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EDITOR’S MUSINGS

Happy Birthday Dabble.... well, almost.

Dabble’s actual birthday is February 28 and we’ve never felt or looked better! To celebrate the occasion, we are announcing a big contest on February 28th. Look for contest details on our website and Facebook pages. Dabble is travelling to Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia for the 11th annual Design Express Trip. To get you in the mood for the trip, you’ll want to spend some time with our Dabble Does Charleston feature on pages 80 to 107. Cover guy Antwon Ford is a Charleston native and one of dozens of artisans who weave sweet grass stalks into baskets and accessories for sale throughout the city. He made the cover thanks to his infectious grin, and we feel it is a perfect representation of the hospitality Charleston exudes. Speaking of the cover, did you notice our jaunty red banner? Team Dabble’s been craving colour so we asked our good friends at Benjamin Moore to help us find a signature colour for each issue. For this issue, we chose Exotic Red #2086-10 from the Colour Preview collection. We liked it so much we’ve used the same colour as an accent throughout the magazine and website—check out Dabble Digs, our section openers and events pages for the Issue 6 colour scheme. With the launch of the next issue, the colour will change. But I'll tell you what won't change—team Dabble's commitment to bringing you more of what we all love—great design, awe-inspiring travel and mouthwatering food. Thank you for your continued support and good luck with our upcoming contest.

Kimberley Seldon

Editor in Chief

Follow me... t f

@kimberleyseldon www.facebook.com/KimberleySeldon

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February/March 2012


FEB/MAR 2012

Kimberley Seldon Editor in Chief

Simon Burn Creative Director and Principal Photographer

Victoria Drainville Executive Editor | Art Director

Cheryl Horne Managing Editor

Bob Seldon Captain Crisis

Design Contributors Lisa Canning, Christine Da Costa, Nyla Free, Erin Mercer, Nicholas Rosaci, Janet Villeneuve, Joy Zaczyk

Travel Contributors Kathy Buckworth, Heather Greenwood Davis, Stephanie Gray, Beth Halstead, Jennifer Weatherhead

Food Contributors Theresa Albert, Corey Burgan, Jameson Fink, David Laudenback, Fiona Van Alstyne

Design & Styling Team www.kimberleyseldon.com Kathy Seale, Linda Jennings

Advertising and Promotion Aysun Kuck aysun@dabblemag.com

Media and Public Relations media@dabblemag.com

Owned and Published by Kimberley Seldon Productions Inc. Cheryl Horne, Managing Director cheryl@kimberleyseldon.com

909 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2Z6 101 California Ave, Santa Monica, California 90403

www.dabblemag.com info@dabblemag.com While every effort has been made to ensure that advertisements and articles appear correctly, Dabble Magazine and Kimberley Seldon Productions Inc. cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. All material is intended for informational purposes only. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editor. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part prohibited without written permission from the publisher.

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y er ev in sue is 14 Dabble Here, Dabble There, Dabble Dabble Everywhere 15

On the Web

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Dabble Digs

134 I dabble in... Maria Killam 136 Just a Dab

ON THE COVER: Benjamin Moore Feature Colour: Exotic Red #2086-10 Antwon Ford stands proudly with the "Transition" basket made from sweet grass.

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design

HOME TOURS

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Jamie Herzlinger Luxe Desert Retreat

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Bob & Cortney Novogratz Surfing Sisters

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Jennifer Brouwer A Heartfelt Space

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Quick Tip Chix Cozy Up the Bedroom

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Reality Check A Kid's Bedroom

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Take 3 Sculptural Resolution

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DIY Guy Copper Showstopper

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Industry Profile Michelle Bergeron

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What's in Store Cake Vintage

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What’s Trending Malachite

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Infusion Karen Merk


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Road Raves Australia

travel

72 Snapshot Iceland 108 Dabble Dare Glacier Hiking 112 Best Places For Igloos

DABBLE DOES CHARLESTON

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Join Dabble’s contributors as they search for the best design, travel and food Charleston has to offer.

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food

118 There’s an App for That Pizza 120 Dabble Chef Homemade Pasta 130 Dinner Date Breakfast in Bed 132 Sindulgence Sin-amon Cake

FEATURED 122 Eat like an Argentinian

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Design Bloggers Conference

here there

Feb. 26-28

Join guest speaker, Kimberley Seldon, design contributor, Nyla Free and other design bloggers for the Design Bloggers Conference in Los Angeles. www.design-bloggers-conference.com

Mar. 08

CityLine Kimberley Seldon hangs out with host Tracy Moore as guest design expert on CityTV’s CityLine. www.cityline.ca

everywhere Find out what Dabble’s contributors have on the go this holiday season.

Mar. 08-10

BlogWest 2012

Join Dabble's Travel Contributor and regular guest parenting expert for CTVNews Channel (Fridays, 11:20 am), Kathy Buckworth, in Edmonton for the first ever BlogWest. www.blogwest2012.wordpress.com

Design Express 2012: Charleston & Savannah

Jun. 13-17

Join Kimberley Seldon for a truly unique travel experience. Immerse yourself in the land of southern hospitality. 5 days, 4 nights, 2 amazing cities. www.kimberleyseldon.com


On the web...

t f

@dabblemag www.facebook.com/dabblemag

New look

New year, new look! Check out Dabble's new colours, browse through the design, travel and food galleries and read blog posts by Dabble's wonderful contributors. Go to the website...

ok W ty ri Cha

Dabble Chef, Corey Burgan, competes for charity. Judges Florence Kwowk, Jean-François Déry, and Theresa Quick stand with Corey as they judge a dish he made with Blue Dragon products. Amy Rosen's Vegetarian Vietnamese Pancake won and she donated $2,000 to the Mickey Network. Read more...

Enter to Win

A Fabulous Audrey Accent Chair. With soft curved shape, velvety fabric and tufted back, the Audrey Chair will enhance any room in your home. A perfect accent chair for bedroom, hallway or living room. Dimensions: 29.5”W x 32.5”D x 32.5”H Retail Value: $499.00 Courtesy of Urban Barn. www.urbanbarn.com Enter contest...

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digs Not Your Bag Tags Identify luggage quickly and keep strangers away with these vibrant, cleverly phrased luggage tags. Luggage tags, US$5, My Tagalongs www.mytagalongs.com

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February/March 2012

The holidays are over and, though you may not feel like shopping again just yet, design contributor Lisa Canning knows which products might tempt you to change your mind.


n ig Des Kinetic Flame Made of polished steel, these Danish designed candleholders create a fluid tabletop centrepiece. Menu Double Candleholder, CA$79, Pimlico Design Gallery www.pimlicogallery.com Stylish Storage This hand-crafted walnut shelf provides elegant entryway storage and a dynamic pop of colour. Wall*Nuts Collection, US$1100, Think Fabricate www.thinkfabricate.com

Treasure Chest Don’t hide your treasures, put them on display...elegantly. Acrylic box, US$268, Alexandra Von Furstenberg www.alexandravonfurstenberg.com

Three’s Company Nest them or arrange them organically, the trio of side tables is perfect for a small space. 3 piece side tables, CA$595, BoConcept www.boconcept.ca

Colourful Underfoot Enliven wood or tile floors with the Indian made wool area carpet. Woolen Dhuri, US$1475, Bev Hisey www.bevhisey.com

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digs

From Coast to Coast Laser cut from birch plywood, these cutout coasters pay homage to San Fran, LA, Chicago, and NYC. US Design Cities, CA$40, The National Design Collective www.thenationaldesigncollective.ca

l ve Tra City Guide Louis Vuitton’s City Guide Collection allows you to explore the world in style. The 2012 City Guides, CA$30 each, $120 box set, Louis Vuitton www.louisvuitton.com

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Foldable Flexibility Easy to transport and stylish to wear, the headphones with integrated microphone work with most Smartphones. Urbanista Copenhagen Foldable Headphones, US$99, Horne www.shophorne.com


Vivid Vessel Keep beverages hot or cold in this hip jug. Stelton Vacuum Jug, US$70, Horne www.shophorne.com

Midas Touch A touch of gold in the morning java provides a glamorous start to the day. Gold Finish Coffee Spoon, US$11, Harabu House www.harabuhouse.com

Food Small But Strong Make the party portable with these 500 ml sized bottles of vodka, whisky and rum. Vodka, Whisky, Rum, CA$20, Proof www.proofbrands.com

Spice Sachet Forego conventional stir-fry with these convenient 2-serving pouches in ready to heat unique flavours such as chilli coconut. Blue Dragon Stir-Fry pouch, CA$2, Blue Dragon www.bluedragon.ca

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We asked our designers...

How do you bring warmth into a space during the winter season?

Photo: Angela Auclair Photography

Christine Da Costa

“To create warmth in a space, I like to add a lot of different texture via area rugs, cozy toss cushions and throws, warm light through candlelight or a fireplace and of course, lots and lots of cuddles.” Christine is a certified interior designer who approaches each room like a woman’s outfit. “Decorate as you dress.” Buy timeless pieces that have longevity and accessorize with less expensive items. A design motto to hang your hat on. www.decorbychristine.com @glamamama

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Joy Zaczyk

“A real roaring fire coupled with a cozy, textured throw and soft background music— the mood is instantly set!”

Janet Villeneuve

“The warm glow of candles surrounded by accessories that reflect light, like mercury glass and silver.” Joy and Janet are the coauthors of the popular tongue-in-cheek design blog moggit.com and the newly launched styleagency.ca. They are bonafide design junkies with a passion for all things gorgeous! www.moggit.com @moggitgirls

Emily Mays

"I bring warmth into a space through an aromatherapy bath ritual. Simply hanging a posy of herbs like lavender, mint and rosemary over a tap of running hot water invites the little collection to release its aromatics.” Emily Mays (AIFD, CFD) composes custom botanical design from her Niagara-onthe-Lake based garden studio. Emily offers tailored gifting, event support and instructional workshops. This spring she will launch Flùranaiche, a pop-up shop showcasing her current collection. www.fluranaiche.com @Fluranaiche


gn si de February/March 2012

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x hi C ip T Quick

Cozy Up the Bedroom WORDS BY Joy Zaczyk AND Janet Villeneuve PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANGELA AUCLAIR

It’s winter. Brrrr. Time to retreat indoors and layer our rooms with warmth and comfort. Perhaps no room benefits more from extra layers than the bedroom. Here’s how Dabble’s Quick Tip Chix, Joy and Janet, feather their nests for winter warmth.

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DESIGN

1. Start with a Great Headboard

The headboard is one of the most important pieces in a bedroom. An ideal headboard combines appropriate style and colour with serviceable material, often providing a ‘jumping-off point’ for the look of the whole room.

Tip: Browse through online magazines, blogs, and other resources such as Pinterest to find styles and shapes that appeal.

2. Light and Bright

Take a page from the masters of winter light—the Scandinavians— and keep your décor light. Using light tones and a generous amount of ambient lighting banishes the darkness of winter and makes a space more inviting.

Tip: Use light-enhancing accessories such as a mirror, glass and polished silver and gold to amplify available light.

3. Tone on Tone Calms

A tonal scheme (all in the same colour family) creates calmness, which is ideal for a bedroom retreat. While contrasting colours are appealing, they aren’t always restful when you are trying to get some shut-eye.

Tip: For inspiration, gather a range of paint chips from light to dark and see how various combinations appeal.

4. Mix and Match Bedding

When gathering an overall bedding look, be patient; take your time and create a custom look. Resist the urge to buy ready-made ‘bed-in-abag’ as the selection and quality can be limited.

Tip: When purchasing expensive items such as a duvet cover,

remember that bold pattern tends to wear out its welcome more quickly than solid colour or subtle pattern.

5. Double the Duvet

Give your duvet that high, lofty look so often seen in magazines by mimicking this stylist’s trick: place two comforters inside the duvet cover.

Tip: Safety pin the corners of two comforters together. It makes it easier to insert and remove them from the duvet.

RIGHT Our model is eight-week old Milo

Odin, an Australian Shepherd-Labrador mix from Animatch, a non-profit dog adoption service in Quebec. February/March 2012

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QUICK TIP CHIX

6. Layer on Texture

A combination of textures—nubbly, smooth, furry, shiny, matte— adds depth and warmth to the bedroom. Include decorative toss cushions and a plush throw at the foot of the bed.

Tip: Mixing textures is critical for successful tone-on-tone spaces, which look sterile with a single fabric. 7. Go Green

Sure the holidays are over, but fresh greens never go out of season. Holly, pepper berry, boxwood or pine branches bring energy into the room.

Tip: Cheery red sprigs of dogwood branches displayed in a simple vase are a great post-holiday choice. 8. Wood Tone Warmth

Wood tones bring rustic earthiness to any room and are especially appealing when mixed with textured fabrics.

Tip: Look for unique wood pieces such as the handmade bench at the foot of the bed to fulfill the two Cardinal rules of design: If it’s in your home, it should be useful and beautiful.

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DESIGN

9. Buy Quality

Since we spend one third of our lives sleeping, we need our beds to be comfortable. Always buy quality sheets and the return on your investment is a good night’s sleep and bedding that will last for years.

Tip: Shop the clearance section in department, dĂŠcor and specialty stores. Often, great quality sheet sets are placed on clearance to make way for new stock. Look for a combination of high quality or Egyptian cotton and a thread count greater than 300.

10. Au Naturel

Introduce outdoor elements such as a decorative dish filled with smooth stones, a glittery paperweight rock, or a collection of shells to breathe life into rooms.

Tip: Take a walk through the park or a forest to see what treasures you can find. Keep your eyes peeled for an antler on your next nature hike. The organic, sculptural shape brings presence to a space.

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REALITY CHECK

Decorating a kid’s bedroom WORDS BY NYLA FREE PHOTOGRAPHY BY LORI ANDREWS

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DESIGN

From crib to bunk to full-sized bed, kids’ bedrooms change often. Nyla Free says forget the themes and embrace your child’s interests and age to create a child-worthy bedroom that feels just right.

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REALITY CHECK

Step 1: Age Appropriate

Think bold and graphic prints for teens and whimsical patterns for little ones. However, before budgeting, consider that most children feel the urge to redecorate every three to five years.

Step 2: Light Control

A dimmer switch sets the mood for bedtime and provides a soft nightlight when required. Covering windows with blackout lined drapery keeps sunlight out when it’s time to sleep.

Step 3: More than a Bed

Bedrooms aren’t just for resting tired eyes. Add a cozy chair for reading, desk for homework and ensure appropriate floor space so there’s room to stretch out and play.

Step 4: Make it Personal

Display photos of friends, keepsakes and personal artwork to create a unique showcase, honouring individual style. Make sure to include a space for bragging rights, where involvement in activities and sports is given its due.

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DESIGN

Step 5: Storage Wars

Step 8: Boost the Fun Factor

Step 6: Think Longevity

Step 9: Room to Grow

Bring the words ‘neat and tidy’ to the forefront of your kids’ minds. Make cleanup and organization trouble free with bins and buckets, bookcases and boxes.

Purchasing classic pieces now saves money later. Bedding and paint colours are easy changes to make as kids grow, but you’ll thank yourself in years to come for investing in furniture with staying power.

Step 7: Save and Splurge

Incorporating vintage finds like a telephone stand as a bedside table adds interest and doesn’t break the bank. Splurge on investment pieces such as a good quality bed they’ll have for years and statement items for impact.

A stylish mix of patterns, colour and texture ensures a ‘not so serious’ approach to children’s room design.

Adapt to growth spurts and ever changing needs by purchasing furniture to grow into. A queen size bed will see young scholars through college while a full size chair snuggles two kids early and one as she grows big and tall.

Step 10: Involve the Kids

Get the creative juices flowing by asking about colour preferences and hobbies. Invite kids to participate in selections by narrowing down options to two choices mom can live with.

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DESIGN

luxe desert retreat PHOTOGRAPHY BY Werner Segarra

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HOME TOUR

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DESIGN

You wouldn’t know it from its formal interior, but this 7000 square foot home is located in Paradise Valley, Arizona, amidst the deserts and the cacti. Designer Jamie Herzlinger is up to the challenge of transforming the house from top to bottom with her client’s specific vision in mind: luxe desert retreat. When you enter the home you are instantly greeted by the 19th century Dutch corbeille-shaped canapé which sits on top of Marie Antoinette patterned hardwood floors: the entrance showstopper. Jamie designed a niche in the foyer to give the room a large presence. The mirror, that sits above the Marquetry commode, purposely reflects into the dining room.

LEFT Jamie used a grasscloth wallpaper in the foyer and hall to create textural interest without distracting from the beauty of the moulding.

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HOME TOUR

“Reflective quality doesn’t always have to be glass, marble or other hard surfaces. Shine also comes from fabrics like the silk velvet material on the sofa cushions.” ~ Jamie

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DESIGN

Jamie describes this space as refined elegance because it’s not too formal but formal enough to go from jeans to black tie. February/March 2012

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HOME TOUR

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DESIGN

A classic white kitchen with framed cabinetry and white Calcutta marble countertops complements the home’s traditional elements. A custom marble mosaic on the back of the island acts as powerful art in a neutral colour scheme. In the dining room, Jamie uses a Gracie wallpaper with bird motif and creates 8-foot window panels to act as the focal point of the room. Rather than use it on all the walls, the panels bring strength to the windows. Jamie found a complementary orange and silver floral Bergamo fabric for the draperies in the formal setting. Jamie tactfully creates interest by combining several different styles of chairs in the dining room, giving the room unexpected charm, a true signature of Jamie’s style. ABOVE There’s no need for a rug under the table as the intricate hardwood floors continue uninterrupted from the foyer.

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HOME TOUR

In the master bedroom, Jamie demonstrates that it is completely acceptable to put a bed in front of a window. “I reoriented the floor plan and put the bed in front of the window deliberately to make the bed front and center in the room.� Jamie says the key to achieving a similar look is to always keep it simple. A neutral palette should have different variations of white and flexible lighting, including table lamps and a chandelier like the Sophia Chandelier by Jan Showers. Desert life never looked so luxe.

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DESIGN

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Take 3

Sculptural Resolution WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY EMILY MAYS

An outdoor urn or planter is an attractive and welcoming enhancement to the entrance. But how many of us find these arrangements quickly become neglected after the holidays are over and the temperatures plunge? Often times, lifeless boughs and tired, broken branches remain until Easter eggs are retrieved. With minimal planning it’s possible to keep urns looking fresh and seasonal right through the winter.

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DESIGN

Jack Frost A simple white planter suits the contemporary arrangement of silver-blue greens and Carolina Sapphire. Snow-dusted grapevine and birch branches create architecture that grounds the assorted greens. Sprigs of Dusty Miller lend colour and texture, acting as focal flowers at the centre of the arrangement.

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TAKE 3

Design Tips A resin planter is not subject to sub-zero cracking but must be properly weighted to avoid toppling over. Add a generous layer of pea gravel to facilitate re-arranging after the soil has frozen. Lay a wreath horizontally on the planter and build your arrangement on top of it.

Two Garden Visitor The same planter and foliage may alternatively be presented as a preface for spring, showcasing favourite garden pieces like the metal bird and egg seen here. A trellis, obelisk or a lantern work equally well. In this version we’ve highlighted a moss wrapped cone, birch covered globes and the perched bird.

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Three

DESIGN

Tradition with a Twist A whimsical arrangement is composed with varying colours of greenery including Fraser fir, blue pine, hemlock and some minimal magnolia. Unlike spring and summer planters which have continual abundant growth, this winter version relies on grapevine, pine cones, and maple branches for structure. Moss and curly willow create added interest. February/March 2012

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Surfing Surfing SISTERS SISTERS HOME TOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW WILLIAMS

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DESIGN

When two artsy sisters bought a home, sight unseen, from a foreclosure sale in the Far Rockaways of New York state, they envisioned a perfect hideaway surf pad. Fortunately the chic siblings, Debra and Katherine Chen, hired two funky designers, husband and wife duo Bob and Cortney Novogratz from 9 by Design. Looks like it's surf's up from here on out.

S S

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HOME TOUR

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DESIGN

M M

Most designers only dream of having free rein in a client's home. Starting with an empty shell, this house didn't even have real stairs going up to the second floor. It didn't have a kitchen either. But what it did have was vision, thanks to surfer residents Debra and Katherine. The siblings asked the designers to create a distinct home where they could entertain friends and family in comfort. The Novogratz's quickly saw an opportunity to inject colour, personality and most importantly, functionality into the home. Using the sisters' admiration for Betsy Johnson as a jumping-off place, Bob and Cortney harnessed the colour pink and brought their dreams to life. The casual and comfy living room features custom toss cushions soon to be available through the designers' home dĂŠcor collection. A dynamic rug, which reads "girrrlll" reflects the clients' fun side. The floral wallpaper is custom from Flavorpaper and it's strategically placed to inject style and personality without overwhelming the space.

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# HOME TOUR

When you enter the house, the stairs are an immediate focal point. The stripes are painted with Stark Paint.

#

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#


#

DESIGN

The sisters invested in appliances such as the pink Blue Star stove. Its colour stands out brilliantly in the white cabinetry.

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HOME TOUR

Designers Bob and Cortney Novogratz pasted Matt Siren's poster of the "Ghost Girls" all over the room, providing graphic drama. To make the wall treatment more durable, the posters are painted over with clear varnish. Using the sisters' own bedroom furniture, the designers treated the floor to a bubblegum pink colour and added the vintage chandelier. For more on the Surfer Sisters' home and Bob and Cortney's designs, watch Home by Novogratz on HGTV Canada.

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DESIGN

February/March 2012

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y u G DIY Copper

Showstopper WORDS BY NICHOLAS ROSACI

“Penny for your thoughts” says Dabble’s DIY Guy, Nicholas Rosaci as he makes cents of his latest project. MATERIALS REQUIRED Table of your choice Pennies 2 cups distilled white vinegar 1 tbsp table salt Small container Lepage® No More Nails adhesive glue Copper coloured spray paint

OPTIONAL Envirotex Pour On High Gloss Finish or other polymer coating 52

February/March 2012

MORE ON THE WEB!


DESIGN

1

SCOUT IT OUT

Scout thrift stores, garage sales, estate sales, antique stores and used furniture stores to find a small, inexpensive but practical table to adorn.

CLEAN EXCHANGE

2

In order to clean pennies, mix vinegar and salt in a small container and soak several at a time in the mixture. Wait three minutes and remove shiny pennies from the container. Rinse coins under warm water and pat dry. Tip: Don’t clean valuable or collectible coins. Removing the tarnish (patina) reduces their value by as much as 90%.

3

UNDERCOVER COPPER

4

SECURE YOUR INVESTMENTS

5

PROTECT YOUR VALUABLES

Spray paint the table a copper or bronze metallic colour to match the pennies. Dupli-Color® automotive paint in metallic copper is a great match. Tip: If you feel like spending a little more on the project, use nickels and spray the surface silver instead.

Glue each penny onto the table until its surfaces are completely covered. Work closely around the base, sides and top of the table and adjust the position of the coins to minimize gaps.

Follow the manufacturer’s instructions if you choose to cover the table with a clear coat of polymer.

Tip

DOUBLE THE LAYER OF PENNIES FOR GREATER DEPTH

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Michelle Bergeron

PHOTO BY: Jonathan Beckerman

y tr us Ind file Pro

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DESIGN

Fashion-turned-interior-turnedfurniture designer, Michelle Bergeron has plenty to smile about.

DAB: What is your favourite part of designing furniture? MB: The process; painting and construction and seeing a piece take on a life of its own.

Dabble gets cozy with the design star who’s beaming about her luxurious furniture line, Skatemoderne.

DAB: Describe the Michelle Bergeron look. MB: My look is always a mix of different aesthetics. Being Japanese and French has deeply influenced my fashion as well as interior design aesthetic. I value the spare and geometric just as much as the more baroque and over-the-top. I would say my signature look is a pair of old jeans and white tee with a Chanel jacket. Old with new, simple with an edge—that is my look.

DAB: What inspired you to create Skatemoderne, with its focus on eco-friendly furniture? MB: As a designer, I always looked to shagreen to make a statement piece in a room or at least as an accessory that could dress up a space. When I began to design my own pieces in shagreen, I realized how fragile and temperamental the skins were, and how much upkeep was involved in keeping items from peeling or cracking with age or climate variation. After years of experimentation and searching, I found a craftsman who invented a product that looks great and wears beautifully. I added my own colour sense—hand water-colouring and dyeing each piece and pushed the envelope of the material. I added patterns and colours not seen in traditional shagreen pieces but complementary to a former fashion designer’s edge.

I dabble in being a mom and wife. I have about 37 seconds a day to spare! ~ Michelle DAB: Where does “couture shagreen” make sense? Primarily as a design accent on case goods— drawer fronts, shelves and cabinet faces. Shagreen breathes new life into a plain wood table or cabinet.

DAB: Do you see any parallels between fashion design and furniture design? MB: I was a fashion designer before becoming an interior designer. My whole concept with this line is to bridge that gap. So much of my inspiration comes from the runway. No one does that. No one bridges that gap. That’s what I want to do. DAB: How has your fashion background helped your interior design career? MB: My background as a fashion designer taught me about quality and seasonality. I want to bring those things to the world of furniture design. I also understand the importance of meeting manufacturing deadlines and how to pace production. Designing one collection while shipping another while producing yet another. DAB: We love the customizable pieces in your collection. Can we expect more? MB: The silhouettes that I am asked repeatedly to customize are sort of the “bread and butter” of the line. However, I produce new pieces constantly. We are a 100% custom line. I can never colour a piece exactly the same way, so each piece has its own inherent design and beauty. DAB: Where do you see Skatemoderne a few years from now? MB: Accessories are so much fun for me and I hope to eventually roll out a complete home line.

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HOME TOUR

a heartfelt PHOTOGRAPHY BY Donna Griffith

What’s the benefit of designing your own living room? “Complete creative license,” says interior designer Jennifer Brouwer.

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DESIGN

space

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HOME TOUR

Jennifer shopped at Arteriors for the tall table lamps with dramatic black shades. The side tables and buffet from Geovin are lacquered red while the curtains and ottoman are custom pieces by Jennifer Brouwer Design.

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DESIGN

“I am a firm believer in the psychology of great design.” ~Jennifer

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HOME TOUR

Jennifer says the secret to mixing and matching different patterns is to select six to ten different fabrics, toss them on the sofa, stand back and see which ones work in the space and which ones clash. 60

February/March 2012


DESIGN

Jennifer’s challenge was to create a 240 square foot office / showroom / living room to be shared by children and a busy working mom and her staff. Located in Markham, Ontario, Jennifer Brouwer Designs is a showroom office where clients are invited to visualize the endless possibilities of a design project. Though Jennifer selected a palette her three children love, the Burberry inspired focal wall and fire engine red accessories are all her. Through a full scale renovation, Jennifer wanted to show staff and clients that starting with great bones and good furniture gives you the freedom to transform spaces with paint and accessories. Jennifer says, “Once Valentine’s Day passes, I can swap the large heart painting by Una Johnstone with something more fitting for spring.” Jennifer hired Barbara Rocha from Paint a Lifestyle to create the large scale Burberry inspired striped wall using Black Iron (2120-20), Exotic Red (2086-10) and Litchfield Gray (HC-78) from Benjamin Moore. The pattern is applied on one wall while the others (including the ceiling) are painted black; allowing decorative elements to pop. When using bold patterns and colours, says the designer, less is more. “What you omit from a room is as important as the things you include.” February/March 2012

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what’s in store?

DESIGN

Cake Vintage 1707 Broadway Nashville, Tennessee www.cakevintage.com

Nashville residents Angie and Robbie Cook are bursting with creative ideas. So much so, the vintage enthusiasts had to find two ways to bring their unique vision to the public. With Knobstoppers, they fashion vintage doorknobs into wine stoppers. And, with Cake Vintage Table & Home, they offer an eclectic selection of fancy kitchen papers, cook-centric chandeliers made from sterling flatware and linen-covered magnetic boards. It all started when Robbie and Angie were rummaging through antique stores and flea markets and bought several unusual doorknobs to fit into their home’s antique doors. One night, over a bottle of wine with friends, Robbie jokingly stuck one of the door handles into the wine bottle and the idea of Knobstoppers was born. Their second brand Cake Vintage Table & Home features some fave items like the recyclable and compostable kitchen paper and the hand screened designs transferred onto organic hemp. Shopping here is a delight.

Why we love it: • Great vintage finds

transformed into unique practical gifts.

• Robbie and Angie raise

funds for the Wonderful Life Foundation, supporting families of children with cancer.

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what’sng trendi #malachite WORDS BY CHRISTINE DA COSTA

Malachite, the distinct green coloured mineral dates to ancient Egypt where it was used for amulets, jewellery and cosmetics. Russia’s Romanov monarchy and in particular the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg made this gorgeous stone synonymous with extravagant luxury in interior design. Its emerald shine is still turning heads.

Merchandise Mart DreamHome Foyer by Summer Thorton Design

Faux Grandeur Perhaps inspired by the famous Winter Palace, this side table looks smart season after season. Cloverleaf Table-Faux Malachite Top, US$218, Interior Needs interiorneeds.chainreactionweb.com

Pretty Paper Make an impact like Chicago interior designer Summer Thorton did in the Merchandise Mart DreamHome Foyer with wallpaper from Cole and Son’s Fornasetti Collection. Cole and Son, Malachite Wallpaper, CA$278 / roll www.cole-and-son.com

Malachite DIY

Faux Never Looked So Good Make your own malachite base lamp like this one created by Danika Herrick from the popular blog Gorgeous Shiny Things. She took an 80’s lamp and turned it into a malachite masterpiece. www.gorgeousshinythings.com

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Luxe for a Steal Photos go glam surrounded by luxurious malachite. Malachite frame, US$18, Honeymoon at Home. www.honeymoonathome.com


Infusion

Colour is all the rage, but white on white never goes out of style. Victoria Drainville selects a serene colour palette inspired by Karen Merk’s gossamer photography.

2138-60 gray cashmere

1436 whirlpool

2142-50 gray mirage

1025 chocolate mousse

2164-20 marsh brown

AF-240 satchel

The holidays may be over, but there are many months of winter ahead. Take a colour cue from the snowy landscape right outside your window.

colour

Matting is as important as the frame. Pick a colour that helps your art stand out.

*Find a

store near you.

texture

pattern

Who wouldn’t want to sit up against a comfy Mongolian lamb pillow?

An acrylic base houses a sea fan; your living room should house this lamp.

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We asked our travellers...

What winter activity do you do to keep warm when it's cold outside?

Scott Wink

“There is nothing better than cranking up the crock pot, putting in some mulling spices and warming up apple cider.”

Crystal Wink

“Snuggling up on the couch under a warm blanket after a long day of work and planning our next trip and what we want to eat while we are there." Husband and wife team, Scott and Crystal Wink, run South Carolina's most followed food blog: Charleston Food Bloggers.They provide readers with interesting features on Charleston’s vibrant food scene. www.charlestonfoodbloggers.com

@SCfoodblogger

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Chassity Evans

"Fortunately our days of cold temperatures are limited here in Charleston, but when those cold days arrive, I like to warm up with a cozy scarf, boots, a large mug of hot chocolate, and warm cookies from my favorite local bakery, Sugar.” Chassity Evans is the author of the style blog, Look Linger Love. There she shares all the stylish things that make her heart pitter patter, whether it be fashion, interiors, or children's style related. She resides in Charleston, SC with her husband and two chidren. www.looklingerlove.blogspot.com

@looklingerlove

Kim Pallozzi

“I hate to admit it, but the best activity is inactivity. Fluffy slippers, flannel and a flick (chick, of course). The joy of sweet lassitude!” Kim has had the pleasure of interviewing an impressive list of iconic Canadian authors, actors, athletes and politicians for various publications. A selfproclaimed explorer, Kim has lived in both Europe and Asia and has travelled eleven countries and counting. For her, home is wherever the heart is.


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Australian R

ROAD RAVES

Heather Greenwood Davis’ adventure continues on Hayman Island as she takes a year off to see the world with her hubby and two kids.

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Respite WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY HEATHER GREENWOOD DAVIS

TRAVEL

The difference between a two-week vacation and a yearlong trip around the world? You can’t go home to refuel. After 100 days on the road I found myself staring down the short end of a very long trip with a gas tank that was very clearly reading E. The solution arrived in the form of a yacht, a lady holding out a glass of sparkling wine and a view that offered blue waters, white cresting waves and the promise of beauty above and below the waters (which, when you think about it, really isn’t a bad way for a solution to arrive). Luxury yacht is only one of the three ways you can get to Hayman Island. The others: Helicopter or Seaplane. Equally amazing options, I’d say. Before we boarded that yacht we took a flight to get us into Australia and another to get from Brisbane to Hamilton Island where the yacht was waiting. If it seems like a lot of work to get to a tiny island, you’re missing the point. The fact that it takes some effort to get there makes the reward that much sweeter. Hayman Island is a private island resort located off the eastern coast of Australia. For 60 years it has been regarded as the premium luxury getaway in Australia. I have met Australians who salivate at its name and mentioning we had been invited to visit almost always caused a raised eyebrow and a dropped jaw. It’s that exclusive. And so, in February 2011, when it was knocked around by not one, but two cyclones that did enough damage to force a 5 month closure, the luxury island visiting public held its breath. February/March 2012

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ROAD RAVES

“The most amazing thing about this property is the ability it offers guests to completely disappear within it. ”

Its recent re-opening is reason for a collective sigh of relief; Hayman Island is even more beautiful than before. The island’s vegetation, ripped, shredded and salted by the cyclones, has been restored and enhanced. More than 33,000 plants were brought onto the island and planted, creating the only hotel botanical garden in the world. Famed Australian landscape designer Jamie Drurie was brought in and he upped the ante, creating a plant paradise that includes 40 species of plants brought in just because they smell good. A 5-star award winning Great Hotels of the World property, they have luxury locked up. Rooms all have stunning views of either the lagoon or the pool and the backdrop to it all is the stunning Great Barrier Reef.

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All of this luxury would suggest an older adult clientele but not so. Young couples flock to the beach villas, which offer romantic private enclaves. And families flock to the suites—thrilled to have found a getaway where they can have the luxuries they crave without having to give up family time and watching their kids chase cockatiels up and down the beach. The fact that Hayman is also one of only a few 5-star properties in the country that welcomes kids of any age only makes it more enticing. Days are wiled away or filled as you choose. The fitness facilities include rotating tennis pros from Peter Burwash International who are as happy to teach the game to a beginner as they are to work on a particular aspect of your swing. Prefer something more leisurely? Take to the croquet yard or borrow one of the windsurfers, kayaks or catamarans for a day on the water.


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For me, the most amazing thing about this property is the ability it offers guests to completely disappear within it.

clean-up crews and renovation teams to make sure the island was restored. Employees don’t do that if they aren’t treated well.

On a rare afternoon, when the kids are in the kids club and Ish and I have a few hours free to explore, we discover a hidden sanctuary. To our right, a waterfall and a bench for two, so much a part of the landscape that we have to do a double take to realize it’s there. To our left, a trail through a butterfly garden and, throughout, shrubs, twisted trees and surprising bursts of colour that dare you to resist snapping a photo or lowering your nose for a sniff.

To hear them tell it– Hayman is their home. They live here, raise their kids here (there is a school on the island for staff children) and grow to see each other as family.

The property is breathtakingly beautiful, but it’s the staff that truly makes it memorable. The island oasis isn’t just a job for them. When the cyclones hit, staff were given the choice to leave. Almost all of them stayed on, working with

So when you visit, by extension you are a guest in their home and you feel it. Guests return year after year. And, despite the distance and the many countries left on this trip of a lifetime, we find ourselves contemplating joining them.

Heather on her journey, at:  Follow www.globetrottingmama.com

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Iceland WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATHY HORNE

In the midst of a two week European cruise with two friends, I set foot in the middle of, well, everything. Known as ‘the land of contrasts,’ Iceland is a geographer’s playground, from steaming geysers to frozen glaciers, tectonic plates to volcanic rock. We see all that and more within our expansive 360 degree view.

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LEFT TO

RIGHT

Cathy H

orne, Dia

nne Nab

uurs and

The Travellers

Miki Tog

uri

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TRAVEL

As the plane swoops into the air (along with our stomachs) our minds ease as the landscape comes into view. We are in total awe of what layed before us. Beneath our wings we see the beautiful and modern city of Reykjavik. Leaving the city behind we fly over farm fields, lush green valleys and countryside with some brush and sparse trees. As we fly farther into

the interior of the country the landscape is barren. I am expecting a mountainous and rocky terrain, but the beauty of this landscape soars beyond my imagination. The view from the plane is a geographer’s dream, geothermal fields (one of the only places on earth where you can actually see the tectonic plates), cascading waterfalls, miles of volcanic rock, flat lava fields and massive glaciers... oh, the glaciers. We fly over Eyjafjallajökull and Tindfjallajökull (go ahead, sound them out, I dare ya) which are bordered on either side by lava fields. The contrast takes my breath away.

With only a day and a half to explore this land of adventure we are whisked away to an airport just outside Reykjavik less than an hour after docking. We apprehensively board an 18-seater twin prop plane for a 2½ hour tour called Fire and Ice, a name which becomes obvious minutes into our flight.

Looking out, even over the noise of the engine, you get a feeling of calmness and a sense of absolute silence. February/March 2012

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Running as far as the eye can see, the fault line of two tectonic plates is splitting Iceland in two. The North American plate is moving upwards and the European plate is pulling away. A fascinating reminder of our origins and proof that our earth is ever changing. We pass over Heckla, a volcano that erupts approximately every 10 years and is expected to erupt in the next year or so. Iceland is the most volcanic region on earth, so earthquakes and volcanic eruption are a constant threat. In the distance, sprinkled throughout the lava fields and mountains, we see what looks like wisps of smoke coming from camp fires, but is actually steam escaping from fissures and geothermal vents in the rocks. Returning to Reykjavik, we hop off the plane and thank the pilot for the unforgettable experience. Our next day’s excursion is a visit to the Golden Circle which encompasses many of the landmarks we saw by air. One is the Gullfoss Waterfall or the Golden Waterfall, so named for the rainbow seen in the mist above the falls on sunny days. Here, the River Hvítá drops 30 metres, falling over two cliffs, and flows into a huge canyon. It’s absolutely beautiful. We walk along footpaths and boardwalks to several scenic lookouts, some a little precarious. Along the trails are lovely coloured wildflowers and moss clinging to rocky terrain. As if this isn’t enough,we see the majestic mountains with a glacier in the distance.

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Gullfoss Waterfall OPPOSITE Large

crevice caused by shifting tectonic plates. February/March 2012

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A geyser ready to erupt.

Our next stop is an active geothermal area with hissing vents, bubbling mud pots and the geyser, Stokkur, that erupts every 2 to 8 minutes, shooting a stream of water and mist 65 feet into the air to every spectator’s delight. It is like waiting for a jack-in-the-box to pop open. We are entranced as it steams and bubbles, then increases in intensity, forming a dome a split second before it erupts. It happens so quickly that the window of opportunity to capture the dome on camera is small. As I stand, camera poised and ready to shoot for what feels like a very long time, my friend watches the bubbles and signals me to shoot. It takes both of us to hit the right timing, but ta da, I get my shot. I’m a happy camper... well, photographer. 78

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Last stop, Thingvellir National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of the most breathtaking sceneries in the country. Crevasses, lakes and lava fields covered with green moss and wild flowers are surrounded by snowcapped mountains. I could have stood there all day, just looking and sighing, sighing and looking. Iceland is known as the ‘Land of Fire and Ice,’ two obvious contrasts yet they both exist in one panoramic view of this beautiful country. I am in total awe. This is one geography class I will never forget.


TRAVEL

A geyser at the peak of eruption. February/March 2012

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIMON BURN PRODUCED BY VICTORIA DRAINVILLE

One of the most impressive things about Charleston is how well-informed its inhabitants are. Natives and newcomers to South Carolina readily speak of its rich and infamous past.

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Charleston is a survivor—withstanding fire, hurricanes, war, poverty, a legacy of slave trade and the largest earthquake on the east coast. Despite its many hardships, the city continues to thrive. Whether you travel to explore, to shop, to sample local cuisine or all of the above, Charleston does not disappoint. Oh, and did we mention shrimp and grits? Served about a hundred different ways? Dynamic duo Scott and Crystal Wink know all about delicious food as writers and editors of Charleston Food Bloggers. We asked them to share some favourite eating haunts with Dabble. Associate Editor Victoria Drainville discovers the best travel experiences and Look Linger Love blogger Chassity Evans explores the design scene. Our contributors have a tasty, beautiful and action-packed weekend ahead of them.

Jog along the ½ mile pebble walkway of Waterfront Park which faces the Cooper River. RIGHT Doug and Nick get their workout pulling Dabble contributors to their first destination.

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CHARLESTON DESIGN

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Chassity Evans surrounds herself with all things stylish and writes about it in her blog, Look Linger Love. “Charleston is such a lovely city,” says the blogger. Chassity invited us to look at her fave design stores, linger in the best ones and fall in love with an unbearable number of covetable items. Oh, and we did some shopping too.

A tiny gem, Lucinda Eden features divine clothing, vintage charms and treasures for the home.

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TOP DESIGN SPOTS

1

King Street is the hot spot for design shops and right in the heart of it is the charming Lucinda Eden (that’s the shop and the owner). Temptations abound with artfully selected home accessories, vintage clothing and even custom haute couture. The shop’s on the second level, so look heavenward and you’re on the right track. Just across the street is another must shop, Lily. The shop is accented with French style offerings at reasonable prices. Owners Kevin and Lin are typically onsite and eager to share their city with you.

2

Another King Street destination is Dwelling where the style is understated glamour. Whether you’re looking for a design consultation or just browsing the fine furnishings, you’ll feel right at home in Leigh McAlpin’s timeless and sustainable shop.

3

If original art is your thing be sure to experience the art galleries on Broad and Church Streets. Or get your own hands dirty and try one of Redux Contemporary Art Center’s class offerings including figure drawing, screen printing, jewelry making, and woodworking.

4

A carefully edited collection of southern paintings is on display at Gibbes Museum of Art. Opened in 1905, Charleston’s premiere art museum is a history lesson and gem of southern culture. The gift shop is worth a visit too.

5

Another enjoyable walking street, Church Street has a lovely stationery store called Dulles Design. Emilie Dulles’ trademark red hair and cheerful disposition are true indicators of what’s in store in this distinct stationery design shop. Stylish correspondence is just beyond her doors.

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5

TOP ANTIQUE SHOPS

1

John Pope stands proudly in his antique shop by the same name.

South of the Fashion District on King, the Lower King Street Design District has more than its fair share of Antique shops. Biggs and Powell, Alexandra and John Pope Antiques are just some of the best high end antique stores in the area. Be prepared: these shops don’t have affordable little knickknacks or flea market type finds; you’ll be spending big bucks when you shop here.

2

Elizabeth Stuart Design is where Charleston’s most design savvy shop. Explore Muffie Faith’s elegantly eclectic boutique, curated with an incredible array of furniture, jewelry, and home décor selections including treasures from Charleston’s very own Sally Benedict, Kate Davis and Harper Poe.

3

Hop in a car or arrange for a taxi (cabs are difficult to find, ask your hotel for assistance) and head to Charleston’s West Ashley area where the city’s designers shop. Antiques of South Windermere and 17 South Antiques are perfect for an off-the-beaten-path antique hunt.

4

Located in the Lower King Street Design District, South of Market offers rustic and sophisticated French furnishings. The ever evolving shop is overflowing with antiques, re-purposed objects and home décor finds that make it one of the south’s leading sources for interior design. Stop in, it’s lovely.

5

If you like religious iconography, architectural salvage or one-of-a-kind treasures, visit Parham & Co. It’s one of the only antique shops located in the Fashion District, but it’s well worth the walk. Say hello to the family’s bichon frisé.

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An eclectic offering at Parham & Co.


TRAVEL

South of Market features a combination of antiques and distressed reproductions. The owner, Kay Douglass, takes frequent buying trips to find items with an old world or industrial feel. February/March 2012

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A 24 carat gold over brass gecko letter opener with Swarovski crystals for eyes sits happily on a pile of antique books at ESD. 88

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TRAVEL Elizabeth Stuart Design’s owner is better known as Muffie. When she’s not in her shop or working with clients she loves to visit the gardens of Middleton Place, a plantation just outside of Charleston.

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CHARLESTON TRAVEL

The Pineapple Fountain in Waterfront Park.

Caption here.

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“There is no better way to learn about interior design than to travel to a city with an extensive history,” says Victoria Drainville. Eager to explore, Victoria is on a mission to find Charleston’s most unique experiences and learn more about architecture and design. She quickly discovers this small, walkable city is loaded with charming southerners and historic places.

Theron Brown displays dried sweet grass which he’ll weave into a handmade basket for sale at City Market.

TRAVEL

5 TOP

TRAVEL

1

EXPERIENCES

The best way to experience Charleston’s rich history is by touring historic homes. Tours typically cost US$10 and are worth every penny to the history buff or home enthusiast. The Edmondston-Alston House overlooks Charleston Harbour and its tour includes the history of this illustrious Charleston family. Visit the Calhoun Mansion and you’ll feel you’re visiting an eccentric aunt whose collections are too numerous to count. The Nathaniel Russell House has a stunning three-storey freestanding staircase and trompe l’oeil crown moulding that is sure to impress.

2

Typical to Charleston are the Single Houses, an architectural style where the main entrance appears to be on the side of the house but leads to a porch. Experience these homes firsthand through the Fall Tours of Home and Garden led by the Preservation Society.

3

There are many ways to get around Charleston, but taking a taxi isn’t one of them. Since you’re on the move anyway, why not combine commuting with a history lesson? Horse and Carriage tours, Rickshaws or even Guided Walking Tours are pleasant options.

4

There are two great shopping areas in Charleston: King Street for Fashion and Design and City Market for souvenirs. You’ll find inexpensive crafts, sweet treats, art, jewelry and sweet grass baskets made by local artisans.

5

Theatre fans will love the offerings at the Footlight Players. Affordable and popular productions run year-round. If reading is your hobby, visit the Heirloom Book Company, a bookshop dedicated to the literature of food.

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TOP TRAVEL SITES

1

In the French Quarter don’t miss the oldest standing tavern (and brothel) in the South. The famous pirate Black Beard may have had an ale or two at the Pink House. Today, the West Indian coral stone walls (which withstood the great earthquake of1886 and Hurricane Hugo) house a small art gallery. Head across the cobblestone street to the Old Slave Mart Museum to hear an informative recorded history of the city’s slave auctions.

2

Wake early and enjoy a leisurely stroll along Waterfront Park. You’ll get a great view of the Cooper River from the pier and see the Cooper Bridge which joins Charleston with neighbouring suburb Mount Pleasant. After a long walk, stroll across Vendue Street and reward yourself with a gelato at Paolo’s.

3

No trip to the South is complete without a trip to a plantation. Historic Middleton Place has lavish gardens which take at least an hour to explore. There is also a reproduction home on the property and a popular lowcountry restaurant. America’s only tea plantation, The Charleston Tea Plantation is humble but may be worth a visit if you’re interested. Tours take guests through the tea fields and into the factory. The gift shop has gifts to bring home.

4

Once you’ve had enough history, take a break and spend a day at the beach. Lay out in the sun at Tides Folly Beach in the West Ashley area, only a 20 minute ride from the historic district.

5

Once you are sold on visiting Charleston, you’ll need to book a place to stay. There are several options: you can stay in a luxury hotel like the Charleston Place Hotel or the Francis Marion Hotel. For a true historic district experience, stay a few nights in a charming inn like the John Rutledge House Inn.

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The distinct diamond-tower design of the Cooper River Bridge, connecting Charleston and the suburb of Mount Pleasant.


TRAVEL

? w no k you id D

• In Charleston, porches are referred to as “piazzas” and are situated to catch harbour breezes and offer a view of the garden. • Homes in Charleston are generally elevated, have large windows and doors and high ceilings in order to have cross-ventilation of breezes from the water. • Many homes have a distinctive architectural name, in local vernacular, referred to as the Single House. These homes are typically one-room and a hallway wide with long piazzas that span the length of the house. The entrance door faces the street but typically leads to the porch where the home’s front door is found. The homes are oriented in this fashion because the British taxes were based on streetfront measurements. A single house.

The Pink House in the French Quarter.

Oil painting artist, Lisa Willits.

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DABBLE DOES Do a tour of the Old Exchange Building with costumed guides like Cameron.

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TRAVEL If you are in Charleston for several days, have dinner at R.B.’s Seafood Restaurant in Mount Pleasant. The view is spectacular.

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CHARLESTON FOOD

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Scott and Crystal Wink know exactly what to order and where to order it from thanks to their expertise as the pens and palates behind Charleston Food Bloggers. Happy to tag along, Scott and Crystal sent us to the city’s best restaurants and led us to the must order dishes on every menu. (It’s a tough job but someone’s got to do it.)

No matter how many times you try Shrimp and Grits it’s always different. That said, High Cotton’s Wild American Shrimp and Grits with smoked chicken and andouille sausage is our two Dabble contributors’ unanimous favourite.

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TOP RESTAURANTS

1

We’re told people travel from all over the country to taste FIG’s Tomato Tarte. Order several of chef Mike Lata’s dishes to share because you’ll want to try it all. The seasonal menu changes daily so visit more than once if you can.

2

The name Closed for Business is sure to scare off or confuse many visitors, but the locals know better. This small drinkery has twice as many beers on tap as they do tables. The drink and food menus are both full of surprises. Try the duck pot pie, chicken salad or the pork slap sandwich— a perfectly fried pork cutlet, house-smoked ham, swiss cheese, green tomato chutney, with a house sauce that’s served on challah (egg bread). Need we say more?

3

Hidden on the first floor of the French Quarter Inn at the corner of Market and Church Streets is the delicious Tristan. Chef Nate Whiting runs the kitchen in this sleek, modern yet simple restaurant. Expect to be visually stunned by the beauty of the décor and the equally gorgeous food.

4

Pealz is the best spot in town to eat raw oysters. It is very small so head over there at 4:00 pm when they open to avoid the big crowds. If you can’t get enough of fresh seafood, go to Hanks and share the Grand Seafood Castle.

5

Dying to try Southern food? Head to 82 Queen Street. Sit in the courtyard and order the she-crab soup and the barbecue shrimp and grits. If you want something that tastes like grandma spent the entire day in the kitchen, try Virginia’s on King. They turn out authentic cuisine using the freshest local ingredients and recipes that are 100 years old.

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TOP FOOD EXPERIENCES

1

Patrick and wife Fanny Panella warmly greet guests in the ambrosial wine bar at Bin 152.

If you’re looking for a great French experience in Charleston, you’ll find it at 39 Rue de Jean. Or, pair a light meal of cheese and meat with a perfect wine from Bin 152. Diners love the décor, and fortunately everything is for sale.

2

A trip to the Charleston Farmers Market in Marion Square on Saturdays is sure to satisfy any craving. Come hungry and try Street Hero’s banh mi sandwiches or tacos, Charleston Crepe Company’s savoury or sweet pancakes and Roots Ice Cream’s small batch flavours like cucumber-mint, beet or caramelized fig.

3

Food trucks are gaining in popularity around Charleston which now boasts a total of eight diners on wheels. HELLO My Name is BBQ is at the Food Truck Rodeo on Saturdays (have a beer braised BBQ Pork sandwich, yum). Try a Chicken Satay Pizza with peanut sauce from ZAHH Pizza. Jeff makes the dough from scratch and cooks the pizza in 90 seconds. Follow them on Facebook to find where they are headed next.

4

You can’t go all the way to Charleston without eating some good ol’ Southern food. Maverick Southern Kitchens operates two fabulous restaurants on East Bay Street: Slightly North of Broad (SNOB) and High Cotton. Try the shrimp and grits at both locations. Tip: Don’t fill up on the wonderful corn bread they serve...or do. If you feel like learning how to make a Southern dish, visit Cooks right across the street and participate in a cooking class. Whether you are just looking for a quick meal or a tasty coffee, visit Caviar and Bananas. First, the name is fun to say and second, it’s a beautiful gourmet store and café.

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A chicken satay pizza with peanut sauce and cilantro? Yes. Jeff Johnson from Zahh Pizza makes it in the wood fired oven of his food truck.


TRAVEL Quite possibly the best dish in Charleston is the John’s Island Tomato Tarte Tatin created by FIG’s Executive Chef, Mike Lata.

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Frank McMahon knows how to prepare a mean Grand Seafood Castle at Hank’s Seafood Restaurant. OPPOSITE Bucherondin cheese from Poitou-Charentes and a Serrano Ham from Spain pair beautifully with a Côtes du Rhône Villages Feraud-Brunel Syrah Blend 2007. Don’t ask, just try it at Bin 152.

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1-2-3 days in Charleston

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Day 1

MORNING Wake up early and start your day with an espresso and decadent pastry at Caviar and Bananas on George Street. Fortified, you’re ready to walk the entire Design District. Even with frequent stopping and lingering it won’t take more than three to four hours to shop ‘til you drop. Make sure to sample the honeys at Savannah Bee Company. NOON Once you’ve worked up an appetite, have a casual lunch at Fast and French on Broad Street. A soup, sandwich and glass of wine come in around $10 so you’ll have funds for shopping. After lunch, take a horse and carriage ride down King Street and enjoy a guided historic tour. Stop at the Nathaniel Russell House or Calhoun Mansion to learn more about Antebellum homes. EVENING Eat an early dinner at FIG and you’ll have plenty of time to watch the sun set at Waterfront Park. Or, if you’re visiting in the spring or fall, take one of the Home and Garden Tours. Prepare yourself for three hours of walking. You’ll want a comfortable pair of walking shoes and a flashlight for evening tours.

Day 2

MORNING If you are staying in the lovely Charleston Place Hotel, you’ll want to enjoy breakfast at your hotel before heading out for a day at the plantations. Hop in your rental car and take a one hour drive to Middleton Place. Linger in the gardens. 12 NOON A lowcountry lunch at the Middleton Place Restaurant is a hearty affair, but may be worth the extra hole in your belt. If you have energy after lunch head to the nearby Magnolia Plantation and enjoy their tour as well. EVENING Head back to Charleston for a tasty dinner on East Broad Street. Try the shrimp and grits at SNOB or the oysters at Pearlz and then take a stroll on Vendue Street and finish the day with a scoop from Paolo’s Gelato.

Day 3

MORNING It may be a good morning to sleep in and that’s just an excuse for brunch. High Cotton is an excellent choice and it’s just across the street from the city’s best kitchen shop and cooking classes at Charleston Cooks. If you’d like to take a class, arrange it ahead of time. AFTERNOON Spend the remainder of the afternoon poking around the city’s art galleries or finish your souvenir shopping at City Market. EVENING It’s easier to stroll on the sidewalk of the French Quarter since cobblestone streets are tough to negotiate. Afterwards, take in the theatre at the Footlight Players.

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for us n Joi ! s es pr Ex n ig Des

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DABBLE DARE

On the Rocks WORDS BY KATHY BUCKWORTH PHOTOGRAPHY BY Garry Sowerby

“If you move one way or the other too far, you will fall down a crevasse. And suffocate and die. Okay, follow me, let’s go!” With these words of encouragement our enthusiastic ice hiking guide marches us off through crunchy snow and ice, his crampons digging into the side of the glacier. Now don’t get me wrong—I have a lot of experience with ice. But most often it’s at the bottom of a glass, or beneath the skates of my hockey playing kids…not lining the sides of a death fall down a seemingly bottomless crevasse. We flew via bush helicopter out of Seward, Alaska, onto the base of this particular glacier, the Exit Glacier. My 17 year old son, Alex, and I adjusted our helmets, which apparently wouldn’t stop us from dying in a crevasse fall, but might protect us from the substantial bird droppings of the many bald eagles circling us. As we stuck our ski/walking poles and spike heeled boots into the terrain, I peered into the clear blue Alaskan sky and, shaking a gloved fist, cursed the Dabble gang for making this my latest Dabble Dare.

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Dare: The GLACIER HIKING IN ALASKA

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DABBLE DARE

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TRAVEL Kathy and other brave souls from her ice hiking group.

We drove from Anchorage to Seward in a Chevy Volt, an electric car so quiet we almost hit a moose on the highway, (his ironic deer/ moose in headlights expression showing that he clearly didn’t hear our silent motor running). I should have known then, this entire trip was going to be a challenge. I’ll admit I wasn’t sure what “Glacier Ice Hiking” entailed when I agreed to the dare, but I was certain it wouldn’t involve going vertically up an ice wall. Oops, my bad. In fact, we got to 1400 feet of elevation, over 1.5 miles of terrain, which included descending a 45 degree rock scree (lose piles of rock). There were moments of pure beauty—taking a drink from constantly trickling streams of the purest water imaginable. Then there were moments of pure fright as I imagined this trickling and melting glacier seemed about to collapse under our feet. We stopped frequently to listen to the glacier moving, creaking and groaning…sounds not unlike the ones I was making as I hauled up to the top of an ice cavity. While I’d rather have a Mouton Cadet in front of me than a Moulin Cadet guiding me, it was an amazing experience. As we watched our bush helicopter pilot descend to pick us up at the end of our five-hour trail hike, I looked over at my son whose “best experience ever” smile was firmly in place. Alaska, even teenagers think you’re cool.

Special Thanks: The Exit Glacier, near Seward Alaska, in the Kenai Mountains.

Kathy toured the Exit Glacier courtesy of Exit Glacier Guides and GM Canada.

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for s ce la p best

IGLOOS WORDS BY KIM PALLOzzi

Swap Egyptian cotton for sleeping bags? Lose the lingerie for long Johns for a crisp cocoon? Some of the hottest hotels in the world leave guests w

Much more than elaborate igloos, the world’s best ice hotels combine the with inspired works of temporary artistry, as most are meant to last from D room temperatures are a crisp -3 to -5 degrees Celsius, we advise a trip to lights out.

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s? Trade carpeted warmth with the chills...literally.

Hôtel de Glace, Québec City February/March 2012

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PHOTO BY: © Luc Rousseau

function of a fine hotel December to March. Since o the bathroom before


BEST PLACES FOR

Finland

PHOTO BY: SnowVillage Finland

Finland is at the centre of the “cool crowd” that consists of Sweden, Norway and Russia…they’re all so good-looking. The Nordic country, known best for its sauna culture, also has its very own igloo hotspot. Located in the western part of Finnish Lapland in Lainiotie, Kittilä, is the Snow Village SnowHotel. Situated 200 km above the arctic circle, this chilly abode is estimated to be made from 1000 truckloads of snow. With 15 double rooms and 8 ice suites, the hotel offers a warm subterranean floor complete with sauna, bathroom facilities, a large fireplace and even heated rooms in case the igloo experience proves too cool. Awaken to hot berry juice and a buffet breakfast and dance the night away in the frozen disco, Europe’s largest ice bar.

PHOTO BY: © Luc Rousseau

Canada

With cross country skiing, dogsledding and snowmobiling options nearby, a stay in Hôtel de Glace makes Old Man Winter seem like a pretty fun guy. Located near beautiful Québec City, the frosty structure is open from January to March annually. With 36 rooms available to adventurous guests, accommodations range in size and décor. Regular rooms have one to three queen size beds made of ice, wood and a mattress. Premium suites may have a fireplace and private spa. No matter the room, each is a unique work of craftsmanship with stunning carvings and artistic lighting. For the less adventurous, a Nordic Relaxation Area offers tranquility and rejuvenation in an outdoor spa and sauna experience.

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Romania

PHOTO BY: Geir Moen

PHOTO BY: Hotel of Ice - Romania

Nestled beside Central European neighbours Serbia, Hungary and the Ukraine, Romania manages to keep a distinct identity. Dotted with well preserved medieval towns, castles and monasteries, Romania may be most famous for its fictional Transylvania resident Count Dracula. We think Drac would approve of the frigid temperatures at the Hotel of Ice-Romania. Situated in the Fagaras Mountains, the highest in the country, guests are whisked to the remote location by cable car access only. For the faithful, there are even church services where prayers are spoken in parkas.

Norway

Vikings, fjords and glaciers, oh my! With territory hovering above the arctic circle, we’d expect to find an ice hotel in Norway, Europe’s northern gateway to immaculate beauty. The Kirkenes Snowhotel, located in the small town of Kirkenes, offers just what the doctor orders to chase away winter blahs—a vodka bar with frozen shot glasses and front row access to nature’s own Northern Lights. With 20 snowsuits to sleep in, each depicting arctic cultural and nature themes, the rooms are unforgettable. And, who knows, the reindeer nature reserve next door may bring guests face to face with Rudolph himself.

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We asked our foodies...

What is your idea of comfort food?

Photo: Jackie Baisa

Corey Burgan

"My idea of comfort food is a big turkey, avocado, bacon, dijon mustard, and crisp romaine lettuce sandwich made on fresh baked bread. Throw in a big glass of chocolate milk and that's ideal... and maybe a chocolate chip cookie or two.” Corey fell in love with cooking when he was 13 and has been in the kitchen ever since. His passion is hosting friends and family. It’s just a bonus that it’s also his career.

www.dabblemag.com @dabblechef

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Alejandra De Miguel

“An Argentinian picada —a tray of cheese, cured meats, olives and a baguette.” Alejandra founded Olivia's at Fifty Three, a restaurant and micro-winery in Toronto's Little Italy. Her passion for wine took over in 2007, when she launched Vintage One Wines, Canada's first city winery. Since then, she has partnered with Celebrity Chefs and internationally recognized organizations as a guest speaker for events.

@V1Alejandra

Jameson Fink

“Anything that comes out of a crock pot. What's more comforting than returning home after a tough day at work to a long-simmering, fragrant stew that requires nothing but a bowl and some crusty bread? And, naturally, a nice glass of wine.” After dabbling in the food and wine industry in Chicago, Jameson moved to Seattle in 2004 to pursue his passion for wine. Currently he is the Wine Editor for Foodista and enjoys blogging about wine.

www.jamesonfink.com @jamesonfink


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Jameson enjoys a sip of the Chianti he ordered at Quinn’s in Seattle, WA.

There’s an app for that... WORDS BY JAMESON FINK

A great Italian wine and pizza? Sounds good to us. Dabble’s wine expert Jameson Fink knows exactly what to order when he’s wining and dining. Like many, I initially thought Chianti came in a straw-wrapped bottle that, when empty, you stuck a candle in to adorn the kitchen table of your first apartment. Since that time I’ve come to appreciate Chianti as an underrated gem that delivers quality and the ultimate in food and wine comfort when paired with any red-sauced Italian dish. With apologies to spaghetti, when I think red sauce, I think pizza. Who doesn’t love pizza?

PHOTO BY: JACKIE BAISA

The hardest part of a pizza night is getting everyone to agree on the toppings. The bad news is, this is an argument that can get heated. The good news is, Chianti, a smooth elegant red with a perfect style-to-substance ratio, is versatile enough to go with whatever ends up adorning your pie. Veggies? Meats? Both? No problem. Chianti is the pizza peacemaker.

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The App

A thin crust pizza with tomatoes, red onions and cheese. Oh my.

Jameson’s Pick

Felsina Chianti Classico 2008

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f he C e Dabbl

Homemade Pasta RECIPE BY COREY BURGAN

Chef Corey Burgan says, “Impress your guests with homemade pasta.”

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FOOD

INGREDIENTS 4 egg yolks 1 cup flour 2 oz of water 2 tbsp olive oil Directions Combine all of the ingredients in a mixer with a dough hook. Mix well until it creates a ball, then turn the mixer off. Take the dough out of the bowl and knead for 5 minutes on a floured surface. Form dough into a ball. Wrap the dough ball with an oiled paper towel (pour oil on the paper towel and scrunch it—the paper towel will prevent the dough from drying out), then Saran Wrap the towel and place dough in the fridge for 30 minutes. Cut the dough into four quarters. Keep the oiled towel on dough you aren’t working with so it doesn’t dry out. With one part of the dough on the table, roughly flatten it with the palm of your hand. Set your pasta machine on the highest number and feed the dough through. Drop 1 number and feed it through again. Then drop 1 more number and feed it through a third time. Fold the dough in half and start over again with the highest number but this time work all the way down to the lowest number. Once the dough is rolled out, create your favourite pasta. Cut it into fettuccini noodles or create pillows of ravioli by adding a favourite filling to the centre. Serves 3-4

Tips:

Folding the dough makes the pasta stronger and more malleable; this is particularly important if you are making ravioli. This recipe lasts up to 1 week in the fridge. If you’re having a dinner party you can pre-make the pasta and freeze it ahead of time. If you are freezing the pasta, space the pieces out evenly on parchment paper so that they do not touch.

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an ke li eat WORDS BY Alejandra De Miguel

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Bitterness and joy are equal parts of the Argentinian cocktail, as we’re known for our joie de vivre and our political strife. It’s often said that Argentinians are defined by their contradictions. Nowhere does this contrast manifest more intensely than at the table - where informal elegance, complex simplicity, and tamed wildness come together.

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EAT LIKE A

I must admit, I am guilty of solving the world’s problems around the glowing embers on which the asado (Argentine BBQ) slowly grills. In those endless hours where cooking, hosting, socializing, and appreciating wine become one, time passes as if it knows that nostalgia will soon be part of it. A famous early tango singer, Carlos Gardel, once said, “Twenty years are nothing.” The hours of cooking, the ritual of drinking maté (yerba mate tea), the tradition of long sobre mesa (sitting around a table and talking after a meal), and the culture of wine all share a similar slow pace. So, before you embark on cooking Argentinian cuisine, be sure to avail yourself of the most important ingredient: time. Do we have to make a day out of a meal? Claro que si!

Chimichurri Traditionally served with grilled steak, this fragrant green sauce is an essential part of Argentinian barbecue or asado. 3-6 cloves of garlic 2 cups fresh parsley, firmly packed ¼ cup fresh oregano leaves 2 tbsp red wine vinegar ½ cup olive oil Salt to taste Finely chop garlic, parsley and oregano leaves. Add the oil, vinegar, salt and mix well together. Store in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

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“...we dance a delicate step between European tradition and Latin passion.” February/March 2012

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EAT LIKE A

Empanadas Pairing: Serve with Domain St. Diego Brut Xero, Lulunta Valley-Mendoza, Argentina. DOUGH 5 cups all-purpose flour ¼ lb butter 1 tsp salt 1 cup warm water FILLING 1 lb ground beef 2 lbs onions 1-½ cups butter ½ tsp salt Pepper to taste 1 tsp oregano 3 hardboiled eggs OPTIONAL 5 green onions ¾ cup black olives Chop the onions finely and place them in a pan with a little butter at medium heat. Add salt and cover while cooking. Cook onions until translucent. Add ground beef, oregano and pepper. Add the olives and the green onions once the meat starts to cook. Refrigerate the filling overnight. In a large bowl, combine water and salt. Add flour and mix together. Add butter then knead until smooth. Stretch out the dough to approximately ⅛" thick and cut 24 circles (approximately 5" diameter). Use a dough cutter or an aluminum can if you don’t have one. Spread the dough disks, and add a tablespoon of the filling and an eighth of a hardboiled egg ( (small piece of white and yolk). Wet your finger tip and wet the edges of the disk. Fold over and press the edges together or use the end of a fork by pressing it down over the edges. Cook at 400�F for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Makes 24 empanadas. 126

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EAT LIKE A

Morrones Rellenos

Pairing: Serve with Colomé Torrontes, Calchaqui Valley – Salta, Argentina 6 red peppers 12 tbsp parmesan cheese (2 tbsp / pepper) 12 tbsp butter (2 tbsp / pepper) 6 large eggs (1 / pepper) 6 tbsp olive oil (1 tbsp / pepper) Salt and pepper to taste Cut the peppers in half. Remove and discard the stems (optional), seeds, and membranes of the peppers. Prepare the peppers by placing them face up and putting butter, cheese and oil into each one. Place the peppers on the grill and crack an egg in each one. Allow them to cook slowly on the grill. Remove the peppers from the grill once the egg is cooked and golden on the top. Serves 6

“True gauchos will eat it right off the grill. .”

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Asado (Argentinian BBQ) There is no real list of ingredients needed to master an Argentinian asado except meat and lots of salt. It is safe to say that only trial and error lead to success. There are different cuts of meat that taste great on an Argentinian barbecue: vacio (flank steak), entra単a (skirt), matambre de cerdo o vaca (a type of pork or beef flank steak), asado de tira (ribs), molleja (sweetbreads), morcilla (blood sausage) and chorizo (sausage). Begin by lighting a fire and burning it down to a large bed of embers or hot coals. The meat is presalted before it is cooked over the fire.

Cooking can be done al asador, using metal crosses or a spit that holds the entire carcass of the animal, or a la parrilla (grill) where the coals are slowly introduced underneath the grill. In both cases, the meat is cooked very slowly and is occasionally hydrated with salmuera (a mixture of water, salt, laurel leaves and garlic).

Asados can take three to four hours to cook, and sometimes even longer. Once it is done, the meat is placed on a tray and eaten immediately. True gauchos eat it right off the grill.

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Guy Wisdom: Never go to bed angry but, if you do, wake up extra early and prepare her breakfast in bed.

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te da r ne Din

breakfast in bed They say you should never go to bed angry but, in the off chance you do, David Laudenback shares the recipe for waking up on the right side of the bed.

Good Morning Crêpes with Greek Yogurt and Apricot-Champagne Sauce Step 1: Good Morning CrÊpes INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

2 eggs 1 cup non-fat milk ½ cup flour 1 tbsp melted butter

Whisk eggs in a small bowl. Add the milk and then the flour. Once it is completely mixed together, whisk in the butter. Heat a medium size (approximately 8”) non-stick frying pan over medium high heat. Pour in batter and cook for approximately 45 seconds per side or until lightly browned.

Step 2: Greek Yogurt Filling INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

1 cup plain Greek yogurt 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp nutmeg 1 tbsp brown sugar

Mix the yogurt, vanilla extract, nutmeg and brown sugar in a large bowl. Place the mixture in a line down the centre of each crêpe and fold the edges over the centre.

Step 3: Apricot-Champagne Sauce INGREDIENTS

INSTRUCTIONS

1 tbsp Champagne ½ cup apricot preserves 10 fresh raspberries 1 tsp lemon juice

In a small saucepan, cook the Champagne for 2 minutes at medium heat. Add the remaining ingredients to the pan and stir for 3 minutes. Top crêpes with the sauce and garnish with fresh blueberries and mint leaves.

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e nc ge Sindul

Sin-amon Cake RECIPE BY THERESA ALBERT

Dabble’s food contributor Theresa Albert shares her recipe for a sin-amon-ful temptation. Ancient and primitive people have known for millennia that spices like cinnamon and cardamom contribute rich and mysterious nourishment, enhancing the very essence of life. Fascinating that a product of tree bark and the unripe seed pod of a small plant can be baked into an exquisite temptation I call Sin-amon Cake. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and enjoy with a cup of rooibos tea.

INGREDIENTS 1 cup cake and pastry flour 1 cup organic whole wheat flour 1½ tsp baking soda ½ tsp sea salt 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 pinch cayenne pepper 1 pinch ground allspice 1 tsp cracked cardamom ½ cup butter, softened at room temperature 1¼ cup organic cane sugar (plus more for topping) 2 large eggs 1 cup buttermilk

INSTRUCTIONS Sift flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, cayenne pepper and allspice together. Place cardamom pods on a cutting board and use the bottom of a heavy skillet to crush them. Discard green pod covers and crack remaining black seeds. Add half to flour mixture, set aside remaining half to top cake. Use a blender to mix together butter, sugar and eggs in a separate bowl. Add flour mixture to butter mixture, one cup at a time, alternating with buttermilk until it is well blended but not over-mixed. Pour into two 8 inch buttered cake pans. Bake for 20 minutes then sprinkle top with a few teaspoons of cane sugar mixed with remaining cracked cardamom and bake for further 5-10 minutes. Serve topped with real whipped cream.

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Serves 24 Prep Time 30 min. Preheat 350째F

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I dabble in...

Maria Killam is a blogger, decorator, stylist, and internationally known colour expert. No-nonsense colour advice and a friendly writing style quickly turned her blog into one of the top ten colour blogs in North America with readers in over 150 countries around the world.

Follow Maria... f www.facebook.com/colourmehappy

t @mariakillam

w www.mariakillam.com 134

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...flower arranging “My home is always filled with fresh flowers. It’s no surprise that my first word was ‘kukka’ which is flower in Finnish.”

...fashion “I’m a colour expert and I like it when people come to me for my expertise. So when I decided to up my style quotient I hired a stylist to take my look to the next level. I really believe in hiring a professional for everything you can’t do yourself.”

...writing “Who knew that my blog would turn me into an internationally known Colour Expert? I write the way I talk and sometimes it’s not grammatically correct. But people say they feel like they are having a chat with a friend. I love my readers, and all the amazing clients I have met through social networking. I can’t imagine my life without it.” February/March 2012

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Profile for Dabble  Mag

Issue 6 - FebMar'12  

Each issue of Dabble Magazine brings you inspiring design from around the world, immerses you in cities ripe for discovery, gives you a tast...

Issue 6 - FebMar'12  

Each issue of Dabble Magazine brings you inspiring design from around the world, immerses you in cities ripe for discovery, gives you a tast...

Profile for dabblemag
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