eastern’s adaptation,

Volpone is played as a woman. Volpone deceives many of the other characters into believing that she is on her deathbed and is looking for someone to make her heir. The characters go as far as tricking Corbaccia, an older women, into writing Volpone as her heir instead of Corbaccia’s daughter, Bonaria. Presents are brought to influence Volpone’s decision while her assistant Mosca plots each one against the other. Volpone in disguise also falls for the husband of Corvina, one of the pursuers of her heir, and sends Mosca to trick Corvina into giving Volpone her husband. Believing it would make her the heir; Corvina bullies her husband into staying with Volpone, even

though he refused. Christopher Mitchell, the director of “Volpone” and an associate professor of Theatre Arts, said this adaptation of the play excluded a subplot that he believed would be comical to the audience, but could not present it in the play because of time constraints. “I think the main plot is pretty funny and has a very satisfying ark to it,” Mitchell said. “I don’t think the audience is missing anything.” Mitchell said he believed the changed genders added more comedy to the play. “They (the audience) seem to really be getting a kick out of it,” Mitchell said. “I noticed on certain lines where the genders play differently, they (the cast) were getting laughs or raised eyebrows.” VOLPONE, page 5


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EIU weather TODAY

FRIDAY

L AKE VIE W COLLEGE

Event donates to end cancer By Ethan Stephenson Staff Reporter

Partly Cloudy High: 57° Low: 36°

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Editorial Board Editor in Chief.....................................................................................Alex McNamee DENeic@gmail.com Managing Editor.......................................................................... Shelley Holmgren DENmanaging@gmail.com News Editor....................................................................................Elizabeth Edwards DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Associate News Editor................................................................. Samantha Bilharz DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Opinions Editor........................................................................................Dave Balson DENopinions@gmail.com Online Editor.......................................................................................Chris O'Driscoll DENnews.com@gmail.com News Staff Activities Editor................................................................................... Sam McDaniel Administration Editor...................................................................... Rachel Rodgers Campus Editor............................................................................. Nike Ogunbodede City Editor..........................................................................................................Sara Hall Photo Editor..................................................................................................Kim Foster Sports Editor....................................................................................Dominic Renzetti Verge Editor........................................................................................ Seth Schroeder Assistant Photo Editor...................................................................... Karolina Strack Assistant Online Editor.......................................................................Marcus Smith Advertising Staff Advertising Manager.............................................................. AnnaMarie Sprague Promotions Manager...........................................................................Allison Twaits Ad Design Manager.........................................................................Shannon Ready Faculty Advisers Editorial Adviser................................................................................... Lola Burnham Photo Adviser.......................................................................................... Brian Poulter DENNews.com Adviser........................................................................Bryan Murley Publisher........................................................................................................ John Ryan Business Manager....................................................................................Betsy Jewell Press Supervisor......................................................................................Tom Roberts Production Staff Night Chief..................................................................................... Shelley Holmgren Lead Designer/Online Production............................................ Ashley Holstrom Copy Editors/Designers/Online Production................................... Sarah Bigler .................................................................................................................Jordan Pottorff About The Daily Eastern News is produced by the students of Eastern Illinois University. It is published daily Monday through Friday, in Charleston, Ill., during fall and spring semesters and twice weekly during the summer term except during university vacations or examinations. One copy per day is free to students and faculty. Additional copies can be obtained for 50 cents each in the Student Publications Office in Buzzard Hall. The Daily Eastern News is a member of The Associated Press, which is entitled to exclusive use of all articles appearing in this publication. Comments / Tips Contact any of the above staff members if you believe your information is relevant. Corrections The Daily Eastern News is committed to accuracy in its coverage of the news. Any factual error the staff finds, or is made aware of by its readers, will be corrected as promptly as possible. Please report any factual error you find by e-mail, phone, campus mail or in person.

SABRINA DUNC AN | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Ali Boyd, senior nursing major, hands out "Kiss Cancer Goodbye" t -shirts to attendees of the breast cancer benefit on Wednesday evening at Lakeview College of Nursing.

way to a table where breast cancer shirts were available for purchase. Rachel Sabella and Kayla Ensor, seniors at Lakeview College, ran the table. They were also in charge of the night’s events and said they were both excited with the turnout. “It’s better than we expected,” Ensor said. Lakeview College senior student Rebecca Vannorsdel said she was glad to see the crowd and thought the night was going very well.

VIGIL

Event gives HOPE Staff Report

HOPE of East Central Illinois will host a domestic violence vigil at Morton Park today to support survivors of domestic and those still living in abusive environments. Angie Hunt, housing program director for HOPE, said the event is one of the organization’s contributions to National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. The event will begin with local music group Motherlode performing from 6:30 to 7 p.m. At 7, the organization invites anyone who opposes domestic violence to speak at an open microphone. The speeches will be followed by a

silent candlelight vigil. The event will also promote the Clothesline Project, which features a clothesline filled with t-shirts designed by both adult and child survivors of domestic violence. Hunt said students should come to support the victims of domestic violence. “It’s so important that we show them that, as a community, we care,” Hunt said. “The benefit is to our clients to be able to come together as a community and say, ‘We don’t want this happening anymore.’” Hunt said she expects between 100 and 150 people to attend the event. The event will be at Morton Park at 6:30 p.m.

Vannorsdel also spoke at the event. Later in the evening, guests gathered around a large projection screen where Lauren Sundermeir, of Avon Products, Inc, the sponsor of the campaign, spoke via Skype on taking preventative measures against breast cancer. To end the evening, winning guests took home raffle prizes, including baskets donated by local businesses Neal Tire, Family Vid-

eo, The Alamo Steakhouse, The Stadium Grill, A COLORFUL U and Jerry’s Pizza. St. Alexius Medical Center, who will receive all the proceeds from the benefit, also contributed informational brochures, according to Shelia Hurley, a Lakeview College student. Ethan Stephenson can be reached at 581-2812 or etstephenson@eiu.edu.

State SIU student guilty of threatening school EDWARDSVILLE— A former Southern Illinois University student has been convicted of writing what prosecutors say was a note demanding money and threatening a Virginia Tech-like killing spree. Olutosin Oduwole, 26, was arrested after police found writing in his car that said, "Send $2 to PayPal account. If this account doesn't reach $50,000 in the next seven days, then a murderous rampage similar to the VT (Virginia Tech) shooting will occur at another

highly populated university. THIS IS NOT A JOKE." A jury convicted him Tuesday of attempting to make a terrorist threat and unauthorized possession or storage of a weapon. Oduwole's defense had argued he was an aspiring rapper and called the words innocent lyrical musings. Oduwole appeared calm upon hearing the verdict, but defense attorney Jeffrey Urdangen put his head in his hands. No sentencing date has been set.

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Entering the front doors of Lakeview College, guests were immediately met by the smiling faces of two of the five Lakeview College students running “Kiss Cancer Goodbye,” a night for breast cancer awareness. Guests stopped by the front table, where they could pick up programs and informational brochures, but most importantly, a pile of pink ribbons, the stars of the night’s show. The crowd at the event was composed of community members and students from Lakeview College and Eastern. Some were gathered around chatting and enjoying the refreshments, while others made their way around the room checking out the informational boards that lined the walls. One Lakeview student in attendance was Katherine Korzun, who came out to support the cause. “I think it is important to support a cause that effects everyone: mothers, sisters, aunts,” Korzun said. Community member Patty Baird, a cancer survivor, also attended the event. Baird said she was not always so enthusiastic about such events. “First I didn’t want anything to do with the pink, but now it’s all about the pink, and I try to be involved,” she said. Moving past the informational bulletins, guests could make their


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News Editor Elizabeth Edwards 217 • 581 • 2812 DENnewsdesk@gmail.com

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Comics bring the lol’s

Set goals focus of meeting Staff Report

K AROLINA STR ACK | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Anthony “OC” Boyd, junior theatre major, begins his performance by unleashing his alter ego to the audience during Last Comic Standing on Tuesday evening in 7th Street Underground of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. The audience erupted in laughs as Boyd shared his experiences with roommates and opinions on over-sharing on Twitter. The competition started with a happy hour and a total of eight student comedians performed for the large crowd that had gathered in the 7th Street Underground; the winner of the competition will get a spot during a community comedy show in the spring.

REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZ ATIONS

The Council for Academic Affairs will address the two final Undergraduate Learning Goals, writing and critical thinking. They will also form a committee to assist in the progression of the goals set for students. The Committee for the Assessment of Student Learning will be presenting the final section of their presentation today.  The presentation will discuss the goals with the CAA. Debra Reid, a history professor, will address the CAA about her document concerning universitywide learning goals.  The council will also assess a memorandum from Provost Blair Lord concerning the University’s Ad Hoc Committee on Online Education. Revisions to the Latin American Studies minor and the addition of a new course, English Major Forum, will be reviewed today as well.  Another item added to the agenda is a revision of the English major. The CAA meeting will take place in Booth Library Room 4440 at 2 p.m. 

RESIDENT HALL ASSOCIATION

Spreading love, knowledge of math

Meeting gets in the spooky spirit

RSO celebrates 20 years on campus

With Halloween just around the corner, the Residence Hall Association’s weekly meeting is expected to get spooky with its meeting’s members in costume to discuss an upcoming conference. Dondre Keeler, the National and Illinois Communication Coordinator of RHA, said he will discuss how the Eastern delegation of select RHA members have prepared to attend the annual Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls Conference at Ball State University. “All the people I will be taking with me will be going to programs to build their leadership skills on campus,” Keeler said. “They have to bring back information and tell people in their hall what they learned.” According to The Great Lakes Affiliate of College and University Residence Halls’ website, it is a student run organization focused on improving on-campus programs across the country by providing skills and training for its members. This year, the conference’s theme, “Make Your Mark,” will be art based. “(The Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls) change the theme every year,” Keeler said. “It brings a lot more interest when people have to relate their school theme to the regional theme.” Keeler said he will specifically discuss at the meeting the delegation’s designs for a banner displaying the delegation members’ names and Eastern and the Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls mascots in the form of a statue. Several events on campus, such as Kids and Friends Weekend, have ele-

By Megan Johnson Staff Reporter

Math is used every day in life. Fro m s h o p p i n g a n d s a v i n g t o paying tuition, math exists almost everywhere in this world. Math Energy is a registered student organization celebrating 20 years on campus. It was first introduced in 1991. Jo a n H e n n , a p r o f e s s o r o f mathematics and computer science, said they started the RSO after students showed interest. “We had a survey made up and asked the students if they would be interested in a math group, (and) we found we had quite a bit of interest,” Henn said. Math Energy is considered a professional organization by Eastern. “It’s really well respected around the state, it has taken on a life of its own,” Henn said. This RSO is connected with different teacher organizations, said Rick Anderson, adviser of Math Energy. “Math Energy is an affiliate of Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics,” Anderson said. The students involved with Math Energy are usually interested in math, but it is not just for math

What you need to know about Math Energy

• Founded 1991 • The president is Brittany Robinson. • $6 per semester • The next meetings are Nov. 14 and Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. • Math tutors are available. majors. Henn said many students majoring in middle school education come and join the group because it is a good way to learn games and teaching techniques for the classroom, “There is a tutoring program Math Energy offers that elementary and middle school education majors can get involved with by volunteering to help students who need help with math,” Anderson said. Math Energy also holds a math fair once every year for students. “Math Energy provides a group for students here at Eastern that are interested in teaching mathematics,” said Brittany Robinson, the president of Math Energy.“It provides great ideas for future teachers and gives opportunities to meet others with the same interest.” There are four meetings every semester and students can get involved that way with the group. The membership fee is $6 and this will automatically involve students with Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics and also National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

Math Energy brings in a lot of different people to speak to the group, Anderson said. “Our speakers come to the meetings to show how to make math more interesting in the area that students are teaching,” Anderson said. Robinson stressed how important math is to students’ lives. “Math is everywhere and with technology growing non-stop, math is only going to grow with it,” Robinson said. “Math is in every profession, so instead of avoiding or disliking math, be preparing for math for the rest of your life,” he said. Math Energy has two remaining meetings this semester on Nov. 14 and Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. in the University Ballroom of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Robinson said new members should get to the meeting early to check in. Megan Johnson can be reached at 581-2812 or mgjohnson@eiu.edu.

By Andrew Crivilare Staff Reporter

ments that RHA members first learned about by attending Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls conferences, Keeler said. Keeler said the RHA first decided to add The Writing on the Wall project, in which students tear down a physical cinder block wall as symbolic gesture towards breaking intolerant behavior, to Social Justice and Diversity Week after attending a Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls conference. Attending a Great Lakes Affiliate of Colleges and University Residence Halls conference is one way that RHA members can advance their position in the residence hall hierarchy on campus, Keeler said. “A lot of people who have gone on to these conferences have gone on to bigger and better things,” Keeler said. “Some of them have gone up to higher positions, like becoming a (Resident Adviser) and some become part of (the National Residence Hall Honorary).” Keeler said potential attendees of the conference were chosen based on both their past leadership experience, personal goals and how they planned to better Eastern. “They had to fill out an application,” Keller said. “My adviser, the RHA president and myself sat down and went through who we thought would really be a great asset.” RHA Vice President Andrew Lilec said residence hall representatives would also hopefully present in costume. “We try to get RHA representatives to dress up at the meeting,” Lilec said. “It’s something goofy.” Andrew Crivilare can be reached at 581-2582 or ajcrivilare@eiu.edu.


O pinions

Opinions Editor Dave Balson 217 • 581 • 2812 DENopinions@gmail.com

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STAFF EDITORIAL

We need to be Target the 1 percent, not their employees better critical thinkers Who is to blame for the recent statistics showing Eastern students’ below average critical thinking abilities? Students may be quick to blame teachers for not covering class material thoroughly enough, while teachers may just as quickly blame students for a lack of concentration or effort in class. While both sides have points, we believe it is a combination of both. Teachers may not be presenting students with enough opportunities to think critically. Multiple-choice questions on tests, though easy for students to take and easy for teachers to grade, do not involve much critical thinking. Short-answer and essay questions, though often loathed by students, would require more mental engagement and critical thinking. Students, however, when presented with these critical thinking situations, need to attack the question with a mental state of wanting to open their minds and think deeply in order to find the answer. This answer might require more than a few seconds of thought and might actually require writing more than one or two sentences for a change. Students should be prepared to think critically in everything they do. This is what separates a university from a regular trade school. Critical thinking is, after all, the point of a liberal arts education. So students should not be surprised when they are actually required to think in college. These statistics should be alarming to Eastern. Eastern does not want to gain the reputation of a school where students are unable to think critically, just as future employers do not want to hire anyone from a school full of people who are unable to think critically. What Eastern can do to help prevent this reputation is have academic advisers suggest courses that would help improve critical thinking skills in those students who seem to be struggling in this specific area. Eastern does not want to be known as a school where people who can’t think critically go, so everyone from teachers to students to the university itself need to pick up the slack and make sure this does not happen. It’s time to put on not just our thinking caps, but also our critical thinking caps and show that Eastern is a place where actual learning takes place, not just another party school in the middle of nowhere. Eastern isn’t a joke, neither is our education, our future employment opportunities are definitely not a joke, especially with the bleak job market we face upon graduating. So when you show up to class, and yes, actually show up, be prepared to think critically, and not just throw stuff on a page.

The DAILY EASTERN NEWS

“Tell the truth and don’t be afraid.”

EDITORIAL BOARD Editor in Chief Alex McNamee

News Editor Elizabeth Edwards

Managing Editor Associate News Editor Shelley Holmgren Samantha Bilharz Online Editor Chris O’Driscoll

Opinions Editor Dave Balson

The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

My father was laid off from his tech-support job at a Chicago-based insurance company earlier this year. His story of being let go is one that is being told too often during the economic downturn of recent years. For months, he saw his co-workers be let go one by one, all the while waiting with dread for his position to be nixed. While we waited, our family began the process of preparing for life as a single-income household. My father was one of the lucky ones. After months of searching for work, he was hired at a big corporation downtown. On his first day at work he was dressed to impress. With his freshly pressed suit coat flapping in the autumn breeze, he strode over the Jackson Avenue Bridge toward his new place of employment. After a pleasant five-minute walk downtown, he rounded a corner to find the front door of his destination blocked by hundreds of people. The people chanted slogans and carried signs saying things like “We are the 99%” Dad got within a hundred feet of the door when the crowd saw him. Mistaking him for a greedy member of the “1 percent,” they turned on him and he had to, on his first day of work in months, push his way through protesters to get into his building. The protesters were members of the ongoing Occupy Chicago protest movement,

Doug T. Graham inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement that began in New York 41 days ago. The protesters stand for and oppose many things, but are united by their anger at the super-rich who control a disproportionate amount of the nation’s wealth. The reason they were standing outside my dad’s place of work is because his new employer is Bank of America, one of the biggest targets of the Occupy protests nationwide. To the protesters, Bank of America is a target because it is one of the largest financial institutions in the country and it accepted the federal bailout money it was offered in 2008. Bank of America is also the company that inspired a movement related to the Occupy Movement called the Bank Transfer Day movement. Kristen Christian, a Los Angeles-based art gallery owner, was fed up with Bank of America’s “ridiculous fees and poor customer service.” She decided to put her

money into a local credit union and started a movement on Facebook to persuade others to do the same. More than 62,000 people on Facebook had said they would transfer their money out of for-profit banks and into credit unions by Nov. 5. While I don’t feel moved to chant slogans in Chicago or pitch a tent in Charleston, I think the protesters are on to something important, despite their lack of focus. There is far too much money in the hands of the rich. The last time so few controlled so much was Oct. 23, 1929, a day before the great stock market crash on Black Friday that kicked off the Great Depression. We can’t expect to resolve our current economic woes while continuing to allow such a lopsided distribution of wealth. However, not everyone who works for companies like Bank of America are members of the much maligned “1 percent.” The Occupiers have accomplished so much already. They have captured the attention of the world and started a very important discussion about the distribution of wealth in America. In order to accomplish more, they have to directly engage the members of the 1 percent, instead of being content with hassling their employees. Doug T. Graham is a senior journalism major. He can be reached at 581-7942 or DENopinions@gmail.com.

FROM THE EASEL

DAVE BALSON | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

LET TER TO THE EDITOR

Protesters need to see Wall Street as the solution And just why should the Occupy Wall Street protesters not be tasked to focus their program? Are they simply to shout, pout, and sulk over the stagnant state of the economy as gainful employment declines? Too much of the mentality of the occupiers inclines them to blame Wall Street, even as they remain ignorant of how Wall Street could be of help. The tax breaks and deregulation needed are not just for

the rich. They would open opportunity for young and middle-aged adults who are not rich but who want to improve their financial condition. Sadly, many readers are too young to remember the Reagan years. If they did, they would be hammering the White House gate with their grievances. This is more a political problem than an economic one. Right now Wall Street

Letters to the editor can be submitted at any time on any topic to the Opinions Editor to be published in The Daily Eastern News. The DEN’s policy is to run all letters that are not libelous or potentially harmful. They must be less than 250 words.

cannot be of much help because of the wrong kind of political leadership of the Obama administration. It has already spent too much money we do not have and is pouting because Congress will not authorize even more spending of funds we do not have. With “No Rusty Swords,” Leonidas H. Miller Mattoon

Letters to the editor can be brought in with identification to The DEN at 1811 Buzzard Hall. Letters may also be submitted electronically from the author’s EIU e-mail address to DENopinions@gmail.com.


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Ancient technology influences medicine “A Futuristic Look through Ancient Lenses: A Symposium on Ancient Egypt” By Tim Deters Staff Reporter

Students and staff will be able to learn how ancient technology influenced medicine and surgery in Ancient Egypt on Monday. “Technology of Medicine in the Age of the Pharaohs,” is part of “A Futuristic Look through Ancient Lenses: A Symposium on Ancient Egypt” series sponsored by the School of Technology, Lumpkin School of Business and Booth Library. Thomas Hawkins, associate professor in the School of Technology, will explore the role technology played in how Ancient Egyptians used medicine and surgery. Hawkins said it is important to

recognize how technological developments changed the way the Egyptians approached medicine and surgery. “You can think of any number of examples from the current practice of medicine how technological innovation has influenced medical care and practices,” Hawkins said. Hawkins also said advanced technologies, both past and present, have changed people’s reliance on medicines to fix their problems. Hawkins said the influence of Egyptian technology still have effect in the present time. “These  ancient dynamics still play out now and will play out in the future,” Hawkins said. Wafeek Wahby, a professor of construction technology in the School of technology and an organizer of the symposium, said the presentation provides students with a unique opportunity to step back from their daily lives and learn from

the past. Wahby, who was born and raised in Egypt, said when he ventures back to his home country, he still wonders at the level of knowledge and technology the Ancient Egyptians had and is in awe. “Students, at large, are more concentrated on themselves,” Wahby said. He said he sees students who are always busy texting or online. Wahby said it is important for students to take time out of their busy lives to “look away and see what other people are doing and learn from them,” and to see the great contributions Ancient Egypt has made to society. “Technology of Medicine in the Age of the Pharaohs” will be presented from 11 a.m. to noon on Oct. 31 in Room 4440 in Booth Library. Tim Deters can be reached at 581-2812 or tadeters@eiu.edu.

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Terror brought to Carman Hall Staff Report

Terror on the 8th Floor is a fullfeatured haunted house that will take place from 7 to 10 p.m. today and Friday. The event is being put on by the University Board Special Events and Carman Hall Council and will take place on the eighth floor of Carman Hall. Admission for Terror on the 8th Floor costs $1 or one canned food item at the door.

All the money and canned food items raised from the event will go to the local food bank in Charleston or around the Coles County area. Graham Sauser, the UB Special Events Coordinator, said the eighth floor of Carman has 15 rooms that have been turned into a haunted house. Each room has different scary themes ranging from movie themes to original ideas from the students. Carman Hall provides the major-

ity of the actors and the rooms. Each floor in Carman Hall that is occupied by students are assigned a room on the eighth floor of Carman to decorate. The UB also get to decorate a few rooms as well. Sauser said last year 600 students total for both nights came to the first Terror on the 8th Floor event and are hoping to surpass that number. “We really love doing it and it’s a blast every year,” Sauser said.

State

Man thought to be Gacy victim found alive in Fla. By The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Siblings who feared their brother was one of serial killer John Wayne Gacy’s eight unidentified victims were amazed and overjoyed to learn that he’s been living in Florida for decades. Tim Lovell and Theresa Hasselberg hadn’t seen their brother, Harold Wayne Lovell, since he left their family’s Chicago home in May 1977 in search of construction work. At the time, Gacy was trolling for young men and boys in the area. He was a contractor, and he lured many of the 33 young men and boys he killed by

offering them work. Cook County Sheriff’s detectives reviewing unidentified remains cases discovered that eight of the 33 people Gacy was convicted of murdering never were identified, and they obtained exhumation orders over the past few months to test the remains for DNA, hoping relatives of young men who went missing in the area in the 1970s might submit to genetic testing. Lovell’s siblings, who now live in Ozark, Ala., were planning to do just that when they discovered a recent online police booking photo of their brother taken in Florida. They reached their brother, who goes by his

middle name, by phone and bought him a bus ticket, and the family was reunited Tuesday for the first time in 34 years. Wayne Lovell, now 53, described the reunion as “awesome.” He said he left for Florida all those years ago because he wasn’t getting along with his mother and stepfather. Over the years, he’s worked various manual labor jobs and has had occasional brushes with the law in and around Tampa, including charges for buying marijuana. “I’ve gone from having nothing to having all this,” Lovell said. “I’m still pinching myself.”

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

DENNEWS.COM

Nation Writer Isaacson on Jobs: ‘I just listened’ By The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Steve Jobs told Walter Isaacson he wanted him to write his biography because he’s good at getting people to talk. Jobs, it turns out, didn’t need much prodding, secretive as he was about both his private life and the company he founded. “I just listened,” said Isaacson, whose book, “Steve Jobs” (Simon & Schuster) went on sale Monday. Jobs, who died Oct. 5 at 56 after a long struggle with pancreatic cancer, was a man full of deep contradictions, a product of 1960s counterculture who went on to found what is now the world’s most valuable technology company, Apple Inc. In an interview with The Associated Press Wednesday, Isaacson said Jobs was a compelling storyteller with “fascinating stories.” Sometimes, the author would hear him tell those tales two or three times, often with slight variations. But through more than 40 conversations with Jobs, as well as

DEN

581-2816

interviews with his family, close friends, co-workers and rivals, Isaacson painted a rich portrait of a complex, sometimes conflicting figure. Isaacson began work on the book in 2009 after Jobs’ wife, Laurene Powell, told him that if he was “ever going to do a book on Steve, you’d better do it now.” It was just after Jobs had taken his second medical leave as CEO of Apple, in January of that year. His third leave, which began in January 2011, would be his final one. “He was not sick through much of this process,” Isaacson said, when asked about what it was like to be working on the book and speaking with Jobs’ family while he was ill. “We took long walks,” he said. “Ever y evening, he would have dinner around the kitchen table with his wife and kids. He didn’t go out socializing or to black-tie dinners. He didn’t travel much. Even though he was focused on his work, he was always home for dinner.”

ROOTS, from page 1 Goode said he became interested in Scott’s influence in America after a trip to colonial Williamsburg where he saw a visitors film made in the 1950s that described the experience of the site’s historical residents. He said he was interested in why a film from the 1950s was still being used to tell the history. “This led to this broader project where I looked over the influence of Scott and the memory of American history and how the formula and plot and stance is informed by these really old novels,” Goode said. Goode said he will describe in his lecture how Scott’s influence

remains present today throughout the country in the designs of museums and historical reenactments. “Part of what the talk is about is some of the lingering ways in which this stuff still shows up in American culture,” Goode said. “I’m talking in theoretical terms what it means when you reenact history.” “The Sir Walter Disease: Reenacting American History after Walter Scott” is free and takes place at 7 p.m. today in the Doudna Fine Arts Center Lecture Hall. Andrew Crivilare can be reached at 581-2812 or ajcrivilare@eiu.edu.

VOLPONE, from page 1 He said the switch in roles was getting noticed. “That is what good theater is supposed to do,” Mitchell said. “It’s supposed to provoke the audience, get them to think, and get an emotion out of them. I think we did our job.” Brittany William, a freshman family and consumer sciences major who attended the play, said you could tell the women were originally men. “(Corvina) was so mean, you can tell she was originally a guy,” William said. “ It’s more powerful from a woman.” Mitchell said he thought the

DON’T BEAR THE ECONOMY RUN AN AD IN THE

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MoutmheePra’rsty

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opening night went well. “The energy is amazing and the chemistry is very good,” Mitchell said. “We couldn’t have had a better cast.” The play will take place at 7:30 p.m. today, Friday, Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday in the Theatre of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. Ti c k e t s c o s t $ 5 f o r E a s t e r n students, $12 for general admission, $10 for Eastern employees and seniors 62 years of age and older. Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

Cash Prizes! $3 Well Doubles $2 Bud Bottles $2 Bud Light Bottles $1 Jager Shots

Free shuttle starting at 10:30 from Ike’s to Mother’s!


C lassifieds Announcements COME IN MY LITTLE PRETTIES. HALLOWEEN AT SPENCE'S (DOWNTOWN) TUESDAY-HALLOWEEN 1-? 345-1469. _________________________10/27 Scholarship to be given by EIU Annuitants Association. Requirements: must be the child or grandchild of either a current EIU employee of at least five years standing or an employee who has retired from EIU. Musts: 3.0 or better cumulative GPA, enrollment for at least 6 hours. Applications due Monday Nov. 7. Complete rules and forms at http://castle.eiu.edu/annuitants/ scholarship.php _________________________10/28 10,000+ COSTUMES FOR RENT! Plus Hats, Wigs, Makeup, Beads, Birthday and Bachelorette stuff. GRAND BALL COSTUMES, 609 Sixth Street, Charleston. Mon- Fri: Noon to 6, Sat: Noon to 3. _________________________10/31

Help wanted Help Wanted. 5 energetic, reliable males needed for The School House Gentleman's Club Male Dance Review Night. Located in Neoga, IL. Once a month for ladies. We will train you and give you plenty of time to practice. Not all nude. Lots of cash! Contact us at 217-273-2937 __________________________11/2

For rent 3 to 4 BR house for rent. $325/ room. New appliances. 708-214-6217 _________________________10/27 2 bedroom apartment. Across from campus. www.eiuapts.com 217-3452416 _________________________10/27 For Rent Fall 2012. 4 BR, 2 bath house. 2 blocks from campus. W/D, dishwasher. Call or text 217-276-7003 _________________________10/28 Leasing Fall 2012. 5 & 6 Bedroom. Close to Lantz. Off Street Parking/ Washer/ Dryer Trash included. 217-259-7262. _________________________10/28 3 Bedroom Townhouse nearly new construction/ Must See. 9th & Buchanan. Call 630-505-8374 24 hours. _________________________10/28 6,5,4,3 bedroom houses for rent next school year 2012-13 contact Cathy 2172541311 dcburge@gmail.com _________________________10/31 2 Bedroom apartment all utilities paid and 3 bedroom house with washer/ dryer. Call (217)294-3641 _________________________10/31 Available now and for January: 1 and 2 person apartments. Very nice. Locally owned and managed. No pets. Call 345-7286 www.jwilliamsrentals.com _________________________10/31

For rent Student houses for 2011-12. 4,5, and 6 bedroom. Close to EIU. No pets. 3457286 jwilliamsrentals.com _________________________10/31 7 BD 3 BATH 1021 WOODLAWN ALL INCLUSIVE! private back yard 217-345-6210 www.eiprops.com _________________________10/31 *PREMIER HOUSING* view your future home at www.eiprops.com _________________________10/31 NOW LEASING. www.chucktownrentals.com _________________________10/31 Very nice 2 bedroom house, close to campus. $640 per month 345-3232 _________________________10/31 7 BR, 2 BA House near stadium. Washer/Dryer, dishwasher, includes mowing & trash. Large parking area. 217-345-6967. _________________________10/31 4 BR house near campus. Washer/Dryer, dishwasher, large front porch, basement. Includes mowing & trash. 217-345-6967. _________________________10/31 7 BR House 1/2 Block from campus. 2 1/2 bath, 2 kitchens. Washer/Dryer. Includes mowing & trash. 217-345-6967. _________________________10/31 Fall 2012 3 bedroom 2 1/2 bath duplex. East of campus. No pets. rcrrentals.com or 217-345-5832. __________________________11/2 Renting NOW! 1,2,&3 bedrooms, Park Place, Royal Heights, Glenwood, Lynn Ro. Close to campus! www.tricountymg.com. 348-1479 __________________________ 11-3 Fall 2012 3 bedroom duplexes on 12th St. and multi-bedroom houses on 3rd St. Coon Rentals 217-348-7872 __________________________11/4 Fall 2012 very nice 5 bedroom house, close to campus, 5 sinks, 3 showers, 2 laundry areas. Need a group of 4 or 5 females. 1837 11th St. No pets please. Call 217-728-7426 __________________________11/4 NOW RENTING FOR 2012-2013. ONESIX BEDROOM HOUSES. CLOSE TO CAMPUS. CALL TOM AT 708-772-3711. __________________________11/4 Best Deals on Campus! 1,2,3 bedrooms. Great Location. Swimming Pool. 217-345-6000 __________________________11/4 Call about our great deals and promotions. Find your home in Charleston at www.lincolnwoodpinetree.com __________________________11/4 FALL '12-'13: 1,2, & 3 BR APTS. BUCHANAN STREET APTS. CHECK US OUT AT BUCHANANST.COM OR CALL 345-1266. __________________________11/7 Available Jan 1st 1 BR apts. Water & Trash included, off street parking, $410/mo. BuchananSt.com or call 345-1266. __________________________11/7

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W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 27, 2011 N o. 141, V O LU M E 96

For rent

For rent I have 3 and 4 bedroom houses available. Freshly remodeled, all appliances included. 11 month lease. Price range $275-$325 per bedroom. Very nice and clean. One block from Old Main. Trash included. Come see what makes our apartments better than the rest! Call Kevin 217-962-0790 pantherproperties.com __________________________11/9 Houses and Apartments 2,3,4,5,6, and 7 bedrooms. Call for details and appointments. (217)345-6967 _________________________11/10 Properties available 7th st. 2 blocks from campus. 5 and 6 bedroom houses, 4 bedroom apartment and studios, and some utilities paid. Call (217) 728-8709 _________________________11/10 www.BrooklynHeightsEIU.com You've been by 4th & Polk and have seen it... NOW it's time to live here! 217-345-5515 _________________________11/14 www.MelroseOnFourth.com Seeing is believing! Call today to schedule an appointment to see what everyone is talking about! 217-345-5515 _________________________11/15 6 bedroom, 2 bath. Trash & yard service included. No pets. (217) 345-5037. www.chucktownrentals.com _________________________11/16 3 bedroom homes available fall 2011. Trash & yard service included. No pets. (217)345-5037. www.chucktownrentals.com _________________________10/31

For rent

Beautifully furnished 6 bedroom house. Basement plus washer/dryer. 1508 1st St. $310 each for 2012-2013. Call Jan 345-8350 _________________________11/16 Beautiful 2 BR 2 BA fully furnished EXTRA LARGE apts available for 2012-13. W/D, walk-in closets, large balcony, cable & wireless internet included, free tanning and fitness, hot tub & rec rooms! Use financial aid to pay rent! 217-345-5515 www.MelroseOnFourth. com & www.BrooklynHeightsEIU.com _________________________11/16 VILLAGE RENTALS. 3 & 4 BR houses w/ washers & dryers. 1 & 2 BR apartments w/ water & trash pu included. Close to campus and pet friendly. Call 217-345-2516 for appt. _________________________11/18 2 BR APTS, STOVE, FRIG, MICROWAVE. TRASH PD. 2001 S. 12th STR. & 1305 18th STR. PH 217-348-7746. www.CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/18 4 BR, 2 BATH DUPLEX, STOVE, FRIG, MICROWAVE, DISHWASHER, WASHER/ DRYER. TRASH PD. 1520 9th STR. PH. 217-348-7746. www.CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/18 3 BR APT 820 LINCOLN. 1BLOCK FROM OLD MAIN. CATHEDRAL CEILING, STOVE, FRIG, MICROWAVE, DISHWASHER, WATER/TRASH PD. PH. 217348-7746. www.CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/18 Female housemates. 1808 9th St. Private rooms. 217-549-3273 _________________________11/18

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  1 Vitamin C source from Southeast Asia 10 Songwriter Jimmy and Senator Jim 15 It has just 16 rules of grammar 16 Western language historically written in the Cyrillic alphabet 17 London newspaper 18 Mork’s TV companion 19 Sea eagles 20 TV network since 1970 21 Bomb, e.g. 22 Alphabet trio 23 Turkey’s location 27 It may be turned against you 28 Hammer’s partner 29 ___ Street, main thoroughfare in “Peyton Place” 30 J.F.K. watchdog 31 Training ___ 32 Jacob who wrote “How the Other Half Lives” 33 Taking one’s sweet time 37 Daly of “Cagney & Lacey” 38 It’s beside a sideburn 39 Muscles covering some 32-Down 40 Actress Gasteyer 41 Barrister’s deg. 42 Credit figs.

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Singer with the hit country album “Backwoods Barbie” Sketch show that launched 40-Across’s career, in short Gist It’s located between two Plymouths: Abbr. Scott of “Joanie Loves Chachi” Mr. ___ “Gotcha,” formally Author Calvino Skating venue Staff up again After U2, highestgrossing concert band of all time, informally

1

2 bedroom house, 1609 S. 12th, d/w, w/d, a/c, porch & patio, $360 each, 2012-13. 217-549-3273 _________________________11/18 6 bedroom 2 bath house, 1521 S. 2nd, w/d, a/c, $360 each, 2012-13. 217-549-3273 _________________________11/18 8 bedroom, 3.5 bath, no smoking house, 1808 S. 9th furnished, covered patio, d/w, w/d, a/c, 'The Parlor' guys or girls. $375 each, 2012-13. 217-549-3273 _________________________11/18 5 bedroom, 2 bath, w/d, d/w, patio, 1836 S. 11th $360 each. 217-549-3273 _________________________11/18 1 1/2 BLOCKS NORTH OF OLD MAIN ON 6th Street 3 bedroom house available August 2012. 217-348-8249 www.ppwrentals.com _________________________11/18 GREAT LOCATIONS- 1 and 3 bedroom apartments available August 2012. 217-348-8249 www.ppwrentals.com _________________________11/18 Available immediately. Furnished 2 bedroom townhouse. Water, lawn, and garbage included. Central air, onsite parking lot, free onsite laundry, tanning, and exercise equipment. Pet friendly and close to campus. $750 per month. 2409 8th St. 217-414-3514 _________________________11/30

FOR FALL 2012. VERY NICE 1,2,3,4,6,7,8 BEDROOM HOUSES, TOWNHOUSES AND APARTMENTS. ALL EXCELLENT LOCATIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL US AT 217-493-7559 OR www.myeiuhome.com. _________________________11/30 August 2012. 1,2,3,4 BR apartment. 1812 9th; 1205/1207 Grant 3 BR Apartments. 348-0673/ 549-4011. _________________________11/30 LEASING NOW FOR AUGUST 2012. 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BEDROOMS. GREAT LOCATIONS, REASONABLE RATES, AWESOME AMENITIES! CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APARTMENT SHOWING. 3455022 CHECK US OUT ON THE WEB www.unique-properties.net _________________________11/31 LEASING NOW FOR AUGUST 2012 SOUTH CAMPUS SUITES, 2 BR / 2 BA APARTMENTS, 2 BR TOWNHOUSES & 1 BEDROOM FLATS. FREE TANNING, FITNESS AND LAUNDRY. AWESOME NEW LOCATION, CLOSE TO CAMPUS WITH RENTAL RATES YOU CAN AFFORD! CALL TODAY FOR YOUR SHOWING 345-5022 OR CHECK US OUT @ www.unique-properties.net _________________________11/31 AVAILABLE AUGUST 2012 4 & 5 BEDROOM HOUSES 1409 7TH ST, 1434 9TH ST. 1705 9TH ST. GREAT LOCATIONS. CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING 345-5022 www.unique-properties.net _________________________11/31

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  1 Ritual in which bitter herbs are dipped   2 Three Ivans   3 “___ of sweat will save a gallon of blood”: Patton   4 Fam. members   5 Lie in the sun with suntan oil   6 Wheelchair-accessible   7 No-can-do   8 Formal acknowledgment   9 “My mama done ___ me” 10 Traded beads 11 Cuban name in 2000 news

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Phone: 217 • 581 • 2812 Fax: 217 • 581 • 2923 Online: dailyeasternnews.com/classifieds

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Win whose money, in a bygone game show? Baseball commissioner starting in 1992 Sloppy place Oven part Hall-of-Famer Yastrzemski 30-Down, sometimes Apt. parts Fisherman’s relation? Course closer It may be sandy or candy See 39-Across 1970s sitcom catchword Dog sound

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Pop for a young person? Fisherman’s relation? Wee bit English author Edward Bulwer-___ Prime minister before and after Churchill Coral creatures Boxer Ali Jon ___, at 6’11” the tallest player in Major League Baseball history Old Scratch Family relation Mined finds String tie Source of some paper pulp

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


SPORTS

T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 27, 2011

N o. 141, V O LU M E 96

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

CROSS COUNTRY

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VIE WS

Panthers hitting stride when it counts most

Z ACH WHITE | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Bradley LaRocuq, senior runner, runs on the Panther Trail during the EIU Walt Crawford Open on Sept. 9.

OVC teams gear up for championships By Olivia Sloss Staff Reporter

Eastern’s men’s and women’s team will compete this Saturday at the Ohio Valley Championships in Richmond, Ky. along with the other teams from conference. The other teams include Austin Peay, Eastern Kentucky, Jacksonville State, Morehead State, Murray State, Southeast Missouri, Tennessee State, Tennessee Tech and Tennes-

see-Martin. Around the OVC The OVC Adidas Male Runner of the Week went to senior Marc Amarillas of Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. Amarillas ended his SIUE career by winning the Illini Open last Friday. Amarillas finished with his second-fastest time of the season with a time of 25:34. No other men were nominated. The OVC Adidas Female Run-

ner of the Week went to senior Aftan Noon of SIUE. Noon ended her SIUE career with a seventh place finish at the Illini Open last Friday. Noon ran the 5K course in 18:53, which was 15 seconds faster than any previous time of the season. No other women were nominated. Olivia Sloss can be reached at 581-7942 or oesloss@eiu.edu

WOMEN’S TENNIS

Women’s tennis wraps up By Grant Truccano Staff Reporter

The Eastern women’s tennis team traveled to Columbus, Ohio, where the Panthers took part in the 2011 United States Tennis Association/Intercollegiate Tennis Association Midwest Championship. The event began on October 20. Only three team members took part in the event for the Panthers, sophomore Janelle Prisner, senior Amanda Dibbs, and senior Shannon Brooks. In singles action, Prisner took on senior Maria Nivia of Western Michigan University. She won both of her sets 6-1 and 6-1 to Nivia. Prisner then would face number one seed junior Breanne Smutko of the University of Illinois. Prisner would lose both her sets 2-6 and 1-6. The other Panther that took part in singles competition was Dibbs. Dibbs faced senior Teona Tsertvadze of the University of Illinois-Chicago, where she

lost both of her sets 4-6 and 0-6. But then she took on senior Raquel Vescovi of Indiana-Purdue University Fort Wayne where she lost to her in two straight sets 3-6 and 4-6. With doubles action, Brooks and Dibbs teamed up to take on the team of sophomore Sam Critser and freshman Sarah Lee of the University of Michigan where they lost 8-1. Later on they took on the team of sophomore Chrissy Coffman and junior Silvia Carvajal of the University of Toledo and beat them 8-5. AROUND THE OVC The Jacksonville State Gamecocks took part in the 2011 Southern USTA/ ITA Regional Championship at Samford University last Thursday. In singles matches, the Gamecocks went 1-4, and in doubles matches they went 0-1. They will now be competing in the Southern Miss Invitational this Friday.

E VOLUM CHANGE NUMBER UE AND ISS

The Eastern Kentucky Colonels traveled to the University of Memphis to take part in the 2011 Ohio Valley USTA/ITA Regional Championship on October 14th. In singles matches the Colonels went 2-2 and in doubles matches they are at 5-3. The University of Tennessee-Martin Skyhawks also took part in the 2011 Ohio Valley USTA/ITA Regional Championship on October 14th. In singles matches the Skyhawks went 0-1 and in doubles they went 2-3. The Murray State Racers will take part in the Southern Mississippi Tournament this Friday. Austin Peay will start their spring season taking the University of Memphis on January 20th in Clarksville, Tenn.

E a s t e r n’s m e n’s s o c c e r t e a m played one of its best offensive matches of the season against Western Michigan, winning 3-1. The Panthers seem to be hitting their stride at the right time. With only two Summit League Matches the Panthers have to win at least one to have a chance at making the postseason tournament. In the last four matches, Eastern is 3-1, losing only to Summit League rival University of Missouri at Kansas City. And in those four games the Panthers have scored seven goals. This shows that the offensive firepower head coach Adam Howarth brought in this off-season is showing its true potential. Eastern has a young teamn so there are going to be ups and downs, but it is extremely talented. TopDrawerSoccer.com said that three of the Panthers freshmen are already amongst the 20 best players in the Summit League. This is huge for the men’s soccer program. The team has struggled in recent years and this recruiting class is already turning that trend around. These freshmen have continued to get better as the season has progressed and that is good news. I have been saying all season that I feel like Eastern has a real shot at a Summit League Champi-

Rob Mortell onship. The Panthers are currently in fifth place in conference; however, they only trail the second place teams by three points, which means a win a puts the Panthers in a tie for second. The Panthers will almost surely make the tournament if they win both matches, and I am sure that is what Howarth is telling his team. Do not let the team fate be decided by another team go out and win both matches. Eastern faces last place Oakland and fourth place Indiana University-Purdue University at Fort Wayne. Two opponents I believe that Panthers should beat. And as I have said before, the tournament is any ones to win and the Panthers keep getting better so why can’t they win a championship. Rob Mortell can be reached at 581-7944 or at rdmortell@eiu.edu.

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J.A.C. opens doors to all Rockin’ out for a reason A square beyond compare Cafe begins live LocAL bAnds pLAy to rAisE monEy for rELAy for LifE

music event every Saturday evening

By Brad York Verge Editor

Jackson Avenue Coffee (J.A.C.) is a location to go blowoff steam, study for hours on end and socialize as the creamy fragrance of lattes, cappuccinos and hot chocolates stream though the air. J.A.C., located at 708 Jackson Ave., may sound like an unusual place for a concert setting, but Dan Reible believes it is the perfect location for live music that has not been offered to Charleston in some time. “In the Charleston area there is no place to relax and listen to music except for a bar,” Reible said. “I’d like a place where people can come relax, have a cup of coffee, sandwich, bagel and take it easy and listen to some good acoustic music.” Reible and his wife Vicki are currently shuffling through papers in order to become the rightful owners of J.A.C.

Reible moved to Mattoon in 1984 after serving in the Navy and soon became a truck driver, traveling the nation with his wife. Reible has played for various bands in the past and mentioned to his friend, Ryan Dawson and the current owner of J.A.C., he was looking for a place to host weekly concerts on Saturday evenings. Dawson then asked Reible if he ever pictured himself owning a café. Reible expressed an interest, and soon, Dawson offered to sell the business. Dawson said the Reibles’ have been his customers since J.A.C. opened nearly eight years ago. “I planned on going back to school this summer to complete a degree in teacher���s certification,” Dawson said. “We were ready to move on to new things. I figured it is best not to run anything into the ground, so I offered to sell the place.” Dawson has high hopes for

By Colleen Kitka Assistant Verge Editor

BRAD YORk | ON THE VERGE

Dan Reible , owner of the Jacksno Avenue Coffee enjoys sunse viewing the humbling setting from his newly titled “retirement bench” at the J.A.C.

the future of J.A.C. and feels as as though hosting live musicians every Saturday night is only the beginning of the growth J.A.C. will see. The first Saturday night performer will be “Reverend” Robert Reynolds Saturday from 8 to 10 p.m. at J.A.C.

pHOTO COURTESY Of REVROBERT.COM

“Reverend” Robert Reynolds plays his guitar; He will play acoustic at 8 p.m. on Saturday at Jackson Avenue Coffee.

None of the performances will come with a cover cost, but instead a hat will be passed around around for donations, which go entirely to the artist. Robert Reynolds is a musician who plays blues music from the ‘20s, ‘30s and ’40s, and is glad Reible is opening his doors to local musicians. Reynolds said he has known Reible for a while because they have been playing music together through the years. “It is good to play one close to home. This is more intimate than the festivals and blues bars I’ve been playing at lately,” Reynolds said. “I play electric when I’m with my band, but this show will be all acoustic.” The intimate setting offers a place for begging and practiced musicians alike. Reible wants to show people in Charleston music they may not have heard before. He plans to host various artists from various genres each weekend. “I’ve got things booked all the way through the end of June,” Reible said. “It’s mostly people I have heard in the area and a lot of local musicians. We are open

to all different styles. It doesn’t matter if I personally like it or not. It’s whatever I think our customers will like.” Reible said his customers are an eclectic group, and notices that he has a lot of high schoolers come there every evening. He said parents know it is a safe place. Reible said he is open to any style of music and musicians who are interested in performing the Saturday night events should come out to J.A.C. Open Mic Night every Thursday. These open mic sessions are used as auditions of sorts for the diverse music Reible hopes to incorporate with the Saturday night performances. In addition to the open mic night artists, Reible searches the Web and various local music hot spots in order to find performers. “I’m hoping to get a lot of music in here that people haven’t experienced before,” Reible said. “People may have heard blues, but it probably isn’t the old delta blues that (Reverend Robert) will be playing.” Brad York can be reached at 581-7942 or at bayork@eiu.edu.

The 7th Street Underground will turn into a concert venue tonight at 5:30 as the Colleges Against Cancer group hosts its second Rock it for Relay concert. The benefit concert will feature the three local bands Good Morning Midnight, Cured by Fire and Madison’s Avenue, and one solo musician, Jenna Jackley. Tickets are $5 at the door and can be purchased starting at 5 p.m. All proceeds go to the Colleges Against Cancer’s Relay for Life team, and will ultimately be given to the American Cancer Society. Kyle Swalls, guitarist and vocalist for Good Morning Midnight, has witnessed the devastation of cancer first hand. Swalls said his grandma is fighting against cancer. “It’s a constant struggle dealing with it,” Swalls said. “A lot of time the chemo won’t be as effective, and they will try a new method and stuff. And so just knowing the constant struggle makes me want to do something like this and raise money for an individual who is having the same, who is dealing with the same kind of suffering.” This band along with Cured by Fire is playing at Friends & Co. later in the evening. They were willing to book two gigs in one night to show their support. “We feel that playing this gig will allow people to see that rock and roll and the whole style of it isn’t just about being on your own and not really caring about anyone else,” Logan Richardson, Madison’s Av-

Square Fest provides stage for new music, new bands and new surroundings By Brad york Verge Editor

pHOtO COURtESy Of GOOD MORNING MIDNIGHt

Good Morning Midnight band members Elgin Combs (guitarist), Michael “Woody” Woodring (drummer), Kyle Swalls (vocalist and guitarist) and Chad Barton (bass guitarist and vocalist) volunteered to play tonight at the Rock it for Relay event to help raise money for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life.

enue lead singer, said. “We really do care about the issue of breast cancer and cancer in general,” Richardson continued. “Because some people

pHOtO COURtESy Of JENNA JACKLEy

Jenna Jackley is a Mattoon High School student and will be playing at the 7th Street Underground tonight at 5:30 p.m.

close to us have had it and, luckily, they have recovered from it.” Many of the bands playing are new to Eastern’s campus. Richardson said performing at the concert would be an opportunity to expose students to a different kind of local music. Good Morning Midnight is an indie and alternative rock band. Beginning nearly a year ago and stationed in Marshall, the group is fresh to the Charleston music scene, but has played in the 7th Street Underground before for a canned food drive. Cured by Fire is a Charleston metal band. Megan Givens, the concert coordinator said the group sounds similar to Metallica or Godsmack and does a good job of getting a crowd going. Their influences come from those bands and others like Guns N’ Roses, Motley Crue and Black Sabbath. Jenna Jackley is a Mattoon High School student who plays the guitar and sings. “She is just memorizing to watch,” Megan Givens said. “She is in high school, so she is still very young, but the caliber of voice she has is just amazing.”

Madison’s Avenue is another young alternative rock band from Charleston that has been putting out their own music for eight months. The group has played all over Charleston, in Havana and in Centralia, but tonight will be one of their first times playing on campus. Givens, a junior elementary education major, said all the bands are hard working and were booked because they came recommended by other artists. The Colleges Against Cancer has raised more than $5,000 through their fall breast cancer T-shirt sales and other fundraisers. They have pledged to raise $8,000, and across campus different groups have pledged to raise $70,000 for the American Cancer Society. Last year, the concert drew a small crowd, but Givens is hoping for more public support. “What ever little amount can put towards the American Cancer Society will help in some way,” Givens said. Colleen Kitka can be reached at 581-7942 or crkitka@eiu.edu.

Spring is a season that brings a refreshing smell into the air as the trees begin to bud and the winter chills become dormant. It is a time for new life to see the wonders of Charleston. With new life comes new ambitions. New ambitions mean new music, and for Charleston that means new events. A fresh take on the Charleston festival scene is exactly what Scott Chaplinski has been planning for nearly a year with the event Square Fest. “I started thinking in February that it was about time to get it going with everything going on with Celebration, Woodchuck Music Festival, there’s finals, there’s Easter. I realized it was crunch time to get it going,” Chaplinski said. Square Fest will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday through 1 a.m. Sunday. The event will take place on Charleston’s square at the bars Mother’s, Friends & Co., Mac’s Uptowner and Top of the Roc. The event will cost $12 and allow patrons 21 and over admittance into any of the bars and performances. Chaplinski said getting the bars involved was the first part of organizing the event, and after he explained the potential benefits they jumped on board. “I kind of just threw it out there,” Chaplinski said. “They’ve given me good ideas, and they appreciate the ideas that I have. They’ve been very helpful with everything I’ve been doing.” Chaplinski has been wanting to get the bars involved with a festival event for more than year and said he feels that now was the best time to bring it all together. “We are hoping it brings a lot of business to the square,” Chaplinski said. “We hope it is going to be a nicer day. It’s a good window of a month and a half of good weather to show all these people,

‘Hey there are all these other great bars in town, and not just the ones near Lincoln (Avenue.).” Many of the featured acts will be Charleston based groups such as Mugwump Specific, Andy Van Slyke and Staff Blues Band while others such as DJ Illith, Poundcake and Ryan Arnold stem from locations throughout the state. “I figure this was a great networking opportunity for a lot of bands,” Chaplinski said. “We are pulling in bands from the Kankakee area, and some musicians from Champaign area. It’s bands that I like, and I know that other people (like).” Chaplinski said most of them are younger bands that have only been playing for a year or two and that many times a band that has been playing for four to five years need a guarantee that they are getting paid. “Having never done anything like this before I didn’t want to make promises to a bunch of people that I can’t fulfill.” Chaplinski said. In fact, much of the money for producing the event was saved up by Chaplinski himself. He hopes that the $12 cover is enough to give some of the traveling bands money to cover their gas costs and without being too high to deter college students and community members from coming out. One local musician, Mitch Davis, a senior management information systems major, saod he plans on showing the crowd some new tunes to commemorate the new event. “I mainly like to get people dancing, but I also play some more chill stuff,” Davis said. “I don’t want people to get burnt out, so I’ll make new songs before the shows. New shows get me motivated to make new songs. (Square Fest) is going to be so new. There’s going to be so many different people playing at so many different bars. I don’t really know what to

BRAD yORk | ON tHE VERGE

Mitch Davis, a senior management information systems major, rehearses new songs and freshens up on older material Wednesday evening in his home as he prepares for today’s Square Fest event.

expect. That’s why I am expecting to play in front of a totally new crowd, so I really got to try to pump people up.” With a wide variety of performances including blues, rock, jam band, electronic and rap everyone is beginning to develop expectations for the new event and Chaplinski is no different. “I want to be able to be out on the square, outside the bars and see people

having a good time,” Chaplinski said. “I want to hear, sort of over-hear, what they did like and what they didn’t like. I just think there will be a lot of good vibes coming. Perfect conditions for me, is hearing that people had a great time.” Brad York can be reached at 581-7942 or bayork@eiu.edu.

eastern’s arts & entertainment magazine

BINGO @ The MOOSE Family Fraternity

Grant Truccano can be reached at 581-7942 or gatruccano@eiu.edu.

615 7th Street Non-members can play

TONIGHT 7 pm 217-345-2012

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@DEN_Sports tweet of the day: EIU basketball tickets go on sale this Saturday at Noon.

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Sports Editor Dominic Renzetti 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 27, 2011 N o. 1 4 1 , V O L U M E 9 6

8

FOOTBALL STANDINGS

Long climb to the top for Panthers By Dominic Renzetti Sports Editor

Jacksonville State remains the No. 1 team in the Ohio Valley Conference, posting an unbeaten 4-0 record in conference. The Gamecocks have an overall record of 5-2 after a non-conference road loss to the University of Kentucky. Jacksonville State leads the conference in interceptions with 10 and field goals, making five out of five. The No. 2 team in the OVC is the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles, also remaining in their spot from last week. The Golden Eagles are 3-1in the OVC and had a record of 4-2 overall. The Golden Eagles, like the Gamecocks, are also coming off a loss. Tennessee Tech is undefeated on the road so far this season in OVC play. The Golden Eagles lead the conference in pass defense efficiency and punting. Eastern Kentucky is the No. 3 team in the OVC with a conference record of 3-1. The Colonels are on a three game winning streak, currently undefeated at home in conference play. The three-game winning streak is currently the longest in the OVC. The last three wins by the Colonels have all been against OVC teams. Eastern Kentucky has an overall record of 4-3 overall. The team also has the No. 1 rushing offense and scoring defense in the OVC. At the No. 4 spot in the OVC is Tennessee-Martin, who holds a record of 2-3 in conference play. The Skyhawks have won two straight OVC games and currently hold an overall record of 4-3. The Skyhawks have the No. 1 total offense, scoring offense, passing efficiency and total defense and rushing defense. The Murray State Racers are the No. 5 team in the OVC with a conference record of 2-2. The Racers have an overall record of 4-3 and are cur-

KIM FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Jake Walker, redshirt junior running back, gets tackled by Tennessee-Martin players during the game on Saturday at O’Brien Stadium; the Panthers lost 24-23. Eastern will take on Austin Peay this Saturday.

rently riding a two game winning streak. Murray State leads the conference in third down conversions with seven and has the No. 1 passing offense in the OVC. The No. 6 team in the OVC is Tennessee State, currently holding a record of 2-3 in conference, while also holding a record of 3-5 overall. The Tigers, coming off a loss, have yet to lose a game at home this season, winning three games on their own turf. Tennessee State leads the conference in average punt return yards, as well as sacks. The Tigers have also attempt-

FOOTBALL

ed more on-side kicks than any other team. The Austin Peay Governors are No. 7 in the OVC standings, currently with a record of 2-3 in conference. The Governors have yet to win a game on the road this season, posting a record of 0-4 on the road. Two of those losses came against OVC teams. Austin Peay is currently on a three game losing streak, with all losses coming against OVC teams. The Governors are the worst in the conference when it comes to converting on third down and have the worst punt return aver-

age. They also have the worst passing efficiency and pass defense efficiency. Like the Governors, Southeast Missouri also has a record of 2-3 in the OVC and 2-5 overall. The Redhawks are second to last in the conference, currently standing at No. 8. While posting an undefeated record of 2-0 at home against conference teams, the Redhawks have yet to win on road against a conference team, posting an 0-3 record. The Redhawks have the conference’s worst scoring offense, scoring defense and passing offense. No team in the OVC has been sacked

more times than the Redhawks. At last in the standings, Eastern has the worst record in the OVC, currently at 0-6. The Panthers have an overall record of 1-7 on the year and are currently on a seven game losing streak. Eastern has the OVC’s worst total offense, rushing offense and rushing defense. However, the Panthers have the best pass defense in the conference. Dominic Renzetti can be reached at 581-7942 or dcrenzetti@eiu.edu.

VOLLEYBALL

Hutchinson leads all players in kill-digs By Lenny Arquilla Staff Reporter Kenny Whittaker

Michael Letton

Two players get booted from team Staff Report

Junior wide receiver Kenny Whittaker and senior defensive lineman Michael Letton were dismissed from the team Wednesday by Eastern head coach Bob Spoo. Whittaker and Letton were dismissed for a violation of team rules. Whittaker, a junior from Miami Shores, Fla., was the team’s leader in receptions with 42, totaling 409 yards. He averaged 9.7 yards per reception, as well as 51.1 yards per

game. His longest reception of the season was good for 72 yards. His only touchdown of the season came in a week two loss to Northwestern. Letton has appeared in each of the Panthers’ eight games this season, making nine tackles. The Panthers will be back in action this weekend when they head to the road to take on Austin Peay. The Panthers currently have a record of 1-7 and 0-6 in the Ohio Valley Conference.

Sophomore Reynae Hutchinson led all players with her 13th career kill-dig double-double with 11 kills and 11 digs. This also marks her 10th this season alone. A l t h o u g h t h e Pa n t h e r s l o s t their midweek match, junior Emily Franklin recorded double-digits kills with 10 and five digs. The Panthers fall to 8-17 overall and 5-9 in the Ohio Valley Conference with Tuesday’s sweep against Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. Franklin lifted the Panthers early when she served seven straight times in the third set, but the Panthers could not overcome a 2-0 deficit and the Cougars pecked away at the Panthers 13-5 lead before finally finishing the Panthers at 21-20 on a kill by Brianna Graunke, who led the Cougars with 10 kills.

Around the OVC: Morehead State beat Austin Peay 3-1 behind junior Ellie Roberson who recorded 22 kills. This marks their 22nd consecutive Ohio Valley Conference win (28-26, 21-25, 25-21, 25-33). The Eagles also got 15 kills and five blocks from red-shirt freshman Laura McDermott while Sophomore libero Leslie Schellhaas came up with a match-high 31 digs. Morehead State swept the season series from Austin Peay for the first time in four years and also won at Austin Peay for the first time since 2007. Austin Peay, however, did get strong offense by Hillary Plybon, who had a team-high 14 kills, and libero Paige Economos, who had 23 digs. Murray State snaps a two-match losing streak with a 3-0 (26-24, 25-17, 25-14) sweep of Southeast Missouri. Murray State moves to 6-19

overall and 6-8 in the Ohio Valley Conference. Murray State was led by freshman Beth Mahurin, who had a career-best 13 kills and five digs. Junior Lia Havili tallied her 12th double-double of the season with 31 assists and 10 digs, while junior Cassy Woolverton added 11 kills. After the first two sets were back and forth, Southeast Missouri earned the first point in set three, but Murray State went on a 9-0 run that gave them the lead for good. The Redhawks scratched away with a 2-0 run, but the Racers countered with a 7-0 run to push the lead to 16-3. The Murray State Racers then earned the 25-14 win. Lenny Arquilla can be reached at 581-7944 or lrarquilla@eiu.edu


Vol. 96 Issue 141