CVSA Guardian Magazine - Third Quarter 2019

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GUARDIAN A Publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Volume 26, Issue 3 3rd Quarter 2019

An Update on CVSA’s Industry Courses – Past and Future COMING SOON: FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse

CVSA Accepting Nominations for 2020 International Driver Excellence Award

U.S. DOT Permanently Bans Commercial Drivers Convicted of Human Trafficking


GUARDIAN

GUARDIAN Third Quarter Volume 26, Issue 3 www.cvsa.org

A Publication of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

IN THIS ISSUE n Insight President’s Message.......................................................................................................1 Executive Director’s Message..................................................................................... 2 n

Regional News Inspector and Trainees Discover Marijuana During Random Safety Inspection.......................................................................................................... 3 Kentucky State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Assists as Oversize Load Escort...............................................................................................3 Kentucky State Police Performs Motorcoach Inspections for Kentucky Derby................................................................................................................. 4 Virginia State Police Motor Carrier Safety Unit Receives Virginia’s 2019 Governor’s Transportation Safety Award......................................................5 Updates from the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement................................................................................6 Sgt. Bill Henderson Wins the 20th Annual Florida Highway Patrol Inspectors Championship............................................................................................. 12 Getting Better or Just Older?...........................................................................................14 North Carolina Trooper and Driver Deliver Presentation to American Legion Student Trooper Program...................................................... 15 Almost Made It.....................................................................................................................16 CVSA International Roadcheck in Hawaii....................................................................16 Montana Inspection Photos............................................................................................. 17 By the Numbers................................................................................................................... 17 Congratulations to Québec’s New CVSA Level I Instructors..................................18 Québec’s Mobile Prevention Unit Hits the Road......................................................18 Major Changes to Safety Standards and Increased Accountability on Alberta Highways Through Mandated Entry-Level Training and Partners in Compliance Designation.........................................................................19 Whitehorse Inspection Photos.......................................................................................20 Newfoundland Inspection Photo..................................................................................20

n Cover Story An Update on CVSA’s Industry Courses – Past and Future...............................22 n n

CVSA Committee and Program News CVSA Awards $1,000 College Scholarships to Five Deserving Students........ 24 CVSA Accepting Nominations for 2020 International Driver Excellence Award......................................................................................................26 Government News The Legislative and Regulatory Rundown............................................................. 27 Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program........................................................................28 COMING SOON: FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse............................. 30 U.S. Department of Transportation Permanently Bans Commercial Drivers Convicted of Human Trafficking..............................................................31

n Knowledge Matters An Example of Teamwork – CVSA Vehicle Committee and Air Brake Chamber Supplier Engineers Address Chamber Pushrod Stroke Identification Issues....................................................................................32

n From the Driver’s Seat Road Trip Tips............................................................................................................................. 33 n

Industry Perspectives Three-Letter Shift: Moving from CSA to IRT..........................................................35 Your Fleet vs. Winter: How to Beat Bad Weather...................................................36 UPS Inducts 1,582 Drivers Into Its Circle Of Honor.............................................. 37 Driver Jeanne Wilson and Her Vehicle Pass Inspection During 2019 International Roadcheck............................................................................... 37 Increasing Marijuana Legalization and Use Raises Concerns for Trucking.....38

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RAD Inspection News Department of Energy Publishes Interpretation on High-Level Radioactive Waste......................................................................................................39 2019 IAEM Annual Conference and EMEX Expo...................................................40 CVSA Level VI Public Outreach Program Featured at Two Events in June.....40 CVSA Conducts Peer Reviews on Level VI Inspection Programs....................40 CVSA Holds Level VI Inspection Classes 174 and 175.......................................... 41 2019 Level VI Inspection Certification Training Courses.................................... 41 Level VI Roadside Inspections (2019 - Fiscal).......................................................42 Level VI Roadside Inspection Violations (2019 - Fiscal).....................................42

GUARDIAN “Guardian” is published quarterly by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance with support from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. CVSA and FMCSA are dedicated to the government and industry working together to promote commercial motor vehicle safety on North American highways. Phone: 301-830-6143 • Website: www.cvsa.org CVSA Staff: Collin B. Mooney, MPA, CAE, Executive Director • Adrienne Gildea, CAE, Deputy Executive Director • Carlisle Smith, Director of Level VI Inspection Program • William Schaefer, Director of Safety Programs • Ken Albrecht, Director of Multimedia Development • Bill Reese, Director of COHMED Program • Kerri Wirachowsky, Director of Roadside Inspection Program • Christopher Turner, Esq., Director of Crash and Data Programs • Nicole Leandro, Manager of Communications • Iris Leonard, Manager of Member Services • Daniel Zimmerman, Manager of Government Affairs • Amanda Wagner, CMP, Manager of Conference and Event Services • Mark Mills, Multimedia Specialist • Wendy Smith, Learning Management System Specialist • Richard Williams, CPA, CNAP, Controller • Moniladae Adewoyin, Accountant • Amelina Kassa, Administrative Assistant Copyright 2019, CVSA. All rights reserved. No part of this issue may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. For comments, suggestions or information, email communications@cvsa.org. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

@CVSA

CVSA Communications

This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration under a grant/cooperative agreement/subaward. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and/or the U.S. Department of Transportation.


INSIGHT

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE My Last Message

By Chief Jay Thompson, Arkansas Highway Police, CVSA President

As I write my last “President’s Message” to you, I sit here reflecting on the many CVSA memories I have. There are so many reasons why I have been devoted to CVSA over the last 16 years of my law enforcement career. I will begin by briefly describing my first and most important CVSA experience, which lit a fire under me to do so much more regarding commercial motor vehicle safety. It was in 2003, when I competed in the North American Inspectors Championship (NAIC). To this day, I feel NAIC is one of CVSA’s most, if not the most, important programs. In short, NAIC opened a young officer’s eyes to not only the work other law enforcement officers were doing to ensure our nation’s roadways were safer, but also, just as important, what the industry was doing to ensure our roadways were safer as well. Simply put, I was amazed and became very proud to be a part of this amazing group of professionals. A few years later, I began attending CVSA conferences and workshops, where I started learning and understanding the big picture, the strategic plan, the reason, the purpose, the importance of CVSA. With the fire still burning, I wanted to do more. My first leadership position within the Alliance was vice chair of the CVSA Size and Weight Committee, of which I later became the chair.

regulations, in which CVSA has been involved. But I won’t, because this magazine is not big enough. What I do want you to know is this: You, the members, are CVSA. I am so grateful for the many personal and professional relationships I have gained during my years working with the Alliance. The work you all do continues to save lives across the United States, Canada and Mexico. I can’t express to you enough how grateful I am to have had the opportunity to serve on your team. I hope and pray that there are many up-andcoming professionals who will get that same fire lit underneath them that was lit underneath me in 2003 at NAIC in Columbus, Ohio. I knew nothing about CVSA then but what I know now is nothing short of a blessing. In closing, I pray God blesses you all and keeps you safe. One last time, I say THANK YOU for allowing me to serve as your president. It has been nothing other than an honor and privilege. Keep up the good work. n

A few years later, with the fire still going and the desire to do more, I became the vice chair of Region II, later becoming the chair. But, wait: The fire and desire to do more had grown. So, I put my name in the ring to be CVSA’s secretary. The Alliance blessed me by electing me as its secretary, where I began learning even more about the “big picture.” Over the following three years, I progressed to vice president and president of CVSA, followed by serving the Alliance as past president. When my good friend and colleague, CVSA President Scott Carnegie of the Mississippi Highway Patrol retired at the end of 2019, the board selected me to once again serve as your president during the remainder of his term. I could sit here and write all week, all month or even all year about the many accomplishments, challenges, programs, success stories and THIRD QUARTER 2019

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INSIGHT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE The Importance of Roadside Inspection Data Management and Quality By Collin B. Mooney, MPA, CAE, Executive Director, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

As CMV enforcement initiatives continue to grow and evolve, CVSA aims to help improve overall data quality within the CMV enforcement and inspection program. The approximately 13,000 enforcement officials that make up CVSA’s core membership are responsible for the day-to-day execution of all elements of the commercial motor vehicle (CMV) roadside enforcement and inspection activities under the North American Standard Inspection Program. As the organization that represents the CMV enforcement community, CVSA has a vested interest in the continued success of the program. The consistency and uniformity in the application of the CMV roadside enforcement and inspection process, and the data generated from this activity, are the cornerstones and foundation of the program. The Alliance actively works to reduce crashes, fatalities and injuries involving CMVs through a combination of activities, such as enforcement of the CMV safety regulations; monitoring CMV regulatory effectiveness; development and delivery of training materials for both the CMV enforcement community and the motor carrier industry; identifying, recommending and implementing enforcement and inspection data quality improvements; improving crash reporting and data collection; and various outreach initiatives to the motor carrier industry, the enforcement community and the general public. Through a partnership with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), CVSA’s state, provincial, territorial and local members, and industry, the Alliance helps to ensure that both the CMV enforcement community and the motor carrier industry understand the CMV safety regulations, know how to interpret the roadside enforcement and inspection data, and are knowledgeable of the CMV crash investigation and reporting protocols. This leads to uniform enforcement and improved compliance, promotes safe practices and fosters a better working relationship with the motor carrier industry.

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In regard to CMV enforcement and inspection data management and quality, the consistent, timely and accurate data is a critical element of a member jurisdiction’s CMV enforcement and inspection activities. Enforcement personnel within member agencies use the data from motor carriers’ past performance to prioritize motor carriers for roadside inspections, safety audits and compliance reviews. Roadside inspection data identifies trends and areas where improvement is needed. For member jurisdictions in the United States, the data is utilized to craft a Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP) Commercial Vehicle Safety Plan (CVSP), determining resources for enforcement and education initiatives targeting specific safety problems. Throughout North America, data from roadside inspections is improving; however, more improvement is necessary. Inconsistencies in violation documentation and human error during the data collection process result in inconsistencies in roadside inspection data. Data quality assurance is a critical component of any program’s effectiveness. Accurate data is critical to the overall success of our collective CMV enforcement and inspection programs. It provides federal, state, provincial, territorial and local agencies the information they need to make strategic decisions regarding the investment of limited resources. As CMV enforcement initiatives continue to grow and evolve, CVSA aims to help improve overall data quality within the CMV enforcement and inspection program. As a result, in calendar year 2020, CVSA plans to once again organize and implement a threeday, system-wide training event for all state personnel dedicated to data management and quality control practices, and to provide subject matter expertise from FMCSA. The objective is to improve the uniform collection and analysis of CMV roadside enforcement,

inspection and crash data generated by nearly 4 million annual roadside inspections. This training will help ensure that crash records and inspection data reports are consistent, timely and accurate. In addition, CVSA will specify what clarifications are needed in the development or updates of relevant FMCSA data systems. CVSA continues to provide recommendations to, and participate in, FMCSA’s inspection modernization efforts by facilitating input from states and providing technical feedback, as appropriate. Additionally, CVSA has been active in developing operational policies and guidance, correctly mapping and classifying roadside data consistently across all jurisdictions throughout North America. Recommendations for hardcoding violations and implementing Smartlogic for inspection software will further enhance CMV enforcement and inspection data quality. Accurate roadside data recordation, through reduced human error, will enhance decision making for FMCSA and the states. Subsequent DataQ challenges for incorrect violations or incorrect designation of an outof-service condition will be reduced through hardcoding efforts. In closing, CVSA is committed to improving driver, vehicle and motor carrier safety through a variety of activities, including national enforcement and education campaigns, support of innovative safety technologies that improve safety, critical mandatory inservice/refresher inspector training, data quality improvements, production of roadside enforcement training multimedia and crash reporting. These initiatives also include targeting unsafe driving in high-risk crash corridors and rural roads, improving the safe transportation of goods and persons in foreign commerce, improving CMV safety and compliance with safety regulations, and public awareness and education. n


REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Inspector and Trainees Discover Marijuana During Random Safety Inspection By Capt. Tristan Truesdell, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Kentucky State Police On May 29, 2019, while conducting training for brand-new commercial motor vehicle (CMV) inspectors, Inspector II Patrick Harris stopped a CMV for a random safety inspection at the Laurel County inspection facility on I-75 near London, Kentucky.

Violations discovered during the inspection:

Upon initial contact and the driver interview, Inspector Harris detected the odor of marijuana. During the inspection of the vehicle in the inspection bay, Inspector Harris, along with the inspector trainees, further detected the odor of marijuana coming from inside the truck tractor. Kentucky State Police (KSP) sworn personnel were contacted and a consent to search the vehicle was obtained.

• Brakes out of adjustment

The passenger of the CMV relinquished a duffle bag to KSP personnel which contained several containers of marijuana, accompanied by receipts from cannabis dispensaries in Colorado, Washington and Oregon. After removing the driver and passenger from the CMV, consent to search was obtained from the driver and additional contraband was discovered. A KSP interdiction team continued the investigation where the driver admitted to smoking a marijuana cigarette earlier in the day prior to coming on duty. The driver was charged with trafficking in marijuana first offense, possession of drug paraphernalia and driving under the influence of narcotic/drug, along with several other CMV violations. The illegal activity was a side activity/endeavor of the driver while working for an interstate carrier.

REGION II

Kentucky State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Assists as Oversize Load Escort

By Capt. Tristan Truesdell, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Kentucky State Police On Jan. 30, 2019, Kentucky State Police Commercial Vehicle Enforcement units assisted in escorting Derenz Transport’s load, measuring 27 feet wide. The load was part of a cooling tower and, due to its size and configuration, required a law enforcement escort in conjunction with normal overdimensional escort vehicles. The load was transported from the Indiana state line through Kentucky to the Tennessee state line. n

• Possession of narcotic/drugs • Flat tire • Insufficient brake linings • Inoperative brakes • Brake hose violations All three of the inspector trainees – Lloyd Cochran, John Moreland and April Moreland – were still obtaining their 32 inspections for certification. It just goes to show, illegal activity can be found at anytime, anyplace and, most of all, when you least expect it….. even during your initial 32 inspections. n

REGIONAL MAP Region I Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, U.S. Virgin Islands and Vermont Region II Alabama, American Samoa, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia Region III Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Northern Mariana Islands, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin Region IV Alaska, Arizona, California, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Mexico, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming Region V Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Yukon

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Kentucky State Police Performs Motorcoach Inspections for Kentucky Derby By John E. Smoot, MCSAP and Federal Training Coordinator, Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division, Kentucky State Police

On May 2, 2019, the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Division of the Kentucky State Police (KSP) performed motorcoach inspections in Louisville, Kentucky, in preparation for the festivities of Kentucky Derby weekend. Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Ofc. Mike Moritz can be seen performing inspections and is under a motorcoach utilizing KSP’s portable ramps, recently purchased with federal funds to assist in bus/motorcoach inspection activities. n

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II The Virginia Port Authority, Newport News Main Terminal

Virginia State Police Motor Carrier Safety Unit Receives Virginia’s 2019 Governor’s Transportation Safety Award By Lt. Sean L. Stewart, Safety Division, Motor Carrier Safety Program, Virginia State Police

On May 22, 2019, the Virginia State Police Motor Carrier Safety Unit (VSPMCSU) was awarded Virginia’s 2019 Governor’s Transportation Safety Award in the category of commercial and fleet transportation safety at a ceremony in Roanoke, Virginia. Virginia State Police Safety Officer Capt. Ronald C. Maxey Jr. and Motor Carrier Safety Unit Supervisor Sgt. Larry W. Montgomery Jr. proudly accepted the award on behalf of the VSPMCSU. This honor was bestowed, in large part, for two week-long inspection projects, conducted May 7-11, 2018, and Sept. 24-28, 2018, wherein the Virginia State Police partnered with the Virginia Port Authority to engage in efforts to detect and disrupt human trafficking activities; to detect and disrupt the illegal conveyance of drugs and other contraband; and to maximize the number of safety inspections conducted on intermodal chassis traveling through facilities owned and operated by the Port of Virginia Authority. Based on fiscal 2017 statistics provided by the Virginia Port Authority, there were approximately 950,311 (approximately 20,000 per week) truck containers received and dispatched through the Port of Virginia. During these projects, the Port of Virginia facilities were saturated with 32 motor carrier

troopers and three motor carrier supervisors who were assigned the task of conducting CVSA North American Standard motor carrier roadside safety inspections on intermodal chassis entering and leaving port facilities in the Tidewater region. As a result of their efforts, 1,479 roadside inspections were conducted on intermodal carriers, where 142 driver deficiencies were cited and 17 unsafe drivers were placed out of service and prohibited from further operation of a commercial motor vehicle of any kind. Additionally, there were 4,391 safety violations cited, which resulted in 589 intermodal carriers being removed from service and prohibited from operating on Virginia’s highways until the deficiencies were corrected.

Pictured left to right: The Honorable Richard D. Holcomb, Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles; Capt. Ronald C. Maxey, Jr. Virginia State Police Safety Officer; Sgt. Larry W. Montgomery, Jr., Virginia State Police Motor Carrier Safety Unit; and The Honorable Ryant Washington, Virginia’s Deputy Secretary of Public Safety and Homeland Security

Not only has this partnership resulted in the removal of a significant number of unsafe operators and vehicles from the highways of the Commonwealth, it has strengthened the bond and relationship between the Port of Virginia and the Virginia State Police, which will hopefully serve as a foundation for future partnerships geared at making the highways and byways of the Commonwealth of Virginia safer for the traveling public. n

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Updates from the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement

On June 25, members from the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement and the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office partnered together to address unsafe commercial motor vehicle concerns in the western part of Palm Beach County. The Florida Highway Patrol truly values its partnerships with its local agencies as they work together for a safer Florida.

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Members from the Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement/Compliance Investigation Section held a group safety audit in Miami for three days in June. During the three days, 157 safety audits were conducted. A safety audit is a review of a motor carrier’s records, designed to verify they have basic safety management controls in place to ensure compliance with applicable Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations and Hazardous Material Regulations. Safety audits are conducted within the first 12 months of the motor carrier’s operation. Some of the areas reviewed during safety audits are driver qualifications, drivers’ duty status, vehicle maintenance, controlled substance and alcohol use test requirements and hazardous materials.


REGIONAL NEWS

Advanced Post-Crash Course Delivered in Mississippi On June 17, 2019, after a request from the Mississippi Department of Transportation, Capt. Bryant Gay and Master Tpr. Matt Chaffin of the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (OCVE) traveled to Biloxi, Mississippi, to deliver its OCVE Advanced Post-Crash Course to members of the Mississippi Highway Patrol, Louisiana State Police and the Mississippi Department of Transportation (DOT). The class consisted of 13 Mississippi DOT officers, nine Mississippi Highway Patrol troopers and three Louisiana State Police troopers.

On May 16, Troop J West Palm Beach – Miami District conducted a multi-agency commercial vehicle enforcement detail with the University Of Miami Police, Key Biscayne Police Department, Florida Department of Transportation, Miami Dade Police Department and the City of Miami Police Department.

On May 8, Troop J West Palm Beach Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement conducted an outreach event for the safety directors and transport drivers of Mobile Mini Inc., an American portable storage company based in Phoenix, Arizona, where it was founded in 1983. Its products provide temporary storage for customers, such as small businesses. The company manufactures, leases, sells and transports welded steel cargo containers that travel routinely on Florida’s roads.

Continued on next page

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II Continued from page 7

Rolling Remembrance Event Held in May

On May 7, members from Troop I – Tampa participated in a Rolling Remembrance event held in Bradenton, Florida. Started by PepsiCo in 2015, Rolling Remembrance is a 8,000+ mile relay that carries an American flag from Seattle to New York to benefit the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation. Using normal business routes, PepsiCo’s extensive network of U.S. military veteran drivers pass off a flag to each other at different relay points. During Operation Enduring Freedom in 2012, the flag was on a UH-60M Blackhawk Helicopter on a combat mission in support of U.S. and coalition ground forces in the Kandahar Province of Afghanistan. The Rolling Remembrance campaign occurs during April, Month of the Military Child, and May, Military Appreciation Month.

A Radiological/Nuclear Detections (RND) Operations class was conducted in early May. This training block prepares RND operators to support special events, such as the Super Bowl, NASCAR races and similar events. The class consisted of secondary screener certification by the National Preparedness Institute, advanced operations of the State Law Enforcement Radio System (SLERS) by Florida Highway Patrol Communications Systems Manager Vic Thomas and Technical Reachback (TRIAGE) training by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Radiological Assistance Program instructors.

The Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement hosted an 80-hour Commercial Motor Vehicle Post-Crash Inspection Course on April 29-May 10. The course was held in Jacksonville, Florida, and was instructed by Capt. Bryant Gay, Tpr. Matt Chaffin and Tpr. Dave Morrison. In attendance, there were 21 members from the Florida Highway Patrol, three from the Maine State Police and two from the Kansas Highway Patrol.

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REGIONAL NEWS

On April 27, Tpr. Mike Orton and Tpr. Danyen Komorek participated in the annual Touch-A-Truck event hosted by the Palm Coast Fire Department at Wadsworth Elementary School in Palm Coast. They saw approximately 200 kids and allowed them to sit in the truck and they took pictures.

On April 25, Tpr. Mike Orton and Tpr. Danyen Komorek participated in the Florida Department of Transportation’s annual Take Your Child to Work Day in Deland, Florida. They were able to give a nozone demonstration to approximately 120 people throughout the day.

Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement and County Sheriff’s Office Conduct DUI Checkpoint On April 26, the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement participated in a DUI checkpoint on US-301 in Bradford County in partnership with the Bradford County Sheriff’s Office. The Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement truly values its partnership with its local law enforcement agencies as they work together to make our highways and communities safer. CMVs through checkpoint: 337 Cars through checkpoint: 991 Inspections conducted: 34 (10% of all CMVs through checkpoint) Vehicles OOS: 5

Drivers OOS: 8 Safety citations issued: 18 Penalty assessed amount: $3,610.05 Arrests made by CVE: 1 (narcotics) Arrests made by SO: 12

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II Continued from page 9

Northwest Florida Construction Career Day

Northwest Florida Construction Career Day took place on April 16-17 in Santa Rosa County. More than 1,200 high school students and 400 volunteers participated in the event. The educational outreach was designed to encourage high school juniors and seniors to be interested in the construction industry. The students were exposed to real-world career opportunities through small group sessions. In the past three years, more than 50 scholarships have been awarded across the state of Florida. The outreach consisted of more than 25 learning labs. The Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) joined the outreach effort to represent the law enforcement community, presenting three learning labs which consisted of the no-zone truck, a scale mat and portable scales. FHP emphasized its mission of safety. The outreach was a great success. Many of the students took great interest in the three labs and commented on how much they liked the contributions of FHP. It was a great recruiting and educational opportunity for the Florida Highway Patrol.

On April 23-24, members from the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, the Georgia Department of Public Safety Motor Carrier Compliance Division and the Georgia Department of Revenue worked together at the state line north of Tallahassee. These agencies worked together to focus on commercial motor vehicle (CMV) credentialing and unsafe operations of commercial motor vehicles. Florida and Georgia enjoy a great working relationship and partnership, all in an effort to reduce CMV-related crashes on our highways.

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REGIONAL NEWS

Isotope Crossroads Radiological Transportation Tabletop Exercise Delivered in Jacksonville

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration conducted Isotope Crossroads, a radiological transportation tabletop exercise (TTX) in Jacksonville, Florida, on April 3. The purpose of the TTX was to promote information sharing, joint situational awareness, team building and problem resolution in a crisis response situation to federal, state and local emergency response personnel, transportation companies and radiological-producing companies when dealing with a weapons of mass destruction scenario involving Category 1 and 2 radiological materials in commercial transit. The FBI and DOE included key personnel from all organizations that would respond to such an incident, if it were to occur in Jacksonville. The scenario provided a valuable opportunity for attendees to gain awareness in a “no-fault” environment. Sgt. Casey Moore attended the event representing the Florida Highway Patrol Preventive Radiological and Nuclear Detection Program and the Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement and their capabilities and response to such a crisis.

In April, Lt. Jr. Torres conducted educational outreach with de Moya Group, a large construction company in the Miami-Dade area. Lt. Torres discussed many aspects of commercial motor vehicle safety with the drivers prior to them heading out to work, early on a Saturday morning.

On March 9, Sgt. Casey Moore conducted an outreach event for the University of Florida’s Pest Management CEU Program in Jacksonville, Florida.

On March 8-9, in Waycross, Georgia, the Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement and the Georgia Department of Public Safety Motor Carrier Compliance Division partnered together for the Southeastern Wood Producers Association’s educational outreach event related to the transportation of forestry products.

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

Sgt. Bill Henderson Wins the 20th Annual Florida Highway Patrol Inspectors Championship The 20th anniversary Florida Highway Patrol Inspectors Championship was held June 5-8, 2019, in Daytona Beach, Florida. Thirteen troopers from across the state competed against one another to demonstrate their knowledge and skills in commercial motor vehicle safety.

2019 Florida Inspector’s Championship Grand Champion – Sgt. Bill Henderson

The 2019 Florida Inspectors Championship winner is Sgt. Bill Henderson (Troop I – Pensacola). Sgt. Henderson was also the 2018 winner. The runner-up was Tpr. Jacob Meyer (Troop J – DeLand). Sgt. Henderson represented the Florida Highway Patrol at CVSA’s North America Inspector Championship (NAIC) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in August 2019. The Florida Highway Patrol Inspectors Championship competitors – Sgt. Tim May, Sgt. Bill Henderson, Sgt. James LaRose, Tpr. Jacob Meyer, Tpr. John Schilling, Tpr. Robert Smith, Tpr. Freddie Thompson, Tpr. Kevin Nelms, Tpr. Anastasia Graeve, Tpr. Brett Kicklighter, Tpr. Paul Thompson, Tpr. Jacob McMahan and Tpr. John Sessa – went through a group of inspection events, consisting of the North American Standard Level I, Passenger Carrier Inspection, Bulk Hazardous Materials, and Non-Bulk Hazardous Materials Inspections. Upon completion of the Inspectors Championship, the competitors assisted the Florida Trucking Association as judges for Florida Truck Driving Championship.

2019 Florida Inspectors Championship Team

Left to Right: Maj. Bill Harris, Chief Derek Barrs, Lt. Colonel Troy Thompson, Sgt. Bill Henderson (Grand Champion), Col. Gene Spaulding, Maj. Jeff Dixon, Capt. Amos Santiago, Capt. Ezra Folsom.

The Grand Champion Award is the highest honor bestowed upon a commercial vehicle enforcement trooper in the state of Florida. Sgt. Bill Henderson with the Florida Highway Patrol Command Staff received his award at the Florida Truck Driving Championship Banquet on June 8, 2019. Sgt. Henderson demonstrated unrivaled knowledge and skills of commercial motor vehicle enforcement. This year, the competition was the closest Florida has ever had, separating the champion and runner-up by only 9/10 of a point.

2019 Florida Inspector’s Championship Runner-up Award – Tpr. Jacob Meyer

Left to Right: Lt. Erick McGuire, Lt. Kevin Vaughn, Tpr. Jacob McMahan, Capt. Amos Santiago, Tpr. Brett Kicklighter, Sgt. Bill Henderson, Tpr. John Sessa, Sgt. Tim May, Sgt. James Larose, Chief Derek Barrs, Maj. Jeff Dixon, Tpr. Robert Smith, Tpr. Anastasia Graeve, Tpr. Freddie Thompson, Lt. Col. Troy Thompson, Tpr. Kevin Nelms, Maj. Bill Harris, Tpr. Jacob Meyer, Capt. Ezra Folsom, Tpr. Paul Thompson.

Left to Right: Maj. Bill Harris, Chief Derek Barrs, Lt. Col. Troy Thompson, Tpr. Jacob Meyer (Runner Up), Col. Gene Spaulding, Maj. Jeff Dixon, Capt. Amos Santiago, Capt. Ezra Folsom.

Tpr. Jacob Meyer with the Florida Highway Patrol Command Staff received his runner-up award at the Florida Truck Driving Championship Banquet. This award is presented to the trooper who demonstrated his or her knowledge and skills of commercial motor vehicle enforcement during the competition.

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REGIONAL NEWS

2019 Florida Inspector’s Championship Team Award – Black Team

Back Row: Tpr. Freddie Thompson, Tpr. John Sessa, Tpr. Jacob Meyer, Tpr. Paul Thompson. Front Row: Sgt. Bill Henderson, Tpr. Anastasia Graeve, Tpr. Brett Kicklighter.

The competitors were split into two groups – the black team and the tan team. Throughout the week and during team competitions, like the Hazmat Olympics, these members worked well together and as a collective group. Together, the black team had the highest average scores in the written and practical exercises during the Championship, earning the winning medallions. Congratulations, black team.

2019 Florida Inspector’s Championship Award of Excellence – Tpr. Paul Thompson

2019 Florida Truck Driving Championship Hall of Fame Inductee – Capt. Amos Santiago

Left to Right: Maj. Bill Harris (Troop J), Chief Derek Barrs (OCVE), Lt. Col. Troy Thompson (Deputy Director and Hall of Fame Member), Capt. Amos Santiago (Inductee), Col. Gene Spaulding (Director), Maj. Jeff Dixon (Troop I), Capt. Ezra Folsom (Tampa District Commander and Hall of Fame Member).

Each year, the Florida Trucking Association and the Truck Driving Championship induct new members into the Hall of Fame. These members are selected from the many individuals who work tirelessly over the years to ensure that the Truck Driving Championship is a successful competition. The Florida Highway Patrol Office of Commercial Vehicle Enforcement is no stranger to this competition each year, and is very much a part of the event and key to planning and executing every detail leading up to and during the competition. For several years, Capt. Amos Santiago has been instrumental to the event. He was selected by the committee and inducted into the Hall of Fame on June 8, 2019, during the Truck Driving Championship Banquet. Congratulations Capt. Santiago and thank you for all the hard work and long hours you put into not only the Florida Inspectors Championship, but also the Truck Driving Championship. We are proud of each of our competitors and the work they do each day to make Florida a safer place to travel. n

Left to Right: Maj. Bill Harris, Chief Derek Barrs, Lt. Col. Troy Thompson, Tpr. Paul Thompson (Award of Excellence Recipient), Col. Gene Spaulding, Maj. Jeff Dixon, Capt. Amos Santiago, Capt. Ezra Folsom.

The Award of Excellence is an honor that commercial vehicle enforcement trooper contestants bestow on a fellow trooper who exemplifies the high standards and unwavering dedication to the profession. Tpr. Paul Thompson with the Florida Highway Patrol Command Staff received his award at the Florida Truck Driving Championship Banquet.

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REGION II

Getting Better or Just Older?

By Master Tpr. Brandon Johnson, Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program, North Carolina Department of Public Safety I began my law enforcement career in 2005 and I transferred to the Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Section of the North Carolina State Highway Patrol in 2010. I knew the transition would be challenging but also an exciting change. I became CVSA-certified shortly after I transferred and what an eye-opening experience. I now had to apply state law and federal regulations, and determine commerce, intrastate rules vs. interstate rules, and exceptions to those rules. It was like drinking from a fire hose that was opened to full blast. I did not know how to process all the aspects of my new role, so I applied my normal, old-fashioned method. I figured the more inspections I conducted, the better I would become at the inspection process and understanding the sometimes convoluted regulations. I just assumed the longer I sat in my patrol car and the more trucks I inspected, the better inspector I would become. In honest reflection, I was wrong. I found myself calling fellow inspectors time and time again with the same questions looking for answers, not guidance, on how to properly reach the correct answer. Each year, I received new federal regulations and each year, I put a rarely used regulation book on my bookshelf from the previous year. It was during that time I realized I was not a better inspector, just an older inspector. I realized I

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cannot simply become better over time. The only thing that time brought me was age and a few more gray hairs trying to figure out the regulations. I determined that if I wanted to become a better, more efficient inspector, I would have to intentionally become the inspector I wanted to be. I was tired of being embarrassed by industry or drivers asking me questions about regulations and not having answers or not being able to find the answer in the federal regulations. I was ready to break out of my comfort zone and improve, not just for the good feeling of being knowledgeable, but because I felt I owed it to the trucking industry and motorist public alike to be the best at what I was hired to do. I believe we develop and improve because we either learn so much that we choose to change or we hurt enough that we are forced to change. I know each of these forces played roles in my professional development and started me on a path of being intentional. I began watching CVSA training videos, reading applicable policies and bulletins, and intentionally studying the regulations. I tried to better understand the regulations, their application to safety and the overall inspection process. My journey led me to pursue becoming a National Training Center (NTC) instructor

to teach future inspectors and continue my journey to be better and more efficient. Once a person becomes intentional in their professional development as an inspector, there will always be that defining starting line, but there is never a finish line. The more we grow and develop, the more room for growth we see. Dr. John C. Maxwell, an instructor on leadership, says, “Experience is not the best teacher; evaluated experience is the best teacher.” I challenge you to take a moment to reflect. Are you becoming better or older? Think of three to five things you can do each day to become better and apply those things every day. For example, read regulations, CVSA operations policies, the out-of-service criteria, or sit through another NTC Course, such as Part A, Part B, General Hazmat, etc. Don’t call fellow inspectors just for answers; instead, call them for guidance. Consider the problem you’re facing, look it up in the regulations, form your opinion, then call for affirmation of your decision, if necessary. Don’t just sit back and age. Get better and continue to get better. Everyone is counting on you to be the best at your trade and constantly hone your skillset. n


REGIONAL NEWS

REGION II

North Carolina Trooper and Driver Deliver Presentation to American Legion Student Trooper Program By Master Tpr. Brandon Johnson, Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program, North Carolina Department of Public Safety

On June 17, 2019, the North Carolina State Highway Patrol Commercial Vehicle Enforcement (CVE) Section and the North Carolina Trucking Association’s Road Team delivered a presentation to the North Carolina American Legion Student Trooper Program in Raleigh, North Carolina. During the presentation, Tpr. Brandon Johnson and Road Team driver John Hathcock explained the role of a CVE trooper and safety around commercial motor vehicles to 30 students. The teens were told about the importance of the CVE troopers’ role in ensuring that commercial motor vehicles operating on the highways are doing so in a safe and efficient manner. Tpr. Johnson spoke about the 37-step inspection process and critical inspection items. He also spoke about the additional training required for troopers who are assigned to the CVE Section. Road Team driver Hathcock spoke about nozones and the importance of being safe around commercial motor vehicles. The students were allowed to look at the tractor and trailer, and see what it looks like from the driver’s seat. n THIRD QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV

Almost Made It

By Sgt. Travis Snider, Commercial Vehicle Division, Washington State Patrol On May 7, 2019, the Washington State Patrol (WSP) Commercial Vehicle Division (CVD) was working an international fuel fraud emphasis with partners from the the Washington State Department of Licensing and Canada’s commercial vehicle safety and fuel and carbon tax enforcement. Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officer (CVEO) 3 Ryan Hernandez and Tpr. Kinkade were assigned to the Lynden U.S.-Canada border crossing. At 5:45 p.m., they saw a fuel tanker proceeding northbound toward Canada, missing its International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) decal. When the tanker finally stopped, it was feet from the Canadian border. WSP CVD often work in CVEO/trooper teams so both can benefit from each other’s unique expertise. Tpr. Kinkade noticed the tanker had placards indicating it contained a hazardous material. The driver was unable to produce a shipping paper but presented a “sales order.” CVEO 3 Hernandez noted the tanker was labeled for diesel and oil, yet the sales receipt showed the load to be gasoline. He conveyed this to Tpr. Kinkade, who started a field interview while CVEO 3 Hernandez focused on the paperwork and hazardous material. Due to their combined efforts, the two officers were able to ascertain the driver was illegally smuggling 6,600 gallons of gasoline which, in British Columbia, equates to about $38,000 USD. The driver was fraudulently passing the gasoline off as off-road diesel. In addition to smuggling gasoline across the border, the driver was referred for obstruction, improper hazard markings, improper shipping papers, failing to produce USDOT hazardous materials registration, no valid IFTA, no dangerous goods certificate, no insurance, no valid International Registration Plan and no record of duty status. Initially, there was a delay before the driver decided to pull over as if he was trying to decide if he wanted to be inspected by U.S. or Canadian officials. In the end, it did not matter. Upon completion of WSP’s investigation, the driver was turned over to Royal Canadian Mounted Police where, undoubtedly, the attempted smuggling of 6,600 gallons of fuel raised some eyebrows. n

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REGION IV

CVSA International Roadcheck in Hawaii Hawaii’s motor carrier safety officers participated in CVSA International Roadcheck, June 4-6, 2019. Commercial motor vehicle inspections were conducted at various locations, focusing on steering and suspension systems. n

Kneeling Left to Right: Officers Clifford Ballesteros, Sean Prendergast, Aaron Kalaukoa, Brett Wong, Marshall Villegas, Santiago Jumawan, Gene Gabriel and Kelsey Higa. Standing Left to Right: Officers Stanton Ishii, Benjamin Sarian and Scott Taylor.


REGIONAL NEWS

REGION IV

REGION IV

Montana Inspection Photos

By the Numbers

By Daniel Carroll, Montana Motor Carrier Services Enforcement How many steps are there in a North American Standard Level I Inspection? How many of us make sure we are hitting all the steps each time we conduct a Level I inspection? How many times have we gotten complacent and not checked the low air warning? How many times did we not do an air loss rate test because the leak just wasn’t big enough? Are we doing a complete Level I Inspection every time or just going through the motions to keep our certification every year? Following the 37-step inspection process ensures uniformity in our inspections. It also guides us to make sure we are looking for violations at every location on the vehicle.

Deflated airbag found by Corp. Russ Corbell Montana MCS Enforcement.

Safety, first and foremost, should be our mindset. Safety for the officer involved, safety for the driver of the truck and safety for the general public sharing the roadways.

Frame crack on hazmat load identified by Sgt. Marlena Fultz, Montana MCS Enforcement.

Disconnected brake chamber discovered by Corp. Jonathan Larson, Montana MCS Enforcement.

Some violations, such as a bald tire, will jump right out at you. Other violations require a hands-on approach to find. Twist wheel fasteners in both directions. Look for areas where airlines may be rubbing. That airline may look fine at a glance but when you move it by hand you’ll see where it has been worn down into the reinforcement ply. Grab U-bolts, shake air reservoirs, make sure those suspension connecting rods aren’t loose. What can you do to become a better inspector? Keep a copy of the Level I Inspection process in your uniform for reference. Work with other inspectors, if available. You will learn from them and they will learn from you. Compete in your state’s inspector competition, if it has one. It will show you where you are strong and what areas you need to work on. Finally, inspect, inspect, inspect. As inspectors, we never know how many lives we may have saved by taking those noncompliant vehicles off the roadway. It’s our duty to ensure that each vehicle we inspect is done to the best of our ability to keep the roadways safe for all who travel on them. n

Disconnected pushrod found by Corp. Jonathan Larson, Montana MCS Enforcement.

Missing drum/brake assembly found by Ofc. Taylor Dodd, Montana MCS Enforcement. THIRD QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION V

REGION V

Congratulations to Québec’s New CVSA Level I Instructors

Québec’s Mobile Prevention Unit Hits the Road

For some commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers, becoming a CVSA instructor is a natural step in their career. Such an opportunity presented itself in June 2019, when Contrôle routier Québec hosted a CVSA North American Standard Level I instructor French course at l’École nationale de Police du Québec.

Since last September, the Société de l’Assurance Automobile du Québec’s mobile prevention unit has been traveling the province to raise awareness of safety issues among road users and commercial motor vehicles.

By Jonathan Beauvais, Provincial Communications Coordinator, Directorate of Counseling and Prevention, Société de l’assurance automobile du Québec (Quebec Automobile Insurance Corporation)

Instructor developer Gino Rousselle (inspection and enforcement Nouveau-Brunswick) paired with senior instructor developer Sgt. Bruno Fauteux (Contrôle routier Québec) to form a duo in developing and evaluating instructor candidates. The four CVSA instructor candidates are experienced Contrôle routier Québec’s instructors at the police institute. Through hard work and dedication, they all succeeded in achieving their goals. Congratulations to Québec’s new CVSA Level I instructors Steeve Hardoin, Chantale Girard, David Lessard and Martin Leblanc, all of whom were successful in becoming certified as North American Standard Level I instructors. Special thanks to Gino Rousselle who took time away from home to give us a hands-on instructor developer course and congratulations to him for achieving his goal of becoming a senior instructor developer. n

Left to Right: Sgt. Bruno Fauteux, senior instructor developer; instructor candidates Steeve Hardoin, Chantale Girard, David Lessard, Martin Leblanc; and instructor developer Gino Rousselle (Nouveau-Brunswick).

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By Jonathan Beauvais, Provincial Communications Coordinator, Directorate of Counseling and Prevention, Société de l’assurance automobile du Québec (Quebec Automobile Insurance Corporation)

The truck, which has been transformed and specially equipped, is driven by Contrôleur Routier (Québec’s commercial motor vehicle enforcement officers) and regional advisers in partnership for road safety. This unique vehicle makes it possible to tackle, sometimes in an entertaining way, a multitude of aspects of road safety. Inside the vehicle, visitors can, for example, try out virtual reality glasses and evaluate their knowledge of road safety through quizzes displayed on an interactive TV. Activities for drivers, motor carriers and owner-operators, such as information on air brakes, are also on the agenda. Meanwhile, using tailored carpets, a demonstration is held around the unit that illustrates the risks associated with commercial motor vehicle’s blind spots. This multipurpose vehicle is also used for general public events, such as conferences and symposiums, as well as visits to businesses, schools, weigh stations, checkpoints and more. n


REGIONAL NEWS

REGION V

Major Changes to Safety Standards and Increased Accountability on Alberta Highways Through Mandated Entry-Level Training and Partners in Compliance Designation By Heather Ramsay, Marketing Communications Advisor, Alberta Motor Transport Association

Highway safety is everyone’s business and for those whose businesses involve moving people and products throughout the province of Alberta on a daily basis, transportation comes with even greater risks and responsibilities. When you consider that there are more than 25,000 carriers on provincial highways and the variety of activities, conditions and demands that are part of each driver’s day, there is no question that safety is a complex and ever-changing issue. And it is an issue that must be the priority of not only carriers but also shippers. Mandatory Entry-Level Training (MELT) was introduced on the heels of the devastating Humbolt bus crash that took the lives of 13 members of a junior hockey team and rocked Canadians to the core; and is just one example of the critical changes that need to be made to ensure improved transportation safety and reinforce accountability. This new government-mandated training for Class 1 and Class 2 commercial drivers went into effect on March 1, 2019, and is now a requirement for all commercial driver’s license applications. The training includes specified hours of in-class, in-yard and in-vehicle instruction, which is offered by designated schools and follows standardized curriculum. “We have been lobbying for entry-level industry standards for a long time and are very pleased that MELT has been implemented,” states Chris Nash, president of the Alberta Motor Transport Association

(AMTA). “The AMTA fully endorses increased training requirements that will ensure consistency in driver education and skills enhancement and increase safety overall.” Another important program that continues to bolster industry standards and is led by the AMTA is Partners in Compliance (PIC). Created in 1995, PIC is the leading safety management program that provides transportation companies with the specific guidelines, management practices, training objectives and performance monitoring that push standards to a true level of excellence. While this volunteer program is in a league of its own for carriers and requires ongoing commitment and reporting, it is attention-worthy for shippers as well. More organizations and municipalities in the province are recognizing PIC and requiring that their suppliers and service contractors have the designation. It is becoming increasingly important for shippers to also take a proactive role in training and safety, such that carriers can be confident in working with them and know that they operate by industry best practices. Earning a designation within PIC not only ensures exceptional training and safety practices, it also gives shippers a competitive advantage and significantly reduces their risk of “vicarious liability” (which falls under Part 7 of the Traffic Safety Act). As interest in and adoption of PIC continues to grow and the likes of large organizations, such as Suncor and Rocky View School Division,

require that their suppliers and vendors have PIC designations, it is anticipated that there will be increased pressure on carriers and shippers to fully understand their responsibilities and be accountable to very high standards. As an association dedicated to safety and training for the transportation industry, the AMTA is pleased to see changes to standards and increased participation in programs, such as PIC. Continuing to improve standards is a matter of due diligence and should be a part of vetting truck companies and shippers before a load is even scheduled for pick up. While it would be ideal for PIC and industry training programs, such as MELT, to become regulated and standard nationwide, matters are currently moving in a positive direction. Any time there is a PIC logo affixed to a truck or school bus, one can be confident that the organization running the vehicle is committed to training, maintenance and safety; especially of the precious people it transports and those with whom it shares the highway. The Alberta Motor Transport Association is a not-for-profit, advocacy and safety training association that serves as the voice, the standard and the resource for the commercial transportation industry in Alberta. For more than 80 years, the AMTA has encompassed a broad range of environmental, social, economic, safety and compliance matters that impact Alberta’s highways. For more information, visit www.amta.ca. n

THIRD QUARTER 2019

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REGIONAL NEWS

REGION V

Whitehorse Inspection Photos Ofc. Matt Juvan found a bent pushrod during a CVSA Level I Inspection in Whitehorse, Yukon.

Ofc. Alex Juskovic discovered this broken brake pot on a commercial motor vehicle at the Whitehorse Weigh Scales, on May 16, 2019, the day after unannounced Brake Safety Day.

REGION V

Newfoundland Inspection Photo In May 2019, Highway Enforcement Ofc. Arthur Taylor spotted this rolling on the inspection scales at the Pynn’s Brook inspection station in Western Newfoundland. It was placed out of service. The vehicle was a loaded tandem van trailer going eastbound.

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Meet the Voices of Safety. “It takes the length of two football fields for my truck to stop.” – Ingrid, Truck Driver

“My car can’t safely pass a turning bus.”

“There’s a lot I can’t see around my bus.”

– Ed, Experienced Driver

– Keith, Bus Driver

Visit www.ShareTheRoadSafely.gov to get the resources you need to spread the word about sharing the road safely with large trucks and buses.

Let’s share the road together, safely. FMCSA is proud to partner with the following organizations:

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National Waste & Recycling Association SM

Collect. Recycle. Innovate.


COVER STORY

“ This course and the materials covered were excellent; a must for anyone who manages compliance.”

An Update on CVSA’s Industry Courses – Past and Future By Kerri Wirachowsky, Director of Roadside Inspection Program, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance This fiscal year, CVSA held two driver requirements and two vehicle requirements courses. I received many calls about the course, with interest from various industry partners. Some attendees attended both classes and others are awaiting the next course to ensure they get all the information. In October 2018, the driver requirements course was held in Conley, Georgia, at a FedEx Freight facility and, in February 2019, another driver requirements course was held in Phoenix, Arizona, at the Arizona Trucking Association. Both courses were a success. The students learned about regulatory definitions, intrastate vs. interstate operations, commercial driver’s license (CDL) and driver qualification requirements, hazardous materials, hours-of-service rules, annual and trip inspections on commercial motor vehicles, and the DataQ filing process.

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Also, for the first time, during the course in Arizona, a section was added on human trafficking, which was well received and will remain in the course in the future. The vehicle requirements course was held in Reno, Nevada, at the Nevada Trucking Association in May 2019 and in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, at the Milwaukee Area Technical College in June 2019. Oak Harbor Freight Lines in Reno supplied tractor trailers for training, and the Milwaukee Area Technical College and Kruepke Trucking Inc. supplied them in Oak Creek. For each course, the students spent the week gaining a better understanding of the relationship between regulatory requirements and out-of-service conditions. The course includes extensive information on parts 393, 396 and Appendix G of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations, the CVSA North American Standard Level I Inspection

Procedure, the out-of-service criteria relating to vehicle components of a commercial motor vehicle, including inspection bulletins and operational policies related to vehicle inspections.

Thank you to the Sponsors

The courses have all been a success with positive feedback and I would like to thank all the companies and organizations that provided training facilities, vehicles, equipment, etc. Without your generous support, these courses would not be possible. Thank you to FedEx Freight, the Arizona Trucking Association, the Nevada Trucking Association and the Milwaukee Area Technical College for providing course facilities. Also, thank you to Oak Harbor Freight Lines Inc. for supplying the tractor-trailer combinations for our vehicle requirements course in Nevada


COVER STORY

“ Not only for leaders of a company, but drivers would benefit too.”

“Great course! Even though I lived it for 20 years, I was amazed at how much I forgot from not doing Level I Inspections for almost 10 years.” and to the Milwaukee Area Technical College and Kruepke Trucking Inc. for supplying the equipment in Wisconsin. It was greatly appreciated. The hoist and all the different training aids at the Milwaukee Area Technical College were an added bonus for the students attending the course in Wisconsin. Thanks to Davey Tree Expert Company for sponsoring lunch one day on each of the four courses. We also enjoyed lunch and breaks sponsored by Kruepke Trucking Inc., Tax Airfreight Inc. and R+L Carriers during the course in Wisconsin. All classes were a full five days and it was a pleasure to instruct and interact with these four groups of people. The level of interest, number of questions and dedication to learning was impressive. We know that these participants have important jobs that they pulled themselves away from to attend these courses.

Future Courses

CVSA plans to hold another driver requirements course by the end of 2019. More driver and vehicle requirements courses will take place in 2020. Once the dates and locations have been finalized, they will be posted in the Training section of the CVSA website: www.cvsa.org/trainingpage/training. If you are interested in taking the vehicle and/ or driver training course in the future, we have an online interest form that you can fill out and submit at any time: www.cvsa.org/ trainingpage/training-sign-up/. You will be notified via email once the course in which you expressed interest is scheduled and registration is open. If you have any questions regarding the industry training courses, contact Kerri Wirachowsky at 301-830-6153 or kerriw@cvsa.org. n THIRD QUARTER 2019

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CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

CVSA Awards $1,000 College Scholarships to Five Deserving Students CVSA awarded $1,000 scholarships to five deserving high school seniors to attend the college of their choice this fall. Brendan Dowling will attend Biola University; William Farris was accepted to the University of Alabama; Kathryn Kelley will attend Southwest Baptist University; Reagan Miller plans to attend Dallas Baptist University; and Marissa Snapp was accepted to Emory and Henry College.

Brendan Dowling

As North America’s leading commercial motor vehicle safety organization, CVSA’s annual scholarship award program is a key component of the Alliance’s outreach initiatives. The scholarship award program is competitive in its selection criteria, uniquely tailored to recognize outstanding high school seniors. Scholarship recipients are selected by weighing a combination of strong academic performance, volunteer work and extracurricular activities. This fall, Brendan Dowling will attend Biola University in California. He is the son of Steve Dowling with the California Highway Patrol. Brendan plans to pursue a career in physical therapy. After graduating from medical school with a PhD in physical therapy, Brendan said he plans to start his own practice, “through which I will give back to the community by helping others battling with physical ailments.”

William Farris

Kathryn Kelley

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Brendan had a 4.0 grade point average and was a member of his school’s Academic Honor Society. As an avid runner, Brendan devoted four years to varsity cross country and varsity track. He also was the recipient of the Travis Williams Award for Cross Country and he cofounded the Rocklin Outdoor Club. His community work includes a two-week mission trip to Bangladesh, packaging food for the military, volunteering time with Feed My Starving Children and Paradise Wildfire Disaster Relief, and leading bible studies.

the Beta Spanish Club. In addition, he was a drum major for his school’s marching band and received the John Philip Sousa Award, which is the pinnacle of achievement in a high school band. Will also participated in tennis, track and field, and drama, as well as Upward Soccer. He volunteered with the LaSalle Parish Special Olympics and the Searcy Little Creek Volunteer Fire Department. Kathryn Kelley will attend Southwest Baptist University in Missouri. Kathryn’s father is Commercial Vehicle Division Capt. Kevin Kelley, a 25-year veteran of the Missouri Highway Patrol. Kathryn plans to obtain a degree in nursing. “By becoming a nurse practitioner, I think that I will gain a platform that will allow me to better the lives of people locally and nationally,” said Kathryn. Kathryn was senior vice president and president of the National Honor Society at her high school. In service of her community, Kathryn provided summer lunch meals as a food program volunteer and worked as a camp counselor with responsibility over more than 85 children over 13 summer weeks. Kathryn was a member of the varsity basketball team and golf team. She was also a member of the Future Business Leaders of America, the STEM Club and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Reagan Miller plans to attend Dallas Baptist University with the ultimate career goal of becoming a freelance photographer and videographer for non-profit organizations around the world. “Although this career is not a common career, I believe that God has placed these dreams inside my heart for a reason,” said Reagan. “Throughout my career, I want to follow my two passions: photography and sharing the Gospel.” Reagan’s father is Raymond Miller with McAnally Wilkins Insurance.

William Farris was accepted to the University of Alabama. His father is James Farris with the Louisiana Department of Public Safety. Will plans to pursue a double major in marine science and biology. “My dream is to do everything I can to help preserve our oceans, teach others of their importance and better understand the creatures that live there,” said Will.

Reagan was a member of the National Honor Society and Interact Leadership Team, she played on her school’s softball and crosscountry teams, and she worked part time most of her high school career, all while maintaining her grade point average. Reagan served faithfully at her church by sharing her time at vacation bible schools and mission trips. And, for five years, Reagan and her family helped feed the less fortunate by serving at a soup kitchen and its mobile unit.

With a perfect 4.0 grade point average, Will was the top student in his class. He was voted Most Likely to Succeed and served as senior class president. Will was a member of the Future Business Leaders of America and

Marissa Snapp has been accepted to Emory and Henry College in Virginia. She is the daughter of Wyndi and Jeremy Snapp with the Tennessee Trucking Association. Marissa’s career aspiration is to become a veterinarian.


CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

2020 CVSA ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION

“Being a veterinarian has been a dream and desire of mine since I was young, and I plan to work toward it till I reach my goal,” said Marissa. She is already well on her way. Marissa has more than 300 hours of community service at the East Tennessee Animal Hospital. She was also a member of the National Honor Society and has been a four-year varsity athlete on her school’s volleyball team. Marissa was awarded certificates for the highest average in her ceramics, personal finance and physics classes. She also helped lead groups in her church’s bible school for the past four years. “This marks CVSA’s 20th year awarding college scholarships to exceptional high school seniors,” said CVSA President Chief Jay Thompson with the Arkansas Highway Police. “I’m proud to be the Alliance’s president during such a notable milestone. We all know how important it is to cultivate greatness in our youth. This year, the award program has given us the opportunity to help five remarkable young adults as they begin on their path toward the future of their professional lives.”

Sept. 20-24, 2020 Wilmington, Delaware

Reagan Miller

All scholarship recipients have been notified of their selection as award winners. CVSA was able to award the scholarships thanks, in part, to a generous donation by J. J. Keller & Associates Inc., a trusted source for transportation, workplace safety, human resources, construction safety and hazardous materials regulation compliance products and services. The CVSA College Scholarship Award Program is dedicated to Gary E. Curtis. While working for the Virginia State Police, Curtis was an active member of CVSA and a cornerstone in the development of the roadside North American Standard Inspection Program. He came to CVSA in 1992, faithfully serving as the Alliance’s director of technical services. His efforts and contributions helped form the solid base upon which CVSA now proudly stands. Curtis lost his life to cancer in December 1998.

Marissa Snapp

Information about the 2020 scholarship program will be announced in early 2020. n

THIRD QUARTER 2019

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CVSA COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM NEWS

CVSA Accepting Nominations for 2020 International Driver Excellence Award CVSA is now accepting applications for its 2020 International Driver Excellence Award (IDEA), an award that recognizes the extraordinary careers of professional commercial motor vehicle drivers and their commitment to public safety. The award acknowledges individuals who go above and beyond the performance of their duties as a professional truck or bus driver, distinguishing themselves conspicuously and beyond the call of duty through the achievement of safe operation and compliance for an extended period of time.

Professional driver Ross Reynolds of Con-way Freight set a high standard as CVSA’s first annual International Driver Excellence Award Winner.

CVSA is accepting nominations through Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. Complete nomination packets must be received in full by the deadline date. No exceptions.

Schneider’s Bob Wyatt was CVSA’s 2016 International Driver Excellence Award Winner.

GUARDIAN

• Company logo on the CVSA Workshop sponsor page with a link to company website • Logo featured on signage at the CVSA Workshop registration area • Company name included in the sponsor scroll at the beginning of the CVSA Workshop general session • Sponsor ribbon on the badge of any company representatives in attendance at the CVSA Workshop

Charles Endorf of Werner Enterprises was the winner of the 2017 International Driver Excellence Award.

Herschel Evans of the trucking company Holland was presented with a crystal trophy and a check for $2,500 as the 2018 IDEA winner.

Professional driver Timothy Dean of Werner Enterprises was 2019’s IDEA winner.

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• Company logo and a website link in the IDEA section of the CVSA website

• Two-minute speaking portion of the general session to assist with presenting the winner with his/her award

The winner will be announced in March 2020, and presented with his/her award on Monday, April 20, 2020, during the general session at the CVSA Workshop in San Antonio. For more information and to download the nomination form, visit www.cvsa.org/program/programs/idea. n

• Company logo and website link in the 2020 CVSA Workshop event app

• Company logo on the giant check presented to the winner

Nominees must have: • At least 25 cumulative years of crash-free driving in a commercial motor vehicle with a clean driving record for the past three years • No felony convictions • No safety-related driving suspensions in the past three years • No driver violations in the past three years, excluding form and manner violations

CVSA’s exclusive IDEA sponsor garners premium exposure with government, industry leaders and law enforcement, while increasing visibility as an industry leader. The $10,000 sponsorship of CVSA’s 2020 International Driver Excellence Award entitles the sponsor to specific, exclusive benefits associated with that program:

The 2020 IDEA winner will receive: • A check for $2,500 • A crystal trophy • Airfare for the winner and one guest to San Antonio, Texas, to receive his/her award on Monday, April 20, 2020, during the general session of the CVSA Workshop • Two-night hotel stay at the Hyatt Regency San Antonio Riverwalk

Sponsor 2020 IDEA

As the IDEA sponsor, at minimum, your sponsorship would make your company a platinum sponsor, which entitles your company to a number of additional benefits associated with platinum-level sponsorship. If you’re already a CVSA sponsor, the IDEA sponsorship will be applied to your overall sponsorship level, entitling you to receive the benefits associated with the designated sponsorship level of platinum, diamond, premier or elite. Visit www.cvsa.org/program/programs/ idea/idea-sponsorship to learn more about sponsorship.


GOVERNMENT NEWS

THE LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY RUNDOWN By Adrienne Gildea, CAE, Deputy Executive Director, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Congress Continues Work on Next Transportation Bill With the August recess and the infrastructure bill talks stalled, Congress turned its focus instead to the next highway reauthorization. Members have begun introducing marker bills, testing the waters for support for their various priorities and seeking stakeholder feedback on proposals. In June, the U.S. House of Representatives’ Transportation and Infrastructure Committee’s Subcommittee on Highways and Transit held a hearing on the state of the trucking industry, asking participants to talk about pressure points and challenges they are facing. CVSA Past President Deputy Chief Mark Savage, with the Colorado State Patrol, testified on behalf of the Alliance and focused his remarks on the need for clear and enforceable regulations and a more effective rulemaking process. The testimony stressed that the history of delays in official rulemaking has created inconsistencies between regulations, regulatory guidance and informal communications from the agency. In addition, he discussed the role that exemptions play in undermining safety and complicating the effective enforcement of safety regulations. Later, in July, the U.S. Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works (EPW) took the lead on moving a highway bill forward by considering and approving the largely bipartisan America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act on July 30. While the EPW Committee has jurisdiction over the bulk of the transportation-related portions of the highway bill, it is only one piece of the final product. The Senate Committee on Commerce,

Science and Transportation is responsible for the motor carrier title of the bill. Plus, the Senate Finance Committee is responsible for determining how to pay for everything. While the EPW Committee’s markup is an important first step, other committees on the Senate side are not moving as quickly and leadership in the House indicated it will likely be 2020 before their committees take up the issue. While the biggest issue remains how to fund the bill, there are a number of policy issues that will have to be resolved before the legislation can move forward. Add to that the fact that 2020 is a presidential election year and the outlook for passage of a surface transportation bill next year becomes even more unpredictable. CVSA’s reauthorization task force continued its work over the summer, meeting by conference call a number of times and approving several policy recommendations. Those proposals will be considered by the Policy and Regulatory Affairs Committee at the 2019 CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in September. Those that are approved by the committee will be referred to the CVSA Board of Directors for final approval.

CMV Policy Efforts Meanwhile, CVSA has been focused on a number of CMV-related issues. The CVSA Board of Directors established a working group to monitor implementation of the program allowing for the interstate transportation of industrial hemp. The group, chaired by CVSA Region III President Capt. John Hahn of the Colorado State Patrol will follow the program and make

recommendations to the board on appropriate steps for the Alliance to take to help prepare and educate the inspector community on the program and its impacts. CVSA staff continues to meet with offices on Capitol Hill to discuss issues of importance to the Alliance’s membership, including automated driving systems, driver fatigue, exemptions, commercial driver’s license age requirements, hours of service and electronic logging devices. In addition, the Alliance filed comments to a number of rulemaking notices, including items from both the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and FMCSA on automated driving systems, a request for comment from FMCSA regarding the agency’s proposal to initiate an under 21 interstate driver pilot program, notices from FMCSA seeking comments on regulatory guidance reform, as well as a number of exemption requests. CVSA also petitioned FMCSA to amend Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations §389.603, Training for supervisors, to require controlled substances training for company supervisors be recurrent every three years. Given the increased levels of drug impaired driving, recurrent training would ensure that supervisors have up-to-date training on recognizing controlled substance use. CVSA members can keep up with the Alliance’s most recent petitions, comments and letters by reading our bi-weekly legislative and regulatory updates sent via email or by visiting the policy section of CVSA’s website at www.cvsa.org/ policypage/policy. n

THIRD QUARTER 2019

27


GOVERNMENT NEWS

Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program

By Selden Fritschner, Senior Transportation Specialist, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation On June 3, 2019, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issued a press release to announce that it would begin accepting applications from eligible motor carriers to participate in its pilot program to allow 18, 19 and 20-year-olds who possess the U.S. military equivalent of a commercial driver’s license (CDL) to operate large trucks in interstate commerce. The Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program, mandated by Section 5404 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act, requires the secretary to establish a pilot program to “...study the feasibility, benefits, and safety impacts of allowing a covered driver to operate a commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce.” A covered driver is: • Between the ages of 18 and 21 • A member or former member of the armed forces, National Guard or reserve components • Qualified in a military occupational specialty to operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) or similar vehicle Motor carriers who wish to participate in the pilot program must apply and be approved by FMCSA. To be approved for participation, motor carriers must meet the qualification standards that were published in the July 3, 2018, Federal

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Register notice titled, “Pilot Program to Allow Persons Between the Ages of 18 and 21 with Military Driving Experience to Operate Commercial Motor Vehicles in Interstate Commerce.” Specifically, participating motor carriers: • Must have proper operating authority, if required, and registration • Must have minimum levels of financial responsibility • Must not be designated by FMCSA as a highor moderate-risk motor carrier • Must not have a conditional or unsatisfactory safety rating • Must not have any open or closed enforcement actions, as defined in CVSA’s North American Standard Out-ofService Criteria, such as imminent hazard, operations out-of-service (OOS) orders, failure to pay OOS orders or patterns of safety violations within the past six years • Must not have a crash rate above the national average • Must not have a driver OOS rate above the national average • Must not have a vehicle OOS rate above the national average

Approved motor carriers will be issued a letter of exemption from FMCSA acknowledging their participation in the pilot program. As an added measure, the names of the carriers approved for the program will be posted to FMCSA’s website and will be available in Query Central (QC). Covered drivers who wish to participate in the pilot program will need to obtain a CDL, just like any driver would, and may have the option, depending on their experience, of having their skills and/or knowledge tests waived. The state driver licensing agency will issue the driver a CDL, most likely with a “K” restriction. Once the applicant has received his or her CDL, he or she will apply directly to an FMCSA approved carrier. All drivers will be pre-screened by their employer and FMCSA to ensure they meet the established qualification standards prior to being approved to participate in the program. FMCSA will issue an exemption letter to the approved drivers and law enforcement will be able to verify a driver’s participation in the pilot program through QC, which will contain a current list of participating drivers and carriers that roadside enforcement personnel will be able to validate real-time. In addition, FMCSA will monitor the safety performance of motor carriers and covered drivers throughout the


GOVERNMENT NEWS

pilot program. The Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program will run for up to three years and FMCSA reserves the right to discontinue the pilot, remove a carrier, or remove a driver if it deems that the continuation of the pilot or certain participants have a negative impact on highway safety. After approved motor carriers recruit drivers for participation, FMCSA will work with CVSA to issue an inspection bulletin to Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program State partners that details how law enforcement can verify a carrier and driver’s participation in the pilot program through Query Central. For years, FMCSA has been a leader in providing programs that help make it easier, quicker and less expensive for individuals with military driving experience, including veterans, active duty, National Guard and reserve members, to obtain a CDL and transition to civilian CMV driving careers. These men and women are a tremendous pool of talent. They offer employers a proven work ethic, personal discipline and invaluable training and experience. In addition to the Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program, FMCSA provides grants and waivers to ease the transition of military personnel to the trucking industry.

The Commercial Motor Vehicle Operator Safety Training Grant Program, which was established by Congress in 2005 through the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act — A Legacy for Users, as amended by the FAST Act Section 5101 and codified as 49 USC Section 31103, has two goals: • Expand the number of CDL holders possessing enhanced operator safety training to help reduce the severity and number of crashes on U.S. roads involving commercial motor vehicles

For more information about the Under 21 Military CDL Pilot Program and other FMCSA military CDL programs, visit www.fmcsa.dot.gov/ commercial-drivers-license/ military-driver-programs.

• Assist current or former members of the United States Armed Forces (including National Guard members and reservists) and their spouses to receive training to transition to the CMV operation industry Beginning in 2012, FMCSA implemented the Military Skills Test Waiver Program, which provided more than 26,000 military truck and bus drivers the opportunity to waive the CDL skills test. In 2018, FMCSA implemented the Knowledge Test Waiver Program, which allows states to waive the CDL knowledge test. When used in conjunction with each other, certain military personnel that meet the standards can do an “even exchange” of their military license for a CDL. n

THIRD QUARTER 2019

29


GOVERNMENT NEWS

 MARK YOUR CALENDAR

CVSA WORKSHOP

April 19-23, 2020 San Antonio, Texas

COMING SOON: FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse

By Gian Marshall, Management Analyst, Office of Enforcement, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations have long required motor carriers to contact the previous employer(s) of prospective new drivers to confirm the eligibility of those individuals to operate a commercial motor vehicle in accordance with U.S. Department of Transportation’s drug and alcohol regulations. Congress, recognizing that dishonest drivers could ‘side-step’ the discovery of past drug/ alcohol violations by excluding pertinent information on their job applications, directed the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) in 2012 to undertake rulemaking to implement a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse. The clearinghouse rule requires FMCSAregulated employers, medical review officers, substance abuse professionals, consortia/ third-party administrators and other service agents to report to the clearinghouse information related to violations of the drug and alcohol regulations in 49 Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 40 and 382, by current and prospective employees. The CDL Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse final rule, which was published on Dec. 5, 2016, will become fully operational on Jan. 6, 2020. The clearinghouse will be an online tool to identify CDL and commercial learner’s permit (CLP) holders who have refused or failed drug tests or have failed to complete a return-to-duty substance abuse program. Authorized users will be able to access driver information in real time. Employers, their services agents, medical review officers and substance abuse professionals must register for the clearinghouse to report violation information or query a driver’s clearinghouse record. Drivers will also need to register to provide consent for queries or to view their own clearinghouse record. However, a violation can be recorded against a driver even if they have not yet registered for the clearinghouse.

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Motor carriers must query the clearinghouse for this information during every pre-employment driver investigation and at least once a year for all CDL drivers they employ. Registration is scheduled to begin this fall. It should be noted that for the first three years, motor carriers will need to query the clearinghouse and continue to contact previous employers for information, as the clearinghouse will start collecting positive test results and refusals in January 2020 and will not be retroactive. Specifically, employers will be required to report alcohol test results with a concentration more than 0.04, actual knowledge as defined under 382.107, a driver’s refusal to test, negative return-to-duty test results and the completion of the driver’s follow-up testing plan. In addition, medical review officers will be required to report verified positive, adulterated or substituted drug test results, refusals to test and any changes to a verified positive drug test. Substance abuse professionals will report the date the initial assessment with the driver was completed and the driver’s eligibility date for return-toduty testing. State law enforcement personnel will be able to view a CDL driver’s eligibility status via Query Central. FMCSA is working with CVSA to finalize out-of-service criteria for drivers who are prohibited from operating a commercial motor vehicle due to positive test results or refusals. Users can learn more about the clearinghouse at https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov. Available resources include a timeline, downloadable informational materials and frequently asked questions. Website visitors can also sign up to receive email notifications with news and updates on the clearinghouse. Questions about the clearinghouse can be directed to clearinghouse@dot.gov. n


GOVERNMENT NEWS

U.S. Department of Transportation Permanently Bans Commercial Drivers Convicted of Human Trafficking On July 16, 2019, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced a final rule that permanently bans drivers convicted of human trafficking from operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for which a commercial driver’s license or a commercial learner’s permit is required. “This is an important step in the departmentwide campaign to keep America’s roadways, railways, airways and waterways from being used for human trafficking,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao. Following the president’s signature of the “No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act,” FMCSA issued this new rule to prohibit an individual from operating a CMV for life, if that individual uses a CMV in committing a felony involving a severe form of human trafficking. The new rule revises the list of offenses permanently disqualifying individuals from operating a CMV for which a commercial driver’s license or a commercial learner’s permit is required. “The commercial motor vehicle industry is uniquely positioned to help detect and report human trafficking, and thankfully professional drivers’ efforts often bring an end to these tragic situations. Sadly, however, some human trafficking activities are facilitated by the use of commercial trucks or buses,” said FMCSA Administrator Raymond P. Martinez. “By enforcing a lifetime ban on any CMV driver convicted of severe human trafficking, we aim to deliver a strong and effective deterrent to this abhorrent behavior. If a commercial driver is convicted of using their commercial motor vehicle related to human trafficking – that person will never be driving interstate commercial vehicles again.”

In 2017, the Department of Homeland Security identified more than 500 victims of human trafficking and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children estimates that one out of every seven runaways were likely victims of child sex trafficking. To report human trafficking activity, contact the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or by sending a text to 233733. The Federal Register notice can be found at www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/ files/docs/registration/commercial-driverslicense/470921/human-trff-signed.pdf. n

Learn more about the U.S. Department of Transportation’s efforts to combat human trafficking by visiting www.transportation.gov/ stophumantrafficking.

Deterring human trafficking in America’s commercial transportation industry is just one step in the administration’s commitment to fighting against these abhorrent crimes. The president has brought to bear the full resources of the federal government to work against human trafficking, protect victims and prosecute traffickers. On July 2, 2019, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Advisory Committee on Human Trafficking submitted its final report to the department providing recommendations on actions the department can take to help combat human trafficking, and recommended best practices for states and local transportation stakeholders in combatting human trafficking. THIRD QUARTER 2019

31


KNOWLEDGE MATTERS

An Example of Teamwork – CVSA Vehicle Committee and Air Brake Chamber Supplier Engineers Address Chamber Pushrod Stroke Identification Issues By Paul Johnston, Consultant, Brake System Product Engineering Pierre Pratte, of Contrôle Routier Québec, presented the CVSA 11-013-VEH Pushrod Travel Limits on Brake Chambers Issue/Request for Action during the 2011 CVSA Workshop Vehicle Committee Meeting in Chicago, Illinois. The issue was summarized regarding the ongoing problem of finding the size and rated stroke information on a brake chamber during a vehicle inspection. The proposal was to create a unique chamber stroke indicator/marking that was applicable for standard and long stroke chamber designs in hopes that it could be implemented as a National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) standard at a later date. During the Vehicle Committee discussion, several brake engineers in attendance offered to pursue the issue with the SAE International Truck and Bus Brake Actuator Committee, of which they were members at the time. The committee is responsible for maintaining and developing new recommended practices that relate to brake chambers and actuators. After numerous brake actuator committee meetings and updates to the CVSA Vehicle Committee, a new SAE International Recommended Practice J2899 DEC2013 Brake Adjustment Limit for Air Brake Actuators Recommended Practice was published in December 2013. J2899 defines the rated stroke markings (A, B, C, etc.) that signify the chamber rated stroke and readjustment stroke limit regardless of the chamber size (T20, T3030, etc.) and standardized the format for how and where the marking is to be placed on the chamber. The CVSA Vehicle Committee agreed that J2899 DEC2013 addressed the CVSA 11-013VEH Issue/Request for Action and when implemented by the chamber suppliers and vehicle manufacturers, should result in an improvement for determining the chamber stroke limits during inspections. The CVSA Vehicle Committee acknowledged that the J2899 DEC2013 was a consensus-driven recommended practice for the industry to voluntarily implement in their brake chamber products, as there is currently no regulatory requirement to have these types of brake chamber features. Both CVSA and the industry agreed to promote the J2899 DEC2013 results as soon as possible; however, petitioning

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NHTSA and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to revise the current regulations to include the J2899 DEC2013 Recommended Practice was not an option until the brake chamber was available in the marketplace and industry began to utilize them. The brake manufacturers were faced with the development of new chamber components and the CVSA Vehicle Committee prepared and sent a letter to truck and trailer manufacturers associations to educate and request them to consider the use of these chambers at the point of manufacture. RATED STROKE MARKING

In parallel, CVSA and its Vehicle Committee developed training material and added information to Inspection Bulletin 2014-02 – Identification of Long Stroke Brake Chambers or Brake Adjustment Limit Markings to educate enforcement and industry of the new style of chamber, even though at that time it was not on the market. In 2018, during an SAE International meeting, the new brake chamber identification was presented and it was indicated by some brake manufacturers that it was now available for purchase and that, in some cases, they were being installed on new trailers. In May 2019, during the Industry Roadside Inspection Course in Reno, Nevada, CVSA Director of Roadside Inspection Program Kerri Wirachowsky found what may be one of the first brake chambers manufactured with the J2899 DEC2013 rated stroke markings in service on a trailer. The T3030 standard stroke chamber marking was much easier to find; the “E” on the chamber housing indicated that the chamber had a rated stroke of 2.50” and a stroke limit of 2” as outlined in the chart, right (from J2899 DEC2013). Wirachowsky shared the news with those who had been involved since 2011 to celebrate the results of the teamwork between the CVSA Vehicle Committee, the brake chamber suppliers and the vehicle manufacturers. Although it sometimes takes a few years to see progress, when it improves the commercial vehicle in-service inspection process and overall vehicle performance, it’s worth all the effort. Job well done to all. n

RATED STROKE MARKING

RATED STROKE ON BRAKE CHAMBER

BRAKE ADJUSTMENT LIMIT

A

1.50”

1 1/2”

38 mm

1.25”

1 1/4”

32 mm

B

1.75”

1 3/4”

44 mm

1.38”

1 3/8”

35 mm

C

2.00”

2”

51 mm

1.50”

1 1/2”

38 mm

D

2.25”

2 1/4”

57 mm

1.75”

1 3/4”

44 mm

E

2.50”

2 1/2”

64 mm

2.00”

2”

51 mm

F

3.00”

3”

76 mm

2.50”

2 1/2”

64 mm

G

3.25”

3 1/4”

83 mm

2.62”

2 5/8”

67 mm

H

3.50”

3 1/2”

89 mm

2.75”

2 3/4”

70 mm

X.XX

Other


FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT

FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT Road Trip Tips

By Gary Martin, Professional Driver, FedEx Ground; American Trucking Associations’ America’s Road Team Captain After 38 years in the industry and 4 million miles driven, I’d like to think I have a good idea about safe driving practices. I drive over the roads throughout North America and get to visit baseball stadiums from coast to coast. I really enjoy visiting new places and showing the drivers I’m training places they’ve never seen before. The one thing that is true of everywhere I go is that there’s plenty of traffic. In my time, I’ve seen all sorts of bad driving behavior; however, I want to focus on some of the issues I see while traveling on desert highways in hot, dry climates. Some people drive very slowly in their recreational vehicles, most likely due to being inconsistent or inexperienced drivers of large vehicles. This can hold up traffic. On the other hand, some areas have long, straight roads that encourage drivers to speed. Not to mention all the people I’ve seen on their phones while they’re driving. With summer coming to its end, there are a lot of simple things drivers can do to stay safe on the road. As a truck driver, you must always be attentive while driving. There’s lots of new technology in our trucks that keeps us more focused than ever − we’re told when we’re drifting out of the lane, when we’re going too fast, etc. I value this technology so much because on the highway, there’s no room to lose focus.

Since my job requires so much driving, I’m often asked for tips for regular drivers. The most important thing to do before heading out on the road is to be prepared. I’ve seen so many people stranded on the side of the road on my route and there are few things worse than being stuck in the desert. First, always check your tires. Tire blowouts are more common than you think, especially in warm weather. Think of it this way: If it’s 90 degrees outside, the pavement of the road can be 110 or even 120 degrees. Also, keep in mind that speeding, especially on the long, straight, hot roads of I-40 or similar highways, greatly increases your chances of a blowout. In case you break down, always have the supplies you’ll need, as well as a gallon jug of water. Another thing I’ve seen a lot of that rarely gets discussed is over-packed cars. People tend to think they can stuff their cars to the brim with luggage and other vacation supplies, but it blocks the back view out of your car. Similarly, I see a lot of sun visors on the side windows of cars, and I know they seem like a great idea to keep the kids from getting hot, but they also deter your vision of oncoming traffic.

road construction season across the country and bottlenecks are inevitable. When I get stuck in bottlenecks on my route, it can take up to 40 minutes to only move five miles. I recommend leaving earlier than you think is needed. Try to always have someone with you when you drive long distances. I’m a professional driver and even I think I drive better in my personal vehicle when someone else is with me. They can keep an eye on your driving and, most importantly, they keep you alert and awake. Truck drivers are very good at knowing when we’re getting tired. When I start to feel that way, I pull over as soon as I safely can and nap for 15 minutes. It’s never worth it to try to push through. Lastly, this should go without saying but no matter how much fun you have this summer, do not drink and drive. Those are just a few tips from a professional truck driver who has been out on the road for nearly 40 years and can tell you dozens of stories about unsafe behaviors and the dangerous consequences that result from those behaviors. n

When you’re on your late summer or fall trips, know there will be delays. That time of year is

THIRD QUARTER 2019

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Download Our New Event App

CVSA will be launching a brand-new mobile app at the 2019 CVSA Annual Conference and Exhibition in Biloxi, Mississippi, and it’s going to be an awesome enhancement to your event experience. 

Access the event schedule and customize your agenda.

Check out the exhibitors and easily locate their booths and contact information.

Get information, such as Wi-Fi passwords, raffle times, transportation information, etc.

See who’s attending and share contact information by networking with other attendees.

Get important updates through push notifications.

Search “CVSA Events” in the Apple or Google Play store to download the new events app. The annual conference app is just the start. There will be a new app for each CVSA meeting or conference from now on, replacing the printed program book distributed at event registration. We’re looking forward to the many new benefits that will be available to our event registrants through this new event app and we hope you are too.


INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

Three-Letter Shift: Moving from CSA to IRT By Chris Nelson, Program Manager, NBIS

If you’re in or around the trucking industry these days, you know there are three letters dominating many of the conversations: IRT. IRT, which stands for item response theory, is the new Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) program methodology that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is adopting to develop a more statistically

principled approach to measuring carrier risk. FMCSA and others believe that IRT methodology is more effective in accurately identifying a poor safety culture because it uses scientific data to measure factors the old Safety Measurement System (SMS) couldn’t account for. What this means is that CSA is moving away from trying to predict crash risk and instead focusing on safety culture.

The new IRT model will move beyond the current seven Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs) and replace it with one safety culture score, which is generated by analyzing the 66 violation groups that currently exist in CSA. Using scientific data, IRT identifies industry patterns and prioritizes violation groups based on their potential to open the door to other risks. As you might imagine, safety culture is more important now than ever. While CSA is an ever-evolving project and we don’t know everything at this exact juncture in time, we do know that if you don’t have the right plans and procedures in place, or if you have many violations across a number of categories, you’re not going to fare very well in this new system. But that’s where managing your drivers and promoting safe driving throughout your organization come into play. In the past, motor carriers manually tracked driver behavior by referring to static driving records. This often left organizations without adequate visibility into which drivers were most responsible for escalating insurance costs and liability concerns. The solution has always been right in front of us, but it has been a difficult one to get to: accumulating all the driver data in one place. “Our analysis shows that the IRT model is an effective means of identifying a poor safety culture at motor carriers and will represent a significant improvement in the overall effectiveness of the CSA program,” said Steve Bryan, executive vice president and general manager for SambaSafety Transportation. “However, IRT… almost completely changes the building blocks of CSA. There are no longer any violation weights, CSA points, BASIC measures or safety event groups. The new, single CSA BASIC Score is a very different way of representing the safety culture of a motor carrier.” Using continuous monitoring tools can change the behavior of an organization’s drivers, which leads to fewer citations and incidents — all leading indicators of risky driving behavior. And since FMCSA also plans to use the IRT model to improve data collection and evaluate the potential of adding new data sets, including carrier characteristics data, such as driver turnover rates, compensation levels and types of cargo hauled, it makes sense to implement a continuous driver risk monitoring solution. To learn about driver risk management tools, contact Chris Nelson or another NBIS risk management specialist at 877-860-RMSS or www.NBIS.com. n THIRD QUARTER 2019

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INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

Your Fleet vs. Winter: How to Beat Bad Weather By Jill Snyder, Compliance Expert, Zonar

Every winter, a plethora of articles appear with helpful tips for drivers on staying safe on the roads during inclement weather. These tips and tricks can save lives and provide a reminder for drivers to be extra vigilant during this time. But fleet managers also have a responsibility to provide both operators and vehicles with the tools and solutions they need to help stack the odds in their favor against the effects of frigid temperatures, torrential rain and darker days. As someone who helped develop safety standards for trucking organizations and the state of Washington, I’ve witnessed the tragic impact of the weather on truck drivers. In fact, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, 21% of vehicle crashes are adverse-weather-related. Before clearing your fleets to get on the roads this winter, consider some of these preventive measures – ranging from high tech to basic behavioral shifts – to help keep your fleet safe throughout the winter months.

Don’t Shy Away from Tech

Hopefully, the electronic logging device (ELD) mandate has helped you and your operators become more comfortable with using technology for streamlining time-consuming processes like logging hours of service or helping with pre- and post-trip inspections. Over the past few years, the use of dashcams has become a more common way to ensure drivers stay safe. Not only do these devices help fleet managers get a better sense of what’s going on while on the road, but they can also provide liability protection against litigation. From my experience, the most important use of in-cab cameras is the coaching that results from the information captured. Fleet managers can help their drivers recognize and

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correct unsafe behaviors while also rewarding safe behaviors behind the wheel. Behavioral changes can take place over a relatively short amount of time; fleet managers that start to use in-cab cameras before winter starts can help their operators make positive changes now that could help decrease the chance for accidents during the most accident-prone time of the year.

Winterize Trucks and Drivers

Accidents take place even during warm weather months so making sure drivers are prepared and vehicles are in good working order is even more crucial in the winter. Inspections can become a matter of life or death. Issues like poor tire inflation (especially in very cold temperatures), broken wipers and drained batteries can not only cause delays and loss of time and money, but can inflict serious injuries. Sometimes though, accidents are unavoidable despite driving a vehicle in good working order, so make sure drivers have what they need on hand if they find themselves stuck in place for a lengthy amount of time. While there some pre-made kits that are easy to pack into trucks, consider where a driver’s route may take them. Anticipate the chance that a driver may need to pull over and remain in his or her vehicle overnight for safety reasons. In snowier climates, they may need more provisions like heavier blankets or outerwear, thick gloves and socks, a portable ruggedized heater and a foldable shovel. In rainy or heavily wooded areas, drivers may need more bright lights, waterproof clothing and sleeping bag and rainboots. No matter what, all safety kits should include bottled water and nonperishable food, flashlights, batteries and tools, such as screwdrivers, pliers and a box knife.

Train for Accidents

Perhaps the best way for drivers to prepare for an accident is to experience being in a simulated accident. Drivers that know what to do when maneuvering over ice, snow drifts or slippery roads are more likely to stay calm when an incident occurs. Budget and time allowing, fleet managers should consider investing in workshops or training schools that can realistically simulate various driving conditions for large vehicles or other scenarios. The muscle memory built during these simulations can help prompt anyone behind the wheel to take the appropriate defensive actions in a real-life situation – potentially helping to avoid injuries and even fatalities. There are also some basic tips and tricks for fleet managers to better prepare their drivers for dangerous conditions and bad weather. For example: • Partner with law enforcement to ensure your fleet is made aware of any anticipated road closures and driving condition alerts for commercial vehicles • Law enforcement can also keep your fleet apprised of what months they will be required to carry chains. • Make sure winter vehicle preparation is part of your year-round maintenance plan. This will help keep your drivers on the road. • Seek to understand the weather your fleet is likely to encounter: •K now what the typical snowfall for the year is for your drivers’ routes • Know what the routes’ typical temperature ranges are for the year • Know if meteorologists are predicting a hard winter With some preparation and a strategic mix of technology and training, managers can help ensure the safety of their fleets before we get too far into winter. n


INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

UPS Inducts 1,582 Drivers Into Its Circle Of Honor UPS inducted 1,582 drivers into its elite Circle of Honor, raising to 10,504 the number of drivers who have not had an avoidable accident for 25 years or more. Collectively, the 10,504 drivers have logged 14 billion miles and achieved more than 257,221 years of safe driving throughout their careers. That’s enough miles to circle the earth at the equator 562,000 times or make 200 roundtrips to Mars. The number of active Circle of Honor drivers is the most in company history and includes 83 new members from Canada, the U.K., France, Germany and the Netherlands. UPS’s longest-tenured safe driver is Livonia, Michigan, package car driver Tom Camp, who has now driven for more than half a century – 55 years – and delivered more than 5 million packages without an accident. Camp was honored for being the company’s longest-tenured safe driver at a ceremony in October 2017. Those in attendance included UPS Chairman and CEO David Abney, political leaders from the Michigan House and Senate, as well as the mayor of Livonia, who declared Oct. 18 as Tom Camp Day in Livonia. The company refurbished a 1960s-era delivery truck in Camp’s honor and christened it the Tom Camp Special, complete with pin striping and prominent “55” badging. “Tom Camp’s 55-plus years of safe driving at UPS is an astonishing feat and a testament to the impact of driver education programs,” said Chris Spear, president and CEO of the American Trucking Associations. “Smart decision making on the road reduces the rate of accidents and keeps both pedestrians and other drivers safe. We applaud Tom for his lifelong commitment to safety, as well as his service to this country as a marine.” Of all Circle of Honor members, 739 have been accident-free for 35 or more years, with 126 of those having driven more than 40 years without an accident. Thirteen drivers have eclipsed the 45-year safe driving mark. This year, 38 new inductees are women and 50 have joined the ranks of those with more than 30 years of safe driving. A total of 234 women are in the Circle of Honor.

“Congratulations on 25 years and more of safe driving and many thanks for helping make our roads safer for everyone,” said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elaine L. Chao. UPS began recognizing its safe drivers in 1923. Founder Jim Casey honored the company’s first five-year safe driver, Ray McCue, in 1928. The company’s 127,000 small-package drivers worldwide are among the safest on the roads, logging more than 3 billion miles per year and delivering nearly 5 billion packages annually. “Our group of elite drivers continues to expand around the world,” said Teri McClure, chief human resources officer and senior vice president, global human resources and labor. “Congratulations to our newest inductees in France, the U.K., and the Netherlands, and congratulations to Tom Camp for his amazing achievement. We can all learn something from these men and women who have set the standard for safety, service and longevity.” Before ever making a delivery, all UPS drivers are taught safe driving methods through the company’s defensive driving platform. The training continues throughout their careers. The company’s UPS Integrad® training school for delivery drivers and Driver Trainer School for tractor-trailer instructors boast some of the industry’s most rigorous safety training. Virtual reality technology is now being used at Integrad sites across the country to give students a chance to learn using the most upto-date methods available.

Driver Jeanne Wilson and Her Vehicle Pass Inspection During 2019 International Roadcheck By Angie Petry, Safety Coordinator, Haggerty Logistics Inc.

Congratulations to driver Jeannie Wilson. She was inspected on June 4, during 2019 International Roadcheck, which was June 4-6, with no violations. Wilson received CVSA decals for both pieces of her equipment. This is her second year in a row being inspected during International Roadcheck and her second year in a row passing inspection. The 37-step North American Standard Level I Inspection includes brake systems; cargo securement; coupling devices; driveline/driveshaft; driver’s seat (missing); exhaust systems; frames; fuel systems; lighting devices (headlamps, tail lamps, stop lamps, turn signals and lamps/flags on projecting loads); steering mechanisms; suspensions; tires; van and open-top trailer bodies; wheels, rims and hubs; windshield wipers; the driver’s operating credentials; appropriate certificates; record of duty status; vehicle inspection report(s); seat belt usage; alcohol and/or drug impairment; sickness or fatigue and rear impact guards.

UPS extends its safe driving expertise to the communities it serves through UPS Road Code® training, a teen safe driving program available in the United States and internationally. Taught by UPS volunteers and based on the company’s safe-driving methods, the program is available to teens between the ages of 13 and 18. To date, more than 47,000 teenagers have participated. The program has been extended to Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, the U.K. and the United Arab Emirates. UPS Road Code training is offered in the U.S., in conjunction with the Boys & Girls Clubs of America, and overseas in six countries with various youth development organizations. The UPS Foundation has contributed $16.6 million to the UPS Road Code program since its inception. n

THIRD QUARTER 2019

37


INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVES

Increasing Marijuana Legalization and Use Raises Concerns for Trucking By Steve Vaughn, Vice President of Field Operations, PrePass Safety Alliance

With more states legalizing both recreational and medical marijuana, professional truck drivers are more likely to be sharing the roadway with car drivers operating under the influence of marijuana. That’s according to the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) and its recently released study “Marijuana Legalization and Impaired Driving Solutions for Protecting our Roadways.”

procedures are set out in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 49, Part 382 and Part 40. Commercial drivers can be tested in the following circumstances:

With 31 states legalizing medical marijuana, 10 states plus the District of Columbia legalizing recreational use, plus nationwide legalization in Canada for recreational use and Mexico for medical use, ATRI found that marijuanainduced driving under the influence (DUI) is a growing safety concern.

• Reasonable suspicion

In 2016, more than 28% of traffic fatality crashes involved at least one driver who was operating a vehicle under the influence of alcohol. How many were also driving under the influence of pot, and how many are now on the road under the influence of marijuana, is the focus of the evolving science of marijuana management. The legalization trends have law enforcement and safety experts expressing justified concerns and seeking answers. The ATRI report explores what is known and unknown about detecting marijuana use. While ATRI’s concern is for the overall safety on our roadways, the report is both a reminder and a warning to law enforcement and the trucking community.

Marijuana and Federal Law

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) regulates truck driver use and testing for marijuana and other drugs. Federal drug testing includes mixtures and synthetic versions. The testing protocols and

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• Pre-employment screening • Post-accident (when a fatality, injury or vehicle tow-away is involved) • Random testing • Return-to-duty and follow-up, following a positive test In each of these instances, the tests will reveal if there is the presence of marijuana. If the level is above the regulated cutoff points, the driver will legally have failed the drug test, irrespective of whether the driver was “inebriated” at the time the test samples were taken. While states’ laws are mixed as to whether marijuana use by a driver is a per se violation or true intoxication has to be proven, federal law is clear: it tests for marijuana presence above a certain level. And federal law preempts state and local laws. Professional drivers are held to a professional standard – something to remember, as marijuana use remains detectable for seven days after use on average. Drivers may also test positive following the use of CBD oil (cannabidiol). Recently, a driver sued the manufacturer of a CBD oil after testing positive and losing his job. The CBD manufacturer had claimed that all traces of THC (tetrahydrocannabinol, the marijuana intoxicant) had been removed from its product. On the horizon at FMCSA is the federal Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) Drug and

Alcohol Clearinghouse. With launch expected in early 2020, the clearinghouse will contain the results of federal drug tests for five years or after a driver completes a return-to-duty test, whichever is later. Motor carriers will be able to query the clearinghouse to see whether a potential hire has a record of positive tests.

Marijuana and Highway Safety

The ATRI report notes younger drivers are the most likely to believe that marijuana intoxication does not impair driving, and consequently they are more likely to engage in its use and continue to drive. But studies clearly demonstrate that marijuana does impair recognition and physical reactions key to safe driving: • Attention: Safe driving requires the reception, distinguishing and prioritization of numerous stimuli – from road signs to other drivers to pavement conditions. Marijuana reduces the ability of drivers to juggle more than one thing at once. • Reaction: Being “mellow” may limit a driver’s sense of aggravation, but it also slows reaction times. • Lane position: A driver’s ability to steadily control the vehicle is impaired by marijuana intoxication. This is often seen by movement within a lane. A marijuana-intoxicated driver may attempt to compensate for his slower reactions and impaired control by increasing his following distance from other vehicles – which, in turn, can introduce unexpectedly slower vehicles into the traffic stream. All these shortcomings are only intensified if the driver also drinks alcohol while using marijuana. n


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

Department of Energy Publishes Interpretation on High-Level Radioactive Waste The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sent a supplemental notice to the Federal Register that provides the public with its interpretation of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), informed by more than 5,000 public comments. For decades, DOE has managed nearly all reprocessing waste streams as HLW regardless of radioactivity. This one-size-fits-all approach has led to decades of delay, cost billions of dollars and left the waste trapped in DOE facilities in South Carolina, Washington and Idaho without a permanent disposal solution. “Recognizing this failure, this administration is proposing a responsible, results-driven solution that will finally open potential avenues for the safe treatment and removal of the lower level waste currently housed in three states,” said U.S. Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar. “DOE is going to analyze each waste stream and manage it in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards, with the goal of getting the lower-level waste out of these states without sacrificing public safety.” Going forward, DOE’s interpretation is that reprocessing waste streams are defined by their characteristics, not just how they were made. With this new interpretation, DOE will pursue new avenues for the responsible and

safe treatment and removal of lower-level waste that has been languishing at DOE sites, while protecting the environment and the health and safety of local communities. This interpretation does not change or revise any current policies, legal requirements, permits or agreements. Decisions about whether and how this interpretation of HLW will apply to existing wastes and whether such wastes may be disposed of as non-HLW will be the subject of subsequent actions. Any actions to implement the HLW interpretation will be done on a site-specific basis with appropriate engagement with affected stakeholders. DOE is also issuing a separate Federal Register notice initiating a National Environmental Policy Act analysis to determine the potential environmental impacts of the disposal of a Savannah River Site reprocessing waste stream as non-HLW at a commercial disposal facility licensed to receive low-level radioactive waste. The department will continue to work with the affected local communities on this analysis and the path forward for cleanup at Savannah River.

About ‘RAD Inspection News’

‘RAD Inspection News’ features news and other stories pertaining to the North American Standard Level VI Inspection Program for transuranic waste and highway route controlled quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive material. This inspection is for select radiological shipments that include enhancements to the North American Standard Level I Inspection Program and the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria with added radiological requirements for transuranic waste and HRCQ of radioactive material. Learn more about the Level VI Inspection Program at www.cvsa.org. ‘RAD Inspection News’ is made possible under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. Since January 2007, it has run as a section inside CVSA’s “Guardian.” n

For more information on HLW and DOE’s interpretation, visit www.energy.gov/em/ high-level-radioactive-waste-hlwinterpretation. n

Photo by Cindy Kubovic, Aiken Standard.

THIRD QUARTER 2019

39


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

2019 IAEM Annual Conference and EMEX Expo NOVEMBER 15-20 SAVANNAH, GEORGIA

Join CVSA’s 2019 Level VI Public Outreach Team at the 2019 International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM) Annual Conference and EMEX Expo, which will take place Nov. 15-20 in Savannah, Georgia. IAEM is a non-profit educational organization dedicated to promoting the principles of emergency management and representing those professionals whose goals are saving lives and protecting property and the environment during emergencies and disasters. IAEM’s mission is to advance the profession by promoting the principles of emergency management; serve its members by providing information, networking and professional development opportunities; and advance the emergency management profession. For more information on the conference and expo and to register, visit www.iaemconference.info/2019. n

CVSA Level VI Public Outreach Program Featured at Two Events in June Level VI Public Outreach Coordinator Larry Stern attended the 2019 Decommissioning Strategy Forum in Nashville, Tennessee, June 16-19, 2019. More than 300 conference attendees had the opportunity to review CVSA’s Level VI Inspection Program. Director of Level VI Inspection Program Carlisle Smith attended the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Transportation Stakeholders Forum in Arlington, Virginia, June 10-13, 2019. Smith gave a Level VI Inspection Program update to the Southern States Energy Board’s Radioactive Materials Committee and participated in the Council of State Governments Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee. Smith

As part of the CVSA’s cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carlsbad Field Office, CVSA conducted two Level VI Inspection Program peer reviews this year. A peer review was conducted on the Maryland State Patrol and Maryland Department of Environment’s Level VI Inspection Program in July. And a peer review was conducted at the Texas Department of Public Safety this past May.

A program peer review covers the following topics: • State program policies and statutes

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During the conference, presentations were given on topics such as the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum management plan, rail routing of spent nucleal fuel, Nuclear Regulatory Commission transportation safety and security, and the Office of Secure Transportation’s mission, to name a few. n

CVSA Conducts Peer Reviews on Level VI Inspection Programs

Any CVSA member jurisdiction that maintains a Level VI Inspection Program can be subject to a peer review. These are not an audit of a member’s Level VI Inspection Program to find fault or discrepancies. Rather, the purpose of the peer review is to identify and share best practices.

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has been asked to participate in an ad-hoc working group tasked with reviewing the possibilities of creating rail inspection procedures on the shipment of spent nuclear fuel on the railway akin to Level VI Inspection procedures for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel on our roadways.

• Organizational implementation and relationships • Inspector training and manpower • Types, locations and number of inspections • Permits, notification and scheduling • Conduct of inspections – inspection procedures and duration • Violations, enforcement and penalties • Inspection equipment • Tracking and managing information • Public perceptions and program outreach • Sharing lessons learned and best practices To view an archive of peer review reports, visit www./cvsa.org/inspections/inspections, select “Level VI Inspection,” click on “News, Updates and Reports” and choose “CVSA/ WIPP Updates and Reports.” n


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

CVSA Holds Level VI Inspection Classes 174 and 175 The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) hosted Level VI Inspection Certification Class 174 at the Mississippi Emergency Management Agencies Operation Center in Pearl, Mississippi, April 15-18, 2019. Fourteen MDOT inspectors attended the class. CVSA Director of Level VI Program Carlisle Smith and Level VI National Instructors Rob Rohr (Public Utilities Commission of Ohio) and Rion Stann (Pennsylvania State Police) provided the classroom instruction. Level VI Inspection Certification Class 175 was held May 13-16, 2019, in Golden, Colorado, at the Colorado State Patrol’s Motor Carrier Training Building on its academy grounds. Participating inspectors were from the Wyoming Highway Patrol, Idaho State Police, Colorado State Patrol and Colorado State Patrol Port of Entry. Instruction was provided by Level VI National Instructors Juel Leus (Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration), Adam Roha (California Highway Patrol) and Carlisle Smith (CVSA). n

Rion Stann and Rob Rohr provide instruction on inspecting packages of radioactive materials.

Mississippi DOT inspectors complete one of their work projects.

2019 Level VI Inspection Certification Training Courses CVSA, under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, offers Level VI certification courses on inspecting motor carriers and drivers transporting transuranic waste shipments and highway route controlled quantities (HRCQ) of radioactive material. This Level VI training is offered to jurisdictional inspectors who meet the prerequisite of obtaining CVSA Level I and hazardous materials certification. If you would like to attend any of the below listed Level VI Inspection certification courses, contact CVSA Director of Level VI Inspection Program Carlisle Smith at carlisles@cvsa.org or 301-830-6147. n

OCT. 7-10

UNION GAP, WASHINGTON Adam Roha provides instruction on inspecting the TRUPACT II shipping containers.

NOV. 4-7

AUSTIN, TEXAS

M ARK YOUR CALENDAR: TRAIN THE TRAINER COURSE

Feb. 25-27, 2020 • Little Rock, Arkansas

DEC. 2-5

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA

The next Train the Trainer Course will be held in Little Rock, Arkansas, Feb. 25-27, 2020. Watch for the course announcement later this fall. THIRD QUARTER 2019

41


RAD INSPECTION NEWS

Level VI Roadside Inspections (2019 - Fiscal) LEVEL VI INSPECTIONS

Federal

State

Total

% of Total

Number of Level VI Inspections

0

667

667

100%

Point of Origin

0

342

342

51.27%

En Route

0

325

325

48.73%

Point of Destination

0

0

0

0%

Unknown Location

0

0

0

0%

Level VI Inspections with No Violations

0

656

656

98.35%

Level VI Inspections with Violations

0

11

11

1.65%

0

2

2

0.30%

Level VI Inspections with Out-of-Service Conditions

Level VI Roadside Inspection Violations (2019 - Fiscal) Violation Code

Violation Description

# of Violations

% of Total Violations

# of OOS Violations

OOS %

393.45D

Brake Connections with Leaks or Constrictions

2

2

13.33%

0

0%

393.48A

Inoperative/Defective Brakes

2

2

13.33%

1

50%

396.3A1

Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of Parts and Accessories

2

2

13.33%

1

50%

393.53B

CMV Manufactured After 10/19/94 Has an Automatic Airbrake Adjustment System that Fails to Compensate for Wear

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.47E

Clamp or Roto Type Brake Out-Of-Adjustment

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

395.3A2 PROP

Driving Beyond 14-Hour Duty Period (Property-Carrying Vehicle)

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.201A

Frame Cracked/Loose/Sagging/Broken

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.9A

Inoperative Required Lamps

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

172.301A1

No Proper Shipping Name and/or ID# Marking on Non-Bulk Package

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.95A

No/Discharged/Unsecured Fire Extinguisher

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.75A3

Tire-Flat and/or Audible Air Leak

1

1

6.67%

1

100%

1

1

6.67%

0

0%

393.60EWS Windshield - Obstructed

42

# of Inspections

GUARDIAN


CVSA LEADERSHIP BOARD OF DIRECTORS REGION PRESIDENTS Region I Sgt. Scott Dorrler New Jersey State Police

REGION VICE PRESIDENTS Region I Sgt. Eric Bergquist Maine State Police

Region II Lt. Allen England Tennessee Highway Patrol

Region II Capt. Adrian Kelleher Louisiana State Police

SECRETARY Capt. John Broers South Dakota Highway Patrol

Region III Capt. John Hahn Colorado State Patrol

Region III Maj. Jon E. Smithers Indiana State Police

PAST PRESIDENTS Deputy Chief Mark Savage Colorado State Patrol

Region IV Lt. Daniel Wyrick Wyoming Highway Patrol

Region IV Maj. Russ Christoferson Montana Department of Transportation

Buzzy France Maryland State Police

Region V Richard Roberts British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

Region V Sean Mustatia Saskatchewan Ministry of Highways and Infrastructure

ASSOCIATE MEMBER PRESIDENT Dave Schofield Oldcastle Materials

Information Systems Committee Holly Skaar Idaho State Police

ASSOCIATE MEMBER VICE PRESIDENT Stephanie Kendall CDL Consultants

Passenger Carrier Committee Tpr. William Alarcon New Jersey State Police

PROGRAM CHAIRS Cooperative Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development Phillip Haskins Public Utilities Commission of Ohio

COMMITTEE CHAIRS Crash Data and Investigation Standards Committee Lt. Thomas Fitzgerald Massachusetts State Police

Policy and Regulatory Affairs Committee Col. Leroy Taylor South Carolina Department of Public Safety

Driver-Traffic Enforcement Committee Capt. Chris Barr Indiana State Police

Size and Weight Committee Maj. Jeremy “Chris” Nordloh Texas Department of Public Safety

PRESIDENT Chief Jay Thompson Arkansas Highway Police VICE PRESIDENT Sgt. John Samis Delaware State Police

Lt. Donald Bridge, Jr. Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles

LOCAL PRESIDENT Ofc. Jason Belz Arlington (Texas) Police Department LOCAL VICE PRESIDENT Ofc. Thomas Mrozinski, Jr. Frisco (Texas) Police Department

NON-VOTING LEADERSHIP

Enforcement and Industry Modernization Committee Chief Derek Barrs Florida Highway Patrol Hazardous Materials Committee Sgt. Brad Wagner Nebraska State Patrol

Training Committee Lt. Ron Jenkins Oklahoma Highway Patrol Vehicle Committee Tpr. John Sova North Dakota Highway Patrol

International Driver Excellence Award Brett Graves K.L. Breeden and Sons LLC International Roadcheck Maj. Michael Forman Mississippi Department of Transportation

Operation Safe Driver Chief David Lorenzen Iowa Department of Transportation Operation Airbrake Capt. Scott Hanson Idaho State Police Shelley Conklin Landstar Transportation Logistics PBBT Users Lt. Joseph Greene Kansas Highway Patrol

Level VI Inspection M/Sgt. Todd Armstrong Illinois State Police North American Cargo Securement Harmonization Public Forum Tpr. Jeremy Disbrow Arizona Department of Public Safety North American Inspectors Championship Richard Roberts British Columbia Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure

THIRD QUARTER 2019

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CVSA SPONSORS PREMIER

DIAMOND

Black Pantone 109

PLATINUM

GOLD

44

GUARDIAN


CVSA SPONSORS SILVER Airgas American Bus Association American Pyrotechnics Association Austin Powder Company Brake Tech Tools Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators Cargo Transporters Inc. FleetUp Geotab Inc.

Great West Casualty Company Hendrickson International Society for Weigh in Motion JNJ Express Inc. Kenan Advantage Group Inc. MANCOMM Inc. Mississippi Trucking Association Platform Science Schlumberger Swift Transportation Company

Sysco Corporation Techni-Com Inc. Transportation Compliance Safety Group United Motorcoach Association US Ecology Inc. Usher Transport Walmart Werner Enterprises Inc.

BRONZE

Admiral Transport Corporation Anderson Trucking Service Inc. Arkansas Trucking Association Asplundh Tree Expert DATTCO Inc. Direct ChassisLink Inc. FoxFury LLC Greatwide Truckload Management

Greyhound Lines Inc. Groendyke Transport Inc. Intelligent Imaging Systems Inc. Intercomp Company Jade Transportation Services J.E.B. Environmental Services LLC Kistler Instrument Corporation Loadometer Corporation

Lytx METTLER TOLEDO Nordion PITT OHIO Specialized Carriers & Rigging Association Tramec Sloan LLC Western Express Inc. WorkforceQA

FRIENDS OF CVSA American Coatings Association Inc. Cassidy’s Transfer & Storage Ltd. Commercial Vehicle Safety Associates of Florida Inc. Envirun Inc.

Greg Neylon Grocery Haulers Inc. Horizon Freight System Inc./Kaplan Trucking Co. Institute of Makers of Explosives Link Engineering Company

Missouri Trucking Association Praxair Inc. Quality Carriers Inc. Transportation Compliance Services Western States Trucking Association

NEW CVSA ASSOCIATE MEMBERS As of June 24, 2019 RST Industries Ltd. Alabama Motor Express Barnes Transportation Services CayCan Safety Consulting Ltd. Cumberland Farms Hunting Titan

Industrial Bus Lines Inc./All Aboard America Miller Pipeline LLC Rosenfeld Injury Lawyers LLC Tracknstop Ward Trucking

THIRD QUARTER 2019

45


6303 Ivy Lane, Suite 310 Greenbelt, MD 20770-6319

2020 COHMED CONFERENCE JAN. 27-31, 2020

Louisville, Kentucky Presented by the Cooperative Hazardous Materials Enforcement Development (COHMED) Program, the COHMED Conference is a focused, one-of-a-kind event for individuals involved in the regulation, enforcement and safety of transporting hazardous materials and dangerous goods. For more information, visit www.cvsa.org/eventpage/events/cohmed-conference


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