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CENTURY VILLAGE EAST

REPORTER

Board of Directors of COOCVE Meets THIRD TUESDAY of the Month at 9:30 a.m. in the Party Room

Official Monthly News/Magazine of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida

JANUARY 2013

SECTION A, 44 PAGES

VOLUME 36, NUMBER 04

From the President

By CHARLES K. PARNESS, President/ COOCVE This community acknowledges the great effort and accomplishments of COOCVE President Steven Fine. As his replacement, I will do my best to continue to work in the best interests of the CVE residents. I would also like to congratulate the election by affirmation of the three new members of the Recreation Committee – Rita Pickar, Don Kaplan and Susan Hanley. Congratulations are also extended to the seven duly elected members of the Master Management Board – Dan Glickman, Alan Schacter,

Jules Kesselman, Danielle Lobono and Dick Ciocca, each for a three year term, and Bill Epstein and Jeff Chester for a one year term. We will be forming the COOCVE committees for 2013. These are the Civic and Cultural, Insurance, Grievance, Audit, Advisory, Budget & Finance, Bylaws and the Contract Negotiating committees. We need volunteers to make these committees function. Anyone, including those on the 2012 committees who wish to volunteer for 2013, please signin at the COOCVE office.

In This Issue 





Condo News

Features

■ Volunteers wanted for new COOCVE standing Committees now forming for 2013. Sign up at office. p. 1A

■ Verdi’s Opera La Traviata by the Palm Beach Opera Company at Kravis Center. p. 18B

■ COOCVE BOD elects new members to Master Management Board. p. 3A ■ Seacrest’s Steve Kittredge responds to letter regarding their access to homeowners bank accounts. p. 13A ■ Grandparents do have rights and can seek both visitation and custody, explains Pat Murphy, COOCVE and Master Management Corporate Counsel. p. 29A

■ Temple B’nai Shalom celebrates Chanukah The Festival of Lights. p. 9B ■ Canadian Club enjoys food at First official get-together brunch of the season. p. 9B ■ Nature Club treated to new recently opened Sea Tanks at Gumbo Limbo. p. 25A

■ S.W. 10th Street getting facelift from Powerline Road to East Newport Center Drive. p. 33A

■ Try to minimize your exposure to BPA (Bisphenol A) suggests Norma Locker. p. 7B

■ Single Stream Program will be implemented during the beginning of 2013. p. 10A

■ Shirley Ravish finds a cure for insomnia. p. 35A

■ Color plays a vitally important role in the ■ Retooled Master world we live exManagement Board elects officers for 2013. plains Reporter’s Betty p. 12A Schwartz. p. 16B

SEMINAR SCHEDULE The COOCVE Advisory Committee is sponsoring an educational seminar. The seminar is free, and we urge anyone interested to sign up. The sign-up sheets are available at the Clubhouse Staff Office and at the COOCVE office. This seminar will be held in the Clubhouse, Party Room. The seminar will be conducted by Bill and Susan Raphan, formerly of the Ombudsman’s office, and now of Katzman, Garfinkel & Berger on Thursday, January 17, 2013 from 1 – 3 p.m. “40 YEAR BUILDING SAFETY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION.” This is an informational review of the 40 year inspection and recertification program in Broward County. This should be of significant importance to all, because in the next few years every building in CVE

will be at or near 40 years old. Do not miss this seminar. As most of you know, a condo association is marked by many rules and regulations. In each building we share “common areas” and rules are essential in preventing anarchy and chaos. The key people in your building for seeing that these rules are enforced are your Board of Directors. Many residents are elected to their condo boards and while most of these volunteers perform their duties in an excellent manner, this cannot be said for everyone. When you join an organization, you are expected to live by their rules. Whether or not it is a formal declaration, it is always implied. All condo units in Florida come under the Florida 718 Condo Statutes. Under these regulations, [Section 718.112(2) (d)3], within 90 days of being elected, each and every member of every condo board must complete a certification form. This can be obtained by attending a sanctioned course or seminar that provides this certification. However, if you cannot attend a course, certification can be accomplished by a board member filling out the Condominium Association Board Member Certification Form. This form

(available at the COOCVE office) states that your name “... certify that I have read the association’s declaration of condominium, articles of incorporation, bylaws, and current written policies and will work to uphold such documents and policies to the best of my abilities and …” The key element is not to read the documents but “work to uphold such documents.” The dictionary defines the word obligation as something by which a person is bound or obliged to do certain things, and which arises out of a sense of duty or results from custom, law, etc. That is your duty, your obligation as board members – an obligation to the association. If you feel no obligation, then why serve? And this means all the rules – not only those you like. I am sure if everyone – Board members and other residents follow their association’s rules, life in CVE will be more enjoyable for all. As a final note, my office and those of the COOCVE Vice-President and volunteers are open to all residents and condo associations. Our office hours are Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Voting Results ~ The Count is in Election Held: December 18, 2012 Master Management Dan Glickman 134* Alan Schachter 122* Jules Kesselman 111* Danielle LoBono 101* Dick Ciocca 95* Bill Epstein 77** Jeff Chester 67** Barry Kimbal 39 *Winner three year term **Winner one year term

Recreation Committee Susan B. Hanley Don Kaplan Rita Pikar All winners by acclimation, to serve two year term.

January 21st


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JANUARY 2013

You’ve tried the rest…now use THE BEST…

CenturyVillage Real Estate, Inc. ®

We are the only, ON-SITE Real Estate Broker INSIDE the community & we are conveniently located at 250 Century Boulevard. There is no other firm whose 100% efforts & energies are dedicated exclusively to Century Village,® please let us show you the Century Village® Real Estate, Inc. DIFFERENCE! Century Village® Real Estate, Inc. has hundreds of properties available inc l u d i n g : 1 Bed / 1 Bath – Garden Apt Westbury G 1st flr, new appliances, move in condition, walk to pool and plaza Ventnor F Cozy, ready to move into, 2nd floor, next to pool, priced for quick sale Grantham A One bedroom, 2 full bath luxury, rear unit, spectacular water view Lyndhurst G One bedroom, great location, needs TLC, close Clubhouse Durham A Desirable building, panoramic lake view, across from Clubhouse, 1st floor Oakridge R Cozy one bedroom, partially furnished, very clean unit Harwood B Wood and tile floors Harwood G 1st floor, water view, fixer upper, rentable building Durham H First floor, laminate and wood flrs thru-out, close to pool and Clubhouse

$25,500.00 $29,500.00 $49,900.00 $25,000.00 $45,000.00 $23,000.00 $29,900.00 $27,500.00 $26,000.00

1 Bed / 1.5 Baths Cambridge D Large bedroom, clean, relax on large patio $48,000.00 Cambridge A Nice, partially furnished, 2nd floor, clean $45,000.00 Prescott B Cottage like setting, encl patio, newer appliance, bldg has lift $32,500.00 Farnham D 2nd floor, lift in building, fully furnished, enclosed patio, garden view $29,900.00 Harwood E Water view, fully furnished, move in condition, enclosed patio $34,000.00 Farnham E Corner, 2nd flr, fully furn, lift in building, patio has hurricane shutters $39,000.00 Harwood E Water view, all tile, newer a/c, fully furnished, move in condition $39,900.00 Lyndhurst G Great location, Location, Corner unit, central air, new air handler, next to pool $39,900.00 $47,000.00 Swansea B 3rd floor unit, close to tennis, pool and walk to plaza Newport U First floor, clean, carpet, water view, patio has exist door to enjoy water view $36,900.00 Cambridge B Remodeled, new a/c as of 2011, furnished in a Cape Cod décor $59,900.00 $45,000.00 Harwood D Lovely, clean, fully furnished, move in condition $32,000.00 Harwood E One bedroom deluxe with beautiful lake view, furnished, newer a/c Upminster C Nicely furnished, close to plaza, pool, tennis and Clubhouse $33,000.00 Durham S First flr, corner, central a/c, furnished, lake view, fabulous location $34,900.00 Farnham B Corner, new central a/c, furnished, lake view, fabulous location $39,500.00 Upminster B Freshly painted, new a/c in living room, newer appliances, close to plaza $32,900.00 Westbury J Corner, furnished, updated kitchen, new stall shower, laminate and carpet $44,000.00 Tilford L 1st flr, corner, water view, tiled and carpet, quiet location $35,900.00 Upminster F Corner, clean & bright, tile, encl patio, freshly painted, walk to pool & tennis $35,000.00 Prescott N 2nd floor, on water, carpet throughout, beautifully furn, enclosed patio $39,900.00 Berkshire B 3rd floor, walk to club & plaza, stall shower, fantastic view from patio $57,000.00 Durham H Corner, first floor, updated kitchen, all tile, enclosed patio, close to Clubhouse $49,900.00 Harwood D 3rd flr, wonderful lake view, enclosed patio, all furnished, bldg claims rentable $35,900.00 Newport M 1st flr, new refurbished, newly painted, tiled and carpeted, close to pool & tennis $34,900.00 Harwood E Large lake view, absolutely lovely, all tile, encl patio, must see $38,900.00 Ashby D All tile, fully furnished, beautiful lake view, close to pools and tennis $49,900.00 Cambridge F Great water view, encl patio, furnished, great location, close to Clubhouse $44,900.00 $33,900.00 Newport U Water view, tiled, enclosed patio, priced to sell quickly Cambridge A Stall Shower, encl patio, tile and carpet, walking distance to Century Plaza $39,900.00 Swansea A Great location, close to pool, plaza, and tennis, large galley kitchen $37,500.00 Cambridge C 2nd floor, new kitchen, updated bathrooms, encl patio, furnished $65,000.00 Newport H Ground floor, water view, tile thru-out, new a/c, walk to pool $44,900.00 $52,850.00 Ashby D Water view, furnished, 4th floor, enclosed patio, close to pool Upminster M Move in condition, totally renovated, close to pool, walk to Century Plaza $39,900.00 Harwood E Spectacular water view, 4th floor $59,000.00 Westbury E 2nd floor, all updated, beautiful water view $36,900.00 Cambridge A Most expensive upgraded unit, the very vest we have to offer $85,000.00 $29,900.00 Markham F Must see to appreciate, close to pool Newport U Enclosed patio, water view, close to pool and tennis $33,000.00 Oakridge M Corner, fully furnished, ceramic tile thru-out, rentable building $39,900.00 Markham J 1st floor, corner, porcelain tile thru-out, furnished $44,900.00 Cambridge B 1st floor, beautiful water view, fully furnished, move in condition $42,800.00 Ventnor J 1st floor, corner, across from pool, clean $43,000.00 2 Bed / 1.5 Baths Newport S 2nd flr, water view, tile & carpet, furn, stall shower, encl patio $45,000.00 Ventnor M Corner, 1st flr, porcelain tile, screened patio, hurricane roll-ups, partially furn $49,500.00 Farnham M Furnished, Sunny condo, remodeled patio with impacted windows, tile floors $45,000.00

Fo l lo w u s o n :

Harwood E Water view, galley kitchen, tile and carpet, newer a/c, needs some TLC $49,900.00 Swansea B 4th flr, side by side fridge, newer appliances, encl patio, walk to plaza $47,000.00 Harwood D Water view, ½ bath converted, encl patio, bldg claims rentable at this time $57,500.00 Newport Q Water view, fully furnished, move in condition, motivated seller $130,000.00 Oakridge P Corner, garden, newer refrigerator, great location, 2nd flr, walk to pool $38,900.00 Harwood D Deluxe two bedroom, beautiful lake view, galley kitchen, 1000 SqFt $41,900.00 Ventnor R Quiet area, close to pool, priced to sell $34,900.00 Grantham F Location! Mint condition! Remodeled condo, white tile, new stall shower $79,900.00 Newport U Mint condition, completely renovated kitchen, remodeled bathrooms $59,900.00 Markham E Water view, encl patio, tile, carpet, & wood, very clean, quiet neighbor hood $47,900.00 Harwood J Corner unit, Hurricane shutters on patio, bright and airy $43,900.00 Farnham G Quiet area, enclosed patio, furnished, Stall shower only, garden view $34,800.00 Grantham F Beautiful, clean, updated, desirable building, walk to Clubhouse $79,500.00 Tilford X Corner, water view, first flr, renovated master bath, stall shower, encl patio $54,900.00 Upminster E Tile and carpet, newer a/c system, lift in bldg, close to pool and plaza $33,900.00 Harwood D Water view, 2nd bath converted to full bath, remodeled kitchen and baths $69,900.00 Markham R Location, corner, 1st flr, encl patio, tile and carpet, building claims rentable $51,000.00 Tilford Q Bright, airy, furnished, first flr, all tile, new appliances, ready to move in $52,500.00 $70,900.00 Tilford A Water view, totally updated, new furniture, steps to pool & tennis Markham H Corner, first floor, tile and carpet, furnished, good location $54,500.00 Newport H Water View, ready to move in, galley kitchen, new appliances, new a/c $64,500.00 Farnham H First floor, corner, all tile, newer kitchen, fully furnished, walk to tennis $56,000.00 Upminster D 2 BD, best value for the money, pergo flrs, tiled counter top, flat top range $42,900.00 $65,900.00 Cambridge B Beautiful wrap around water view, walk to Clubhouse. Corner unit Ventnor S Beautiful lake view, wood floors, building claims rentable at this time $49,500.00 Ellesmere B Golf view, tile thru-out, remodeled kitchen, shower stall $59,900.00 $58,900.00 Cambridge B Corner, water view, shower stall, enclosed patio Tilford J Corner, 2nd floor, carpet thru-out, stall shower, building claims rentable $38,900.00 Markham B Beautiful water view, quiet area, corner unit, light and airy $49,900.00 Harwood D Water view, ceramic tile thru-out, furnished, rentable $59,500.00 Newport S Beautiful water view, new kitchen, furnished, shower stall $69,500.00 $52,500.00 Newport Q Clean, furnished, garden view, close to pool Durham X Beautifully redone, tile, cabinets, corner, pool, close to building $54,900.00 2 Beds / 2 Baths Luxury Ventnor G Completely updated, open kitchen, magnificently furnished, enclosed patio $89,900.00 Richmond F Luxury renovated condo, wood cabinets, SS appliances, tile thru-out $99,500.00 Ventnor H Luxury, beautifully furn, golf view, enclosed patio, priced to sell $68,900.00 Oakridge V Luxury, 2nd floor, new appliances, Carpet and wood floors, encl patio $89,900.00 Ventnor P Spectacular panoramic golf view, tennis and pool close by, park at your door $69,900.00 Oakridge F Beautiful preserve view, tile thru-out, new appliances, next to pool $87,900.00 $76,900.00 Lyndhurst J Golf view, ground floor, new a/c, new appliance Lyndhurst I Great location, 3rd floor, enclosed patio, walk to pool, close to Clubhouse $74,900.00 Keswick C What a beauty, fantastically updated, open kitchen, all tile, turnkey, close to club $134,900.00 Harwood D Executive unit, unfurnished, 1st flr, remodeled, lake view $169,900.00 Richmond E Luxury, ground floor, steps to pool and tennis, all tiled $74,900.00 Oakridge V Water view, penthouse, new patio enclosure, great location $79,900.00 Rentals Newport V Harwood F Oakridge B Durham F Durham H Harwood D Islewood C Oakridge P Upminster C Markham T Tilford E Upminster C

1 bedroom, furnished, water view, 2nd floor, corner, a must see $800.00 2 bedroom deluxe unit, fantastic lake view, fully furnished $950.00 Beautifully furnished, new kitchen, lake view $1,400.00 One bedroom, one bath, nicely furnished winter rental $1,300.00 1stflr,laminated wood flrs, across fromClubhouse, closeto pool, freshlypainted $1,400.00 Executive unit, 1563 SqFt, 2 bedroom 2 full baths, lake view, Updated $1,300.00 First flr, nicely furn, fantastic lake view, close to pool and close to Clubhouse $1,500.00 Two bedrooms, corner, tastefully furnished, cozy and comfortable $1,700.00 Comfortable, ready to move in, cozy winter rental, lift in building $1,700.00 Newly furnished, corner, pool right in front, close to Clubhouse $1,650.00 Corner, 2nd floor, very nicely furnished, king size bed, garden view $1,800.00 Everything you need for a warm winter stay, ready for you, bring toothbrush $1,800.00

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JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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COOCVE Board of Directors - December 18, 2012 P

resident Steven Fine called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. Mr. Fine led the Pledge of Allegiance and Moment of Silence. The Sergeants-at-Arms confirmed that there was a quorum present, 156. Joe Rubino moved to waive the reading of the minutes from the November 15, 2012 BOD meeting, seconded by Elaine Schachter. There were no corrections or additions, and the minutes were approved as submitted in the Reporter. Sheriff’s Report – Deputy Cooper Deputy Cooper reported that there was a minor assault at Prescott; no injuries were reported, and no charges were pressed. She wished all the residents a Happy Holiday and Happy New Year. Mr. Fine then recessed the COOCVE Board of Directors’ meeting so that Anthony Falco, President of Master Management, could ask the directors of COOCVE, the voting stockholders of Master Management, to vote on the candidates for Master Management’s Board of Directors. Anthony Falco addressed the directors and turned the meeting over to Joe Sachs. Mr. Joe Sachs, Chairman of the COOCVE Election Com-

mittee, reviewed the rules for voting. Mr. Sachs stated that members do not have to vote for seven candidates; they can vote for any number but no more than seven. Those buildings that have not paid their COOCVE dues cannot vote. Directors will be voting first, and then alternates will be called. The first five candidates receiving the most votes are elected for a three-year term, and the sixth and seventh highest vote getters are elected for a one-year term. Mr. Sachs then called up the following candidates, alphabetically, to address the COOCVE Directors: Caryl Berner, Jeff Chester, Dick Ciocca, William Epstein, Daniel Glickman, Jules Kesselman, Barry Kimbal, Danielle LoBono and Alan Schachter. Each candidate provided the directors with a summary of their background and why they should be elected. Caryl Berner stated that she will not be running for election to the MM Board. Mr. Fine reconvened the meeting of the COOCVE BOD. Mr. Fine stated that the Election Committee will tally up the votes and then report back to the COOCVE Directors those elected to the MM Committee at the end of the meeting. Roslyn

Leeds moved to elect Susan B. Hanley, Don Kaplan and Rita Pickar to the Recreation Committee; Joe Rubino seconded. Motion passed unanimously. President’s Report – Steven Fine Mr. Fine stated that this is his last meeting and thanked everyone for their support and stated that it was a pleasure serving the Village for the past seven years. He then turned the meeting over to Charlie Parness as he will be taking over as President of COOCVE. Treasurer’s Report Total income for the year, to date, is $67,000; Expenses were $81,054; Net loss was $13,150; Total Equity balance is $240,608. Civic and Cultural Committee – Rita Pickar Gulfstream’s “Going to the Races” is on January 24, 2013; cost is $50. For further information, please contact Rita at 954-428-8890. Election Committee – Joe Sachs Mr. Sachs announced the election results; The following candidates have received a three- year term: Daniel Glickman, Danielle LoBono, Alan Schachter, Jules Kesselman and Dick Ciocca. The following candidates will receive a one-year term: Jeff

JANUARY 2013

Chester and Bill Epstein. Old Business: None New Business: None

Motion to adjourn at 11:25 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Steven Fine, President

Hazela’s HAIMASHA HOUR Many surprise guest musicians & singers

WED. FEB 6th 3:30 Party Room C.V.E. It’s your traditional time for wonderful entertainment! Come bring your singing voices, clapping hands & dancing feet for a FREE frailacha good time! Outsiders must be accompanied by Village residents

FEBRUARY 2013

OFF

Tuesday, January 8 Recreation Committee

9:30 AM Monday, February 11 Main Clubhouse COOCVE Executive Committee Gen. Purpose Room A

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Wednesday January 9 Council of Area Chairs

9:30 AM Activity Center Room B

Tuesday, February 12 Recreation Committee

9:30 AM Main Clubhouse Gen. Purpose Room A

Thursday, January 10 CVE Master Management Board of Directors

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Wednesday February 13 Council of Area Chairs

9:30 AM Activity Center Room B

Monday, January 14 COOCVE Executive Committee

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Thursday, February 14 CVE Master Management Board of Directors

9:30 AM Activity Center Room A

Tuesday, January 15 COOCVE Board of Directors

9:30 AM Main Clubhouse Party Room

Tuesday, February 19 COOCVE Board of Directors

9:30 AM Main Clubhouse Party Room

CVE Reporter Deliveries, January 7 and 8, and February 4 and 5

The CVE Reporter Is Now Delivered Directly To All CVE Buildings By Outside Publishers, Inc., On The Monday And Tuesday That Fall Before The Second Friday Of Each Month. Copy For All January 2013 Meeting Minutes Is Due By Our Deadline, The 3rd Wednesday of This Month.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

The Mayor’s Message By PEGGY NOLAND, Mayor/ City of Deerfield Beach

I

want to welcome everyone to 2013. I am confident that this New Year will bring Deerfield Beach great cvereporter@hotmail.com prosperity. With the recent Editor-in-Chief STEVEN H. FINE completion of several essenAssistant to the Editor tial projects and the initiation Betty Schwartz of others, Deerfield Beach Editorial Staff residents, businesses and Sy Blum Judy Olmstead visitors will most certainly exWendy Rosenzveig Betty Schwartz perience the very best of what Activities Editor Deerfield Beach has to offer. Sandy Parness This past month, Deerfield Production Beach celebrated the compleSid Goldstein Christie Voss tion of the International Photo Journalists Fishing Pier Project with a Sid Birns Jules Kesselman Fred Safran Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Advertising Consultants on December 7. The event Susan Dove Estelle Sabsels featured the facility’s familyOffice Staff friendly restaurant, bait shop, Lori Benoit, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Carol Carr, Susan Dove, Claire Eskind, Rhoda Jarmark, Estelle Kaufman, ocean rescue station and secSandy Parness, Toni Ponto, Betty Schwartz, Estelle Sabsels ond story public observation Staff Cartoonist Prepress Technician tower as we gathered together Alan G. Rifkin Christie Voss Alvin Sherman 1913-2000 to share memories, enjoy live entertainment and indulge in Columnists and Regular Contributors Shelly Baskin, Sid Birns, Norman L. Bloom, Sy Blum, Marion G. Cohen, great food provided by some Richard William Cooke, Harry L. Katz, Jules Kesselman, BSO Sheriff Al Lamberti, Sandi Lehman, Dr. Norma Locker, Pauline Mizrach, Barbara Naof our local restaurants. I than Marcus, Deerfield Beach Mayor Peggy Noland, Gloria Olmstead, Judy want to thank everyone who Olmstead, Lori Parrish, Charles Parness, Dr. Sylvia Pellish, Phyllis Pistolis, Commissioner Marty Popelsky, Bernice Ruga, Irving Ruga, Betty Schwartz, supported our efforts in the Helene Wayne, Stan Weinstein, Jerry Wolf, Len Witham, Janice Zamsky. facility’s construction and the Business Manager hundreds who stopped by to Steven H. Fine unite in the historical occa Circulation Proofreaders Outside Pubs, Inc. Sy Blum, Carol Carr, sion. I know that our City’s Barbara Turner Estelle Kaufman, Toni Ponto, Wendy Rosenzveig, International Fishing Pier and Betty Schwartz its new amenities will truly The CENTURY VILLAGE EAST REPORTER is published monthly and distributed, set Deerfield Beach apart from without charge, to the residents of Century Village East, Deerfield Beach, Florida. It is published for the edification of said residents, and contains reports of the monthly meetany other city along the Atlanings of the corporations, Board of Directors and its Committees, as well as news, bus and tic Coast. theater schedules, and contributed articles of current interest to the residents. Official publication of the Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc., 3501 West Drive, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Phone: (954) 421-5566 Fax: (954) 421-9269

The Condominium Owners Organization of Century Village East, Inc. a.k.a. COOCVE, a not-for-profit corporation, its officers, directors, editors, staff, any committee people are not responsible for typographical errors or misrepresentations in any advertisements or article. They are not responsible and assume no liability for the content of, or any opinions expressed in, any contributed articles which represent the author’s own opinions and not necessarily the opinion of COOCVE. Acceptance of advertising for products or services in no way constitutes an official endorsement of the product. Information to contributors: The Reporter reserves the right to edit, accept and refuse articles in the interest of brevity, clarity and the appropriateness of subject matter. Residents are advised to check with the person they are hiring to be sure they are licensed and insured.

Due to space limitations, the CVE Reporter reserves the right to limit the length of all Minutes submitted. Strict priority will be given to Motions, Actions taken, and Information disseminated at the Meetings. Full copies of the Minutes can be obtained from the relevant Committees. -BOD CVE Reporter, Inc.

Scan our QR Code with your smart phone to read the Reporter online or past issues. Escanea nuestro Código QR con ​​ tu teléfono inteligente para leer el Reporter en línea o números anteriores. Scannez notre QR Code avec votre téléphone intelligent pour lire le Reporter en ligne ou les numéros précédents.

B

I am also proud to announce that in December, our City Team completed The Pioneer Park Boat Ramp improvement project as scheduled. The boat trailer parking area is now available to our public. Currently, our City Team is focusing their efforts in the expansion of some of our recreational facilities. Westside Park is in the initial stages of the development of Little League Baseball Fields. Also on our agenda, we plan to begin holding public input meetings for the development of an athletic facility at the newly acquired, Tam O’Shanter Park. As these city projects continue to unfold, I want

to remind residents that this January hosts our 33rd Annual Festival of the Arts, put on by the Deerfield Beach Cultural Committee and the Parks and Recreation Department. The festival will take place along Ocean Way, just south of our newly redesigned pier facility on both Saturday and Sunday, January 26 and 27, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. This year there will be over 140-juried artists. Come out to support the art community as they display their original photography, paintings, sculptures, glass, wood, jewelry and more. There will also be live music, food and children’s art exhibits at the Main Beach Parking Lot. I hope that all our residents can stop by and join in on what is always a beautiful event, electric with the enthusiasms of the art world. Also, The Deerfield Beach Green Market will continue every Sunday at the Cove from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. As always, if you have something on your mind, please feel free to contact me through the City Manager’s office at 954-480-4263 or via email at web.commission@ Deerfield-Beach.com. Have a wonderful year!

The Mail Bag

y far the most popular and widely read segment of our publication is the Letter-tothe Editor columns. We encourage letters that enable our readers to “sound off” on any subject. However, we will not print letters from the same person on the same subject in two consecutive issues. Also, letters must be from CVE residents, must be signed and, if possible, type-written double-spaced. Please include your phone number. When we receive letters about applicable contracts, please remember, the Reporter does not endorse any single company. Residents are free to make their own choices each year. Criterion for letters that will not be published: Letters in poor taste, demeaning and vastly untrue.

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question that has to be asked. et There Be Peace in There are signs throughout Century Village the Village and notations To the Editor: throughout the Reporter every Let there be diverse opinmonth SPEED LIMIT 25 MPH ions with civility and demoon the Blvd; only 15 MPH cratic right and respect for on all other roads. Now the someone to have an opinion problem here apparently other than our own. is “people can’t read.” It’s Let there be less self impor- obvious to me as I drive at 25 tance, but more importance miles per hour, I keep being on putting forth opinions passed by drivers doing anybased on research and fact. where from 30 to 40 miles per hour, so that indicates to me Let there be a nonexistence they don’t know how to read of nasty, insulting characwhich makes me wonder terizations of well meaning how did they get their drivpeople that volunteer their ers license! time on our umbrella boards. My writing about speeding (No long lines of super proin the Village is not meant to fessionals waiting to take their be funny, it’s very serious. place.) What will it take to make Let there be votes based on you drive at the posted speed issues, not personalities. I humbly wish all a Healthy limit.....must you have an accident? Will that make you and Happy New Year. aware of the need to drive FRED ZUCKER at a speed that will give you Cambridge F the opportunity to avoid an accident? Or will you say to yourself, “I always drive o Speed or Not to at the posted speed limit.”  Speed... If that were so, I wouldn’t To the Editor: be writing about excessive  ...and that’s not even a

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speeding here in the Village. BE AWARE AND TAKE CARE. SID BIRNS Islewood D

“F

irst-Class” Boss To the Editor: I have genuinely enjoyed working for the Reporter under your direction for the past five years. Your expertise in the print industry has imparted on me an invaluable learning experience. You are generous, kind and forgiving. I am grateful to be working alongside some of the most amazing volunteers. Through all the hard work, I have witnessed wonderful projects blossom and come to fruition to the benefit of the Village. I am proud to be part of the Reporter team. Emily and Sophia will miss raiding your desk for candy, and I will miss working alongside you. You leave behind a big pair of shoes to fill. Thank you. CHRISTIE VOSS Prepress Technician, CVE Reporter See MAILBAG, pg 13A


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CVE REPORTER

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JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

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JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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9A

Village Meeting Minutes

COOCVE Executive Committee - December 10, 2012 T

he Executive Committee meeting of December 10 was called to order by COOCVE President Steven Fine at 9:30 a.m. He led the Pledge of Allegiance and asked for a moment of silence. It was noted that a quorum was not present, therefore nothing would be voted upon. Steven Fine and Gene Goldman stated that there is no reference in the COOCVE bylaws that a quorum is needed at the COOCVE Executive meeting. Minutes Joe Sachs moved to waive the reading and approve the minutes from the November 12 meeting. Bob Gravatt seconded. The motion was passed by a show of hands. Joe Rubino abstained since he did not receive the minutes by email as requested. Mr. Fine suggested that he contact Charlie Parness since other Committee members had received them. President’s Report - Steven Fine At the BOD meeting on Tuesday, December 18, there will be elections for MM and Recreation. Because there are only three candidates running for the Recreation Committee, they will be elected by affirmation. The election for Master Management will be held immediately following the Sheriff’s Report. This is a very important election, and Mr. Fine urged everyone to attend this meeting. There are currently nine names on the ballot; the first five candidates elected will serve a three year term and the remaining candidates will serve a one year term. Mr. Fine stated that this will be his last Executive Meeting and next week will be his last BOD meeting. He urged residents to come out and volunteer and participate in the monthly meetings. He also stated that the COOCVE

dues are to be submitted by the end of January 2013; $8/unit. Committee Reports Master Management Reva Behr/Sergio Purriños Irrigation is moving along very smoothly. White lights have been installed at the Main Gate to brighten up the entrance. Sergio Purriños stated that with regard to irrigation, pump #2 is ready to be turned on. The East Gate is about four weeks from being completed. Gene Goldman stated that there has been an issue with the reader at the Main Gate for several months. Sergio stated that he was not aware of the issue and would follow-up with security. Mr. Goldman and Mr. Fine both mentioned that the landscaping at the East Gate, located on SW 10th Street and Military Trail, needs to be addressed as it is very bad. Mr. Fine stated that even though it is the City of Deerfield Beach’s responsibility, MM should take action and make our Village look presentable. Mr. Purriños agreed and stated that he would discuss it at his meeting with the City Manager as well as speak to Seacrest on how we can make this happen. Mr. Saraceno stated that recently FPL installed a light pole in front of the Harwood area for buildings that are being built across the highway. He stated that the Building President and the Area Chair did not know anything about this. Mr. Purriños was not aware of this and will look into it. Joe Rubio asked why code enforcement is in the Village issuing citations to residents who have satellite dishes. Mr. Fine responded that he went to the City for help. He stated that he was fed up with residents coming into the Village, installing satellite dishes and then leaving for six months during the hurricane

season putting residents in harm’s way with these dishes on the buildings. Mr. Fine stated that he went to the City and spoke to code enforcement and the City Manager and reported individuals for installing these dishes against condo documents. Area Chairs Ashby: Joe Sachs; Mr. Sachs thanked Steven for all his work he has done on the Reporter. Mr. Sachs stated that this year the candidates were at the Executive Committee Meeting on November 12 and they presented themselves to the Committee. On December 5 there was a Meet the Candidate event held. At both of these meetings questions were asked from the floor. Bios of all the candidates have been printed in the Reporter and at the BOD meeting on Tuesday, December 18, candidates will present themselves again to the Directors; but there will be no questions from the floor. Mr. Sachs stated that he spoke with MM to secure the dates for next year so that they can be printed in the paper and potential candidates can have it on their calendars. Berkshire: Naomi Redisch; Ms. Redisch asked if Bob Gravatt was reporting every building with satellite dishes to code enforcement. He responded that only the buildings he is aware of. Cambridge: Currently no Area Chair and Vice Chair Durham: Joe Rubino; nothing to report Ellesmere: Marjorie Campbell; nothing to report Farnham: Norman Kaplan; Mr. Kaplan stated that there is an ice cream truck parked in the Farnham D area which he reported to security. Why is security allowing this truck into the Village? Also, the guard during the daytime at the East Gate is not doing his job -- while the arm is up, he

Low and Normal Vision Book Club The JBI Library and the Talking Book Library can provide free audio books and the Broward County Library, written books, for normal vision individuals. Come and join the Century Village East book discussion group open to all, which meets every second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. at the Clubhouse in Music Room B. All low-vision participants will receive the same audio book prior to our meeting and others will receive guidance as to how to request the book from the public library. For information, please call 954-689-0207 or 954-360-9074.

sits in the booth and does not watch the cars or pedestrians going in or out. Mr. Fine asked Mr. Kaplan to write down the date and time and submit the information to MM. Mr. Purriños stated that he will speak to Security and address these issues. Grantham: Gene Goldman; Nothing to report Harwood: Joe Saraceno; Congratulated Steven on his tenure in the Village and mentioned that he would like to see traffic enforcement in the Village. He mentioned that a resident in his building installed a dish on the roof, Mr. Saraceno explained the rules to him, told him to remove the dish and he didn’t. Mr. Saraceno stated that the rules must be enforced so he hired someone to remove the dish and sent him a bill. Mr. Fine replied that both COOCVE and MM do their best to resolve issues and enforce the rules in the Village. Reva Behr stated that there are many issues that MM and COOCVE receive that are the responsibility of the Association. The Boards of the Buildings must become more assertive and not allow residents to do certain things because they are friends. The issues in the buildings do not belong to MM. The Village does not have a single enforcer. MM is here to assist the running of the Village; the Associations are the sole responsibility of the buildings. Islewood: Rhoda Jarmark; Not present Keswick: No longer has an Area Chairperson Lyndhurst: Don Kaplan; Not present Markham: Judy Olmstead; Not present

Newport: Rita Pickar; Not present Oakridge: Jules Kesselman; Not present Prescott: Robert Gravatt; Commented that the City has cleaned up the area on SW 10th street and is looking much better now that palm trees were planted, perhaps we can get the City to work on Military Trail. The problem with recreation vehicles in the Village is that the Building Presidents allow these vehicles in the Village and do not assist COOCVE in removing them. Richmond: Cecile Baskin; Not present Swansea: Bill Epstein; Not present Tilford: Basil Hales; Mentioned that there is a problem with dogs inside the Village. Mr. Fine stated that the Building President and the Association need to take action with this issue. Upminster: Ann Rifkin; Not present Ventnor: Sheldon Pierce; Not present Westbury: Carmen Colon; Many Presidents in the Westbury area do not know anything about the documents and they do whatever they want to do. Mr. Fine suggested that when Westbury has an area meeting that this be addressed; it is up to the Associations to enforce the rules. He stated that as an Area Chair, you have an obligation to make sure the Presidents do what they are supposed to do. Old Business: none New Business: none A motion was made and seconded to adjourn the meeting at 11 a.m. Respectfully submitted by, Steven Fine


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Village Meeting Minutes

Master Management BOD - December 17, 2012 P

resident Anthony Falco called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. on December 17, 2012. In attendance were: Reva Behr, Caryl Berner, Norm Bloom, Harry Chizeck, Anthony Falco, Dan Glickman, Bill Goddard, Gloria Olmstead, Felicia Prince, Fred Rosenzveig, Alan Schachter, Mel Schmier; Absent: Judy Olmstead, Jules Kesselman; Staff Present: Sergio Purriños, Executive Director Open Mic: Abe Trachtenberg: Stated that he would like permission to move the containers located behind the pool area as they are having a hard time picking up the bulk trash. He mentioned that the lights in the Durham area are not working properly. Mr.

Trachtenberg also stated that the roads behind the Durham pool area are in poor condition and need to be addressed. Mr. Falco stated that it is Recreation property. Mr. Purriños stated that he is working on it and would speak to him after the meeting. Deerfield Beach Recycling - Cheryl Miller The Single Stream program will be implemented during the beginning of 2013 and will take approximately six months to roll out to the Village. This program will be installed one building at a time. A flyer will be distributed stating when your building will begin and on what day. All roll carts will be removed and replaced with a blue dumpster. If residents

already have a blue dumpster, the dumpsters will either be exchanged for a different size or will be relabeled. All single stream recyclables will now go into the blue dumpster and the number of pick-ups for recycling will be increased. It is up to the Presidents to inform their residents where bulk trash is to be placed. Residents are reminded again and urged to break down boxes before placing them in the dumpsters. Minutes: Alan Schachter moved to waive the reading and accept the minutes from the Board Meeting on November 15, 2012. Mel Schmier seconded. Motion passed unanimously. Treasurer’s Report – Gloria Olmstead The CVE Master Manage-

ment Financial Report was distributed to all Board members and discussed in detail by Gloria Olmstead. For November, the Total Income was $978,903; Total Expenses were $893,450; Net Income was $85,453. Total Checking/ Savings is $3,466,231; Total Assets are $4,593,388; Total Liabilities are $3,721,645 and Total Equity is $871,742. Overdue Accounts Receivable from unit owners is $986,395. President’s Report – Anthony Falco Anthony stated that he had just returned from vacation and thanked Mr. Purriños for handling everything in his absence. Executive Director - Sergio Purriños At the Area Chair meeting last week, it was stated

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that an ice cream truck was parking in the Farnham area. Mr. Purriños stated that the truck was removed on Friday, December 14. A resident informed Mr. Purriños that the truck returned and was parked in the area over the weekend. He stated that he will speak with Kent Security today on this issue. Mr. Purriños also spoke about the recent water main break on Friday, December 14. The source of the break was the main line that feeds the golf course irrigation system. Two additional cameras have been installed in Le Club. A broken drainage gate near Tilford was replaced last week. Mr. Purriños stated that he is looking into cleaning up Military Trail landscaping. He has a meeting with the City Manager the first week of 2013 and has also asked Seacrest to submit a quote for this project. The lights have been installed at the main gate and the consensus is to keep them lit throughout the year. Mr. Purriños also announced that AJ Bock has left the organization due to a conflict in his hours. Hector has been doing a great job in picking up the workload and at the present time we will not be replacing this position. All requests and calls will continue to be routed through the MM offices. Mr. Purriños stated that the East Gate is about three and a half weeks away from completion. Caryl Berner stated that some of the lights facing Hillsboro are not working and mentioned that this was the same issue as last year. Mr. Purriños replied that he would look into the issue. Reva Behr mentioned that the CVE East sign on Hillsboro was not working last night. Committee Reports - none Old Business - none New Business - none During members’ comments, Caryl Berner was ruled out of order and asked to stop speaking. After being admonished three times, she came to order, but then began speaking again in a disruptive manner. At that point, without objection from the Board, the President asked her to remove herself from the meeting and when she refused, he adjourned the meeting in accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order. Announcements: The next meeting is scheduled for Monday, January 10, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in the Activity Center. Motion to adjourn was made at 10:15 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Anthony Falco


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Village Meeting Minutes

Council of Area Chairs - December 12, 2012 T

he Area Chair Meeting for December 12 was called to order by Chairperson Don Kaplan at 9:30 a.m. Mr. Kaplan led the Pledge of Allegiance and a moment of silence. The roll call was taken and it was noted that a quorum was present. Minutes Joe Rubino moved and it was seconded to waive the reading of the November 14 meeting minutes. Since there were no corrections or additions, the minutes were approved and accepted unanimously by a show of hands. Chairman’s Report Don Kaplan stated that Keswick is now represented by May Golden and that Markham is now represented by Bill Lieberman. Joe Sachs mentioned that there was an error in the Reporter under the Area Chair listing; Joe is still the Area Chair, the person listed is only the President of Ashby D -- not of the Area. Don Kaplan also mentioned that if an Area schedules a meeting and then notifies everyone that it is cancelled, please remember, those individuals are volunteers and are not getting paid for what they do. COOCVE - Steven Fine Mr. Fine mentioned again that he will be leaving both the Reporter and COOCVE at the end of December. He also reminded everyone that the COOCVE BOD meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 18 at 9:30 a.m. in the Clubhouse. This is a very important meeting, as the elections for MM will take place. There are nine candidates running for seven positions. You do not have to vote for all seven positions but if you vote for more than seven, your ballot will be invalid. Norm Kaplan stated that as the Area Chair of Farnham, he has no responsibility in removing the truck parked in the Farnham P area. The President of Farnham P approved the truck, COOCVE and MM should tow the truck. Mr. Fine replied that they are working on the issue. The Building President had no authority in allowing him to park his truck in the area. Master Management - Sergio Purriños Mr. Purriños stated that the MM meeting has been rescheduled from Thursday to Monday, December 17 at 9:30 a.m. in the Activity Center. He stated that he is working with Kent Security to have the ice cream truck removed from the premises ASAP. The East gate is about three and a half weeks from completion. The

irrigation project is moving along and FPL is currently installing a new pole to feed pump station two. Holiday lights have been installed at the main gate and we are considering keeping the lights year round, as there have been several requests. Two additional security cameras have been installed at Le Club. Mr. Purriños also announced that AJ Bock is no longer with the organization. A number of changes were made, in particular his hours of work, and AJ decided to move on. MM will be handling his duties and projects with staff already on board and will not be filling the position at this time. Norm Kaplan stated that the ice cream truck is still parked in the Village. Security states that they do not see it although it has been parked every day in the same spot for the last six months. Don Kaplan responded that the trucks need to be stopped at the main gate. It is in the documents that anyone coming into the Village cannot park overnight. It is the building’s responsibility to remove the truck. They should call the Sheriff, but it is the building’s responsibility to get them out, unless the building goes to COOCVE and asks them for assistance. Mr. Purriños stated that he will try and set up a meeting with BSO and the City Manager, and that through an agreement, Kent Security would be able to call upon BSO and issue a ticket for certain traffic situations. Mr. Rubino applauded Mr. Purriños in speaking with the City Manager and establishing a relationship. Mr. Goldman stated that a number of buildings have placed towing signs at the entrances to their property so that cars parked illegally can be towed. Norm Kaplan brought up an issue with Seacrest double billing residents on their Master Management coupon. He stated that it is not right that residents have been overcharged in amounts as much as $1,000. The article in the Reporter stated that residents will not be reimbursed unless they contact Seacrest. Mr. Fine stated that this is not right since many of our residents are elderly and do not look at their statements. Mr. Purriños stated that he will speak with Seacrest and get back to the Committee. Carmen Colon commented that every day there is a group of Kent Security personnel gathering near the

main gate looking as if they are having a party. Mr. Purriños stated that he is aware of it and is working on the issue. Joe Saraceno discussed the pole that is being installed in front of the Harwood area. Why wasn’t anyone from the area aware of this? Mr. Purriños stated that they don’t need to call us, as a courtesy the liaison should be informing us of these situations. He stated that he will be setting up a meeting with the liaison to discuss these types of issues. Mr. Purriños stated that the pole that was installed is powering pump station 2. Recreation - Don Kaplan The budget is being worked on. There were three openings on the Recreation Committee and three candidates ran, so there will not be an election on Tuesday. The new member is Susan B. Handley. Norm Kaplan stated that he paid his coupon check on November 5, by placing it in the box opposite the Clubhouse. On November 16 he received a non-payment notice. The bank stated that it was deposited, but not received until November 15. He checked with Bay Management and they stated that Seacrest is not picking up the coupon payments in a timely manner. They also stated that in the future, they would not take away the late charge even though it is a Seacrest issue. Don Kaplan stated that he would follow up with Seacrest. Seacrest - not present East Coast - nothing to report Areas Ashby: If your buildings have had their election already, the new Directors are only allowed to vote next year. If your Association did not pay their COOCVE dues, your building will not be allowed to vote. Mr. Sachs also thanked Steve and Seacrest for the coffee/bagels that they provide every month. He also wanted everyone to know that the Ashby pool house is still not open. This project has been worked on for six months. If your area requires a pool house renovation, make sure Recreation does not use this company. Don Kaplan replied that the company is selected by the best bid submitted and the reason for the delays is usually permitting. He mentioned that he would speak with Nancy Giordano and Rita Pickar when they return from vacation. Durham: Recently a unit

owner from Durham went to the pool and it was chain locked. He called security and it was stated that it opens from dawn to dusk. Mr. Rubino stated that there was a security report which stated that a resident put personal locks on the gate with a sign that the pool is not open until 8 a.m. Don Kaplan stated that Recreation did not authorize anyone to lock the pool gates. He then authorized security to speak with this resident and inform him that he cannot put personal locks or post any signs on the gates; if it is done again, his ID will be pulled. Joe Rubino asked to have his name and phone number removed from the Area Chair listing in the Reporter. Grantham: Suggested that the Area Chair meeting and the Executive Committee

meeting be combined since the content is repeated at each meeting. Don Kaplan stated that it has been discussed before. He stated that he would like to have it brought up at the next meeting and perhaps someone can make a motion. Westbury: The restrooms at the pool are not properly maintained. Don Kaplan suggested she put it in writing and send a note to the staff office. Abe Trachtenberg: Mentioned that on a recent Saturday night, there was a dog at the show. Security responded that it was a service dog. Old Business - none New Business - none A motion to adjourn was made at 10:40 a.m. Submitted by, Don Kaplan

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Village Meeting Minutes

COOCVE Recreation Committee - December 18, 2012 I

n attendance: Shelly Baskin, Donna Dowling, Susan Dove, Nancy Giordano, Don Kaplan Rita Pickar; Absent: Donna Capobianco; Representing Bay Management: Norma Taylor, Bob Dolson and Kim Whittemore The meeting opened with the Pledge of Allegiance and a Moment of Silence at 12 p.m. Minutes Don Kaplan moved to waive and accept the minutes from the November 13 meeting. Rita Pickar seconded. The motion was passed unanimously. Correspondence A letter was received from Joe D’Ambrosio, president of the Italian American Club. Joe congratulated the Recreation Committee and thanked them for all they have done in completing the Bocce courts and installing lights. He stated that he would like the Committee to look into installing lights over a third court if money is available. He also stated that he will contact Mr. Porto regarding the plaque for Luciano Porto. Rita stated that she spoke with Joe and he would like the plaque presented to Mr. Porto at their upcoming

tournament; Joe will advise the Committee of the date. A letter was received regarding movies and Nancy replied that the Committee does not get a wide variety to choose from. Several comments were received regarding the Office Staff stating what a wonderful job they are doing especially when residents register for classes. Nancy thanked Donna Dowling for her service to the Recreation Committee. Donna stated that it was a wonderful six years and this Committee should be very proud of what they have accomplished. President’s Report Nancy announced that for the first time in four years, the Recreation coupon will be increased. During the last four years, Recreation has absorbed increases to vendor contracts, salaries, minimum wage and utilities. In 2012, a state of the art lighting system was installed and much needed changes were made to the Party Room. In 2013, a major renovation will begin on the tennis courts and to the exercise facilities as well as the satellite pools and

Master Management Special BODDecember 20, 2012 Acting President Anthony Falco called the Special MM BOD meeting to order at 11 a.m. on December 20, 2012. In attendance were: Reva Behr, Harry Chizeck, Dick Ciocca, Dan Glickman, Anthony Falco, Bill Goddard, Jules Kesselman, Gloria Olmstead, Felicia Prince, Alan Schachter and Mel Schmier; Not Present; Norm Bloom Mr. Falco welcomed Dick Ciocca, Jeff Chester, Danielle LoBono and Bill Epstein to the MM BOD. Mr. Falco stated that the elections will be done by closed ballot. Election of Corporate Officers Reva Behr nominated Anthony Falco for President. As there were no other nominations, Anthony Falco was elected unanimously. Alan Schachter nominated Mel Schmier for First Vice President Felicia Prince nominated Reva Behr for First Vice President Jeff Chester nominated himself for First Vice President The votes for First Vice

President were as follows: 10 votes for Mel Schmier 3 votes for Reva Behr 1 vote for Jeff Chester Mel Schmier was elected First Vice President. Jules Kesselman nominated Reva Behr for Second Vice President. As there were no other nominations, Reva Behr was elected unanimously. Reva Behr nominated Gloria Olmstead for Treasurer. As there were no other nominations, Gloria Olmstead was elected unanimously. Reva Behr nominated Dan Glickman for Secretary. As there were no other nominations, Dan Glickman was elected unanimously. The next meeting is scheduled for January 10, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. in the Activity Center. A motion was made and seconded to adjourn the Executive Meeting at 11:15 a.m. Respectfully submitted, Anthony Falco President

all remaining pools will be fenced in. Bay Management Reports - Kim Whittemore/Norma Taylor/Bob Dolson Bocce: The pavers have been installed at the Bocce Courts as well as the irrigation and the sod. Shuffleboard Courts: The Shuffleboard Courts are completely redone and all the lights have been cleaned. TV’s: Larger TV’s have been installed in the gym and the smaller TV’s will be installed in the weight room. Tennis: Windscreens at Richmond and the Clubhouse have been installed. There is one area at each court that is being redone because of improper measurements. Those screens are being delivered to Fastdry and will be installed next week. Nancy stated that in 2013, the Tennis Court project will begin. Richmond will be the first one to be completely remodeled with new surface and then the Clubhouse. Rollers have also been added at every court and a weekly maintenance schedule has been scheduled for each court. Canopy Lights: Florescent lights have been installed at the Newport and Ventnor pools. If there are any pools interested, please send a letter in writing to Kim Whittemore. The lights can be set on a timer and most residents are enjoying this added feature. Petanque Courts: Three new benches and umbrellas have been ordered and are scheduled to be delivered this week. The old benches have been placed at the Bocce Courts. Benches: New benches have been installed at the entrance of the tunnel. Clubhouse: Residents can

now register for classes at the Staff Office. The Party Room chairs are expected to be delivered on January 14, 2013. New flowers have been planted outside the Clubhouse and near the pool area. The theatre roof has finally been resolved and there currently are no leaks. We are still working with the City of Deerfield to resolve the issue with the Cupola. They are stating that it is an occupied space and impact windows are required. FPL: Recreation is still working with FPL to resolve the issue of the switchgear. Durham Pool: Don stated that a resident is locking the pool so that residents do not use the pool before dawn. Don recently announced at the Area Chair meeting that if this resident continues to lock the pool, Security is instructed to confiscate his pass. Ashby Pool: The Ashby pool is now complete. When the sidewalk is fixed, the plantings will be installed. Old Business Capital Needs Study: The capital needs study has been completed. The study provided Recreation with information on the life expectancy of various components. Dedication plaque: Rita stated that a good time to present the plaque would be at the Bocce Tournament. New Business Ceramic Building Conversion: Recreation has discussed converting the ceramic building into an international library. Those residents who are not English speaking would be able to use this area and have a library dedicated to their language. The library will be run by the different groups who would be utiliz-

ing it. Recreation will make sure the building, windows, floor, etc. are working and clean. Portable Sound System: Nancy discussed purchasing a portable sound system which can be used at the aquatic classes, shows in the Party Room, the Flea Market or any other event Recreation is hosting. Kim discussed three bids that were received: Full Compass Systems for $3,400; ProAudio for $3,450 and Guitar Center for $4,549. Donna moved to accept the bid from Full Compass Systems for a new portable sound system in the amount of $3,400. Motion passed unanimously. Shelly asked about the status of implementing a snack shop in the Party Room. Rita stated that she will put a sign-up sheet in the Staff Office to see if there is any interest from organizations who would like to participate after a show. The purpose is not for Recreation to make money but for the organizations who would be supplying the snacks. Announcements Gulfstream: Going to the Races on January 24, 2013; cost is $50. For further information, please contact Rita at 954-428-8890. Flea Market: The annual flea market will be held on March 3, 2013. If you would like to participate in selling, you must go to the Staff Office and sign up. There is a fee of $10 to rent a table. Relay for Life will have a table selling food and refreshments. A motion to adjourn was made and seconded at 12:30 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Nancy Giordano

Utility Location Flags and Ground Markings Sunshine Locators, the City of Deerfield Beach and Treasure Coast Irrigation, LLC are flagging underground utilities (water,

sewer, electric power, cable TV, etc.) around the Village ahead of the excavations for the new irrigation system. DO NOT REMOVE, MOVE OR TAMPER with utility location flags on or around your property. Tampering with, moving or removing utility location flags is a felony punishable by law and could also result in loss of service to your building or unit. Mowing crews have been made aware of the location flags and ground paintings and have been instructed not to disturb them.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Mailbag Mailbag

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Final Farewell To the Editor: As the New Year approaches, I will be passing the BSO torch on to the new Sheriff shortly. It gives me pause to consider what an absolute honor and privilege it has been to serve the citizens of Broward County for the past 35 years. One of the most memorable experiences I had was when I was contacted by the Governor in 2007 and asked if I would accept the appointment as Sheriff of Broward County. The single most memorable experience was when the people of Broward County, through the democratic process, chose me as their Sheriff one year later. It was particularly momentous to me, considering that I would be the first sheriff in the 97-year history of the Broward Sheriff’s Office to come up through the ranks. It is something that I will take away from the experience and keep in my heart forever. Rather than dwell on the well-documented accomplishments of my administration, I want to take this opportunity

to thank the people of Broward County for the opportunity to have served for the past five years as their Sheriff with honor, dignity and mutual respect. As I leave this office and my constitutional responsibilities, I would ask all citizens of Broward County to stay involved and up to date on issues affecting your community. Please do all that you can to educate, nurture and protect our children. It is our collective responsibility; it is our mandate. As I have said many times during my extensive travels throughout the region speaking with people about various public safety issues, “Our children are 30% of our population but they are 100% of our future.” Thank you again for the opportunity to serve you, and always stay safe. AL LAMBERTI Broward County Sheriff

L

etter to Mayor Noland To the Editor: I sent the following letter to Mayor Noland: I understand that this summer the City of Deerfield Beach adopted a motion to restrict the availability of beach

parking stickers to Deerfield Beach residents with cars bearing Florida license plates. I have been unable to obtain the justification or rationale for this decision. My repeated telephone calls to the office of Mr. Popelsky have remained unanswered. I am a proud owner of a condo in Century Village East. My wife and I love Deerfield and the beach; we are snowbirds. On behalf of all the snowbirds who are taxpayers of Deerfield Beach, and who love the beach, I strongly recommend that this bylaw be rescinded as it divides your taxpayers and may drive them away. The fact that this law was passed during the summertime when a large number of your taxpayers were away, leaves much to be desired when a law affecting those that are away is passed during their absence. I need not dwell on the benefit to the City of Deerfield Beach brought about by all the snowbirds. Respectfully, RAYMOND BABEUX Cambridge G

Have You Heard?

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6061 Palmetto Circle N. • Boca Raton, Fl 33433

I

n Response to Letter in December Issue by Andy Miller To the Editor: We at Seacrest would like to take this opportunity to respond to the recent letter to the editor regarding Master Management payments. Seacrest processes all monthly common charge payments for Master Management; we do not bill these charges. We do not have access to the Master Management checking account as it relates to payables. At the beginning of each year, new coupons are sent reflecting the new Board-approved payments for the upcoming year to all homeowners who have not authorized direct debit payments.   Let us be clear about one of the letter’s inflammatory assertions: Seacrest never did, and does not, have access to homeowner bank accounts. In order to provide auto debit for a homeowner, they must fill out and sign an authorization form accompanied by a voided check. Without auto debit, payments are made to the Master Management account directly by each homeowner. In checking over the Master Management Prepaids

Report, we came across one residence that fit the clues provided in the letter to the editor. The history of that owner showed they provided Seacrest with an authorization form, in December 2011, to begin direct debit in January 2012. We set up the direct debit but the owner also continued making payments the same way they had for the three prior years.  While both Seacrest and Master Management try to review and monitor accounts, it is not possible to do so regularly for 8,500+ accounts.  Also, many residents do purposely prepay their maintenance fees.  We do encourage residents to review their bank accounts and contact Seacrest or the Master Management Committee if they have any questions. Seacrest would also like to take this opportunity to thank the Master Management volunteers for the endless hours they have spent working to collect past-due amounts for the residents of not only Upminster H but the whole community. STEVE KITTREDGE Seacrest Services, Asst. Dir. Property Mgt.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Condo News CVE Reporter Board Members for 2012

Chair: Wendy Rosenzveig Board: Don Kaplan Betty Schwartz Toni Ponto Gloria Olmstead Bob Gravatt Phil Goldenberg Licensed Professional Massage Therapy

By Janice In Your Home

Call today 954-708-5644 Swedish 60 min $65 Deep Tissue 90 min $95 Reflexology Couple Special $120 Pain Management Stress Scalp Massage

Janice Raya L.M.T. MA57899 janiceraya@rocketmail.com

COOCVE Appointed Committee Members for 2012 ADVISORY Robert Gravatt Phil Goldenberg Charles Parness - Chair Rhonda Pitone AUDIT Al Bakelman Norman Bloom BUDGET & FINANCE Danielle LoBono Gloria Olmstead Arlene Roth - Chair Bernice Schmier BYLAWS Marj Campbell Phil Goldenberg Gene Goldman Robert Gravatt - Chair Charles Parness Rita Pickar Rhonda Pitone Fran Stricoff - Vice Chair

CONTRACT NEGOTIATION Maureen T. Doherty Ed Gallon - Chair Joe Rudnick CIVIC & CULTURAL Arlene Roth, Chair Carol Carr Nancy Giordano Phil Goldenberg Rita Pickar Sue Popp Myriam Sachs Bernice Schmier GRIEVANCE Robert Gravatt Phil Goldenberg Charles Parness Joseph Sachs - Chair INSURANCE Carman Nepa - Chair Herman Shwide


JANUARY 2013

SAFE HOME CHECKLIST Start the year right.

Make your home safe by checking each item below.

 Post emergency

numbers by every phone. Numbers must be large and clear enough to be seen from a distance.

 Keep a first aid kit

handy and know how to use it.

 Install smoke and carbon monoxide and all-purpose fire extinguishers. Check them monthly.  Store flammable

materials away from the furnace, fireplace and other heat sources. Never leave an open flame burning unattended even for a minute.

 Use flame-retardant curtains and bedding.

 Don’t let anyone

smoke in bed.

 Have your heating system checked and cleaned by a qualified contractor yearly.

 Inspect electrical

equipment regularly. Replace frayed or cracked electrical cords and broken sockets and plugs. Make sure electrical appliances are properly grounded.

 Lock up all drugs

and hazardous materials out of children’s reach.

 Keep stairs, sidewalks

and hallways well lit and clear.

CVE REPORTER

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Tips for Traveling Research and Plan Ahead Planning, reserving and confirming must be accomplished sooner rather than later. When the destination is resolved with target dates, research airlines, Amtrak, buses, cruise lines. For air and land transportation, seek the most direct and shortest travel times. If there is a choice of three airlines, for example, enroll in the no-cost frequent flier program for each. This should give you access to the lowest fares and possible benefits at the airport and aboard the flight, as well as for requesting special services. Know that once very common, most senior discount fares are history except for Southwest Airlines and Amtrak. To find other senior-special offers, go online to SmarterTravel.com.

Request and Reserve Special Services Request seat assignment in the rows designated for disabled travelers. And, importantly, request cost-free wheelchair service at every airport origination, connection and arrival location. If there is meal service aboard, advise the reservation system of any dietary needs. If traveling alone, ensure you will have human assistance from the counter, through security, to the gate and then to board the aircraft. If staffed by an airline employee, there is no cost for wheelchair or assistance. If staffed by Red Cap-type personnel, you will be expected to tip for that assist. If you are traveling with family, they can offer to handle the wheelchair. If you don’t make and confirm all of these requests at the time of reservation, the airline, train or bus line has no obligation to make them available on check-in or while en route.

1500 E. Hillsboro Blvd. , Suite 210 Deerfield Beach, FL 33441

Tel: 954.419.9632

PMC Hillsboro Joseph Arena, M. D. Michael J. Cavanaugh, M. D. Dana Portnoy, ARNP

"Have You Heard About All Of THE GREAT BENEFITS Our Patients Enjoy"

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ATTENTION MEDICARE MEMBERS!!! Dedicated medical professional commited to serving the healthcare needs of the senior community

Other locations 1806 North Pine Island Road, Plantation FL 33322 Tel: 954.474.0110

8397 West Oakland Park Blvd. Sunrise, FL 33351 Tel: 954.741.5000

1500 E. Hilsboro Blvd. Suite 210 Deerfield Beach, FL 33441 Tel: 954.419.9632

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

TAMARA LISS, F.A.C.P.,M.D. BOARD CERTIFIED INTERNAL MEDICINE All your primary health care needs. Accepting new patients. Medicare and most major insurances. Flu shots still available! Pneumovax and shingles vaccines.

Wishing you Happy Holidays!

(561) 347-9044

801 Meadows Road, Suite 108 Boca Raton, FL 33486 (opposite Boca Raton Regional Hospital)

www.thebocaratondoctor.com

Twin Lakes Medical Center


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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19A

Condo News

Federal Agencies

Other Important Numbers

FEMA Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-621-FEMA (3362) TTY for hearing/speech impaired . . . . . . . . . . 800-462-7585 FEMA Fraud Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-720-5721 National Flood Insurance Referral Center . . . . 888-275-6347 US Small Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . 800-659-2955 Social Security Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-772-1213 Internal Revenue Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-829-1040 TTY for hearing/speech impaired . . . . . . . . . . 800-829-4059 Dept. of US Housing and Urban Development 800-669-9777 Dept. of US Department of Veterans Affairs . . 800-827-1000

State Agencies Florida Dept. of Economic Opportunity . . . . . . 800-204-2418 Arbitration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 850-414-6867 Attorney General’s Office & Fraud Hotline . . . 866-966-7226 Condominium Ombudsman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-202-3234 Bilingual Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954-202-3235 Contractors (Dept Bus Prof Registration) . . . . . 850-487-1395 Department of Agriculture Consumer Service 800-435-7352 Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) 850-488-1122 Department of Elder Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-963-5337 Department of Financial Services . . . . . . . . . . . 800-342-2762 Anti-Fraud Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-378-0445 Hurricane Help Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-22-STORM (8676) Children & Families Access Line . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-762-2237 Human Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 850-488-7082 Road Information – State Highway Department . . . 888-638-0250 Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 727-319-7400

Voluntary Agencies

American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 866-GET-INFO Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-HELP-NOW Salvation Army . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-SAL-ARMY

(438-4696) (435-7669) (725-2769)

Volunteer Florida – Volunteer/Donation

Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-FL-HELP1 (354-3571) America’s Second Harvest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-771-2303

County Emergency Management Offices

For immediate disaster needs, residents can call their county emergency management office. For information about services in the area, call 211, if available in the county.

Brevard/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . . . 321-637-6670 Broward/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . . . 954-831-3900 Collier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239-252-3600 Glades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863-946-6020 Hendry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863-612-4700 Indian River/Sheriff’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772-569-6700 Lee/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239-477-3600 Martin/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . . . . 772-288-5694 Miami-Dade/Community service 311 . . . . . . . 305-468-5900 Monroe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-289-6065 Key West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305-809-1058 Okeechobee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 863-763-3212 Palm Beach/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . 561-712-6400 St. Lucie/Community service 211 . . . . . . . . . . . 772-462-8100

Important websites:

Condominium Ombudsman: . . . www.myflorida.com/condos Dept. of Bus & Prof. Regulation: www.myflorida.com.dbpr Dept. of Financial Services: . . . . w w w . m y f l o r i d a c f o . c o m Federal Fair Housing: . . . . . . . . . www.hud.gov/offices/fheo FL Commission on Human Relations: . . . . www.fchr.state.fl.us Florida Statutes: . . . . . www.leg.state.fl.us/Welcome/index.cfm


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Condo News

SEMINAR SCHEDULE CHARLIE PARNESS, Chairman/COOCVE Advisory Committee

T

his winter the COOCVE Advisory Committee is sponsoring three educational seminars. The seminars are free and we urge anyone interested to sign up. If the number of signees is greater than the scheduled room can hold, we will try to obtain a larger auditorium. The signup sheets are now available at the Clubhouse Staff Office and at the COOCVE Office. As of now, all seminars will be held in the Clubhouse, Room GPA, except for the 40 YEAR BUILDING SAFETY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION seminar which will be held in the Clubhouse Party Room. The seminars will be

conducted by Bill and Susan Raphan, formerly of the Ombudsman’s office and now of Katzman, Garfinkel and Berger. Thursday, January 17, 2013   at 1–3 p.m.   40 YEAR BUILDING SAFETY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION This is an informational review of the 40 Year Inspection and Recertification Program in Broward County. This should be of significant importance to all because in the next few years every building in CVE will be at or near 40 years old. Do not miss this seminar. Thursday, February 14, 2013 at 1–3 p.m.   BOARD MEMBER BASICS A fresh, lively interactive course that covers the basics of serving on a Florida com-

munity association Board of Directors. Enjoy a fun class while at the same time fulfilling the State’s Board Member Certification requirements. Learn the basics of vendor negotiations, financial reporting and budget preparation, collection issues, meeting notices and elections, preventing fraud, and much more! Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 1–3 p.m.  CONDOMINIUM DOLLARS AND SENSE For all the treasurers and wannabe treasurers out there, this course is for you! This is a great primer for all Association Board Members on the basic financial aspects of condominium finances. Topics include proper budget preparation, reserves, financial reporting requirements, competitive bidding requirements and more.

OOPS!

There was an error in Jeff Chester’s resume for Master Management, as listed in the December issue of the Reporter. He was not Honorary Chair of the CVE Philosophy Club but a guest lecturer. He was honorary chair of SOCO. We regret this error and congratulate Jeff on his election to Master Management. ~ CVE Reporter Staff

Recreation’s Most Commonly Asked Questions By KIM WHITTMORE Administration/Bay Management Office What do I do about my payment if I don’t have coupons? If you do not have or have lost your coupons, you still are responsible to make your Bay Management payment. The payment can be dropped off at the Bay Management Office or mailed to Bay Management, 2400 Century Boulevard, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Always make sure

your unit address appears clearly on the check for proper credit. PLEASE NOTE: Your Bay Management payment has increased for 2013 by $5. If you do not have 2013 coupons, please add the $5 increase to your regular 2012 monthly payment amount. Call us at 954-428-6892, Option 1 if you have any questions. Staff Office How do we find out what activities and clubs are available for CVE residents?

2013 Property Tax Exemption Filing Dates Announced For Century Village Deerfield Beach (Fort Lauderdale) Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish has announced special 2013 homeowner sign-up dates for Homestead and Senior Property Tax Exemptions at Century Village Deerfield Beach. 2013 SCHEDULE Deputy Property Appraisers will assist residents with Homestead, Senior and other exemptions at the Century Village Deerfield Main Clubhouse Room GP-N First Thursday of Each Month ** 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. ** Please note: No event in January and 2nd Thursday in July (July 11, 2013) Documents required to file a Homestead Exemption include: • A current Florida driver’s license or Florida identification card, and • A current voter registration card or declaration of domicile • Non-US citizens must also provide proof of permanent residency. Qualified residents 65 years of age or older as of January 1, 2013 may also apply for the additional Senior Exemption. Eligible seniors must have a total household adjusted gross income not to exceed $27,030. Seniors must bring a copy of their 2012 Income Tax Return or copy of 2010 Social Security 1099 form if no tax return was filed. For further information visit our website at www.bcpa.net or contact the Outreach Department by phone at 954.357.5579 or email at njones@bcpa.net.

The Staff/Information Office exists to make room reservations and provide information about clubs, organizations and Clubhouse activities. Residents will find numerous flyers available in the office covering a wide variety of topics. Call or visit the Staff/Information Office in person or via telephone: 954428-6892 Option 2; or view notices and activity postings on Channel 99. ATTENTION! Copa Dances Are Back! See info provided below under Class Office. ID Department When I am not in residence in Deerfield Beach Century Village East, what procedures must be followed in order to have guests occupy my unit? 1. Write a letter to the Building President. 2. State the name of the guest(s). 3. Include the exact dates of the visit. 4. The Building President has to issue approval by signing the letter and affixing the building seal. 5. The letter should then be brought to the ID Office for the pass to be issued to the guest(s). NOTE: You will have to call the guest(s) in at the Front Gate when they arrive at CVE. Theater Are there any provisions set up in the Theater to assist hearing-impaired audience members? Yes, we are able to provide three separate options for those Theater/Movie attendees with hearing issues. There is an Infrared Hearing Impaired System in place in the Theater. Headsets are available in the Staff/Informa-

tion Office – there is no charge for use of the headsets, just leave your CVE ID when you pick up your headset. There is a Hearing Impaired radio station – 91.7 FM – that broadcasts Theater performances. You must supply the radio, ear phones and batteries. If a film has closed captioning available, we will present the first matinee and first evening viewing of the film with captioning for our hearingimpaired audience members. If you have questions you may call the Staff/Information Office – 954-428-6892 Option 2; leave your name and phone number so our technician can contact you. Athletic Department What is the proper way to use the Sauna that is located in the Locker Rooms? A set of rules has been posted in the Sauna; please read these carefully prior to use. Do not use the Sauna as a dressing room or to dry towels, clothing or footwear. Each person should bring their own towel and Sauna time is limited to 15 minutes. This is a dry heat Sauna; do not add water to the heating element. Also, the Sauna door is to remain closed at all times. Please respect the privacy of other Sauna users. NOTE: If you have a heart condition, please check with your doctor before using the Sauna. We do not recommend using the facility alone; bring a friend. Use of the Sauna is not recommended after a strenuous workout; a cool down period of one hour is recommended. Recreation Maintenance Are there any pools or tennis

courts in Century Village East that are not part of Recreation responsibility? The Tilford (a.k.a. Le Club) pool and tennis courts are not part of the Recreation Properties and are not maintained by Recreation Maintenance. Any maintenance issues concerning Le Club, the Tilford pool or the Tilford tennis courts should be reported to CVE Master Management, located in the COOCVE Offices. They can be reached by phone at 954-421-5566. NOTE: The COOCVE Office is closed on Fridays. The number for Master Management emergency issues is 1-561-656-6310 (Seacrest Services). Class Office Are the Copa dances returning this year? Yes, we are happy to confirm that we will be offering two (2) Copa dances for this season. The first Copa dance will be Sunday, January 27, and the theme will be Mardi Gras. The second Copa dance will be February 22 with a Hawaiian Night theme. Both dances will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Party Room. Pick up your tickets in the Staff/Information Office for $5 each; at the door, admission cost is $7. Ticket Office What are the Ticket Office hours? The Ticket Office hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, with extended hours on Wednesdays, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. during season. Should there be a need to cancel the Wednesday evening hours a notice will be posted at the Ticket Office.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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at CVE On Monday, March 25, 2013, Temple B’nai Shalom will be holding our Passover Seder starting at 5 p.m. in the Party Room at the Clubhouse. Rabbi Winters and Cantor Sherman will conduct the Seder

All are welcome! Please call Sandy Parness arness 954-725-1384 or Sandy Schmier 954-428-8231 To make your reservation. The cost is $48 Choose brisket, roast chicken or salmon.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Ducks Run AMUCK! We have been asked by a resident, “Is it OK to feed the ducks?” NO! Feeding ducks causes them to lose their fear of humans; they become accustomed to being fed by residents and will approach people, sometimes becoming aggressive. There have been reported instances of residents being attacked by aggressive ducks, some of which are quite large. In addition, feeding them interferes with their natural diet and encourages them to remain in the area and continue to be a nuisance. The end result is that they swim and poop in the pools and make a mess everywhere. Duck feces is a health hazard and an inconvenience to everyone; particularly those who enjoy the pool facilities, as the pool area has to be closed, cleaned and the pool treated for feces. Remember – food in, equals something unpleasant out!


JANUARY 2013

BSO Reminds You To.....

SLAM THE DOOR ON SCAMMERS!

Special Needs Residents Visiting the Clubhouse We have many residents with special needs (handicapped, mobility challenged, etc.) who are not able to access the Clubhouse without assistance. Fortunately for some residents, they are able to enjoy the Clubhouse amenities through the assistance of an aide, family member or friend. Whoever accompanies a special needs individual should never leave that person unaccompanied.

CVE REPORTER

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CVE Watering Schedule

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Frank Murphy and Carol Masciantonio Realtors & Residents Of Century Village

561-414-3747

“Nous Pouvons Vous Aider En Francais Aussi”

Over 200+ Condos For Sale In Century Village Wishing Everyone a Prosperous 2013

Garden 1-1

Islewood A

1-1½

Markham B

1-1½

Tillford R

1 Bedroom / 1-1½ Bath Cles en mains! with Water View!

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Decorator Touch. RENTABLE

$41,900

WOW FACTOR. Quiet Garden View!

Garden

$39,900

2 Bedroom / 1-1½ Bath

2-1½ Farnham P

CORNER. Sunny Unit Through-Out! $45,000

2-1½ Westbury C

Tile, Carpet clean!

2-1½ Farnham C

CORNER. Tiled Throughout!

$44,900

Rentable. Super Clean! Move-In!

$49,000

2-1½ Durham J

High-Rise

2nd Floor View!

$49,900

1 Bedroom / 1½ Bath

High-Rise

2 Bedroom / 1-1½ Bath

2-1½

Cambridge G Great Water View! Near Clubhouse! $55,900

2-1½

Ellesmere B

Terrific Golf Course View!

$52,900

2-1½

Newport G

WoW. Water Preserve View!

$47,500

2-1½

Grantham F

MOVE IN. Garden View! Near Pool!

$79,900

High-Rise

2 Bedroom / 2 Full Bath Private Garden View!

2-2

Oakridge D

CORNER.

2-2

Ventnor G

Golf Course View! Near Pool!

$58,900

2-2

Richmond F

Water View. Great Location!

$79,900

2-2

Lyndhurst K

CORNER. Golf Course View!

$69,900

2-2

Lyndhurst J

Golf Course View! Near Clubhouse!

$75,000

1-1½

Harwood D

Lake View! Central A/C.

$33,900

1-1½

Newport G

Serene Water and Preserve View!

$39,900

1-1½

Berkshire B

Spectacular View! Near Pool!

$72,000

2-2

Ventnor P

1-1½

Harwood F

Water View! Near Clubhouse/Pool!

$49,900

2-2

Harwood D

Incredible Golf Course View! WOW Water View! EXECUTIVE !

$69,500

$72,000 $169,900

We Want To Sell Your Condo! 561-414-3747

Frank@MyRealtorRep.com


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Condo News

The Nature Club Calls Out This Year’s Trips By DORIS WACHSLER

N

ature’s calling! This season’s cooling temperatures and dry days are ideal for outdoor exploration with the CVE Nature Club so we have planned events in the coming weeks to stretch your legs and open your eyes to nature’s wonders. Our varied program has trips to view marine life, tropical trees and butterflies, as well as birds and animals of the South Florida habitat.

Gumbo Limbo Nature Center is a delightful treat. First, on December 17, the Club went to the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center. If you’ve never been there, or haven’t visited recently, you are in for a delightful treat when you go. Beautiful new sea tanks were recently opened. Two tanks feature near-shore mangrove and reef habitats; another holds an artificial shipwreck with deep sea fish. To tell us about these great interactive displays and all the other features of the Center, a staff naturalist guided us on a private 90-minute tour of the butterfly garden, boardwalks and tower. If you missed the Club’s visit, try to go on your own; Gumbo Limbo is nearby

A totally new and different trip to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale on March 20. in Boca Raton on A1A.We welcome everyone, Nature Club member or not, to ride the free bus with us to Monarch Hill Renewable Energy Park on January 16. Another guided tour, it’s courtesy of Waste Management Corporation. We’ll hear how our garbage and recyclables are converted into electricity for 9,000 homes. Just off Powerline Road, the Energy Park and its plantings tower above everything around, so there’s a great view for miles. We’ll have great appetites after being at that altitude, won’t we? Fortunately, a sponsored lunch follows the tour. Who doesn’t love a zoo? The Palm Beach Zoo is one of the best! By special request of its members, the Nature Club will return there this season on January 23. The many offerings of the zoo—1,400 animals in its lush tropical habitat, scheduled performances throughout the day, and close encounters with the free-roaming peacocks—are special enough. But besides walking the grounds to see the rare white alligator, lively sloths and playful river otters, we will have a private tour in the Tropics of the Americas Exhibit. It’s unusual to have

Mayan pyramids and sculptures of a bygone era in a zoo this size, but Palm Beach

Tropics of the Americas Exhibit. with Mayan pyramids at the Palm Beach Zoo. has done it. In 2006, Animal Planet named this exhibit one of the “Ultimate Zoo” exhibits. Our guide will describe the artifacts and discuss the native cultures of the Central and South American regions as we go through the recreated rainforest. Animals that make their home in these areas—jaguars, tapirs, cavies, and giant anteaters, to name a few—will be around us. From fauna to flora, animals to plants, we will go by bus to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens in Coral Gables on February 27. This garden spectacular is not to be missed! It is one of the world’s foremost botanic gardens with extensive collections of rare tropical plants including palms, cycads, flowering trees and vines. We

We welcome everyone, Nature Club member or not, to ride the free bus with us to Monarch Hill Renewable Energy Park on January 16.

are scheduled for a 45-minute tram tour around the gardens and plenty of time to view our favorite sites individually. Many artists exhibit their sculpture, chandeliers and other works in the fountains and conservatory. To name but a few, Zimbabwe arts are featured currently and the Garden’s own outstanding Chihuli pieces are always on display. The CVE Nature Club is offering a totally new and different trip to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale on March 20. The International Game Fish Association was formally launched in 1939 at the American Museum of Natural History; the first members in the International

seagrass beds and mangrove trees, plus a chance to touch some living animals such as sea stars, sea urchins and horseshoe crabs from these habitats. The Wetlands Lab is a guided tour through the four-acre wetlands outside with an instructor who knows the ecosystems and animals. Our knowledgeable guide will teach us those interesting facts about our environment that we wouldn’t learn otherwise. Here, in its Legacy Gallery, is an exhibit of Zane Gray’s 1,000 pound fish caught with a rod and reel. You will also find fishing simulators that demonstrate the effort required to reel in various species. Just feel the pull exerted by that grouper! Great IMAX theatre! Touch screen computers follow the history of recreational fishing. Included also are a recreated saltwater marsh and wetlands with alligators and fish. Are you hooked yet? Do a lot or do a little; you’ll enjoy it either way.

Fairchild Tropical Botanic Gardens in Coral Gables on February 27, is a garden spectacular not to be missed! Game Fish Hall of Fame were inducted in 1998. Come along with us for fun and adventure on this trip! We’ll have two private tours included: a Touch Tank Lab to learn about three South Florida habitats – coral reefs,

For information about these trips and the Club’s monthly programs, pick up our newsletter, Nature Voice, at the Staff Office in the Clubhouse and/ or call the CVE Nature Club President, Janet Rothkopf, at 954-428-3025.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Condo News Century Village Recent Sales AREA Durham Ellesmere Harwood Markham Newport Oakridge Swansea Upminster Ventnor Westbury

Building Durham T Ellelsmere A Ellesmere C Harwood F Markham B Markham Q Newport H Newport S Newport S Oakridge D Oakridge F Oakridge P Swansea A Upminster I Ventnor R Westbury G Westbury J

Unit No 559 3018 172 4074 46 370 4033 3092 1092 1029 2060 275 1018 178 250 137 175

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Price 37,000 60,000 20,000 65,000 31,000 33,000 35,500 47,000 18,900 78,000 80,000 22,000 55,000 36,000 25,000 34,900 18,500

Size 2/1.5 2/1.5 1/1 2/1.5 1/1.5 2/1.5 1/1.5 1/1.5 1/1.5 2/2 2/2 1/1 2/1.5 2/1.5 1/1.5 1/1 1/1

dOn't Dump it, Donate it ! Save the environment. Help our Community. Donate your used Cell phones and Print Cartridges! ______________________________________ Dear Century Village East residents,

FUND for PARKINSON DISEASE RESEARCH, Inc, is conducting a cell phone and print cartridge recycling fund raiser. There is nothing to buy and we do not want your money. We are simply asking you to protect the environment by donating your used digital cell phones and empty ink/toner cartridges. Proceeds will help fund this local charity. We greatly appreciate your support! Please bring your old print cartridges and your old, no longer used cell phones to the special bins outside the main entrances to our Clubhouse - upper level or lower level. You may also find a convenient bin at the entrance to the COOCVE, CVEMM office near Le Club. Just dump your items in the bins- no paper work, no questions. We have an arrangement with a company that will pick up our bins each week and pay us varying amounts for your "donations." If you would like to know how this recycling helps our environment, please email us and we will send you the facts behind this claim. fund4pksn@aol.com PO Box 4594 Deerfield Beach, FL THIS IS A NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION AND YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE. A COPY OF OUR OFFICIAL REGISTRATION, NUMBERED -N11000009261, AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION. MAY BE OBTAINED FROM FLORIDA DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY PHONE. THE TOLL-FREE NUMBER OF THE DIVISION IS 1-800-HELP-FLA (435-7352) – CALLING FROM WITHIN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, OR (850) 488-2221 – CALLING FROM OUTSIDE OF FLORIDA. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE."

LOOKING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION OF COMPUTER SAVVY VOLUNTEER FEDERAL INCOME TAX PREPARERS FOR OUR NEIGHBORS.

Where?   In CVE Clubhouse   When?    Monday afternoons for four (4) hours, First Monday in February through April 15 The returns are prepared on computers and then filed that afternoon electronically. Each certified volunteer will prepare 30-40 returns during the ten week tax season. A copy of the return is given to our clients There is no charge for this voluntary service Volunteers will need to apply to AARP to volunteer and be certified annually by taking and passing an online IRS test including ETHICS, BASIC, INTERMEDIATE and ADVANCED TAX THEORY Training can be accomplished on line and/or at a January training provided by experienced AARP Volunteers

If interested call the

District coordinator

Jack Fink at 732-213-4522 or Dan Pearl at 954-815-1348

Winter                             

4091 Oakridge U                 Deerfield Beach, FL 33442   

954-360.2947 Summer

200 Market St. #411 Lowell, MA 018527

978-452.8039   


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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27A

1 (888) 738-5195 www.LifePolicyPayout.com

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tires/check tire pressure pRotate inspect antipVisually freeze/coolant, air and cabin filters, belts, wiper blades, exterior lights Top off all fluid levels Check Engine Light/ABS/Air Bag

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

DUMPSTER MAN SAYS

CVE Clubhouse Library

JANUARY BOOK FAIR

For a $1.00 donation you will be able to purchase two (2) hard covered books this month.

TO OUR SEASONAL RESIDENTS

Hooray! Hooray! Single stream recycling is starting in our Village this January. Expect this change to take place over several months. Building Presidents will be given advance notice before their roll carts are discarded.

Some Blue Newspaper Dumpsters will be repaired, some will be replaced and some additional ones will be added. To Recycle Right, adhere to the signs on the Dumpster:

PLEASE, PLEASE, NO PLASTIC BAGS AND REMEMBER TO FLATTEN THOSE BOXES Presidents! Please designate an area where your unit owners can place their

We welcome your volunteering at the CVE Clubhouse

bulk objects for pickup on Wednesday. Items should Not be placed in front of

Library. Even if you can’t give three hours a week,

or on the side of dumpsters where the trucks cannot reach them on Thursday.

whatever you can give will be invaluable. Please call Ruth Nesselroth at 954-428-4294

RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE RECYCLE RIGHT Your Solid Waste and Recycling Committee Felicia Prince and Jules Kesselman


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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29A

Condo News

Volunteers Needed

Volunteers are needed to deliver Meals on Wheels to the needy residents of the Village. Please contact

Matter of Balance – LEGAL CORNER Do You Have Concerns about Falling?

Patrick J. Murphy General Legal Counsel For COOCVE and MM

By SHARI BAER, BSW – Public Education Coordinator

A

Matter of Balance is an award-winning program designed to manage falls and increase activity levels. Classes will be held weekly for eight weeks starting: February 5 through March 26, 2013 from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. at the Activity Center, Room B. Refreshments and participant workbooks are free of charge! This class is the result

of a partnership between Deerfield Beach Fire Rescue and the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Broward, funding provided through the Florida Department of Elder Affairs and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. For more information or to register for the class, call: Shari Baer, Aging & Disability Resource Center of Broward 954-745-9567 ext. 267.

Marvin Schmier

at 954-570-3316.

CVE Simplified Presents “Economies of Scale” in Multi-Condominium Associations with Donna Capobianco

Tuesday, January 22 at 7 PM In Clubhouse Room GPA November’s presentation “Steps to Merge” dealt with specific legal requirements, merger steps, cost and all the help we will get. Our next presentation on January 22nd will delve into “economies of scale” experienced by existing Florida multi-condominium associations. Our guest speaker will present actual cost savings experienced by actual communities to give us the big picture of savings we can realistically expect as we move forward.

If you plan to attend, please RSVP to CVESimplified@gmail.com so we can contact you if any change. (Seating is limited, first come first serve basis.) If you did not see the 1st or 2nd presentation, please, in your email, request the video links so you can watch them and be better prepared.

Patrick J. Murphy & Associates, P.A.

G

randparents’ Rights Florida law has increasingly recognized the bonds between grandparents and grandchildren in relationship to both custody and visitation. Grandparents do have rights and can seek both visitation and custody. Typically, a grandparent will be granted the right to visitation during and after a divorce is finalized. If a grandparent is denied visitation, an application should be made with the court in the county in which the child resides. A grandparent has the obligation to prove to the court that visitation with the child is in the best interests of that child. Some of the factors a court would take into consideration in deciding if a grandparent’s visit is appropriate is the relationship between the child and the grandparent; the relationship between each of the child’s parents or a person with whom the child is residing with and the grandparent; time elapsed since the child last had contact with the grandparent; the effect such visit would have on the relationship between the child, his parents or the person with whom the child is residing; the sharing agreement if the parents are divorced that exists between the parents and the child; parents’ good faith in filing of the application; and, finally any neglect or

abuse history by the grandparents towards the child. In those unfortunate circumstances where a custodial parent is incapable of providing an appropriate home environment for the child, Florida law allows a mechanism for grandparents or other relatives to intervene on behalf of the child. They can petition for temporary custody before a family court judge or a guardianship, temporary or permanently, through probate court. Keep in mind that the burden is high and one must show extraordinary circumstances to substantiate reasons, but at all times keeping in mind what is in the best interests of the child. If you are a relative or a grandparent seeking visitation or custody of a child or trying to remove a child from a dangerous situation, you should consult with a lawyer of your choice to further determine your rights and obligations. Pat Murphy is General Counsel for CVE Master Management Company, Inc., COOCVE, and the CVE Reporter as well as for various Associations within CVE. Please call Pat for a free consultation on this or any other matter. His address is: 272 W. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield Beach, FL 33341. He can be reached by phone at 954-5255509 or emailed at: pmurphy@ murphys-law.cc

TAROT READER

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

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*Must mention special prior to service. Discounts are not combinable with VIP Discount Program, insurance or other offers or programs. The patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours responding to the advertisement for this free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Minimum fees only. Dr. Neal Ziegler DN 6483 **With approved credit.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Condo News

CVE Simplified By DONNA CAPOBIANCO

I

n the November presentation we discussed in detail the legal “Steps to Merge”. This is not a quick thing to do. The process will take several months to complete. We also learned the advantages of being in the first group to merge, some of which are: • Participate in deciding language of documents • Be prepared to bring Merger to your members for their vote by your annual meeting next year. • Lock in current pricing through March 15, 2013 After March 15, associations wishing to merge are welcome to do so, however they will not be considered part of the initial group and legal pricing will be subject to change. INITIAL STEPS: By March 15, 2013 if you are considering merging: 1. Email CVEsimplified@ gmail.com if you wish me to attend one of your meetings to help educate your Board and/or your members. 2. Have minutes show-

ing majority of your Board voted to proceed. (Check documents for actual % vote by BOARD required.) (Does not mean your association has merged, ONLY that your Board intends to proceed in that direction.) 3. Call to retain our attorney at 954-486-7774. (See below for cost depending on how many associations join at same time.) (You do not pay all at once but as the work occurs.) 4. Email CVEsimplified@ gmail.com confirming you have retained attorney. Legal costs: $2500 per association, two or more associations, but less than five at one time, 10% discount from the above ($2,250). Five or more associations but less than 10 at one time, 15% discount ($2,125). More than 10 associations at one time, 20% discount ($2,000). Our next presentation on January 22 will delve into “economies of scale” experienced by existing Florida multi-condominium associations. Our guest speaker will

present actual cost savings experienced by actual communities to give us the big picture of savings we can realistically expect as we move forward and grow. Most of us know, by our experience buying from COSTCO or BJ’s, when we buy in bulk, we save. A multi condominium association can contract for multiple building services and work and obtain savings for doing so. All of us have to comply with the upcoming 40 Year Inspection & Recertification requirements. Just think what we might save by contracting for multiple building inspections and resulting work requirements rather than contracting individually. We know just five properties under one set of insurance policies will likely cost less than each having to write its own. All our 253 associations redundantly obtain bids and pay for all services and work today on our own. The more associations merge together into one multi condominium association, the more all of us

can save over time. Learning actual “economies of scale” achieved by those managing multi-condominium associations will provide us a better perspective of what cost savings associations that merge can expect. If your Board is thinking

of working toward merging in 2013, just follow INITIAL STEPS outlined above. If you plan to attend the January 22 presentation or wish to learn more, receive links to the 1st and 2nd presentation videos, etc., please email: CVEsimplified@gmail.com


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Consumer Interest

“Ask Lori…Parrish on Appraisals” Broward County Property Appraiser Lori Parrish Answers Your Questions…

T

ax Savings for Eligible Homesteaders! Dear Lori, Can you tell me what new state constitutional amendments passed and what it means for eligible property owners? V.K., Plantation Florida voters in November approved three new state constitutional amendments which create additional homestead tax savings for eligible property owners. Some of the changes take effect immediately for the 2013 tax year. Other portions first require the Florida Legislature and local governments to enact changes in law before

the additional benefits can be carried out. Combat-Disabled Veterans. This amendment deletes the requirement that a veteran has to be a Florida resident at the time of entering military service to receive a Veteran Property Tax Discount. This exemption, which takes effect immediately for 2013, provides an additional property tax discount on the homesteaded property of partially or totally permanently disabled veterans, age 65 or older, as of January 1, whose disability was combat related. Surviving Spouses of First Responders Who Die in the

Complete

property; is 65 or older; and whose household income does not exceed the income limitation; and/or: An additional exemption equal to the assessed value of the property to an owner who has title to real estate in Florida with a just value less than $250,000; has maintained permanent residence on the property for not less than 25 years; is 65 or older and whose household income does not exceed the income limitation. The income limitation for 2012 is a Household Adjusted Gross Income of no more than $27,030 (adjusted annually); the State will determine the 2013 limitation in January 2013. If you would like more information about property tax exemptions, exemption filing, assessments, community outreach events and homebound visits, please visit our website at www.bcpa.net or contact our office directly at 954.445.6830. If you have a question for Lori, please email her at lori@bcpa.net or write to her at the Broward County Property Appraiser’s Office, 115 South Andrews Avenue, Room 111, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33301.

Armen’s Auto Sales

Remember Snowbirds:

Line of Duty This amendment allows the Legislature to provide property tax relief on homesteaded property to the surviving spouse of a veteran who died from service-connected causes on active duty

or the surviving spouse of a first responder who died in the line of duty. The Legislature must adopt enabling statutes before this exemption becomes effective. Legislative action is expected by May 2013, which may permit eligible persons to apply these new savings starting in 2013. Additional Homestead Tax Exemption for Seniors This allows counties or municipalities to grant either or both of the following: An exemption not exceeding $50,000 to any person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate; maintains their permanent residence on the

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JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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33A

My Presence in the Village

By MARTY POPELSKY, Commissioner District 3

Y

ou may have noticed Florida Department of Transportation working on SW 10th Street from Powerline Road to East Newport Center Drive in Deerfield Beach over the last few months. These project improvements include repaving SW 10th Street, modifying the shoulder width, installing a video detection system, installing guardrails on the bridge, new signage, and new pavement markings. In addition, FDOT will also be installing ADA ramps and some minor landscaping to beautify the area. The project is expected to be complete in February. I hope you all enjoy the new improvements right in our back yard. A HAPPY AND A HEALTHY NEW YEAR TO ALL! NEWS & UPCOMING EVENTS City Commission/CRA Meeting schedule for January The January 4 and 18 regular City Commission meetings have been cancelled. The only City Commission Meeting for the month will be on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 7 p.m. The

CRA meeting will be held on January 8, at 6:30 p.m. Both meetings will be held at City Hall. Deerfield Beach Green Market at the Cove When: Sundays, beginning November 4 until April 28, 2013 Time: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. N.E. Focal Point CASA 15th Annual Fashion Show Luncheon “Elegance of America” – January 30 When: Wednesday, January 30, 11:30 a.m. Where: Lighthouse Point

Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 N.E. 42nd Street, Lighthouse Point.

Fashions by Sondro at the Cove. Benefiting N.E. Focal Point Children’s, Alzheimer’s, Senior’s, and Adults Tickets are $50 in advance.  Call 954480-4460 for information. The 33rd Annual Festival of the Arts – Jan. 26 & 27 When: Saturday, January 26 and Sunday, January 27, 2013, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day. Where: The festival takes place on Deerfield Beach, south of the International Fishing Pier. The Festival will feature 140 talented artists and a continuous presentation of live

music on the center stage. A variety of food and beverages will also be offered. Remember that I am your only full time Commissioner. I am always here to assist you in any way I can. Call me any time, and I will be glad to help you resolve your problems. City Hall Office  954-4804218 City Assistant Phone  954480-4263 Email:    web.commission@ Deerfield-Beach.com Regards & Good Health Marty Popelsky Your District 3 Commissioner

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Congressman Ted Deutch

Traveling Office Hours At the Century Village Clubhouse  

An assistant from the Congressional Office and State Senators Office will be available to meet with you the last Friday of every month from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Recreation Committee Office - Ground Floor of the Clubhouse

If you need any assistance with Medicare, Social Security, immigration or any other federal or state related issue please visit the Clubhouse traveling office.    Please feel free to contact Congressman Deutch’s Broward Director, Theresa Brier at (954) 935-5378 with any questions or concerns.

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Sounding Board

The Art of the Ibis By SHELLY BASKIN

S

everal weeks ago, I was enjoying the view through my rear window. Everything was in place; the variety of ducks in the canal, the turtles swimming near the surface with only their heads protruding, the Wood Stork looking for a fish or two. There was also an Ibis – alone! This is the magnificent water bird with the orange curved beak used for yanking out a grub or two, a worm or an insect. The end of the beak is usually temporarily brown from digging through the dirt. They are a beautiful bright white, with only a slight amount of black under their tail feathers and at the edge of the wings that can only be seen in flight – outstretched. The one I call Andrea had a pronounced limp. These water birds have four claws on each leg, one in the rear to act as a thumb and three in the front. In this way, any of G-d’s creatures, whether great or small, are able to get around and survive. She was obviously in some pain that was

noticeable with every step. Andrea was separated from her flock of about 30 to 50. Maybe it was difficult for her to keep up with her friends or maybe the injury was too great and she was discarded by the others. She would visit almost daily. To be a friend to a bird or a person is pretty much the same, I feel. Speak to them softly, friendly and caringly. It looked as though the Ibis was able to sustain itself; she was strong in flight. It seemed the only problem was in walking and being alone and, keeping up with the others. She seemed to follow me around, out back, hoping that I could do something on her behalf to make her well. The streamlined, wellproportioned, eating machine was surviving better every day. The limp in her right leg was diminishing with each week that passed. I was hoping that Andrea could survive a few more days, and I believed that I could give her some hope just by being there for her. Anyone that

deals with, or loves, animals or creatures knows that if

you believe in them, they will react in a positive manner.

That flock of Ibis’, that we have all seen, cherished, taken photos of, remarked about, adored and marveled at, dropped in from the sky nearby. It was a scene taken from the movie blockbuster, The Extra Terrestrial, where the spaceship came back for ET. This group of soaring beauties landed near Andrea, and I was thrilled to watch her become a part of the family again. Of course, they all became re-acquainted and surrounded my friend before moving to another section where the grubs and worms seemed more abundant. Birds are very much like us. They want to be happy, around friends, part of a group and especially, healthy; so do we! Taking a lesson from Andrea is almost similar to life in humans—look skyward, have hope, wish for the best, care for others, be friendly and maybe we shall be uplifted in our daily routine. If a bird can do it, so can we!


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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35A

A Cure for Insomnia By SHIRLEY RAVICH

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t my daughter’s home in Madison, Wisconsin, there is no cable television. At 9 p.m. when my four-year-old granddaughter Sonia, finally retires, it’s lights out throughout the house. This means I am confined to my bedroom with warnings to be very careful not to wake up Sonia. I wish somebody would threaten to wake me up. That is if I could ever fall asleep. These are my rebellious bedtime thoughts until I discover Me (Retro) TV, one of the few channels that the antiquated set can master. Before this, I flip through the few available non-cable channels, searching for something of interest. If only I liked amateur singing and dancing competitions or sit-coms of the modern vintage. I think longingly of my many cable choices at home— seemingly endless true crime type shows like Who the Bleep Did I Marry? or even better, the high roller real housewives’ sagas, not to mention multiple Law and Order reruns. I can watch these all night if insomnia strikes. To make matters worse, regular network programming ends at 10 p.m. in Wisconsin, and I am confronted with an hour of the local Madison news. I flip through the channel selection twice, mainly hitting commercials. But then when I

hear the theme song from the Bob Newhart Show, I think I am hallucinating. I settle in to watch, remembering that my husband and I in our pre-children days, used to regularly view this show and think it was funny. Why, I wonder, as the opening scene begins. Maybe there have been too many inept psychologist and annoying neighbor jokes over the years. While I am trying to pinpoint the exact time period of this vintage show, the remote slips from my fingers and I am miraculously asleep at 9:35 p.m. But not for long. A half hour later, I wake up to a haywire theme song and test patterns which I quickly identify as The Twilight Zone, the very early half hour version that rocked the nighttime television world. There he is, a disheveled Rod Serling, chain-smoking and introducing the 1960’s Twilight Zone in all of its former splendor. This is a treat, I decide, admiring the black and white picture and the impressive author credits that announce the story, a science fiction classic. Timeless except for the characters not talking on cell phones. But, the pace is slow. The characters are slow. And where are those chilling twists that used to give me nightmares? Or was that Alfred Hitchcock Presents? Before I can decide, I am, once

again, asleep until an unforgettable theme song nudges me awake. Like greeting an old friend, I meet Perry Mason’s intense stare, and take comfort in his soothing voice. In the late 50s that haunting theme, a siren’s song, would call me from my bedroom in my parent’s house, away from my tedious homework, and into the living room. There was Perry and Della and Paul all waiting for me, along with my father who had put aside his nighttime reading. No explanations are needed about unfinished homework. What was important about this show, explained my father, was that it always had a good story, a story that would keep you wide awake. No falling asleep on Perry. But, lulled by these soothing voices and the secure (no one ever tries to murder Perry) talking heads environment, I am once again asleep. But not for long. The final playing of the theme song jars me awake. What happened? We are already on to the next show. Who loves you baby? Lollypop man himself—Kojak. Five minutes into this and I am again asleep—this time for the night, an unprecedented 11:30 p.m. Over coffee the next morning, my daughter, Katie, nervously asks me the big ques-

tion, “How did you sleep, Mom?” She knows about my insomnia problems. Foolishly, I have complained to her about sleepless nights during our long distance phone calls, just proving that you can’t give your kids too much information about your life. “I slept great.” I can see by her frown that she thinks I am lying. “No, really. I slept great.” “All night?” “More or less.” She is relentless. “What time did you fall asleep?” “About 11:30.” “That’s—great. What happened?” I hesitate. Shall I tell her the truth, thus reinforcing the no cable television policy that I have so strongly opposed? “I don’t know. It’s so quiet here. Peaceful.”

She smiles, and, mercifully, Sonia interrupts us. “Grandma, can we play one of our games?” “Don’t bother Grandma right now,” Katie warns. “She needs her coffee.” “No, I can play. I’m fine.” Without excuses I follow Sonia to our designated play area, taking my cell phone from my jeans pocket, imagining how shocked the Comcast representative will be when I cancel my Cable television subscription. My husband will be even more shocked, maybe outraged. But I’ll deal with him later—after I’ve had another good night’s sleep.

Please Don’t Feed the Ducks By RACHEL GRECO One night I happened to be swimming over at the Richmond pool. I was looking up at the beautiful sky and bright shining stars and enjoying the peace and quiet.  All of a sudden upon looking up I saw two very large ducks ascending over my head and landing with a splash right on top of me.  I immediately shooed them away and began yelling at them to get out of the pool.  They went on the outside, perched with their feathers on their hip and looked at me indignantly, as if to say, “This is our pool, who are you and what are you doing here?”  After a short time, and witnessing them making a mess around the perimeter, I gave up and got out of the pool.   They jumped back in, not caring at all about me.  So, I jumped back in and splashed and yelled at them to get out.  Guess who won?  

I noticed they put a large box, directly in front of the pool area. This box is supposed to be a deterrent, by

making a sound to frighten them away. I think one of the ducks was talking to the box, and I was thinking, could this

be the beginning of a beautiful love affair? The following morning I was out early playing tennis at the court adjacent to Richmond pool.  I later saw the men trying to clean up what the ducks had left the night before and early morning.  I know this pool was just deep cleaned the day before, and imagine this is a costly proposition affecting everyone’s budget.  I mentioned to my friend who also swims and lives at Richmond, that maybe they can fly these birds to Russia and drop them off?  She is from Russia and with her accent, replied, “Oh, no good, they have navigator system in their heads.”  I laughed, but realized the truth about the situation, knowing these ducks were born right outside of the pool.  The humane society laws are:  These ducks cannot be destroyed.  This is a huge problem, and has been going

on for the last several years. I was out golfing yesterday and guess who came to visit me?   Not sure, if they were the same two, and remembered a few years back, I hit one with a golf ball, and felt terrible.  They are very brazen and nothing affects them.   My friend and I are trying to get a picture of them at the pool, but ever since I decided to write this article, somehow they are coming out in the middle of the night.  They’re still leaving evidence of being there, so therefore we are pleading with those who ignore the signs and feed the birds, animals or ducks, whatever the signs read. We all love animals, birds and nature, except maybe the guys who have to clean this up every morning.  If you see people feeding these ducks, take a picture with your IPhone, and we can post them.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

BROWARD HEALTH NORTH WISHES YOU A HAPPY NEW YEAR!

PRESENTS

January Announcements FREE Lectures & Events NEW! FREE HEALTH SCREENINGS EVERY MONTH AT CENTURY VILLAGE!

Dr. Matthew Pezda, Opthamology The First Tuesday of the month is FREE Health Screening and Healthy Talk Day! Broward Health North is bringing you a FREE cholesterol/sugar screening to the first 55 people who register on the first Tuesday of each month at 8 am in GP-N. (You must fast from midnight on). The health screenings will start at 9 am and be followed by an interesting health presentation from one of our experts at 10 am. Tuesday, January 8 from 9-11am.

IMAGINE HIP REPLACEMENT WITH A FAST RECOVERY AND NO MUSCLES CUT!

Find out more about Anterior Hip Replacement using state-of-the-art technology. It’s less invasive, features a quicker recovery and helps get you back to being you again. The BHN Joint Replacement Center features all private rooms & bathrooms, family centered patient education and group therapy. Tuesday, January 8 from 6-7pm presented by Dr. Steven Naide, Orthopedic Surgeon, Medical Director BHN Orthopedic Trauma BHN Conference Center, 201 E Sample Road, Deerfield Beach, FL 33064. Reservations required due to limited availability. Call the Health Line at 954.759.7400 to reserve your space

THE SENIOR DATING GAME

Remember that great TV show from the 60’s? We’re bringing it back …. SENIOR STYLE!A busy, active life can help keep your brain young and healthy! Making new friends and socializing is a great way to stay healthy. We are looking for fun-loving singles 65+ to be a part of our dating game panel. AUDITIONS: Monday, January 7, 2013 10am-noon at BHN Classroom 5 For more info or to RSVP for auditions call 954.786.5197! DATING GAME EVENT: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 3-5pm at BHN Conference Center. Seating is limited to the first 150 people, reservations are required. Reserve your seat, call 954.759.7400!

Support Groups for the Community

ALZHEIMER'S & RELATED DEMENTIA FOR MORE INFO: 954.786.7392 Support group for SPOUSES and/or ADULT CHILDREN of those with Alzheimer's or related dementia – Every Tuesday from 10:30 - Noon in Neuro Resource Center Every Friday from 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m. in the Neuro Resource Center Support group for ADULT CHILDREN of those with Alzheimer's disease or related dementia 2nd and 4th Tuesday of the month from 6 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. in the Neuro Resource Center DAY C.A.P.- Helps caregivers deal with special concerns of caring for a dependant loved one. Takes place over 4 consecutive days, four hours per day NIGHT C.A.P. – Same as DAY C.A.P. but held two evenings a week for two consecutive weeks from 6-9pm for adult children or working caregivers

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 954.786.7333 Support group for STROKE SURVIVORS and/or their CAREGIVERS 2nd Thursday of the month 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. followed by rehabilitative exercises from 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. in the Neuro Resource Center

PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 954.786.2305 Support group for those with Parkinson’s Disease and/or their CAREGIVERS 2nd Tuesday of the month 1 p.m. - 3 p.m. support group and exercises in the Neuro Resource Center

TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 954.786.2400 3rd Tuesday of each month 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. in the NBMC Conference Center

CANCER SUPPORT GROUPS Spanish Speaking Women’s Cancer Group

1st Monday of every month Neuro Resource Center—off main lobby 6 p.m. Please rsvp to Patty Gonzalez 754-366-6219

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP 1st Thursday of the month 6pm RSVP to Linda Watson – 954.786.5127

MEDITATION & RELAXATION GROUP Last Thursday of the month 6pm RSVP to Linda Watson - 954.786.5127

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Last day of the month 10 a.m. until noon, Please rsvp to Linda Watson 954-786-5127 Must Be Registered To Participate!!

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JANUARY 2013

It’s a Crime By HELENE WAYNE s I closed the blinds on the patio windows, the sun was going down and throwing its last rays on the lawn behind the building. There on the green grass was a sea of the color pink. If you look at it more closely, you will see that there are

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these tiny little pink flowers growing on a short stem. We all know they are classified as “weeds.” Usually, this type of thing we do not want on our lawns. Actually, the color against the green of the grass where they were not growing was truly a treat for the eyes. I know that the men will

CVE REPORTER

be here in the next few days with those nasty, noisy lawn mowers and all our pretty little flowers will be gone. Unfortunately, I also know that these pretty little things can play havoc on a lawn and must be removed. When our building was first opened, in its formative years, we who were on the Board of Directors were really gung-ho on tropical plantings. Our gardening committee purchased and installed plants called Night Blooming

Jasmine (a member of the olive family). It never had any fruit but it had flowers of many colors. It also threw off a fragrant scent in the nighttime hours. We installed them in front of the tile walls on the front of the building. Then came the local gardening crews with their clippers and lawn mowers, and they started to trim them like a hedge. So, hedges they became and the flowers never had the opportunity to come out again. With no flowers, of course, there was no lovely

few pills and a glass of water before her daughter. Rachel dutifully swallowed the pills and returned the glass to her mother. With a deep sigh, Mrs. Miller retrieved the glass and disappeared inside the flat. “Would you like to play cards?” Rachel took a deck from under her chair. “Sure.” “Gin Rummy, A Hundred and One or Casino?” “Gin Rummy is okay.” Expertly, she dealt seven cards each; I collected them in my hand and although I had three kings, two aces and two threes, I decided to allow her to win. After all, she couldn’t play with her peers while the entire street was my playground. “Your turn,” she said. After we played a few rounds, I realized that she wanted me to win. Perhaps, it would induce me to visit her again. Without its competitive edge, the game turned out to be a disaster. We both laughed. Just then, the rags peddler’s wagon filled with assorted junk and drawn by a tired old horse rumbled down the street. The bushybearded driver wore wellworn mismatched clothes, and a battered wool cap. He shouted in a high, tremulous voice, “Rex, Rex.” “Why does he say Rex? What does that mean?” Rachel asked. “He’s from the old country and can’t pronounce the letter “a” so rags becomes rex. She grinned, “And I always thought he was selling something special called Rex!” “Me, too, until I figured it out.” I said. Then I told her that Perry Weinstein, pretending he was a knight on horseback, wielded a yardstick and chased the substitute teacher around the classroom. Rachel laughed again. And Itsik Shapiro was kept in after school

for a month for putting a live turtle in Miss Adelstein’s desk. She giggled and slapped her knees. “I haven’t had so much fun since my seventh birthday party when my parents took me to Belmont Park and I rode a horse on the merry-go-round.” “I always wanted to be a comedian.” “Comedienne,” she corrected me. At that moment, the girls below called, “Hey Annie, come on down; we’re playing Mother May I Take a Step and we need you.” I rose from my chair. “Gotta go, see you around.” “Will the street still be here after I’m gone? “What do you mean?” “The children, the games, the iceman, milkman, rexman and Artie.” “Where are you going? I asked. “To a beautiful place. Ma can’t come with me yet but she‘ll meet me one day. You’ll also come but not for a long time.” “Oh,” I said, finally understanding. “But I’m not afraid because the soul lives forever.” “Yes, of course.” “It’s just sad leaving all this behind.” She gestured to the street. “It’s like a movie – some win, some lose, some laugh and some fall and cry. And I sit here and watch everything.” I took her hand. “Someday soon you’ll come downstairs and be in the movie too.” “Maybe,” she said in my mother’s adult voice. I knew then that, although she was a child like me, she knew more about life and its joys and pain, than all of us on the street. The children’s voices chimed below in unison. “Well, are you coming? We don’t have all day.” I didn’t move. “Go Annie. Now is your time to play. If you come tomorrow,

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aroma to enjoy. Our committee contacted the company that was taking care of the trimming and mowing. They said they would take care of it. But, as you can see, they are still hedges. We tried to have our Board of Directors, over the years, take care of it but it never came to pass. As we all know, nature can be so beautiful if you let it. It is truly a crime for man to ruin its opportunity to really show its stuff.

The Girl on the Balcony By AVIVA RAVEL

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ll through the long summer days we played hopscotch, tag, hideand-go seek, skipped rope, and bounced our balls to the tune of My Name is Alice… The boys were occupied with boisterous games like kick the can, and shmateh ball (an old sock stuffed with rags, served as a baseball) while some of us spent entire days on roller skates. The street was safe then, it was our second home. All summer long, Rachel Miller sat alone on her second-storey balcony and watched the happenings on the street. Her pale face, framed by light blonde hair, never lost its tired expression. When the street was wrapped in darkness and our mother’s voices called us in a discordant chorus to come home for supper, Rachel rose and took one last look at the street and disappeared inside her flat. No one raised their eyes to speak to her; it was as if she didn’t exist. Rachel had not attended school since Purim so it was obvious to anyone who gave her a second thought that she was very sick. Sometimes I noticed that her wistful gaze followed Artie, the cutest boy on the block, as he rode his two-wheeler, carefully avoiding collisions with the children who swept by on their roller skates. I don’t know what possessed me to climb the narrow spiral staircase to her balcony that August afternoon; perhaps I was overcome by pity for a ten-year-old who spent her days confined to her balcony or perhaps by curiosity, an inner need to know what it was like to be Rachel Miller. She was a year younger than I so we had never attended the same classes. I dismissed the thought that her illness might be catchy, like measles or mumps; and in a moment, I found myself on her

balcony facing her. “Hi,” I said awkwardly. “Hi,” she replied softly, staring at me in wonderment as though I had made a sudden appearance from outer space. “Can I visit?” “Sure, please sit.” She fingered the tiny gold Magen David that glistened at her throat. She rubbed her arms as though to relieve a persistent itch. There was a softness in her gaze despite the disease that ravaged her body leaving her thin and weak. She gestured to an overturned orange crate that served as a chair. On the table lay an unopened Nancy Drew mystery and a half glass of what appeared to be lemonade. “Will you go to school in September?” I asked. I knew that was a dumb question but I couldn’t think of anything else to say. “The doctor said I don’t have to. That is, not until I’m well.” “There’s a lot of time to get well. It’s over a month before school begins.” “Yes,” she said faintly and rubbed her arm as though to relieve a persistent itch. The door to her house opened on a big woman wrapped in a large blue apron. A kerchief covered her grey hair, except for a few strays that fell on her forehead. A big smile formed on her round face. “Would you like some lemonade?” She spoke in the familiar Yiddish accent of my parents. “No thanks, I’m not thirsty.” “I’ll bring some anyway, maybe later you’ll want to drink. You can stay as long as you like. Rachel does not have many friends.” She paused and asked in Yiddish, “Vos iz dein nomen?” (What is your name?) “Annie; they call me Chana’leh at home.” “That’s nice.” She set a

I have a Monopoly game and maybe you’d like that.” “Yes I would.” The next day, an ambulance, which was a rare feature on our street, parked in front of Rachel’s building. Everyone stopped playing and gathered around the vehicle, waiting to see what would transpire. My heart dropped when two medics climbed the stairs to Rachel’s flat carrying a stretcher. In a matter of minutes, they emerged; and I caught a glimpse of her pale face above the white sheet that covered her. Mrs. Miller, clutching her purse, walked behind them. The men carefully descended the winding staircase. When Rachel saw me, she held out her little hand and smiled. “Don’t cry, Annie; I’ll be back, and we’ll play.” I looked directly into her intense blue eyes and took her hand. “Yes, of course, and this time I won’t let you win.” When the medics slowly placed the stretcher and its occupant inside the ambulance, she reluctantly released my hand. Mrs. Miller wore a large-brimmed hat that shaded her face but I could see her swollen red eyes. The woman turned to me. “It was nice of you to visit yesterday, thank you.” The medic assisted her into the ambulance. The other medic slammed the door to the back of the ambulance and hurried to the cab. “Alright, we’re ready,” he said to the driver and leaped inside. I wiped my tears with the back of my hand as I watched the vehicle drive past the grocery, the Talner Rebbe’s shteebl ( a room in the Rabbi’s house that served as a synagogue and classroom), the candy store and disappear around the block We never saw Rachel again, but her spirit has remained with me to this day.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Nursing Home Roulette By MARVIN HERSHORN

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was an Alzheimer’s patient in a respectable nursing home. One evening a staff member forgot to raise the side of his bed. Several hours after his bedtime the overnight head nurse discovered him on the floor. Two days later, his daughter received a surreptitious call from his companion. “M is being taken to the hospital,” she whispered. “You better get here fast.” After 11 hours in an overcrowded emergency facility, M was diagnosed with an inoperable fractured hip. At age 90, it was too risky to operate. He was given a morphine patch and returned to his nursing home. Two days later he was dead. When the family complained to the ombudsperson, the accident report was nowhere to be found. The family subsequently decided not to pursue the case; the process proved

to be too painful and traumatic. P, a patient in the same home, was being lifted into a bathtub with a specialized harness which opened suddenly and P smashed to the floor. She died the next day of her injuries. These cases are not anecdotal; I am familiar with both. The first victim was my father-in-law; the second victim was the mother of a friend. In a groundbreaking 2001 report called The Shame of Canada’s Nursing Homes, a frightening series of abuse and incompetence was revealed to be taking place in long-term-care facilities across the country. Residents were confined to their beds and wheelchairs for lengthy periods. Staff shortages motivated the tranquilizing of residents in order to prevent them from being a bother to the already harassed orderlies. Incontinent patients were rash infested because their

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diapers were not changed often enough. The combination of rashes, bed sores, skin irritations and chronic itches, due to immobility, amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. Dr. Stanley Blum, a dentist who is sensitive to the needs of seniors, pointed out those residents of long-termcare facilities receive a variety of medications combined with inadequate oral hygiene. This can lead, among other things, to the development of a fungus called thrush, periodontal disease, tooth loss and decay. A 1988 study in Hull, Quebec, revealed that in 16 nursing homes in that city, 74% of the 1,000 guests experienced either moderate or severe malnutrition. With one-third of the 200,000 Canadians 85 and over living in long-termcare facilities, relatives are distressed by the smorgasbord of abuses that victimize and disempower the elderly. How do families demystify the quality of private, public and charitable homes? How do families find the right home? How can seniors afford a long-term-care facility given the fact that many live in poverty? Most can claim a current income of $13,000. It’s not surprising that two-thirds of seniors 85 and over are not in long-term-care facilities. Who looks after them? How do we evaluate their quality of life? As persons grow older, contact with other family members is increasingly overshadowed in importance by a growing need for care or help with the ongoing necessities in life. Peter Silin’s book, Nursing Homes: The Family Journey (Johns Hopkins University Press) has detailed suggestions on how to choose a nursing home. As a social worker and geriatric care manager, he shares his experiences with his readers in dealing with the issues that might develop. He teaches his readers to be proactive caregivers. Eileen Kraatz’s book, A Spy in the Nursing Home: InsideTips and Tactics for Choosing the Right One in Five Days (Health Information Press). Her checklist of tips begins with a pre-emptive tactic: Start checking out nursing homes before you need to find one. With a resident’s permission, push a call button. Does the staff respond in reasonable time? Do too many residents have bruises? Are people stuck in wheel-

chairs with nothing to do? Are residents well groomed and clean? Are there too many thin residents, indicating they’re either not getting enough nutritious food or not being helped to eat? Wendy Birkhan, a social worker with the Jewish Family Services of Ottawa, argued that “Rather than focus on the list of negative issues, I would guide the readers to look more objectively when choosing a facility.” Her suggestions include an evaluation of: The ratio of staff to residents The levels of services provided The smell, sound, look and “feel” of the facility The sensitivity to cultural difference The schedule of recreational activities, their frequency and quality of instructors The nutritious quality and variety of the meals. Does the facility have a nutritionist? The transportation to events or medical appointments outside the facility The provision of medical, dental or psychiatric treatment. Does the facility have its own physicians, psychiatrists, podiatrists and social workers? The presence of children or pets The Danes may be light years ahead of North Americans in long-term-care facilities. Danish innovation in the Thorupgaarden senior’s residence in Copenhagen includes the showing of pornographic films on closed circuit television on Saturday evenings. If the residents wish to go beyond the film, they are allowed to ask for the services of a prostitute. In North America, the disempowerment of seniors as sexual be-

ings is pandemic. The notion of the “dirty old man” becomes a knee jerk reaction to any manifestation of sexuality in nursing homes. Seniors in their late 60s, 70s and beyond still have the ability to order Viagra or the new drug Cialis which lasts for 36 hours. Certainly these drugs beat Prozac to combat anxiety, boredom and stress! Sexual enjoyment certainly beats “warehoused” seniors existing in a drugged stupor. By the year 2021, seniors will make up almost a quarter of the population as baby boomers pass through middle age. By 2030, one out of every four Canadians will be over 65. This means that in 20 years there will be twice as many seniors as in the present. The new senior will be different – more educated, more aggressive, more empowered, less likely to accept a seat in the background. These seniors will be able to get what they want from government because of their knowledge of the system, their aggressiveness and because of their sheer numbers and resulting power. Both federal and provincial governments must pre-empt the long-term-care system crises and address the needs of the new senior. The aging of the population, combined with continuing budgetary deficits and large accumulated government debts, raise concerns about the care for seniors in the future. The results may be explosive! The increase in taxation and the reduction of longterm- care service could lead to a new quiet revolution of angry seniors. The implications of this revolt of unfulfilled expectations may affect the entire society.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

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JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Travel

A Drive Across America – Part II By RICHARD COOKE

T

hrough the Wild West to the Golden West – 14 Days and 3,592 Miles Theodore Roosevelt National Park is a beautiful combination of North Dakota hills, wild sagebrushcovered plains, flat grassland that stretches for miles and buffalo, lots of buffalo. So many that one would be welladvised to allow for frequent and long stops to allow herds of buffalo to cross the road in front of you. When a twoton buffalo decides to park and take a breather in front of your car, you don’t keep going; you stop for as long as it takes. After two days in Bowman, it was time to depart temporarily from my Lewis and Clark itinerary, following the Missouri River and heading south, back into South Dakota and a four-night stay in Rapid City. This is an area I had visited years earlier and of which I still have many good memories. It’s an area of unlimited sightseeing opportunities: awe-inspiring Mount Rushmore; the famous, funky Wall Drug Store; the old mining towns of Lead and Deadwood, still lively and thriving with saloons, gambling and live country-western music; roads winding through the eerily-beautiful moonscapelike Dakota Badlands and the immensely beautiful forests and lakes of the Black Hills, teeming with Big Horn Sheep, wild turkeys, wild burros, antelope herds and more buffalo, lots more buffalo! My departure from Rapid City started at 4 a.m. as I had a long driving day ahead to get to my next destination, Butte, Montana. But first there were three important stops along the way which was another reason for my early departure. The first was Devil’s Tower, Wyoming, a natural 1,267 rock monolith that visually explodes out of the prairie around it. Sacred to Native tribes, it is now a favorite spot for thousands of rock climbers who are allowed annually to climb, in deference to local tribes, only one section of it. Approach-

ing Devil’s Tower by car and seeing its face glowing pink from the light of the justrising sun was a moment to remember. Then on to Montana and the Battle of the Little Big Horn or as it is also known, Custer’s Last Stand, where General George Armstrong Custer and his band of 700 well-armed cavalry members were confident they could, finally, easily defeat the bows and arrows of the local Indians and put an end to the their grumbling over the policies of the U.S. government. On the morning of July 25, 1806, as the battle began, little did Custer know that there were thousands of Sioux and Cheyenne warriors hidden in the surrounding hills. While hundreds of Indians were killed in the battle which lasted until the next day, July 26, Custer’s much smaller force was totally decimated and Custer, himself, as well as his brother and nephew were killed. The site contains the graves of all the dead soldiers as well as that of many of the infantry’s slain horses. There appears to be no record of where, or if, the bodies of the dead Indians were buried. Some experts believe they were cremated following the custom of some tribes. My last stop prior to Butte was Pompey’s Pillar, about 30 miles east of Butte. Alongside the Missouri River, it was a resting site for the Lewis and Clark expedition. The 150-ft. high rock contains the signatures of many who passed by, including a carved signature made by William Clark himself. It is the only concrete evidence of the expedition’s passage anywhere along the trail. It is found near the top of the pillar, a viewpoint Clark wrote about in his journal and is reached via a rickety set of stairs and boardwalks. A huge B (the product of local promoters and volunteers) on the side of a scrub-covered hill announces the presence of Butte, the largest city in the West during the golden age of gold and silver mining. Now a shadowy remnant of its former self, the city is worth

a stop to view the Berkeley Pit, a former open-pit mine. Opened in 1953, production ceased in 1982 although portions of the mine are still worked today. At one mile long and one-half mile across, it continues to be among the world’s largest mines. Today, its 1,780 ft. deep pit is being filled with seeping groundwater at the speed of one foot per month. The bluish-green color of the water, as seen from a high lofty visitor’s viewing platform, is jewel-like and contains highly- dangerous and toxic liquid. The next day’s drive took me through the old-time ghost towns of Virginia City and Nevada City, former mining towns only minutes apart. Today, the two towns attract mostly tourists who come to prowl through what’s left of the remaining shops and walk the towns’ sidewalks made of weathered lumber and raised above ground, as they were 100 years ago, so townsfolk didn’t have to walk through the ever-present muddy streets. Touristy saloons and live floor shows, replete with can-can dancers, attempt to recreate the atmosphere of old. After an overnight in Billings, I headed for Spokane, Washington. Reluctantly, I had to cancel one stop along the way – Traveler’s Rest in the Lolo Pass connecting Montana and Idaho. Nestled amongst the towering mountains of the Bitterroot Range, parts of which reach an altitude of over 11,000 feet, Lewis and Clark paused at this scenic spot, as I wanted to do as well. There wasn’t time; on my next trip, I promised myself. After a night in Spokane and a trip to the local Costco

to pick up more photo supplies, I was on my way to Grand Coulee Dam in eastern Washington State. Construction on this dam, the largest electricity-producing facility in the U.S., began in 1933 and ended in 1942. Grand Coulee, which still supplies power to the entire Pacific Northwest and beyond, is striking in size and appearance. There is an excellent Visitor’s Center plus an array of trails, one of which takes you to the bottom of the spillway which, unfortunately, due to the severe drought in the Western states, was mostly dry the day I visited. Having followed the continuation of the Lewis and Clark Trail westward on to the Pacific many times over the years, the next day I turned, instead, south. Through the rolling wheat fields of Eastern Washington and to Hermiston, Oregon for another quick overnight before moving on. The next day, a long drive through the isolated, high desert country of Eastern Oregon, across the border into California to the town of Alturas, a popular winter destination for skiers and my next overnight. From there, I headed to Lassen Volcanic National Park where, on May 19, 1915, after months of rumbling, Mt. Lassen exploded sending a 20 ft. high wall of mud, slush and melted snow down the mountainside. Three days later, a huge mass of ashes and gases shot out of the volcano, destroying a swath one mile wide and three miles long. Ash poured 30,000 feet into the air. Today the area is still actively hypothermal. Stinking fumaroles, churning mud pots and steaming hot

springs attract visitors as does the magnificent surrounding scenery of forests, mountains and rushing creeks, all of which can be visited via a series of well-kept and wellmarked trails. The rocky, arid three-mile trail to the top of Mt. Lassen was closed the day I was there due, in part, to a rash of recent forest fires in the area, one of which I drove through; its fallen trees and shattered tree stumps along both sides of the roads were still smoking and warm. On to Red Bluff for the night, then to the Pacific the next day and the Northern California town of Cloverdale to spend three days with my sister, Ann, and her husband, Ray, in their beautiful home. I had a delightful time gorging on the fresh fruit from their backyard trees – fig, orange and lemon, as well as red and green grapes from their backyard vineyard. Their next-door neighbor is a long time grower of grapes on a 150 acre vineyard in Cloverdale, doing what his father before him did on those same 150 acres; and he reported that the year produced a record crop for him, as it did in all California vineyards. One day, my hosts took me to the Francis Ford Coppola Winery, just minutes from their home, where we enjoyed a delightful, extravagant outdoor patio lunch at Coppola’s, the film director’s beautiful restaurant overlooking rolling fields of premium-quality grapes. The restaurant/winery also features a large museum in which much of Coppola’s eclectic array of collectibles is housed, including the large desk and chair used in all of his Godfather films and one of the few Tucker three-eyed automobiles ever built. The 1948 Tucker, initially known as the Tucker Torpedo for its advanced, “ahead of its time” styling was conceived by famed designer, Preston Tucker. Only 51 Tuckers were ever made; few were sold and the company went bankrupt in 1949. Luckily, Coppola got his hands on one, and it’s a polished, bright red beauty! Part III continued in the February Reporter.

Please drive carefully through our Village Residents should stop and yield to buses picking up & dropping off passengers at bus stops


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

The Reporter your source for village information

cvereporter.com 01/31/13

Remember! Village Speed! 25 MPH on main roads

15 MPH everywhere else!!

www.cvereporter.com


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Phyllis’ kitchen By PHYLLIS PISTOLIS

SALMON STUFFED PEPPERS 1 c. cooked barley 3 lg. green peppers 1 can salmon, drained and flaked 1 egg – slightly beaten 1 c. processed American cheese cut into ¼ in. cubes 1 tsp. minced onion ½ tsp. Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp. salt 1 c. (8 oz.) tomato sauce Cook barley according to package. Cut peppers lengthwise in half; scoop out seeds and membrane. Cook in boiling salted water for 2 minutes, drain. Meanwhile, combine salmon, barley, egg, cheese, onion, Worcestershire sauce and salt. Place pepper halves in shallow baking dish; fill with salmon mixture. Pour tomato sauce over tops. Bake 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Makes 6 servings. EASY BREAD PUDDING 6 slices raisin bread 4 c. milk – scalded 1 tbs, butter or margarine ¼ tsp. salt

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16 Northeast 2nd Ave., Deerfield Beach (Just N. of the Post Office)

954-481-8889

Same Location For Over 30 Years! Within a 72 hour period the Patient And Or Any Other Person Responsible For Payments Has A Right To Refuse Pay, Cancel Payment Or To Be Reimbursed For Payment For The Free, Discounted Fee Or Reduced Fee Service, Examination Or Treatment, Implant Dentistry Is Not Recognized As A Specialty By The ADA Or FDA. All Dentists Are Independent Contractors. Expires 1/31/13.


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CVE REPORTER

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Well here we are another New Year 2013! Our office is ready for another Season! Our staff of “Village Pros” Realtors are in the office and looking forward to assisting you in all your real estate needs. Nous Parlons FranÇais – To all of our French speaking customers stop in today! WHETHER YOU ARE BUYING OR SELLING, ONLY THE VERY BEST WILL DO THAT’S THE DUBMAN WAY! WE ARE HERE FOR YOU!

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JANUARY 2013

JANUARY 2013

SECTION B, 44 PAGES

CVE REPORTER

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VOLUME 36, NUMBER 04

“I’m Bored” Text by SID BIRNS, Photos by JACK FRANKS

Y

ou say you don’t know what to do with yourself, now that you are retired. You don’t have any particular hobby, and you’re not really into sports. Well, step right up to my podium, have I got a deal for you pilgrim. You live here in the Village and if you don’t know what is available to you on a daily basis,  just check out the pictures that accompany this article -  activities galore. First off, you don’t have to be an ace at any sport, you just have to join in and have fun...so what if you can’t hit the tennis ball hard or your accuracy is kinda short, or when the volley ball comes

your way and you hit it outside the court. At this stage in our lives, not to worry, there aren’t any scouts out there looking to pick you up to play professionally. The idea is to get out into the fresh air and have fun while at the same time enjoying the sunshine and beauty that abound here in the Village. Any sport, walking, cycling, swimming, tennis, just to mention a few, is not only good for your physical well being but also good for your mind.  Put them together and you’ve got the formula for good health. And that ladies and gentlemen, is what it’s all about!

On the walking, biking and roller blading path, that’s what we have here, two out of three. I will admit, roller blading is a tad more difficult, better left to the younger crowd, those in their 50’s.

The day is cool, the teams are hot and the ball is in the air …volleyball, a sport for everyone.

Shuffleboard, the every person sport – even played aboard cruise ships.

“Ah, za French ‘ave brought zere game to za Village.” Petanque, that’s the name of the game. Here you see measuring the distance from the ball to the “jack.”

And here we have the “old…Tennis anyone.”

You have jazzercise, you have regular exercise and now you have “Poolercise,” otherwise known as water aerobics. Again, an exercise that anyone can do and enjoy.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Help us Help YOU get answers from COOCVE & Master Management Contact your Building President, or in their absence, your Area Chair

If your President or Area Chair cannot help you, the Area Chair will bring your concern to the COOCVE Officers and they will get an answer back to you...

COOCVE Board of Directors

Master Management

If you wish to contact us directly, just drop off a note with your: Name, Address, Phone, Email, Date and the Question or Issue. We will be happy to get it to the right person for you.

Tips for Traveling Prepare Documentation A government passport is accepted as the highest level of identification by federal TSA security officers. If you do not already have a passport, consider applying for such months prior to your travel. Your local post office will have the application forms; or you can go online to access the information and forms. Official photographs are available at AAA offices and at many large drug and department stores. Personal photos are not acceptable. Two copies of the photograph must be sent with your application. Request copies of prescriptions and/or statements of medical conditions from each physician and medical treatment center. Make at least four photocopy sets of the passport, driver’s license, Medicare and insurance cards, travel tickets and itinerary, boarding pass (if secured in advance online), plus any physician prescriptions and/or statements. One complete set is placed in your hand-carry bag, another in your roll-aboard luggage. One set is forwarded to family at the arrival destination, and one is left at home. Have a telephone calling card so that you can maintain contact or a cell phone, perhaps one with a predetermined number of minutes. Program in your closest family member’s telephone number as the first emergency number.

Plan for Security Checkpoints If in a wheelchair at transportation centers, access to and through TSA (Transportation Security Administration) security may actually be quicker than through the long line of other travelers. Brief the TSA about any medical conditions that would set off alarms, such as surgical hip and knee implants. To avoid unwanted delays, get a physician’s statement about the implanted steel and make sure the senior has that documentation with them. Oftentimes, personnel will ask you to step aside and perform a wand screening, rather than passing through the sensors. Dress in easily-removed (but safe) walking shoes. Security will probably want them removed.


JANUARY 2013

Tips for Traveling Be Practical When Packing Pack light. For a person traveling with at least some limitation, aim to pack everything necessary in a roll-aboard suitcase plus a medium-size overthe-shoulder carry-on. Do not check the roll-aboard as luggage, as in-cabin flight staff will gladly stash it in the overhead rack. Such will save a lot of time at the final destination airport. All prescription and overthe-counter medications should be placed in a one quart zip-lock freezer bag, including also copies of any prescriptions and/or physician statements in the hand-carry bag. Do not place the pill combinations separately into a separate plastic box as “the next combined dosage.� Such will never get through security. Enclose also any medical appliances such as extra braces or first-aid needs. If toting gifts to relatives, do not wrap them. Place the items in the roll-aboard luggage.

Think about Safety, Security and Comfort There are thieves everywhere and, particularly, in high-traffic travel centers. Don’t give the scalawags any opportunity to steal from you. Women should not carry a purse but, instead a money belt worn under a blouse or a neat Passage Wallet hidden under her coat by a neck cord. Men should not carry a wallet in his back pocket but, instead, the same Passage Wallet from the neck cord or as a hidden wallet tucked into his pants and secured by a cord to his belt. If traveling alone, always keep your carry-on between your feet when standing, or with the shoulder strap looped around the leg of a chair when seated. For comfort, consider the purchase of a travel pillow, a c-shaped balloon that supports the neck and head when resting aboard transportation.

                       

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CVE REPORTER

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Any in-store Computer or Laptop Repair Offer cannot be combined with other

discounts or promotions Present Coupon w/Repair



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3B


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

N o t i c e Residents’ Green Vehicle Stickers T

Preventing Falls in the Elderly

No Longer Recognized

he Village’s new Entrance Gate Security System is up and running. Bar code readers have been installed on the security gates on both East and West Drive entrances, and residents with bar codes may now enter any of the three (3) entrances without checking with security. Both East and West

Drive entrances have also been equipped to allow entrance by nonresidents to reduce the vehicle load on the main gate entrance (Hillsboro Blvd.). Residents without a bar code will be stopped by Security and asked to show their Resident I.D. Card at each of the three (3) entrances.

The new Security System recognizes resident’s bar code, identifies the resident in the resident database, records the date and time of entry, and photograph’s the vehicles license tag while comparing the information collected with the information on file. The old green sticker does not provide this function-

ality and security has no way of knowing if the vehicle bearing the sticker has been sold to a non-resident, or even who the vehicle belongs to. Residents are encouraged to purchase a bar code sticker for each of their vehicles to expedite entry through the three (3) entrances.

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Outdoors  Repair cracks and abrupt edges of sidewalks and driveways.  Install handrails on stairs and steps.  Trim shrubbery along the pathway to the home.  Keep walk areas clear of clutter, rocks and tools.  Install adequate lighting by doorways and along walkways leading to doors. All Living Spaces  Use a change in color to denote changes in surface types or levels.  Secure rugs with nonskid tape as well as carpet edges.  Avoid throw rugs.  Remove oversized furniture and objects.  Reduce clutter.  Check lighting for adequate illumination and glare control.  Maintain nightlights or motion-sensitive lighting throughout home.  Use contrast in paint, furniture and carpet colors.  Install electronic emergency response system if needed. Bathrooms  Install grab bars on walls around the tub and beside the toilet, strong enough to hold your weight.  Add nonskid mats or appliques to bathtubs.  Mount liquid soap dispenser on the bathtub-wall.  Install a portable, hand-held shower head.  Add a padded bath or shower seat.  Install a raised toilet seat if needed.  Use nonskid mats or carpet on floor surfaces that may get wet. Kitchen  Keep commonly used items within easy reach.  Use a sturdy step stool when you need something from a high shelf.  Make sure appliance cords are out of the way.

Stop in

today!

FootPads.com

Manufactures, open to public, Monday-Friday 9am-6pm

Living Room  Keep electrical and telephone cords out of the way.  Arrange furniture so that you can easily move around it (especially low coffee tables).  Make sure chairs and couches are easy to get in and out of.  Remove caster wheels from furniture.  Use television remote control and cordless phone.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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Community Message Board Deerfield Beach Green Market kicks off at the Cove Shopping Center. This increasingly popular market features a variety of artisan foods, clothing, soaps & oils and other unique finds while promoting the beauty of its recently renovated surroundings and  the merchants that inhabit it. The market will be held every Sunday from 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.

CVE Symphony Orch

estra Guild

January 13, Sunday at 2 p.m. OPEN MEMBERSHIP MEETING Entertainment by tale nted students

of Opera Argento Scho ol e. Public invited.

GPA room in Clubhous

January 20 (Sunday M

atinee) Verdi’s Opera, La Tra viata featuring Maria Alejandres at Palm B each Opera Company at Kravis Center Price $69. Phone Mario n Cohen, 954-428-1315

SEMINAR SCHEDULE CVE Symphony Orch

estra Guild

DAY WITH A DIFFE

RENCE February 5 (T

uesday) Visit Costume World to view a collection of co stu mes from the stages of Broadway . Lunch at a replica of Tavern on the Green. Visit Jaffee Cent er for Book Arts at FA U Library for a demonstrations and lecture on books that ar e rare and unique in shape and fo rm. Price $83.

Phone Gladys Miller, 954-421-9232 or Betty Schwartz 954427-1157

Thursday, January 17, 2013   at 1–3 p.m.   40 YEAR BUILDING SAFETY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION This is an informational review of the 40 Year Inspection and Recertification Program in Broward County. This should be of significant importance to all because in the next few years every building in CVE will be at or near 40 years old. Do not miss this seminar.

Ballroom Dance Dress Code for Women: White Party Room of the Clubhouse January 24, 2013

Featuring “Le Bel Age”

Swing Cha-c ha

Fox-t rot

A n n o u n c in g The CVE Recreation Committee’s

Rock

4th A n n u a l

Walt z

Fle a M a r k et

Tang o Mambo Samb a Disco

Continental

Rumb a

Sunday, March 3rd, 2013 from 9am to 3pm Look For Additional Information In the Staff/Information Office

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Antioxidants, ORAC and Resveratrol By ELLEN KAMHI PHD, RN/ The Natural Nurse®

A

ntioxidants occur naturally in a large number of fruits, vegetables and botanicals; and they are being used extensively in oral supplements and natural cosmetic and personal care products. Consumers are associating antioxidants with health. The FDA has strict guidelines on the use of the term anti-oxidant. For example, manufacturers cannot just splash “high in antioxidants” on the label (which is often done). If a statement is made about a high antioxidant value, the manufacturer must actually reference a known and measureable antioxidant, such as vitamin A or vitamin E. They must then reference the RDA (also known as the RDI or reference daily value), and specifically show that their product contains an amount of that individual nutrient which is equal to or higher than the RDA value. With the increased activity of the FDA, many manufactur-

ers are receiving notices that they are not complying with labeling laws. One of the up and coming concepts in the antioxidant area is measurement of the ORAC value. ORAC stands for Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity. ORAC describes a laboratory analysis of the antioxidant activity against various free radicals, such as the peroxyl radical, which is one of the most common reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause damage to cell membranes in the body. ORAC measures the ability of substances to neutralize this free radical. The greater the amount of free radicals a nutrient or product can combat, the higher its ORAC score. This standard was developed in a collaborated effort by the National Institute on Aging and the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. Consumers are becoming more interested in ORAC value as they become more educated about what

Resveratrol is a concentrated grape derived ingredient which has also shown a surge of popularity, in recent years, as an anti-aging antioxidant. Resveratrol is also found in high amounts in the wild plant called Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum). Commercially available supplements offer Resveratrol in both liquid and capsule form. Read your labels carefully since some brands also include sweeteners and preservatives such as potassium sorbate, while other brands are free of sweeteners and additives. Muscadine grape is a rising star in the antioxidant category. Muscasdine grapes are a berry-like grape that is native to the USA. It contains Resveratrol in its skin and has a very high level of naturallyoccurring, health-supporting natural constituents such as ellagic acid (a polyphenol antioxidant), anthocyanins, flavoniods and other healthful compounds. Muscadine

this means. Some of the highest ORAC scoring products in the world include many items that are called Super Fruits, such as pomegranate, Acai, Mangosteen and Goji, along with green tea and Muscadine grape. There are many Super Fruit products available, such as Nature’s Answer® Orac Super 7, which guarantees 5000 to 7000 ORAC Units in one serving! It is a blend of many of the Super Fruits mentioned above (Acai, Mangosteen, Goji, green tea, Muscadine grape) known to be high in ORAC value.

grapes often grow as wild, edible, medicinal plants found on fences around farms and fields. The Muscadine berry is extremely resistant to pests and fungus probably due to its extremely thick skin, and is not sprayed with pesticides or herbicides. Include a variety of brightly colored fruits and vegetables in your daily diet to insure that you are getting an array of beneficial antioxidant compounds! Ellen Kamhi PhD RN, AHG, AHN-BC , The Natural Nurse®, can be heard on radio daily. She is the author of several books, including THE NATURAL MEDICINE CHEST. Dr. Kamhi has been involved in natural health care for over four decades. She is available for group presentations, answers consumer questions at www.naturesanswer. com, and has a private practice. Dr. Kamhi will be lecturing in Century Village on Tues., Feb. 5 at the (CUNY) Alumni Group, 7 p.m. in GPA. All residents are welcome. www.naturalnurse. com 800-829-0918

Century Village East Athletic Schedule January 7th thru April 1st2013

8:00 AM 9:00 AM

Monday

9:15 AM 9:45 AM 10:35 AM 10:45 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 1:15 PM 2:00 PM 3:15 PM

Tuesday

Low Impact Aerobics Low Impact Aerobics (Cristina) (Debbie) Body Toning &Weights (Gale)

Easy Stretch (Gale) Low Impact Aerobics (Elen) Line Dance (Mitzy) Senior Fitness &Weights (Gale)

Relax with Yoga (Janet ) Low Impact Aerobics (Debbie) Zumba (Fabio)

Balance (Gale)

4:30 PM 5:30 PM

Zumba (Marina)

8:00 AM

Intermediate Aerobics (Blanca) Body Toning &Weights (Blanca)

Zumba (Andrea)

Aquacise (Sandy) Aquacise (Viktoriya) Aqua Zumba (Hugo)

Aquacise (Gale) Aquacise (Viktoriya) Aqua Zumba (Hugo)

9:15 AM Outdoor 10:15AMOutdoor 11:00AM Outdoor 10:00-12:00 PM Indoor 12:00 PM Indoor

Swimming Lessons (Norwo) Arthritic Aquacise (Viktoriya)

Low Impact Aerobics (Blanca) Body Toning &Weights (Debbie)

Easy Stretch (Debbie) Low Impact Aerobics (Debbie) Zumba (Fabio) Senior Fitness &Weights (Debbie) Tai-Chi (Terry)

Awareness Through Movements (Iris ) Yoga Stretch (Dotty)

9:00 AM

Health Club All Levels Wednesday Thursday

Chair Yoga (Janet ) Beginners Belly Dance (Mary Ann) Intermediate Belly Dance (Mary Ann)

Pilates (Nancy)

Arthritic Aquacise (Debbie)

Low Impact Aerobics (Cleide)

Relax with Yoga (Janet ) Low Impact Aerobics (Cleide) Line Dance (Mitzy) Chair Stretch (Gale) Balance (Gale) Chair Yoga (Janet )

Friday

Saturday

Easy Stretch (Cleide) Low Impact Aerobics (Nancy)

Pilates (Cleide)

Low Impact Aerobics (Cleide) Body Toning &Weights (Cleide)

Low Impact Aerobics (Cleide) Body Toning &Weights (Cleide)

Yoga Stretch (Dotty)

Zumba (Fabio) Senior Fitness &Weights Zumba (Marina) (Cleide) Awareness Through Movements (Iris )

Beginner Belly Dance (Marion) Yoga Stretch (Dotty)

Party Room All Levels

Intervals Aerobics (Cleide) Ball Sculpt (Cleide)

Zumba (Andrea) Pilates(Gale)

Aquatic Schedule All Levels Aquacise (Blanca) Aquacise (Blanca)

Arthritic Aquacise (Viktoriya)

Aquacise (Sandy) Aquacise (Cristina) Aqua Zumba (Hugo) Swimming Lessons (Norwo) Arthritic Aquacise (Cleide)

Intervals Aerobics (Debbie) Body Toning &Weights (Debbie) Aquacise (Viktoriya) Aquacise (Viktoriya)

Arthritic Aquacise (Viktoriya)

Aquacise (Blanca) Aquacise (Blanca)


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

Helpful Health Hints By DR. NORMA LOCKER

T

he BPA Story BPA is the acronym for bisphenol A and there is much controversy surrounding its use in the USA. It is just about everywhere in the environment, so avoiding it entirely is almost impossible. BPA is used to make hard plastic containers and the linings of food and beverage cans because it protects the metal from contaminating the

contents. Meanwhile, the BPA is leaching into the products. It’s also found in CDs, eyeglass lenses, cash register receipts and much more. Everyone has traces of it in their body. However, the Federal Drug Administration has currently announced that it wouldn’t ban BPA from food containers as yet because there isn’t enough evidence that low levels of human exposure through diet are unsafe.

What are some of the dangers of exposure to BPA? It is an estrogen mimic that may disrupt the normal hormonal control of tissues that naturally occurring estrogen activate. Researchers have found that high levels of BPA in urine tests have shown that it has caused anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and poor emotional control in young children. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, lower sperm concentration, motility

and damage to sperm DNA were also detected in urine samples with BPA. How can we minimize our exposure to BPA? Avoid polycarbonate, the hard clear plas-

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tic that carries the recycling #7 on the bottom. Thankfully, the FDA has banned BPA usage in baby bottles and sippy cups. Heating foods in plastic containers or adding hot or boiling liquid to plastic containers is taboo!! Cut back on canned foods and substitute when possible frozen or fresh, bottled or dried foods. Harvard researchers fed volunteers a serving of canned soup every day for five days and they found that the BPA levels in their urine increased more than tenfold!!

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE CLASS DESCRIPTION Low Impact Aerobics Low impact aerobics is a low intensity workout designed to help you condition the cardio respiratory system by using a diversity of exercises. The class starts with 30 minutes of Aerobic workout followed by 15 minutes of weights and 10 minutes of abdominal work and stretching. Low Intermediate Aerobics: Intermediate to Advanced This has been created for those requiring more intensity and more challenge. Body Toning & Weights: All Levels This is a total body toning which helps those with problems of osteoporosis and muscle density loss. (You must bring your own weights and rubber tubing.) Tai Chi: All Levels

A series of slow, graceful low impact movements developed thousands of years ago in China. It helps with balance and posture.

Chair Stretch: All Levels This is a gentle approach to Yoga focusing on exercising both the body and the mind, through stretching, breathing and relaxation. All are done standing and sitting. Arthritic Aquacise: Beginner This is an easy to follow class, focusing on building flexibility, balance and strength to increase joint mobility and range of motion.

Beginner Belly Dance

Tone your body while learning traditional belly dance moves that target and isolate areas of the body that rarely get attention. No experience required-just a willingness to shake what you got! Bring scarf or coin belt to wrap around your hips.

Intermediate Belly Dance This class is for those who want to learn different routines and have previous Belly Dance Training. Easy Stretch This is a beginners approach to yoga with low intensity forms of stretching, combining mind and body to relieve stress and rejuvenate your spirit. It is a blend of traditional posture or forms and techniques to increase body awareness, flexibility, balance and strength. Yoga Stretch This class is designed for those at the intermediate level to engage in the endless benefits of the yoga practice by enhancing your mind/body, increasing strength and flexibility. Relax with Yoga: All Levels Yoga is a practical self discipline to gain mastery over body and mind, to increase strength, flexibility, balance, stamina and endurance in a positive mental atmosphere. There is special emphasis on proper breathing, relaxation and meditation techniques.

Swimming This class is provided for those who don’t know how to swim. We show basic techniques and the ability to enjoy the outdoors in South Florida in a better way. We offer beginner and advanced classes.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Aquacise: All Levels

Get in the pool and enjoy an invigorating class that gives you cardio respiratory conditioning. It also helps you with any arthritis symptoms by reducing the stress of joints. (You must have a noodle.)

Ball Sculpt: Intermediate and Advanced Enjoy a class built to improve core muscle stability, balance and strength. This class incorporates a combination of different techniques, like Pilate’s strength training and abdominals, to give you a full body workout. Pilates: Beginner and Intermediate

Pilates is a way of connecting the whole body and mind through proper breathing and slow, controlled movements to help you develop core abdominal strength and a leaner body by lengthening and stretching the muscles without building bulk.

Zumba: All Levels This is a mix of Latin dance and fitness moves worked into a high energy aerobic workout geared to make you burn calories while dancing your heart out. So come Salsa, Cha-Cha and Meringue your way into fitness. Line/Tap Dance An entertaining and fun class! With choreographic routines, that combine line dance patterns with other rhythms. Balance: All Levels Activities useful to improve stability and strength of the muscles needed to obtain better balance.

Chair Yoga Same great results as Relax with Yoga For People Who: Have limited mobility Have difficulty doing Floor Exercise Have arthritis or other physical limitations Are recovering from surgery *** Doctor Approval recommended***

Senior Fitness & Weights This is a program to increase strength flexibility and energy through weight lifting and cardiovascular exercises. (You must bring your own weights and rubber tubing.) Hawaiian Hula

The hula is a Polynesian dance characterized by undulating hips with coordinating movements of the arms and hands and hips.

Interval Training

This is a combination of strength and endurance Awareness Through Movements This class is for every one of all abilities and age from individuals searching for relief from pain, though those seeking continued wellbeing to that seeking performance excellence. • • • • • • • •

7B

No registration necessary: You must consult your doctor before involving yourself in any exercise program. Aquacise classes will be at the Indoor Pool when air temperature is 60 degrees or below. Athletic Classes are restricted to *CVE residents and renters only. Proper Footware is required. You must have your resident ID card. Party room classes are more intense. Equipment Orientation is made by appointment only. (No phone appointments.) This schedule is subject to change.


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8B

CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Bon Appétit – Cambridge D Enjoys “Meet and Greet” Luncheon Text By JANICE ZAMSKY Photos by LEN WARSHAW

G

ood food fosters a convivial ambiance; this fact was very much in evidence at the Cambridge D luncheon on Sunday, December 2. The “meet and greet” white tablecloth (plastic, but nonetheless elegant!) affair was held in the Party Room of the Clubhouse. A handful of residents

ventured onto the dance floor as CDs played. The roster of attendees was read off by President Ed Franks as each person stood up to be introduced. All the food was delicious and delectable! The buffet table was laden with enough variety to suit all palates and a luscious “sweet table” followed.

Our building is a mélange of occupants, a mixture of year-round residents and snowbirds (who hail from various states and countries), also younger seniors and older seniors. Guests enjoyed mixing and mingling. The luncheon committee who was responsible for this successful afternoon event consisted of: Chair Ruth

L-R Lucienne Dupont, VP, Ruth Franks, Luncheon Chairwoman, and Jeannine Paradis.

Franks who was ably assisted by Vice President Lucienne Dupont and Jeannine Paradis (and their respective husbands – President Go, Gracien and Reginald who did all the heavy “schlep” work) and Esther Appel. Longevity is alive and well at the Cambridge D building! Our seniors are very active physically and mentally; two

of our floor captains are 96 and 97 years young, very fit and very “with it.” Our 102-year-young resident can still recite poetry from her school days and knows all the lyrics from all the songs of Fiddler on the Roof. Our tap water must come from some mysterious fountain of youth!

Bill Zamsky, left, Lee Weinstein, right enjoying a wonderful luncheon.

Islewood D Gets New Board Text and Photo by SID BIRNS

A

t their annual meeting, the outgoing President, Rosalie Rairden, presented a brief rundown of the accomplishments for the year. Uppermost was the installation of a new eleva-

tor which came in under the estimated time of completion. Continuing with improvements was the parking lot with the re-striping of parking spaces and putting condo numbers on both sides of the

parking block. The fire alarm pull-down arms were replaced due to rust, and condo numbers will be installed on all of the water shut-off valves to avoid shutting off the wrong valve which has

been a problem in the past. The new Board of Directors are: Irving Siegel, President; Ralph Wilner, Vice President; Mark Sataloff, Treasurer; Gloria Birns, Secretary; Helen Bender, Direc-

Going over the list of new Board members are left to right: Ralph Wilner; Mark Sataloff; Helen Bender; Paul Kurtz, Islewood D Property Manager; Gloria Birns; Stuart Weiser and Dottie Alleyne.

tor; Dottie Alleyne, Director and Annette Thiofault, Director. The new Board held its first meeting on December 19. The outgoing Board members all agreed they would be on hand to assist in the transition.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

9B

Surprise Birthday Party Text By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Photos By LORI BENOIT

O

n December 19 Charles Parness made a sur-

prise 75 birthday party for his wife Sandy. th

Approximately 50 people were on hand at the Olive Garden to participate in the

celebration, including her sister and several close friends from her childhood.

Sandy is President of her building Ventnor O and a volunteer at the Reporter.

L/R Sandy Wicker, Marsha Klass, Sandy Parness, Roz Bugen

Charlie and Sandy

Temple B’nai Shalom Celebrates Chanukah Text By ALLEN MINSKY, Photos By ELYSE GREENE

O

n Friday, December 14, Temple B’nai Shalom celebrated Chanukah - The

Festival of Lights with a play accompanied by Chanukah songs. This was the story of

the commemoration of the dedication of the Temple after a long battle, where the inside of the Temple was destroyed, and the miracle of having

L/R Cantor Gary Sherman, Florence Landau, Julia Bale, Claire Eskind, Bea Rosner with their lit candles.

only enough oil to light the Temple lights for one day somehow lasted for eight days, until new oil could be produced.

The entertainment was greeted with much enthusiasm by the audience and a treat of jelly donuts afterwards was enjoyed by all.

B’nai Shalom Choir performing their play.

Brunch Crunch Text by SID BIRNS; Photo by JACK FRANK

O

ver 300 Canadian Club members came together to enjoy their first official get-together brunch in the Clubhouse Party Room. There were no speeches, no announcements, just a hearty welcome to one and all, eat and enjoy and then there were drawings for door prizes (nobody ever wins the door; I wonder why that is? hmm). There were platters of chopped eggs, tuna fish,

white fish, cream cheese, cottage cheese and a mild salsa dish to give everything just a bit of spice. Added to that, there were platters of salad makings: tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers and Bermuda onions.  You say something is missing; never happen.  The worldwide delicacy, one of the most controversial food items that you can’t get two people to agree upon, the bagel.  Without the bagel,

The Clubhouse Party Room played host to 300+ Canadian snowbirds. This was the Annual Meet and Greet Brunch where old friends who hadn’t seen each other for however long now, over a bagel and cream cheese and coffee, had the opportunity to catch up on the years’ happenings. it wouldn’t be a brunch; it wouldn’t even be a breakfast.  If you come from Brooklyn, no one comes close to a Brooklyn bagel. 

But I digress, so why are all these Canadian snowbirds here in the Party Room, besides to eat, which of course is very important?

So, over cups of coffee and miniature Danishes, they talked and shmoosed until it was time to go.   So, what’s for dinner?


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10B

CVE REPORTER

Active CVE Republican Club New and regular members, call Gloria Wolff at 561-3685720. For action plans for 2012 campaign, also call Gloria Wolff at 561-368-5720. AMIT (Americans for Israel and Torah) meets the second Monday of every month at 12:30 p.m. Board meetings are held on the fourth Monday of the month from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. September to May. For information, call Norma at 954428-2386 or 954-571-8673. AMIT Children, Golda Meir Chapter of Deerfield Beach For information, call Ruth Berkovils at 954-428-5788. Art Club of CVE meetings are held on the second Friday of each month (November through April) from 10 a.m. to 12 noon in Clubhouse Room GP-A. Membership is $15. Come see our interesting programs; join our trips & exhibitions; look up our website at http://artclubofcve.site. voila.fr/. Artists and non-artists are welcome. For information, call Barbara Nathan Marcus, President (November through April), at 954596-8812. Astronomy Club begins its meetings in November and meets the second Tuesday of the month from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., in General Purpose Room E. For information, call Jerry at 954-428-9381 or Norma at 954-480-8938. B’nai B’rith Unit #2995 for Men and Women All meetings will be held in the Activity Center and includes board and membership. For further information, contact Dave Polak at 954-420-0096. Bible Study Group meets every Thursday in the Clubhouse from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in General Purpose Room E. Study the old and new testaments. All are welcome. For further information, call Cora Woodman, 954-421-2789 or Marion Rosenthal, 561-865-1128. Billiards Ladies and Gentlemen, your tables are waiting. Come in and enjoy the great game of pool. If you are a beginner and require instructions, Martin Feldman will be glad to help. Contact him at 954-419-9477.

JANUARY 2013

Bowling Club of CVE meets every Thursday at 11:30 a.m. at Strikes of Boca (formerly Boca Bowl), Town Center Rd. and Military Trail. All are welcome. Come join us and have fun. For information, call Nelson at 561865-3864. Broward Council of Na’Amat USA (formerly Pioneer Women) meets the fourth Monday at 9:30 a.m. at the Na’Amat Council Office, 1721 N. State Road 7, Suite H in Margate. For information, call 954-327-0770. Canadian Club of CVE This club was founded in 1976 as a social club for snowbirds. Many interesting activities, e.g. excursions, theatre outings, entertainment and lectures are planned for the members. Longlasting friendships are a side benefit. Regular meetings are held on the second Thursday of every month in the Party Room of the Clubhouse. For additional information, check the website at www.canadianclubcve.com, Channel 99 or telephone Ala Gamulka at 954-482-0640. The Catholic Social Club will be active again this year. The meeting will be held on the third Thursday of every month at 2 p.m. in Room GPA at the Clubhouse. Everyone is welcome. For more information you can contact Jim O’Neil at 954-571-7931 or Bob Mulligan at 954-428-8343. Century Camera Club meets Tuesdays at 1 p.m. in Room GP-F in the Clubhouse.. For information, call Patty Bender at 908-477-7811. Century Plaza Library Century Village residents average about 15,000 visits there each month. For more information, contact Marian Rosenzweig, 954-428-9197.

Choraleers CVE, President Dr. Robert Griffin and The CVE Choraleers are looking forward to welcoming our Canadian members, our year-round residents, and all CVE vocalists interested in joining The CVE Choraleers. Do you enjoy singing? Then come for an audition. Become a member of our Chorus. You can only pick up your music after you officially join us, by paying a one-time fee of $10. Music Director Bill Weinhaus has prepared a delightful arrangement of songs for our upcoming spring concert, March 14, 2013 at 7 p.m. For additional information contact Esther Abramowitz 954-421-8815 or Shirley Green 954-426-2107. City University of New York (CUNY) Alumni Club meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Clubhouse in General Purpose Room A, November to April. All CUNY graduates and their spouses are welcome. We have interesting programs and field trips. For information, call Norma at 954-480-8938.

Call Sarah Goldstein at 973748-0992. CVE Duplicate Bridge Club games are Monday, Tuesday and Saturday at 12:30 p.m. in the Clubhouse Card Room B. For information, call Bernice Ruga at 954-698-9741. CVE Fishing Club Salt and fresh water fishing. For more information, call Lucky Mel at 954-684-6881. CVE Mandolin Orchestra now meets every Monday afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Clubhouse General Purpose Room, November thru March. Musicians who can play cello, viola or clarinet are invited. For further information, call Vincent Zappi at 954-428-1794. CVE Sewing Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Sewing Room. For further information, call Rita at 954-571-1645.

Clubhouse Bingo meets every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. in the Party Room. It is new and exciting and lots of fun. Only dabbers are used; no more chips. A six pack sells for $3, the Early Bird and Bingo Special for $1. The Early Bird and Bingo Players Special each pay $75. Bingo will be played all year. For more information, call Judy at 954-421-2580.

CVE Shuffleboard Club meets first Friday of each month at 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Clubhouse in Room A, located on the second floor. Membership of $10 entitles you to free coffee and donuts, free lessons, use of club equipment, open play all season and social events. Call Secretary Shelia Guernard at 954-428-9822 or email Larry Norris at hlnorris@comcast.net.

Cornerstone Community Baptist Church, Pastor Bret M. Lovitz, Worship Services 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., Sunday School 9:45 a.m., Wednesday Service 7 p.m., CCBC Youth Group 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. For information, call 954421-2530.

CVE Symphony Orchestra Our 65-member orchestra practices on Sunday mornings during the season. We perform one concert, each month, from January through March, including professional soloists. We are looking to add more violinists. If you are an experienced string player and would like to join us, please call Mary Ellen at 561-395-5645.

Coping With Life Changes is a Bereavement and Peer Support Group who meet and gain support and understanding from others who have experienced loss of a loved one. Learn tools to cope with the grief experience, healing and live life again. The group meets every Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 12 noon in GP-G. For information call Laura Durant, LCSW, 954-777-5300, ext. 3041.

Chabad of Deerfield Beach Shabbat services are held on Saturday mornings at 9:30 a.m. at Temple Beth Israel, 201 South Military Trail (back gate access from Century Village). Torah study is on Wednesday evening from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. For information about additional events and classes, please call the Shul at 954-422-1835 Craft Exchange will meet or email to ChabadDeerfield@aol. beginning December, 20, 2012, com or check our website at www. every Thursday at 10 a.m. to 12 ChabadDeerfield.com. noon in the Clubhouse GPC room.

CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild supports our Symphony Orchestra. We are urging you to participate in our fundraising efforts. Meet the Board of the CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild at their meeting open to the public. You will be rewarded with a wonderful musical program. Details of these fundraisers can be found in the flyer at the Staff Office, in the Guild’s column in this Reporter or on Channel 99. Become a member of the Guild.


JANUARY 2013

Support your orchestra! For further information, contact President Bea Guccione at 954-426-3540. For membership in the Guild, contact Kitty Cole at 954-360-7956. Dance with Us for Folk and Line Dancing meets on Tuesdays from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Health Club. No charge. For information, call Gloria 954-480-6474 or Jerry 954-698-9240. Deerfield Beach Computer Club The popular Deerfield Beach Computer Club meets from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. every Friday except holidays from September through May in the Le Club/ Activity Center Room B. First time guests admitted free. $1 per class. The building has Wi-Fi, so bring your smart phone, laptop or tablet to follow along. For more information contact Barry at 954725-9331 or Julies at 954-5709470 or go to the club website at www.db-cc.org. Deerfield Beach Democratic Club will now meet the second Monday of every month at 12 noon at Le Club. A light lunch will be served to all members who have paid their dues. Come and meet our interesting speakers. For information, call Bernie Parness, President, at 954-415-5658. Deerfield Progressive Forum meets Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, in Le Club for lecture/ discussion sessions on political, economic and social issues. For information, call 954-428-1598. Disabled American Veterans Chapter 133 of Deerfield Beach has trained Service Officers to assist you in obtaining benefits that you are entitled to. THERE IS NO CHARGE TO VETERANS FOR THIS HELP! Just call 954-4216097 to set up an appointment. District Council 37 Retirees Next meeting will be held at Temple Anshei Shalom, 7099 Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 33436. For information, call Chairman Vincent Socci at 561-451-3643. Emunah of America meets third Wednesday of every month at 12 noon in the Young Israel Synagogue in Century Plaza. Light lunch and interesting program. All are cordially welcome. For information about this chapter, call Ina Ciocca, 954-360-0740; Selma, 954-427-8674 or Pearl, 954-426-0189. Friends of Deerfield Beach Arboretum, 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Free tour of the Arboretum every Friday at 10 a.m., and the

first Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. Seminars held at 7 p.m. in Recreation Room of Constitution Park. All seminars followed with an auction featuring plants, herbs and trees from our nursery. Refreshments served. All are invited. Volunteers needed to help spread mulch, weed and participate in planting activities. For further information, call 954-480-4494. Hadassah Deerfield Beach meets monthly on the third Monday at 12 noon in Activity Room B at the rear of Le Club. Use bus No. 5. Interesting programs! For information, call Minerva Katz at 954-427-9902 or Adele at 954 427-4970. Hispanic Club meets on the second Sunday of each month in Room B at the Activity Center from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Our dues are $6 per year. Come and meet new friends and help us plan club activities. E-mail for the Club is hispanicclubcve@ gmail.com. For information, call Ana at 954-427-6033. El Club Hispano se reune el segundo Domingo de cada mes en el Salon B del Activity Center de 2:30 a 4:00 de la tarde. Las cuotas son $6 anuales. Unase a nosotros y haga nuevas amistades y ayundenos a planificar actividades. Email for Club is hispanicclubcve@gmail.com. Para mas informacion llamen a Ana al 954-424-6033 o Jane al 954-421-5584. Independent Living first Wednesday of each month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Elevator Alcove near the theater. Distributes phones for the hearing and sight impaired. For further information, contact Felix Cruz at 954-722-6400. Italian-American Club, your heritage, meets the second Monday of each month at 10:30 a.m. from October to April in the Clubhouse Party Room. Join us for fun. Some of our functions: pizza parties, picnics (the Italian way), trips, lunch/dinner theatre, guest speakers and more. Contacts all year: Lena Radicella, 954-4282184; Lucille Carlucci, 954-4212406 and Toni Ponto, 954-4280286. JOIN, JOIN, JOIN Jet Setters Singles Club Jet Setters Singles Club The Club was started for widows, widowers and singles in Century Village to meet and find new acquaintances to enrich their lives. We host bus trips, places of interest, shows, beach luncheon parties and offer many exciting monthly activities.

The Jet Setters Singles Club allows our CVE singles to enjoy life again after a spouse passes away. We are a kind, friendly group so come join us. The Club meets the third Monday of the month in Music Room B at 1 p.m. Meetings will resume again on Monday, December 17, 2012. Already scheduled is a Dinner-Show, with private bus transportation, to see the Lips show on Sunday, February 10, 2012. Dues are $5 (cash only) for all members per season. We look forward to seeing our previous, as well as new members who wish to join the Jet Setters Singles Group. For more information, call Shirley, 954-421-2567 or Sandi, 954-725-5895. Jewish War Veterans Post and Auxiliary 265 meets the third Sunday of the month in the Activity Room C behind Le Club at 10:30 a.m. Show your support of our troops by joining and getting involved in our numerous programs benefitting our armed forces. We need more JWV of Korea and Vietnam wars. For information, call Kitty Cole, 954360-7956; Richard Rosensveig, 954-426-1960, or Ralph Bell, 954590-2965. The homeless veterans, both men and women, in South Florida are part of the “wages of war.” Those of us who were fortunate enough to go comparatively unscathed through the battles, both at home and abroad, owe them a debt. This post is conducting a clothing drive to aid them. They need blankets, new underwear and socks, toiletries, outerwear, shoes, rain gear and whatever else you can think of that will help. Please, all items must be clean and in wearable condition, not torn or dirty. All items collected will be delivered to the Veterans Center in West Palm Beach by us. Just a phone call to 954-5902965 will bring a prompt reply. This post would like to increase its membership. If you are a veteran of any war and are interested, please contact us at the above number. Knights of Pythias Kings Knights Lodge #221, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at Cypress Hammock Park, 1300 Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs. Parking is available and a collation is served after the meeting. Our meetings start at 7:30 p.m. and for further information call PC Larry Hochfeld at 954721-4833.We welcome all paid up Pythian brothers to join us. Knitting Club of CVE meets every Monday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Sewing Room at the

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Clubhouse. We welcome beginners and experienced knitters and crocheters. If you have an “Itch to Stitch,” come and have fun and make someone happy. Call Florence 954-698-9421. Kosher Singles A new club for dining, travel and day trips meets the third Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. in Room B, first floor. For more information, call 954480-8958. L’Alliance Francophone CVE Join more than 1800 Frenchspeaking residents of the Village, mostly snowbirds from Canada. The association was established in 1995, offering great activities. For information, call Jean Leduc 954420-9649 or Pierre Laliberte 954427-9839. L’Alliance Francophone of CVE Si vous parlez Français, joignez-vous aux 800 personnes déjà membres de notre association. Nous avons de nombreuses activitès tres diversifièès a vous proposer. Pour toute information, appeler Jean Leduc 954-420-9649 or Pierre Laliberte 954-427-9839. Lapidary Club members only, work every Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Lapidary Room. Supervisor must be present. Sessions will be added as needed. For information, call Walter Reich at 954-421-6875. Let’s Talk About Books and Things meets monthly on the fourth Thursday in General Purpose Room G at 2 p.m., October-May. Suggested reading The Columbus Affair by Steve Berry. All are welcome. For more information, call Gladys, 954-4219232 or Irene, 954-418-9156. Lois Meet Lois Introductions are easy at the meetings of the Lois Club where membership across the nation is solely on a first-name basis. The premise of the Club seems to take hold because the name, while popular in the 1930s and 1940s, went out of style. Lois’ say they don’t often encounter others with the same name so when they do, they’re drawn together. The South Florida Lois Club is fascinating to see how similar we are. Those interested in joining our Lois Club are welcome. For further information, call Lois R. 954-425-6922, organizer. Low Vision Support Group meets the 4th Tuesday each month, October to April, 10 a.m. in Music Room B. Contact Fran Massel 954-426-1077.


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Marie’s Cabaret If you like to sing, tell stories and have humor to relate, come visit Marie’s Cabaret every Monday at 6 p.m. in Music Room A or the GPA Room in the Clubhouse. Also, if you play the piano or any other instrument, we welcome you. Visit us, and enjoy an evening of pleasure along with meeting new friends. For further information, call Marie 954-725-1365. Mended Hearts Cardiac Support Group, an affiliate of the American Heart Association, meets the first and third Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. Heart healthy snacks will be served. Open to all cardiac patients and their families in the community. Located at 7300 Del Prado Circle South, Boca Raton. For information, call 561392-3000. Na’Amat USA, Negev/Gila Chapter (Century Village, Deerfield Beach) Information about this organization, call Kitty Cole at 954-360-7956 or Marjorie Moidel at 954-970-8609. National Council of Jewish Women meetings are held at the Clubhouse Room N at 12 noon on the third Wednesday of each month, October through April. All are welcome, nonsectarian. For information, call Sylvia Katcher, President, at 954-421-8870, or Betty Swinkin 954-570-9526. Nature Club will meet the second Wednesday of every month from December to March in Clubhouse Room GP-A at 1 p.m. A different speaker is at each meeting and several trips are enjoyed by our members. These trips are to a variety of nature sites. For information, contact Janet Rothkopf at 954-428-3025. Newbies Come and meet new people interested in social activities, dinners and trips. Meetings will be held on the first Tuesday of each month, December-March in Room G in the Clubhouse. For further information, call Rebecca, 954426-0469 (NY number 914-7793467) or Jackie, 954-596-4916 (NY number 631-979-8075). New Book Discussion Group Are you interested in having a stimulating discussion? Are you looking for some intellectual activity? Join the New Book Discussion Group for thought provoking discussions. We meet on the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse in Music Room B. For additional information please contact Hy Rosenblum at 954-419-9554.

JANUARY 2013

New Covenant Church on the Lake celebration service every Sunday morning at 10 a.m. with continental breakfast beginning at 9:30 a.m. Bible Study every Wednesday evening at 6:30 p.m. with children/student ministries available. Dinner is served, beginning at 5:30 p.m. For further information, call the Church Office at 954-781-3170. New Horizons Church of Deerfield worship service at 10 a.m., Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. For information, call the Church at 954-427-3045. New York Transit Retirees of Florida meets the second Wednesday of the month at 11 a.m. at Centura Park Clubhouse, 2395 N. W. 36th Ave., Coconut Creek. Keep informed of your pension and medical benefits. For information, call 561-479-2149. North East Focal Point Senior Center: Adult Day Care Service, Monday to Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. for individuals with dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or memory loss. Contact Mary Jo Bodnick, Case Manager at 954480-4463. Yoga Lite every Monday at 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Ballroom Dance Lessons every Tuesday, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; Enhance Fitness Program, Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. or 12 noon to 1 p.m. ($10 donation per month) “Hot Topic” discussions every Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Open Water Color Painting Class every Wednesday at 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Self Empowerment Support Group every Wednesday at 12 noon to 1 p.m.; Line Dancing ($4 donation) for beginners/ intermediate, every Friday 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Beginner Computer Lessons offered, oneon-one, at $40 for six one-hour lessons. Contact Michelle Flower at 954-480-4447 and assist in Floral Arrangements. Volunteer Opportunities, contact Claire Riccardi 954-480-4447. Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, 5201 N. Military Trail, Deerfield Beach. Daily Mass, Monday to Friday at 9 a.m.; Saturday Vigil at 4 p.m.; Sunday Masses at 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. by Rev. Kenneth Whittaker. For further information, call 954421-3246. Ping Pong Club Intermediate/ Advanced ping pong players wanted for doubles and singles games, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. daily. Come or call Rudy Mozny 954421-4299.

Poetry Study and Discussion Group Poetry heals! It can relieve boredom, anxiety, depression, loneliness and more. Come and see. The group meets Mondays, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call Howard at 954571-7148. Saint Ambrose Catholic Church, Pastor Rev. Bryan Dalton, Daily Masses at 6:30 a.m., 7:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.; Saturday mornings at 7:30 a.m. only. Vigil Masses at 4 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Sunday Masses at 7:30 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 12 noon and 6 p.m., Confessions on Saturday, 11 a.m. to 12 noon and 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. For information, call the Church at 954-427-2225. Senior Support Group is here to give the support you need. We pledge confidentiality. Thursdays, 1:45 to 3 p.m., Room C in the Clubhouse, provided by the Center for Group Counseling and sponsored by the United Way of Palm Beach County. For more information, call 561-483-5300 Center for Group Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Road just south of Palmetto Park Road. Sisterhood of Young Israel of Deerfield Beach meets at the Synagogue the first Tuesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. Gift Shop is now open on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Everyone is welcome. For further information, call Helen Hagler at 954-360-9939 or Tobi Kleiman at 954-725-3776. Sisterhood of Temple Beth Israel meets on the second Thursday of each month at 11:30 a.m. A mini lunch is served, followed by an interesting program. For further information, call the Temple Office at 954-421-7060. Sixty-Five Social Club Come join us if you are a couple and like to be active and enhance your lifestyle, our Club affords the opportunities of meeting new friends, going on many different cruises, experiencing many restaurants, as well as day trips to museums, casino gambling, shows and theaters, weekends away and mystery trips. All couples of any age are welcome. Don’t waste another minute. For information, call Lillian at 954-360-2941. Social Singles If you are young at heart, this is the club for you. We are a club that enjoys going to shows, museums, nature outings and more. We dine at local restaurants for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. Our meetings are held the second Monday of the

month in the Clubhouse at 7 p.m., Room G. For more information, please call Felicia 954-421-9817 or Irene 954-571-5004. Softball Players now forming Century Village teams. No age limitations. Call William Brooker at 561-702-2081. South Florida Gold Coast Chapter of Myasthenia Gravis support group meets on the second Saturday of each month at 1 p.m. at the North Broward Medical Center, I-95 and Sample Road. For information, call Gladys or Evelyn at 954-429-0455. South Florida Harmonica Club Do you play the harmonica? Would you like to play in an active harmonica group? We are a performing harmonica club, often playing gigs. Our audience tells us that we are their best entertainment. We meet at the North West Focal Point Senior Center on Wednesday afternoons from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. The Center is located at 6009 N.W. 10th Street in Margate. Please call Sam at 954-421-5792 or Bea at 954426-3540. Stained Glass Club meets on the first Wednesday of every month November-March at 10 a.m. in GP-E. For further information, call Harry Liner at 954-426-4853. Stock Market Discussion Club meets the first and third Monday of each month at 10 a.m., GPE, November-April. Exchange information about stocks, mutual funds, ETFs and bonds. No fee involved. For further information, call Janine at 954-482-0584. Supervisory Bridge meets in Card Room B in the Clubhouse on Friday only 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. beginning the first Friday of December and will end in March. $1 fee per person. We supply partners and cards. For further information call Irving Ruga 954698-9741. Talking Book Club The JBL Library, in conjunction with the Low Vision Group in CVE, is forming a monthly Talking Book Club. Each participant will receive the same audio book. A representative for the JBL Library will facilitate the book discussion once a month. The group will meet the second Tuesday of the month at 10 a.m. in the Clubhouse, Music Room B. For information, call Marilyn Ball 954-360-9074. Tai-Chi The class will be on Wednesday from 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. in Exercise Room at Clubhouse with instructor, Terry. Come join our class and get rid of stress.


JANUARY 2013

Temple Beth Israel is a Conservative, Egalitarian Congregation, which has a daily Minyan at 8 a.m. during season. Friday at 5 p.m., Rabbi Craig Ezring conducts Friday evening services the first and third Friday of the month, at 7:30 p.m., followed by an Oneg Shabbat. He also conducts Saturday morning services which are held at 9 a.m., followed by a Kiddush. The Temple has a circulating library of books in Judaica and current best sellers. The library also has an ongoing book sale; hours are Monday to Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For information, call the office at 954-421-7060. Temple B’nai Shalom (Reform) services are conducted every Friday at 8 p.m. in the Activity Center by Rabbi Alton M. Winters and Cantor Gary Sherman. Oneg Shabbat follows services every week. For additional information,

call President Marvin Schmier, 954-570-3316. The Theosophical Society of Deerfield, located at 831 SE 9th Street, phone number 954420-0908, offers a free Sunday Speaker’s Forum every week from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. In addition, we have many interesting classes during the day and evenings, also without charge. To obtain a free, quarterly bulletin, call the lodge at the above number or Lillian Mayer, a CVE resident, at 954-360-7080 for more information about specific classes we offer. The Village Vagabonds dance band plays Thursday afternoons from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. in the Music Room B from January through April. For information, call Ted at 954-428-0578. United Federation of Teachers/ Retired Teachers Chapter

meetings are at Temple Anshei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave. west of Jog in Delray Beach. For further information, call Hilda Cohen at 954-428-6805. United Order of True Sisters All are welcome. UOTS presents MEET THE AUTHOR, January 22, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., in Room GP-A. This is a wonderful opportunity to meet and enjoy A.R. Alan, Author and Comedy Writer for such notables as Joan Rivers. For information about this event contact Edith Cohen, 954715-4851 or Frieda Schwartz, 954429-1750. For information, about UOTS contact President Marilyn Asner, 954-427-0461 or Betty Swinkin, Membership Chairperson, at 954-570-9526.

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For further information, call Eunice Westin at 954-427-7119. We Care of CVE is still available for supplies (wheelchairs, walkers, canes, etc.) only. Contact Barbara Brown at 954-574-9675. Workers United Club (Union retirees and friends). Contact Ann Jackson after 3 p.m. at 954-721-5789, for information about future meetings. Workmen’s Circle, Branch 1051 meets at 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday at South County Civic Center on Jog Rd. For information, call Miriam Guz at 561-495-7378.

Yiddish Club of CVE Speak and improve your Yiddish. Have fun with Yiddish humor and more. All levels invited. Club meets the Waves (Navy gals) meet every third Tuesday of every month at 7 month on the first Saturday, 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. in GPE from October noon at the Olive Garden on through April. For information, call Federal Highway in Ft. Lauderdale. Sheila at 954-427-9090.


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JANUARY 2013

No Other Auld Lang Syne By ANTHONY DIGIACOMO

T

here is an old saying which exists in the cultural mind of Mankind throughout all ethnicities, creeds and races. It is “Though old be forgotten, let

none be regretted.” The truth about these “golden years” is that they really aren’t golden at all. Fool’s Gold and such coat these often floundering times. No one would be ashamed to raise a deep-felt

cry of “not fair”, meaning life is unfair. A brilliant writer, a narrator of the human condition, wrote a television script dealing with this theme, dead on target, sharpshooter accurate. Rod Serling gave us fans and

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viewers a penultimate, no holds barred, no sugar coating slap on the cheek with They’re Tearing Down Tim Reilly’s Bar. The long story short, Randy Lane, widower, aging corporate “little cog in a great machine” awakens one foreboding day to find his life falling apart around him, a mid-life crisis and the desperate lonely ache for his wife, as well as

the realization that he squandered all the valuable things in his life. He has to fight off a predatory junior executive by day and return to his tiny prison of an apartment at night. When he sees construction machinery readying to demolish the one thing from his beloved cherished past, Tim Reilly’s Bar; he loses it – loses his mind. He frantically shuttles from present to past and from present to empty future, slipping in and out of reality. His problem is that he no longer fits into this new modern world. He wishes only to return to the familiar, safe and cozy past. Like Randy Lane, we all face those feelings- sometimes frequently, sometimes constantly. We cannot play by the rules this new world is run by. Widowed, widower, aging bachelor or bachelorette, we hear the song, Auld Lang Syne, and wish for better. We wish for an external force or power to make things right once more! What we do not see, but which our fictional friend Randy does come to realize is only through letting the past stay buried where it belongs and only through looking around us at the things in our life, can we breathe hope into the “not so golden years.”


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A Tale of Old Deerfield ~ Part II By ANTHONY DIGIACOMO

A

Harsh New Home In Part I, we learned that the supernatural was a large factor in the matter of interaction between natives and immigrants. This chapter will focus on the harsh conditions the new land presented. Florida is almost a tropical environment. It is more often than not, humid and rain soaked - the summer monsoon rains being particularly destructive. Hurricane season adds to the inhospitable nature of conditions here. The settlers were profoundly shaken by weather they had no prior experience with. In a land where it rains every day, sometimes for an hour straight, wood becomes saturated and cannot be used for fires or home building. In a land where winds are so strong they can actually blow away things. The thatched roof and “wattle and daub” huts were no shelter. Fauna (animals) were another issue that had to be faced. Most of Florida, before the 19th Century and the advent of terra forming (the large scale modification of land in order to make it hospi-

table,) was swamp. Inhabiting these swamps were poisonous snakes, alligators, boar and poisonous insect species. The settlers were again faced with things they had no prior experience with. The first colonizers were decimated by the animals that are at home here. The natives have oral histories, related through sagas, that poke fun and derision on those hapless white-eyes. Climate and terrain were against the technology of European industry. In a climate where the humidity is almost saturating short of rain, things (furniture, etc.) rot. Metal rusts and degrades, wood rots to a weak pulp and leather becomes decayed. Clothing and textiles literally become rags. The supplies brought by the settlers rapidly became useless. Food spoiled quickly here, not only because there was no artificial refrigeration but because the humidity and torrential rains aided the formation of mold, mildew and fungus. Europeans had long known how to use “ice houses” to store perishables; they were psychologically devastated once the realization there would never be ice or snow here hit home.

Terrain was another major obstacle. Swamps filled with quicksand bogs, sinkholes and mire dominated the land. The condition of Florida, being exactly at sea level, was hard to understand. Europeans were used to hills, mountains, valleys, caverns, etc. Here there was flatland from coast to coast. The settlers could not build dug out houses or lean-to houses. They had to learn how to build homes on pylons or stilts to raise them above the water line. With no forests or hill country to provide a barrier against the winds and rain, the settlers were faced with the problem of how to build permanent housing that was able to withstand

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the climate. Oral histories and personal journals describe the misery they faced. There was an aura of despair clinging to the efforts to tame this land. The natives again had a laugh on the whites-eyes. Here were technologically-superior people who were totally defenseless against Nature. Eventually, the settlers had to import lumber and other necessities. They boiled tar and sap, coated their lumber with it and prayed this preventative would resist the climate. They kept their metal tools and pots, pans and guns well oiled also. Every effort was

made to keep their quality of life as civilized as possible. Eventually, all of these obstacles and obstructions in the path of conquering this new land were overcome. The stubborn tenacity of the settlers overcame the worst this new land could throw at them. Peace between the Seminole and these whites came slowly. Mistrust and fear colored many of those early interactions. The gradual change that saw mistrust and fear turn to cordiality and true acceptance, eventually put native and immigrant at peace with each other.

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Does Color Matter? By BETTY SCHWARTZ, Assistant to the Editor Color plays a vitally important role in the world in which we live. Color can sway thinking, change actions and cause reactions. It can irritate or soothe your eyes, raise your blood pressure or suppress your appetite. When used in the right ways, color can even save on energy consumption. As a powerful form of communication, color is irreplaceable. Red means “stop” and green means “go.” Traffic lights send this universal message. Likewise, the colors used for a product, web site, business card or logo cause powerful reactions. Color matters! Is red the most extreme and

powerful color on earth? How can yellow be the color of both happiness and caution? Suppose the color blue was removed from the world, specifically the sea and sky; what color would fill the void? Dr. Max Luescher, a Swiss psychologist, developed a means of examining the connotations of specific colors and their relationship to different traits. He says that there are four “psychological primary colors.” Dark Blue: Represents a need for tranquility. Green: Persistent, obstinate and self-centered. Orange-Red: Excitable and assertive. Yellow: Extroverted, opti-

mistic and joyful. When you are making choices, whether for personal or business use, does color matter? The answer is a resounding “Yes” as color is one of the strongest determining factors in the way we perceive things. Steve Jobs, a man always a step ahead, said in 2000: “What’s your favorite color is going to be one of the most important questions for consumer PC buyers.” Interestingly, many people make a subconscious judgment about a product within 90 seconds of first seeing it. And, over 60% of people make their evaluation based on color alone. Tests have demonstrated that color is one of the prime factors in the sale of virtu-

ally every commodity on the market today. When frozen foods first appeared, they were packaged in ice-green or snow-blue containers with pictures of Eskimos, igloos or other Arctic designs. They didn’t attract the eye of the average housewife however, until they were re-packaged in warmer colors that suggested the appetizing appearance of the re-heated food. There are psychologists who are convinced that colors can be used to cure a variety of illnesses and emotional problems, ranging from alcoholism to ulcers. Dr. Oscar Brunier, a Swedish researcher, exposed two groups of mildly-intoxicated men to different colored lights. Those in yellow-orange light stopped

drinking, and those in red light kept drinking. Color is an integral part of our daily life – from the green of the grass to the blue of the sky. Even our language is liberally sprinkled with colorful phrases we use to express our emotions, such as seeing red or green with envy. Certain qualities have been associated with specific colors. Black, for instance, is the traditional color of tragedy and death. In the Middle Ages, suicides from Black Friar’s Bridge, a gloomy black structure in the heart of London, declined by one third when it was painted bright green. What is your favorite color? And what does it say about you?

Long Term Care Insurance-What You Must Know By STEVEN M. DUNN Long term care insurance is perhaps one of the most valu-

able assets you own. First, as you age, it becomes prohibitively expensive to purchase the insurance, or you become

uninsurable and cannot buy it at all. Second, the average cost of home care by a home health aide is nearly $20 per hour, and you are living longer which means you will need the care over a long period of time. Home care could easily cost in excess of $50,000 per year. Long term care insurance affords you the ability to remain as independent as possible without the worry of burdening your children and depleting your assets. Most importantly, the insurance affords you the flexibility to make the most critical decision in your life-where and how you are going to spend your remaining years. It is therefore essential that you understand how your long term care policy works and how to use it. This article will address some important features of the policies. Years Ago I Bought a Home Care Policy and Now I Am Considering Moving to Assisted Living. Can I Use My Policy in Assisted Living? The answer is that in most instances you can. Under Florida law, a licensed Assisted Living Facility is considered to be a person’s home. If the assisted living facility provides you with assistance with two or more activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, ambulating, feeding, or transferring, your home care policy should cover the cost of that care. So, if you are considering moving to assisted living or you or someone you know has moved to assisted living and has been unable to secure policy benefits, you should have someone

review your policy and advise you accordingly. What If I or a Loved One Can Still Physically Function Well and can Perform Our Daily Functions Independently But Because of Memory Issues, We Can’t Do What We Used to Do. Will Our Policy Pay For an Aide? YES. Long term care policies must cover custodial care for people who suffer from dementia. So, even if you can physically dress and bathe yourself, but need prompting and reminding, and otherwise need someone around in case of an emergency, your policy will cover the costs of an aide. I Need More Care Than My Insurance Company Will Approve. Is There Anything I Can Do? YES. Frequently, after you have submitted a claim for home care benefits, the insurance company will either call you or send someone to your home to assess your need for care. Often times, the insurance company will conclude you do not need as much care as you or your home health agency believes you need. If you have been properly assessed by your home health agency and your plan of care has been approved by your doctor, then you stand an excellent chance of reversing the insurance company’s decision. I Have a Nursing Home Policy. I Need Care But I’m Not Ready For a Nursing Home. Can I Use the Policy at Home? It depends. In Florida, if your policy states that it is a “long term care” policy, then it must include home care as well. If you are facing this

dilemma you should have someone review your policy and receive appropriate advice. I Have Been Told That My Insurance Benefits Have Run Out. Is There Anything I Can Do to Keep the Policy Working For Me? YES. Most policies offer a feature called “restoration of benefits.” That means even though you have limited benefits, restoration of full policy benefits will occur under most instances if you have gone 180 consecutive days without receiving covered benefits. During the 180 day period you will typically be required to pay premiums. This is a critically important policy feature. If you have used all of your policy benefits, you should have someone review your policy before you stop paying premiums. Steven Dunn is a long term care insurance lawyer whose father is an Alzheimer’s victim. He developed a passion for working for the elderly as a result of his father’s illness and a denial by his father’s long term care insurance company. Since that time he has successfully handled hundreds of long term care insurance cases, and has been involved in the first appellate court cases in Florida under Florida’s Long Term Care insurance statute. For more information about Mr. Dunn visit his website at www. longtermcarelawoffice.com, or call him at 305-868-1400. Mr. Dunn is available for a free consultation and review of your long term care insurance policy.


JANUARY 2013

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When Is A Book Not A Book? By SY BLUM, Associate Editor My past two columns have dealt with what I consider electronic miracles that have to a great extent, changed the way we live. I am referring, of course, to the iPhones, iPads, etc., pioneered by the late Steve Jobs. Also, last month I told the story of Google and how it functions. In this column, I will attempt to explain another fairly recent development which, while not on the scale of the above two, nevertheless has revolutionized a very common activity of most everyone, including senior citizens. It is an alternative way to read books: the subject is e-books (the “e,” refers to “electronic.”) The history of this fairly new kid on the block is a bit misty. The first e-book may be an annotated electronic index to the works of Thomas Aquinas that appeared back in the 1940s. Actual e-books started to appear in the 1960s at Stanford University, the incubator of so many of our present day electronic miracles. One Michael S. Hart, working at the University of Illinois, is credited with creating the present e-book back in 1971. There have been many improvements since then to perfect the present-day version. The point of this column is to present, to the best of my

ability, what the e-book is and how we can use it. In a word, an e-book is a digitalized version of a printed book that is, of course, ink on paper. It has been with us since Johannes Gutenberg invented movable type and printed the first book (a bible) back in 1455. Down through the years, the procedure has changed little. Of course, better inks, paper and printing presses have greatly improved the quality of the finished project but the process is basically the same . . . until now. By converting the contents of the traditional book into a digitalized version, it is now possible to read complete books on an electronic pad downloaded from a computer, yours or someone else’s. Electronic e-readers go by the names Kindle (Amazon), Nook (Barnes & Noble) and several others. They range from simple readers that do nothing else (like ours) to models that are virtual computers. Of course, the bottom line is to sell books, periodicals etc. by downloading them directly from the seller, at a price, of course. It then becomes yours forever. On a personal note: I have been aware of the availability of these e-readers almost since their inception. I don’t know about you, but throughout what has turned out to be

a long lifetime, I have never read a book twice. So, by my reckoning, why should I buy a book either over the counter or electronically if I am only going to read it once? Don’t go away. Fortunately, there is a way to read books (thousands of them) electronically for free! Once again our public libraries, among others, make it possible. U.S. libraries began providing free e-books in 1998 through their web sites. In 2010 the Public Library Funding and Technology Funding Access Study found that 66% of public libraries were offering free e-books. It certainly must be almost 100% at this writing. At first the procedure for downloading a book you want to read on your e-book reader seems complicated for the average computer user. However, like so many things, repetition makes the whole procedure simple. If I can do it, you can do it (maybe!) First, of course, you must have access to a computer equipped with a router (which most users already have) and one of the e-book readers mentioned previously. You must also join and “log on” to a public library web site and locate the e-book function. From there on you simply follow the instructions and shortly will arrive at a menu that will offer you

books in the category you desire (fiction, non-fiction, etc.) Based on your selection, you will be offered as many as 500 or more titles in that category. By selecting the “available now” option you scroll down the list, scan a brief summary of each book and decide if you would like to read it. If you do, you type in your library card number (which does not have to be repeated) and soon thereafter the word “download” will appear. You then connect your Nook (or whatever) to the computer and in seconds the entire book you select will appear on your reader; it is as simple as that. You also can select the length of time you would like to keep the book (generally up to 21 days). The book will automatically be deleted from your e-reader when the time is up or you can “return” it to the library sooner if you do not like it. Most e-readers enable you to store many books. So, you may ask, what are the advantages of an e-book over the traditional ink and paper book? In my estimation, there are many. For one thing, as previously stated, it is free, except if you opt to buy a bestseller, etc. directly from the bookseller. Then there is the perk, especially for the elderly, of not having to walk the aisles, scan the books available necessitating you standing on your tippy-toes or bending down

to the lowest shelf. Once you have the contents of the book in your e-reader you can enlarge or reduce type size to your satisfaction. You turn the pages by simply tapping the edge of the glass screen. When you want to quit you turn the e-reader off. When you want to resume reading, you turn it back on and there, lo and behold, is the page you were on right there ready for you to continue reading; no thumbing through the book to find your place and no bookmark necessary. In addition, at least on our Nook, is a glo-light feature, which when turned on illuminates the lines you are reading. In fact, I have seen Bernice reading during a sleep-break with the entire room dark except for the illuminated lines she is reading. Finally, the size: 5x6-1/2” by about ¼” thick enables one to carry it in a pocket or purse, making it extremely portable. It can be read virtually anywhere; no “schlepping” of a traditional book. The large capacity battery makes it possible to read for several days without recharging. The foregoing is just another example of the magical, electronic world we live in. Why not join it? HAPPY NEW YEAR! If you wish to get in touch with Sy you may email him at Melody001@msn.com.


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

CVE Clubhouse Library News By BARBARA NATHAN MARCUS

I

hope that you all enjoyed the Holiday Season and are already well into 2013. It promises to be an exciting year for all of us in the Library of CVE. We are having the best book sale ever! All hardcover books are two for one dollar; come by and have a look. You can’t resist this offer! The following is a list of some of the new books that have been ordered recently

for your reading pleasure: Threat Vector by Tom Clancy; Out of Warranty by Haywood Smith; Kinsey and Me: Stories by Sue Grafton; The Midwife’s Tale by Samuel Thomas; Unnatural Habits by Kerry Greenwood; Nano by Robin Cook; The Wrath of Angels by John Connally; Political Suicide by Michael Palmer; The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier (author of Girl with a Pearl Earring); Collateral

Damage by Stuart Woods; Blood Money by James Grippando; The 100 Year-Old-Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson. Don’t these books sound exciting and interesting? I am particularly looking forward to reading about the 100-yearold man who climbed out the window. I myself am but 69 years old, and I am finished with climbing out of windows. And, if the new Tracy Chevalier is as good as Girl

with a Pearl Earring, we have a treat in store! Speaking of stores, I should talk about the Boutique for a moment. We have some wonderful treasures for you. I know because I buy many treasures from the Boutique, as well as give many of my treasures to the Boutique. So look through your things, make a donation to the Boutique and come by to buy some treasures; it is as simple as that. Since we are a selfsustaining library, this is one

of the ways we can buy books for all of us to read. Also keep in mind, tucked away in the back right-hand corner of the library is a wonderful magnifier, an excellent opportunity to read what some of us normally would not see. I have one at home in Ottawa and even use it for reading labels on cans. That is it for this month; be well, and enjoy what CVE and the Library has to offer.

CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild By MARION G. COHEN

D

o you enjoy symphonic music? Do you take pride in our Symphony Orchestra, an orchestra that adds so much culture and entertainment to Century Village and to the community? The Guild has been fundraising for the Symphony Orchestra for over 20 years. Every year we present a sizable sum to the orchestra. Have you given thought to the tremendous costs incurred by this orchestra? There is music to buy, salaries to pay, equipment to purchase, playbills to print, etc. and the list goes on. Some of our activities planned for this year are now

history. On December 13, 2012 we visited the Henscratch Farms in Lake Placid, Florida. After our tour of the farm and lunch and wine tasting, we boarded the bus for a tour of Lake Placid. Our docent arranged for the group to view a film describing the 44 famous Lake Placid large building murals before we set out on a bus tour of the town. On January 13, 2013 in room GPA at 2 p.m. we will be entertained by talented students of Opera Argento School at the Open Membership Meeting. For all you opera lovers out there, we will be attend-

ing a matinee performance of Verdi’s opera, La Traviata by the Palm Beach Opera Company at the Kravis Center on Sunday, January 20, 2013. The bus will leave the Clubhouse parking lot at 12 noon. The price is $69 per person and includes bus transportation. For availability of seats call Marion Cohen at 954-428-1315. La Traviata literally translated means, “the woman who has gone astray.” Can a courtesan change her life? Join us to find the answers. This year we have planned another Trip With A Difference. We will visit The Costume World and Tavern on the Green on Tuesday, February 5, 2013. The Broadway Collection is an astounding exhibit of the finest costumes ever brought to the Broadway Collection stage by the most honored and respected designers in the history of the American theater. The tour will be led by entertaining theater professionals who will give a behind the scenes look at the most famous stage costumes. We will lunch in the re-creation of the famed New York Tavern on the Green where we will be served beneath the original crystal chandelier from the Tavern. Your meal will be presented on the same exquisite china, silver and crystal that once graced the tables of this historic restaurant. After lunch, we will visit the Florida Atlantic University Library to view an exhibit of rare and unique books classified as works of art. A film and an animated presentation of Books in Unusual Form follows. The price is $83 per

person. For more information contact Gladys at 954421-9232 or Betty Schwartz at 954-427-1157. Mail your check made out to CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild to Gladys Miller, 41 Tilford C, Deerfield Beach, Fl 33442. Have you purchased your tickets to the gala fashion show and luncheon on Saturday, February 16, 2013? We will be showing women’s and men’s clothing from Bealls. The lunch will be catered by TooJays, and as usual there will be entertainment and door prizes. Admission to the event is by advance reservations only. So make out your checks for $25 payable to CVE Orchestra Guild. Include your name, phone number and food choice (meat or dairy) mail to Toni Ponto, 79 Prescott D, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Any questions? Phone 954-428-0286. Deadline for reservations is February 12, 2013. On Wednesday, February 27, 2013, we will be attending a performance of Waist Watchers, the Musical at the Plaza Theater in Manalapan at a matinee performance to be followed by dinner at Tony Wu in Boca Raton. The play is a musical parody revue about food, diet, exercise and relationships. Meet the bus at the Clubhouse parking lot at 12 noon. Mail your check in the amount of $87 made out to CVE Symphony Orchestra Guild to Betty Schwartz, 1028 Farnham O, Deerfield Beach, Fl 33442. For reservations and

further details phone Betty at 954-427-1157. Indicate with whom you wish to sit. We will terminate the season with another Open Membership Meeting on Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 2 p.m. in the Clubhouse Party Room where the Opera Argento students will return for an encore performance. Don’t miss this favorite group. And bring a friend. Have you paid your dues of $10 single and $15 family membership? Please send your check to Kitty Cole, 7 Oakridge B. Her phone number is 954-360-7956. The Membership Committee is ready to receive your dues at any performances by the CVE Symphony Orchestra. Every membership helps to support our unique orchestra. On Tuesday, January 15, 2013 the orchestra takes to the stage with Weber’s overture to Oberon, six songs for cello and orchestra (world premiere) by Rachmaninov and Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8.On Tuesday, February 19, 2013, the orchestra brings to the stage its second concert of the season, an evening of beautiful music including Bizet’s Carmen Entr’Acte, Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy, Haydn’s Symphony No. 22, Jossef Strauss’ Village Swallows and Fucik’s Entry Of The Gladiators. Support your orchestra by attending these performances to show your appreciation of their efforts to enrich your lives in our Village.


JANUARY 2013

ARE NOT BEING CALLED

Are You Worried About Macular Degeneration? Do You Have Any Of These Questions?

IN AT THE FRONT GATE DELAYS AND CONFUSION PLEASE CALL ALL VISITORS INTO THE AUTOMATED SYSTEM BY DIALING 954 421-2556

PAGE

Preserve Your Vision with Trust And Confidence

VISITORS

CAUSING

CVE REPORTER

-

Why do I need so many shots? Am I getting enough shots? Which medicine is being injected in my eye and why? EYLEA, Lucentis, or Avastin....Which is best for me? What are the latest treatment options?

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Wonderfully

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JANUARY 2013

CAUTION!!! CVE RESIDENTS

There is a “NO TURN ON RED” sign on Powerline Rd. at West Gate

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Ballroom Dance Expires 02/15/13

Dress Code for Women: White Party Room of the Clubhouse January 24, 2013

Featuring “Le Bel Age” Expires 02/15/13

Expires 02/15/13

Swing Cha-cha

Rock

Fox-trot

Rumba

Waltz Tango

Expires 02/15/13

Expires 02/15/13

Mambo Samba Disco

Continental


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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JANUARY 2013

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CVE REPORTER

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Low Vision Book & Support Group The JBI Library and the Talking Book Library can provide you with free books, magazines and cultural materials that you can read with ease. Our mission is to serve people of all ages and backgrounds by making available books in audio format. Come join the Century Village Talking Book discussion group. They meet the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. in Music Room B. All lowvision participants will receive the same audio book they can enjoy prior to our meeting. For additional information, please call 954-689-0207 or 954-360-9074.

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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013


JANUARY 2013

SUDOKU

CVE REPORTER

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27B

There is really only one rule to Sudoku: Fill in the game board so that the numbers 1 through 9 occur exactly once in each row, column, and 3x3 box. The numbers can appear in any order and diagonals are not considered. Your initial game board will consist of several numbers that are already placed. Those numbers cannot be changed. Your goal is to fill in the empty squares following the simple rule above.

Sudoku doesn’t require any special math skills or calculations. It is a simple and fun game of logic -- all that’s needed is brains and concentration.

1. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each row. 2. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each column. 3. Fill the grid so that the numbers 1 through 9 appear in each 3x3 box. 4. A complete Sudoku puzzle contains the numbers 1 through 9 in every row, column, and 3x3 box. Hint: Start with a square that only has three numbers missing. Look at surrounding squares and grids to see which numbers you need to fill that 3x3 grid. SOLUTION ON PAGE 29B

JUMBLE By CHARLES K. PARNESS

Unscramble these words. The letters in brackets complete the sentence.

CRYPTOGRAM By CHARLES K. PARNESS

ab zd eaf , b ot oa

1) EEILNORVW

( _) _ ( _) _ _ _ ( _) ¬_ _

erv

2) EEGOQRSTU

( _) _ ( _) ( _) _ _ _ _ _

mh,

3) SPAEHINSP ( _) ( _) _ _ _ _ ( _) _ _ 4) EGINRSW

_ _ _ ( _) ( _) _ _

He stood on the bathroom scale for thirty minutes, so his wife called it …….. “// ( _) // ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) // ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) ( _) //”

Solution on page 29B

roo

zegghk phs

ndp. Jsrk up

mh

nbkd

emebg. phs wojboto

feajbgm

usrk

kdek

egf mhf

phs

b

wjorr

ha ghk

jhto

phs.

phs.

b j re

hx

ejj kdo mbg ubjjr bg ejj kdo khngr

ejj

htoa kdo nhajf, rdo nejvr bgkh

f b ej h m so

xahu

kdo

ubgo.

uhtIo zerew jegze

Hint: The letter “k” appearing above stands for the letter “T”

SOLUTION ON PAGE 29B


PAGE

28B

CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Simply Figure Out The ox B e h e’ T d i s k ‘in n i h T

Message Inside The Box Example: Think = Think Inside The Box

Get All 4 Correct & Bring To Reporter Office

FREE Gift Magnifier Compliments of the Reporter

Answers will be published in the following month’s Reporter.

Answers for “Think Inside The Box” from December issue of the Reporter

e Box h T ’ de ‘insi k n i Th

Congratulations to our winners for the December contest. Thank you for your participation.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

Sudoku Solution: Cryptogram Solution: 1) RICHARD, I CANNOT GO WITH YOU OR EVER SEE YOU AGAIN. YOU MUST NOT ASK WHY. JUST BELIEVE THAT I LOVE YOU. GO, MY DARLING AND GOD BLESS YOU.

~ ILSA

2) OF ALL THE GIN MILLS IN ALL THE TOWNS ALL OVER THE WORLD, SHE WALKS INTO MINE. ~ DIALOGUE FROM THE MOVIE CASABLANCA

Jumble Solution: 1) WOLVERINE 2) GROTESQUE 3) HAPPINESS 4) SWINGER Answer: “A LONG WEIGHT” AREA

CHAIRPERSON

VICE CHAIRPERSON

2013 Area Chair and Vice Chair

ASHBY BERKSHIRE CAMBRIDGE DURHAM ELLESMERE FARNHAM GRANTHAM HARWOOD ISLEWOOD KESWICK LYNDHURST MARKHAM NEWPORT OAKRIDGE PRESCOTT RICHMOND SWANSEA TILFORD UPMINSTER VENTNOR WESTBURY

Joe Sachs Naomi Redisch

"D" 1022 "D" 2061

725-2404 725-9175

Josh Rosman Harry Chizeck

"A" 6 "C" 4046

410-8174 426-3178

Joe Rubino Marjorie Campbell Norman Kaplan Eugene Goldman Joe Saraceno Rhoda Jarmark Philip Norris Don Kaplan Judy Olmstead Rita Pickar Jules Kesselman Robert Gravatt Cecile Baskin Bill Epstein Basil Hales Ann Rifkin Charles Parness Carmen Colon

"E" 224 "B" 4019 "K" 254 "C" 353 "D" 2043 "D" 3015 "C" 454 "I" 4018 "S" 406 "S" 4098 "V" 2106 "I" 180 "F" 151 "A" 4015 "S" 407 "E" 116 "O" 3049 "I" 155

418-0768 725-3301 428-1409 429-8313 426-3946 426-8582 571-1899 426-9812 213-1171 428-8890 570-9470 725-5999 428-0634 531-0969 426-3263 481-8934 725-1384 725-4308

Abe Trachtenberg Elaine Levy Dan Glickman Fran Stricoff Ed Yietz Elaine Solomon Tim Lippman Lori Benoit Donna Dowling Joan Baker Donna Capobianco Toni Ponto Carol Garcy Richard Grundt

"K" 364 "B" 1028 "G" 153 "C" 349 " I " 97 "D" 3016 "B" 22 "K" 1043 "N" 289 "Q" 2075 'V' 4109 "D" 79 "E" 439 "B" 3026

419-9730 427-2447 421-6259 570-8112 571-9773 428-1317 428-9751 427-2627 428-3780 427-9684 263-0645 428-0286 428-6104 427-7124

Mary Ann Braun Sheldon Pierce Harvey Masef

"A" 2 "C" 49 "C" 60

571-2266 419-9758 421-2344

Don Kaplan

Council Area Chair

954-426-9812

donaldmkaplan@yahoo.com

Joe Sachs

Council Area Vice Chair

954-725-2404

joeleprof@yahoo.com

29B


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Dear Stan By HELENE WAYNE

D

ear Stan, Hey, Stan, I’ve got to tell you that you really missed a good one last Saturday night. I’m talking about the show at the Clubhouse. It was the usual set-up, a comedian and a lady singer as the opener. The young lady was, as I said, the opener; her name was Mary Eiland. Yes, I know what you just said. I never heard of her either. Out came this pretty little thing, dressed in a lovely gown, very attractive and young.

She sang songs that we all know. They were the ones that we heard and loved so many years ago. Her style of singing was sort of like a female version of the way Bing Crosby used to perform. I would call it soft and mellow, very pleasant to listen to. She spoke a little about her past and when talking about her husband mentioned that she was married over 30 years. That’s why the asterisk is up at the top. Thirty years nearly blew us away; she looked like a young chick. It was one of those “You could

have fooled me” situations. Now on to the main act. He was a comedian; his name was Phil Tag. (I had never heard of him either) but enjoy the opportunity to laugh whenever I can. Let me tell you, Stan, this guy was really funny. Most of the comedians that we see these days have routines that are either repeats of the good old days or very similar to the funny men we’ve seen before. This fellow started, and you could tell that he was inviting the audience to get into the act. Sure enough, our

Bill The Handy Man CVE Resident 954-574-9303 Counter Tops Made To Order Plywood & Formica Closet Shelving - Bifold Doors Tile & Sheetrock Repair. Kitchen Cabinet Doors Replaced. Can Do Anything That Does Not Require A License. Section 9-127 Broward Code.

people realized it and started to respond to him. Whatever subject they brought up, he did his whole act around them and their statements. I’d say he had shills in the audience because the jokes that he had everyone hysterical about came from his responses to all of us. In between this stuff, he did some of what must be his normal program. The lady sitting in front of me was laughing and clapping so loud I know that I missed a lot of what he was saying. From what must have been his standard humor, he said that he was after Delta Airlines because they lost one of the two pieces of luggage that he brought down with him

from New York. He said that tonight he was wearing his underwear inside out. Then he said that the reason the airline took the name Delta was because it meant Don’t Expect Luggage to Arrive. He truly was what you would call a funny person. Everything that he said from that stage came across like it was coming straight from his brain to his mouth. So, Stan, I send you this little note to tell you, as a regular of the Saturday night shows, you and Beverly really missed a wow one by not being there.


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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31B

Hazela’s HAIMISHA HOUR 2012 Text by HAZELA WAINBERG, Photo By JONATHAN STAR

F

rom the exciting Hevenu Shalom musical march into the Party Room to the captivating closing Yiddish version of God Bless America, the capacity audience was entranced with the camaraderie of the annual Hazela’s Haimisha Hour. The crowd sincerely appreciated the sometimes rare Yiddishkite in the fun, spirited program. There were many familiar tunes such as Tumbalalaika, Bei Mir Bistu Schein, Ottawa’s Isaac Musikansky’s lively singing of Alle Brider, Ted Schneider’s resounding trumpet in Oyfn Pripetchik, Harvey Lubin’s beautiful bass tones of Go Down Moses and Shalom Alechem, Sara Staple’s Schein Vi de Levone, songs from Fiddler on the Roof, and a rambunctious hora, ending in Hava Nagila. Highlights included the Kulanu Chorus, Regine Rhu’s belly dance to Erev Shel Shoshanim, Sid Rosensweig’s poignant singing piano rendition of My Yiddishe Mama, Hazela’s and Ted’s shofar followed by a haunting Aveenu Malkenu, Hal Wicker’s melodious harmonica in Jerusalem of Gold, Raphael Vance’s accordion playing a Klezmer Frailach, and a Montreal-style audience dance to

Moshiach animated by Miron and Nella Goldszmidt. Included also were the parodies of Chuck Prentiss who is the lead singer of The Mummers and original Yiddish lyrics sung by Jerry Grey as well as Jocelyn & Jerry Cooper, who wrote both their own love songs and Shtelt Zich For sung by the Kulanu Chorus. Aside from Sid and Ted, the Village Vagabonds were represented by Joe Cassano on bass, Burt Gallo on guitar, Bob King on the sax and Jeff Brown on drums. Other musicians included the delightful Coopers on guitar & autoharp, Canadian famous icon Jerry Grey on the banjo and organizer Hazela Wainberg on the melodica. Marie Hertzler’s Monday night Cabaret participants included singers Bea Rosner, Sara Farber, Marjorie Miller and Meryam Vance. Mario & Antoinette Tetro danced the quick step to Tsena, Tsena. Merv Blostein was the jokester. Mimi Lourenso acted as a collaborator and was on percussion. Other popular entertainers were the jolly Yiddish teacher Freidele Oz and Montreal

lead clarinetist Joelle Selby. The Kulanu Chorus, under the direction of the Coopers, included Alex Gladstone, Benny Bokser, Carole Shiller, Dawn Mill, Dorothy Michaelberg, Evelyn Cherniak, Faigie Teitelbaum, Harriet Viontz, Len Warshaw, Lois Rosenberg, Mary Warshaw, Ruby Cobrin, Sandy Diamond and

Syd Shapiro. Fred Safran has video copies of the entire program. Jonathan Star’s photos are reproduced for The CVE Reporter. This year, there will be many more surprises. The Haimisha Hour will be on Wednesday, Feb 6, 2013 at 3:30 p.m. in the Party Room.

There will be new, very accomplished singers and a greater complement of guest musicians and dancers to make it an even more frailach event. Admission is free. Outsiders with ID who want to attend must be called into the Village by a resident, and enter the Clubhouse with a resident.

God Bless America: L/R lst row: Chuck Prentiss, Freidele Oz, Marjorie Miller, Regine Rhu, Meryam Vance, Mimi Lourenso, Mario and Antoinette Tetso, Miron Goldsmidt, Nella Edel, Heidi Lipes, Merv Blostein, Harvey Lubin. L/R 2nd Row – Hal Wicker, Jerry Cooper, Sid Rosenzweig, Joe Cassano, Hazela Wainberg


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Cooke’s Look at Books By RICHARD WILLIAM COOKE A monthly look at books of interest – new and occasionally, not-so-new, fiction and nonfiction – available at local libraries, bookstores and from online booksellers.

Prague Winter

By Madeleine Albright, Harper Collins, 467 Pages, $29.99 When President Bill Clinton appointed Madeleine Albright U.S. Secretary of State in 1997, there were those who questioned how this matronly grandmother of a woman could handle the rigors of constant, long-distance travel, deal one-on-one with kings, presidents, prime ministers and other heads of state and how she could handle the crushing stress created by constant and dangerous international challenges to the United States of America. The doubters needed not to have worried. Albright not only proved them wrong, she left behind a sterling record of achievement and an abiding reputation as one of the finest Secretaries of State the nation has ever known. Even today her name continues to appear on virtually all listings of The Ten Most Admired Women in the World. An accomplished author, (her Madam Secretary was a bestseller) Albright’s latest book subtitled, A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948, takes the reader back to when, at the age of 12, her life was shaken by the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia, the country where she was born. From the capital, Prague, to the bomb shelters of London and from the desolate prison ghetto of Terezin to the highest councils of European and American governments, the author provides a sweeping, and often shocking and

sad portrait of her life during a decade of tumult and war. She also reflects on her discovery of her family’s Jewish heritage many decades after the war and of the moral choices faced by her parents and their generation. “Millions of innocents did not survive,” she writes of the war. “Today we lack the power to reclaim lost lives, but we have a duty to learn all that we can about what happened and why.” In this new book, Albright pens a fascinating, enormously moving guide to the future through the lessons of the past.

In One Person

By John Irving, Simon & Schuster, 425 Pages, $28 In this new novel, acclaimed author John Irving has created a story and a main character, both of which are oddly compelling. Venturing into an area of subject matter not often visited by authors, Irving fearlessly challenges readers to be open minded, thoughtful and loving as they travel with Billy Abbott, one of Irving’s most tormented and impassioned protagonists. Billy quickly captures our compassion when he tells us, “If you were like me, at an all boy’s boarding school in the fall of 1960, you felt utterly alone; you trusted no one, least of all another boy your age and you loathed yourself. I’d always been lonely but self-hatred is worse than loneliness.” Probably best known for his groundbreaking novel, The World According to Garp and the film that followed the book Irving, in this new book, takes us unflinchingly, boldly, and often uncomfortably into the life and mind of Billy, a bisexual man dealing with his solitariness and the loathing

of an intolerant society. Growing up around people who are tilted toward the slightly off-beat – Miss Frost, the buxom, statuesque town librarian; Jacques Kittridge, his school’s blazingly handsome wrestling star; his grandfather, Harry Marshall, the owner of the local sawmill who dons women’s clothing and performs female roles in the local community theatre –Billy’s understanding of sexual roles ends up being confounded at best. Billy eventually becomes a writer, draws friends and lovers from a wide spectrum, and in that journey comes to terms with his own complex desires. A page-turner that is at once sad and funny, revolting and touching, In One Person is finally a wonderfully satisfying celebration of all of us, outsider and misfit included.

Killing Lincoln

By Bill O’Reilly, Henry Holt, 324 Pages, $28 “Friday, April 14, 1865, Washington, D.C., 10:15 p.m., John Wilkes Booth takes a bold step out of the shadows, Derringer clutched in his right fist and knife in his left. He extends his arm and aims for the back of Abraham Lincoln’s head. No one sees him. No one knows he is there. Booth squeezes the trigger. The ball launches down the barrel as the audience guffaws at the play. Abraham Lincoln has chosen this precise moment to lean forward and turn his head to the left for another long look down into the audience. A half second later, he would have been leaning so far forward that the ball would have missed his skull completely. But the president is not so lucky.” This new dramatic re-

counting of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by the anchor of Fox TV’s, The O’Reilly Factor, has become a publishing phenomenon, firmly implanted for weeks and deservedly so, on the New York Times’ bestseller list. Readers of a certain age will remember the popular early-TV program, You Are There, that each week dramatized historic events. In this book, co-written with author Martin Dugard and subtitled, The Shocking Assassination that Changed America Forever, the authors have brilliantly succeeded in creating the same you are there experience to the events before and after the Lincoln assassination. The increasingly harrowing final battles of the Civil War; the reasons for Lincoln’s generous terms for Robert E. Lee’s surrender; the difficult fulfillment of Lincoln’s dream of healing a divided nation; how one man and his band of murderous accomplices, filled with hatred against Lincoln and his slave-freeing agenda, nearly plunged the nation into a chaos from which it could never recover; it’s all here. Featuring some of history’s most remarkable figures, both known and until now unknown, including that of the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government; this mesmerizing, cannot-putit-down, vividly-detailed account of an actual seminal historic event reads like a thriller.

Heartbroken

By Lisa Unger, Crown Publishing, 370 Pages, $24 Dysfunctional families make for the best novels; that has never been truer than in the case of this new book from successful novelist Lisa Unger. Using journals left be-

hind by her aunt and grandmother, Kate writes a novel based on a very real, very old love story that ended in tragedy and one that uncovered a past Kate needs to probe. On the other side of town, Emily, along with having been coerced into a robbery that went horribly wrong, is in a dead-end job, involved with the wrong man and feels she’s headed for consequences which are horrific. With nowhere to go, she finds herself on the run. Kate and Emily do not know each other and have never met, but they both head to the same place for their own reasons; it’s Heart Island, an idyllic place in the middle of a lake in the Adirondacks. It just so happens that Heart Island has been owned for generations by Birdie Burke’s family. Birdie is a harsh and unyielding old woman, one you wouldn’t want to tangle with. Those who have done so have paid a steep price. When Kate and Emily reach Heart Island, who do they find there? Birdie, of course. And on top of that, the island itself holds a terrifying history all its own – a mystery that up until now Birdie has been able to keep to herself. Out of these parts, author Unger, has stirred up a delicious stew for the reader – part thriller, part ghost story and part generational drama. Heartbroken is a tense, mesmerizing novel about the limits of dysfunctional families, an island haunted by dark ghosts and the all-too-real demons all of us must battle. A riveting tale of family and a ticking clock of bad deeds and sinister outcomes, Heartbroken delivers a ride you don’t want to end.

Feeding Wildlife Causes Problems Please DO NOT feed the ducks or other wildlife in the pool areas or elsewhere in the Village. Feeding wildlife causes the animals to loose their fear of humans and they can become aggressive toward people in their search for handouts. Ducks in particular are becoming accustomed to being fed by residents and will approach people demanding to be fed. Feeding them interferes with their natural diet and encourages them to remain in the area and continue to be a nuisance. The end result is that they are making a mess everywhere including the pool areas. Duck feces is a health hazard and an inconvenience to everyone; particularly those who enjoy the pool facilities, as the pool area has to be closed, cleaned and the pool treated for feces.

Remember – food in equals something unpleasant out!


JANUARY 2013

Bridge

CVE REPORTER

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33B

CVE Duplicate Bridge Club Winners for November

By IRVING RUGA

By BERNICE RUGA Bd: 16

♠J7

Dlr: West

♥84

Vul: E-W

♦KQJ94 ♣ 10 8 7 2

♠ K 10 4

♠Q832

♥ A 10 6 2

♥K93

♦ 10 2

♦A63

♣KQJ5

♣943 ♠A965 ♥QJ75 ♦875 ♣A6

If West opens 1♣, North should pass (or maybe risk 2♦). A 1♦ overcall should be sound since the bid has limited competitive value and no obstructive value. If North passes, East bids 1♠ and West can raise to 2♠. After two passes, many Souths will pass but some will risk a balancing double. North will respond 3♦ and may play there. At some tables, North will overcall 1♦ strictly as a lead-director. When East responds 1♠, South has many possible actions: a diamond raise, a 2♣ cuebid or a conventional double to show hearts plus a diamond fit. In any case, North-South will compete to 3♦, and East-West will sell out again. Norths at 3♦ will be down two against careful defense, but North-South may get a fair result for -100 since Easts at 2♠ can be +110.

Saturday 11/3/12 H. Wiseman/J. Wiseman – V. Del Favaro/B. Luber 11/10/12 B. Cohen/N. Cohen – E. Brodkin/I. Brodkin 11/17/12 S. Kaufman/L. Bregman – A. Margittai/P. Margittai 11/24/12 V. Del Favaro/D. Connell – B. Luber/H. Luber Monday 11/5/12 B. Feldstein/L. Fertik – V. Del Favaro/A. Greene 11/12/12 B. Cohen/N. Cohen – A. Greene/B. Luber 11/19/12 B. Ruga/I. Ruga – V.

Del Favaro/B. Luber J. Ferstman/A. Greene – E. Brodkin/I. Brodkin 11/26/12 H. Wiseman/J. Wiseman – B. Luber/H. Luber Tuesday 11/6/2012 H. Lieberman/B. Feldstein – A. Boisclair/M. Brazeau 11/13/12 B. Wolf/B. Luber – I Brodkin/E. Brodkin 11/20/12 M. Brock/S. Yaffe – N. Brotman/L. Pearson 11/27/12 L. Lolonde/A. Doss – A. Boisclair/M. Brazeaue E. Sohmer/P. Tepper – R. Ginsberg/M. Ginsberg

The Puzzler By CHARLES K. PARNESS

PLAYING WORDS 2 5) 57 H. V. 6) 11 P. on a F. T. 7) 7 H. of R. 8) 101 D. Example 1): 8 S. 9) 64 S. on a C. B. on a S. S. means 8 10) 13 C. in a S. sides on a stop sign 11) 10 L. I. Example 2): 3 12) 20.000 L. U. T. B. M (S. H. T. R.) means 3 blind mice S. 13) 13 O. C. ( see how they run) 14) 12 K. of the R. T. Now what does 15) 13 in a B. D. each of these mean? 16) 66 B. of the B. 1) 4 Q. in a G. 2) 24 H. in a D. 3) 1 W. on a U. The Solution to Puzzler – can be found on page 35B. 4) 5 D. in a Z. C. Can you solve this?


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Movie Review January By SANDRA PARNESS

BOURNE LEGACY-Jeremy Renner, Rachel Weisz and Edward Norton star in this expansion of the universe from Robert Ludlum’s novels. The latest action filled mystery is centered on a new hero whose stakes have been triggered by the events of the previous three films. PG-13, 135 minutes. Playing Thursday, January 3, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Friday, January 4, 2013, 2:00 & 7:30 p.m., Monday, January 7, 2013, 2:00 & 7:30 p.m. THE JOURNEY-A group of Westerners try to leave the city when the Soviets occupy the country. This

classic film stars Deborah Kerr, Yul Brenner and Jason Robards. N/R, 126 minutes. Playing Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 2:00 p.m., Thursday, January 10, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Friday, January 11, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Monday, January 14, 2013, 2:00 & 7:30 p.m. HOPE SPRINGS-Meryl Streep, Tommy Lee Jones, Steve Carell and Jean Smart star in this comedy romance drama. After thirty years of marriage, a middle-aged couple attends an intense, week-long counseling session to work on their relationship. PG-13, 100 minutes. Playing

Wednesday, January 16, 2013, 2:00 p.m., Thursday, January 17, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Monday, January 21, 2013, 2:00 & 7:30 p.m. THE WORDS-A writer at the peak of his literary success discovers the steep price he must pay for stealing another man’s work. Bradley Cooper, Dennis Quaid, Jeremy Irons and Olivia Wilde star in this romantic drama. PG-13, 97 minutes. Playing January 24, 2013, 7:30 p.m., Friday, January 25. 2013, 2:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., Monday, January 28, 2:00 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.

THE DOUBLE-A retired CIA operative is paired with a young FBI agent to unravel the mystery of a senator’s murder, with all signs pointing to a Soviet assassin. Richard Gere, Topher Grace and Martin Sheen star in this action drama. PG-13, 98 minutes. Playing Thursday, January 31, 2013.

The Opera Comes to CVE Text and Photo By SID BIRNS

I

was never much for Opera, having seen one many moons ago as a young person. It was all in Italian and, of course, no one told

me to read up on it, so I came away not liking it very much. Well, tonight was a totally different story. The Canadian Club of CVE, through

Merle Margles of Lyndhurst J, reads a synopsis of the Opera La Traviata by Giuseppe Verdi.

the auspices of Mark Litvak, brought La Traviata to the Village, via a live performance beautifully recorded on a disk with English captions, so you were able to get a good understanding of what was happening.

There wasn’t one thing I didn’t like. The music composed by Giuseppe Verdi, the costumes and the magnificent voices of the Opera singers were all outstanding. The comments heard at the intermission were all posi-

tive, “beautiful music, what magnificent voices...” In January the Canadian Club will present Madame Butterfly, so if you like good music and great opera performances, here’s your chance to have a “Night at the Opera.”

La Traviata as seen on screen, with English captions. 


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

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A Snowbird Reviews By JANICE ZAMSKY

C

avendish Classics Three great singers provided a big treat for CVE music lovers at their On Wings of Song Cavendish Concert on Saturday, November 24. Soprano Rebgkah Diaz and tenor Bryon Grohman gave excellent performances, but it was baritone Graham Fandrei who stole the show. Yes, I am partial to baritones but my opinion was echoed by numerous audience members. Fandrei’s hardy baritone is fabulous! With the assistance of accomplished veteran accompanists, Maestro Dr. Warren Broome on the piano and percussionist Doug Friend, Fandrei set the tone for the evening’s performance, opening with a masterful rendition of the Figaro aria from Barber of Seville. A Rigoletto selection by tenor Grohman followed and was most capably executed. Soprano Diaz’s voice is as lovely as her appearance. Baritone Fandrei also delighted the audience with his non-operatic solos: Plenty of Nothing and Begin the Beguine. This was a most delightful evening of stellar performances by all three singers. Man 1, Bank 0, Wednesday, November 28 Raconteur Patrick Comb successfully carried a oneman show for an hour and a half—an enviable task. I am aware that many people in the audience had only a very tepid opinion of this show but I beg to differ for two reasons: First, Combs is a first rate entertainer in my book because he is very dynamic, energetic and moves his show

along rapidly. His enunciation and diction were perfect as I could understand every word with my declining hearing. (A staff member informed me that our theater’s audio system, along with the lighting, was also upgraded during the summer.) Combs didn’t swallow his words. Second, because I was a court clerk in my other life, I could understand Combs’ increasing frustration as he waded through the ambiguity and gobble-de-gook of legalese experience by laymen. I found this young man’s performance certainly refreshing and superior to some smutty comedian’s so-called humor with mostly re-run quips. Cavendish Revue, Saturday, October 1 Four Gold Coast singers (sopranos Cheryl Cavendish and Terry Oster, tenor Bill Wynn and baritone Bill Stafford) presented an effective tribute to Broadway. The tenor and baritone did a great duet of Luck Be a Lady from Guys and Dolls. Stafford offered the baritone classic, Old Man River, with aplomb, (Showboat is now 80-years-old!) The quartet hit many Broadway shows and all were very competently performed. Some of the shows included were: Hello Dolly, Mame, Showboat, A Chorus Line, Sweeney Todd, Miss Saigon and Les Miserables. Cavendish is always a pleasant theater evening. The Nutcracker Ballet, Wednesday, December 15 Despite not being ballet aficionados, my husband and I were enthralled with this production. A cast of 31 dancers mesmerized the CVE

chorus girls in beautiful costumes. However, this show lacked some of the pizazz and spectacular choreography of the recent Chinese Circus event and even the November South Beach Ballroom show. The first act was a great opener—a spectacular dance routine with performers coming down an aisle to the stage, accompanied by throbbing drum music and chanting. Some of the dancers throughout the show were very first class! At any rate, this show was by far a great improvement on last year’s Brazilian revue. I guess every show can’t be an extravaganza; I was getting spoiled!

audience with their leaps, levitations and talent. The show had beautiful costumes, lots of action and never lagged. There were beautiful and agile (as were all the cast!) prima ballerinas and 16 teenage dancers. Even the four children were skillful dancers. (Was the one precious young boy really a girl with hair pulled back and tucked under?) A friend told me that she had just paid $60 for a ballet that was so inferior to this nine dollar event! The Kings of Swing, Saturday, December 8 Another unexpected pleasant surprise for me! I was lukewarm about seeing this show, but my hubby prevailed, and I’m certainly happy he did. Little did I anticipate more than a half dozen numbers of Sinatra’s songs (the idol I swooned over as a teen-age bobby-soxer many, many moons ago!). The band was really “hot” and consisted of nine musicians (only one woman, a percussionist). Two male vocalists belted out the Golden Oldies in fine form. The trombone player sang Just a Gigolo and received hearty audience applause. Some comic shticks added levity to this torrid musical show. Not only was the band extremely talented, but their evening’s repertoire was great. Some of my favorites were: I’ve Got You Under My Skin (remember Cole Porter?), Bye, Bye Blackbird, and I Left My Heart in San Francisco (remember Tony Bennett?). Frank Sinatra classic tunes included New York, New York, The Lady Is A Tramp, Night and Day, and Come Fly With Me. This England-based band of talented musicians received a well-deserved standing ovation and responded with an encore. This was an evening

of easy listening to a tour down memory lane, featuring the classic hits of yesteryear. (Much better than contemporary music to the ears of an old fogey like this reviewer.) Cirque Chinois, Monday, December 10 This performance was absolutely the most magnificent of all the Chinese circuses that have appeared at CVE in recent years! This performance had it all: a large cast of highly talented young people who were outstanding in feats of gymnastic and acrobatic skills; gorgeous costumes and props; choreography out of this world; and, last but certainly not least, acts I have never seen before of human pretzels and human pyramids (sometimes in shapes of arches). To think about the planning and training for these intricate routines is mindboggling. Hours and hours of practice must go into each fantastic act. Every good show needs a little levity. Two clowns and a magician act provided light breaks from the precarious acts. The straw hat routine was also lighter, but very skillful. Finally, a “sell-out” show! Please don’t think I’m a Pollyanna type reviewer who sees everything through rose-tinted glasses but these last three shows have all been superb. My work has never been censored so I am free to tell you if a show was a bomb or very mediocre. Ola Oba Brazil, Saturday, December 15 This was a good show that received great audience approval, as evidenced by heavy applause throughout the evening. There were talented acrobats, gymnasts, dancers and, also Vegas-like gorgeous

Answer to the Puzzler from page 33B 1) 4 quarts in a gallon 2) 24 hours in a day 3) 1 wheel on a unicycle 4) 5 digits in a zip code 5) 57 Heinz varieties 6) 11 players on a football team 7) 7 hills of Rome 8) 101 Dalmatians 9) 64 squares on a chessboard 10) 13 cards in a suit 11) 10 little Indians 12) 20,000 leagues under the sea 13) 13 original colonies 14) 12 knights of the round table 15) 13 in a baker’s dozen 16) 66 books of the Bible


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CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

JANUARY 2013 Wednesday, January 9 $10 The Capitol Steps Saturday, January 12 $11 The Great American Songbook Tuesday, January 15 $8 CVE Symphony Orchestra Wednesday, January 16 $8 Cavendish Classics

Saturday, January 19 $9 Will & Anthony Nunziata “Broadway Our Way” Sunday, January 20 $11 New York Three Tenors & A Diva Wednesday, January 23 $11 Little Anthony and The Imperials

Saturday, January 26 $9 All Hands On Deck! Sunday, January 27 $11 Adbacadabra – The Music of “Mama Mia” Wednesday, January 30 $10 Rave On! The Buddy Holly Experience


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

For a complete listing and information visit the Ticket Office.

37B


Z

AA

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

38 36 34 32 30

C

D

E

F

G

H

J

K

L

M

N

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

AA 38 36 34 32 30

114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

Z

Y

X

W

V

U

T

S

R

Q

P

N

M

L

K

J

H

G

F

SECTION A

38 36 34 32 30

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15

1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15

1 3 5 7 9 11 13

1 3 5 7 9 11 13

1 3 5 7 9 11 13

1 3 5 7 9 11

1 3 5 7 9 11

1 3 5 7 9 11

SECTION D

DD

CC

BB

AA

Z

Y

X

W

V

U

T

S

R

Q

P

N

M

L

K

J

H

G

F

E

D

C

B

A

SECTION B

FF 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 FF

SECTION D

EE 28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 H H H H EE 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 EE H H H H 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 EE

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 DD 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 DD

DD 38 36 34 32 30 DD

EE

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 CC 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 CC

CC 38 36 34 32 30 CC

AA 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 AA

Z

Y

X

W

V

U

T

S

R

Q

P

N

M

L

K

109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101

107 106 105 104 103 102 101

E

D

C

B

A

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 BB 114 113 112 111 110 109 108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 BB

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

28 26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

26 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

J

H

G

F

107 106 105 104 103 102 101

107 106 105 104 103 102 101

106 105 104 103 102 101

106 105 104 103 102 101

106 105 104 103 102 101

BB 38 36 34 32 30 BB

Y

X

W

V

U

T

S

R

Q

P

N

M

L

K

16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2

14 12 10 8 6 4 2

E

D

C

B

A

SECTION C

AA

Z

Y

X

W

V

U

T

S

R

Q

P

N

M

L

K

J

H

G

F

E

D

C

B

A

SECTION E

29 31 33 35 37

EE

29 31 33 35 37 DD

29 31 33 35 37 CC

29 31 33 35 37 BB

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

29 31 33 35 37

SECTION E

CVE REPORTER

J

H

G

F

14 12 10 8 6 4 2

14 12 10 8 6 4 2

12 10 8 6 4 2

12 10 8 6 4 2

12 10 8 6 4 2

SECTION B

38B

E

D

C

B

38 36 34 32 30

B

A

38 36 34 32 30

A

SECTION A

Stage PAGE JANUARY 2013

Theater Seating Chart


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

39B

New East shuttle bus schedule in effect as of January 2, 2012

East Route: Mon-Wed-Fri 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Leave CVE

Sawgrass Promenade

N. Broward Medi cal Pl aza

Sawgrass Promenade

Arri ve CVE

9:00 9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15

9:10 9:55 10:40 11:25 12:10 12:55 1:40 2:25

9:20 10:05 10:50 11:35 12:20 1:05 1:50 2:35

9:30 10:15 11:00 11:45 12:30 1:15 2:00 2:45

9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15 3:00

East Route: Tuesday-only 9 a.m. – 3 p.m Leave CVE

Boca Center

Town Center

CVS Pharmacy

Arri ve CVE

9:00 9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15

9:15 10:00 10:45 11:30 12:15 1:00 1:45 2:30

9:25 10:10 10:55 11:40 12:25 1:10 1:55 2:40

9:35 10:20 11:05 11:50 12:35 1:20 2:05 2:50

9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15 3:00

East Route: Thursday-only 9 a.m. – 3 p.m Leave CVE 9:00 9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15

Festival Flea Market

Kosher Market

Aldi’s Market Market

Al di 's

Arri ve CVE

9:15 10:00 10:45 11:30 12:15 1:00 1:45 2:30

9:25 10:10 10:55 11:40 12:25 1:10 1:55 2:40

9:35 10:20 11:05 11:50 12:35 1:20 2:05 2:50

9:45 10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15 3:00

East Route: Saturday (Town Center) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m Leave CVE

Boca Center

Town Center

CVS Pharmacy

Arri ve CVE

10:00 10:45 11:30 12:15 1:00 1:45 2:30 CVE 3:30 CVE 4:20

10:15 11:00 11:45 12:30 1:15 2:00 2:45 Church 3:40 Boca Ctr 4:35

10:25 11:10 11:55 12:40 1:25 2:10 2:55 Boca Ctr 3:55 Town Ctr 4:50

10:35 11:20 12:05 12:50 1:35 2:20 3:05 Town Ctr 4:05 CVS 5:00

10:45 11:30 12:15 1:00 1:45 2:30 3:15 CVS 4:15 Church 5:10

East Route:

Sunday-only

10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m

Leave CVE

Festival Fl ea Market

Kosher Market

Aldi’s Market

Al di 's Market

Arri ve CVE

10:30 11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15 3:00 3:45

10:45 11:30 12:15 1:00 1:45 2:30 3:15 4:00

10:55 11:40 12:25 1:10 1:55 2:40 3:25 4:10

11:05 11:50 12:35 1:20 2:05 2:50 3:35 4:20

11:15 12:00 12:45 1:30 2:15 3:00 3:45 4:30

Sundays and Holidays Leaves every half hour from Clubhouse 10 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday thru Saturday Leaves every half hour from Clubhouse 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Mini-bus to Plaza Ceases service each evening from Clubhouse at 7:30 p.m. Route #1: Clubhouse, Berkshire A, B & C, Upminster Pool, Swansea A, Century Plaza, Westbury, Cambridge, Durham, Clubhouse. Route #2 Clubhouse, Durham A & V on Century Blvd., Islewood, Oakridge A & B, Prescott A & E, Newport, Oakridge C & D, Lyndhurst Pool, Keswick, Restaurant, Clubhouse. Route #3: Clubhouse, Berkshire A, B & C, Upminster Pool, Swansea A & B, Upminster A-M, Richmond, Farnham, Grantham A-E, Harwood, Markham A-K, Lyndhurst corner, Keswick, Clubhouse. Route #4: Clubhouse, Berkshire A, B & C, Ashby, Farnham, Harwood, Grantham F, Markham S & T, Oakridge Pool, Oakridge F-V, Markham L-R, Lyndhurst corner, Keswick, Clubhouse.

CVE 4:20 CVE 5:15

Route #5/6: Clubhouse, Ellesmere, Ventnor, Tilford A-R, Le Club/Activity Center, Reporter/Medical Center, Tilford S-X, Tilford P-R, Le Club/Activity Ctr/Medical, Prescott F-G, Oakridge corner, Markham corner, Lyndhurst corner, Ellesmere-Century Blvd, Keswick-Century Blvd, Parking LotDepot, Clubhouse. Show nights, Express A & B – Motor Coaches will run an hour before the show and after. As of 6/27/11


PAGE

40B

CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

Why God Made Fingers The Dollar Store I walked into a dollar store with a shopping cart, I couldn’t resist the pretty bows or the dish shaped in a heart. I fill my wagon with boxes of cookies that they sell, candy suckers, a bag of potato chips I guess I can use that as well. I pass the aisle of paper goods I could use colorful napkins too, and I see a box of prunes which is so good for you! Deodorant and toilet paper for a dollar, it can’t be beat and then I see some slippers too so soft for my tired feet. Talcum powder, hand lotion so very nice, how can you resist it at that dollar price! Stationery I must have to write to my special pals and such darling little reading books for my little gals. Then I see a clock so perfect so utterly divine! The colors are perfect for my bedroom I hope it keeps good time!

Imbroglio Why should I tell you everything, when everything has been Told And you have done nothing? No, I will tell you only One thing Youth is not innocent. Old age is unwise Love corrupts Power weakens Victims Rob Populists Dictate Tocqueville’s Tyranny of the majority Progress retards Virgins abort There is more than one infinity And only ashes will rise up Out of ashes

I will tell you something Smile days. Sleep nights. There is no reason, why Or Why not? ~ MARVIN HERSHORN

Picture frames I really do need for all my photos too and those candles are so pretty I can give them when I visit you. And oh those pretty mirrors would look so lovely on my wall but where the devil can I put them maybe at the entrance hall.

My Secret Admirer

My wagon is a clicking as I go along the tables and then I must have those gorgeous dishes with the picture of a golden hen.

I have an admirer who comes to visit me, He knocks on my patio window to see if I am free.

Then I spot the drinking glasses they are all so nice! And oh I must have them too they’d be great with tea on ice! Then I spy instant decaffeinated coffee a dollar, such a deal! I throw it in my wagon it’ll be great after my dinner meal.

He knocks and knocks until I see him there, He is so beautiful and handsome so very debonair!

~SANDI LEHMAN

~ NORMA LOCKER

But these do not diminish your significance,

Such pretty “Cock-A-Mammies” I cannot resist so I buy some more but where will I put them I could open my own “Cock-A-Mammy” store!

We all love to visit the Dollar store so how come no one spends just a dollar when they go to that Dollar, Dollar store???

Fingers are good for plucking roses, and even fine for picking noses. To hold a fork they come in handy; for stirring coffee they’re fine and dandy. They’re good for holding a bowling ball, and even making a telephone call. Fingers are used for clicking a mouse, and for turning a key to enter the         house. We need a thumb to hitch a ride; with fingers shoelaces can get tied. We use them when we write a letter, or for holding a sandwich, that’s even better. Dropping nickels in a slot-machine; shampooing hair ‘til it’s squeaky clean. With fingers we can strum a guitar, or shift the gears when we drive a car; or tickle the piano keys; or blow our noses after a sneeze. God made fingers to fondle and touch; to pick up pins and coins and buttons and such; to create light with the flick of a switch; to scratch ourselves when we have an itch. Fingers are best for clasping a hook; for turning the pages in a book; for pressing the buttons on a remote; we also need them to button a coat. We need fingers to count our cash, and they’re handy for tying a sash. We can drop coins in a piggy bank, and unscrew the cap on our gas tank. Fingers are used for so many things, notably for sporting rings. So treat them with respect and care, and they’ll give you years of sturdy wear.

He has a beautiful head of red and sings to me He knows I’m so happy to see him and wants my company. He tweets and tweets his songs to me And shows he cares As he keeps coming back to me. I’ve taken a photo of him for you to see He’s the most beautiful bird And he’s smitten with me! ~SANDI LEHMAN

Cleavages Too much sharing, too much internet, text messaging gone viral Too much twittering the minutia of people’s mundane lives Too much in your face Facebook Cleavages and twittering are like sharing information on steroids Cherry picking the essence of people’s lives Boring tides of personal information on wireless waves Of dumb down masses, using the internet as their opiate Who cares about their Facebook Wall? About their therapist appointments and stressful days And sleepless nights, their religious faith Their zits or their constipation both literal and metaphorical Cleavages How about their colon cleansing procedure…or healing Or finding Jesus in a sense of rapture on the social media And their repetitious OMG, an information debasement This unctuous flood of existential updates, freely associated Compulsive sharing in a global chat line…oedipal Chat messaging shorthand… maligning chat acronyms as verbal art LOL R U OK? … OMG, CYA, AOK? More Facebook…too much Twitter…an overload of nothingness Cursive writing is gone; the new world of word style is superficial Even ephemeral by nature, a gravitas eroding apocalypse Words must remain grammatically unencumbered… even benign With one quickie wordscape melting into another hyper connected Text messaging their one liner, life’s effete little sound bites This post skill movement…creates word cleavages They are too profound, too brazen, creating profundity This insular and arrogant fraternity with debased values Their level of frivolity in this new birth of word minimalism And…serendipitous tastes …immersed in frivolous standards Like a designer colostomy bag unplugged Or phlegmatic window word mannequins being debased Embraced by a delusional sense of entitlement Lacking skill and grace, when words morph into existential vignettes Am I being too cantankerous, too old or extremely curmudgeonly? Let us organize our internet scrabbled brains on pure authenticity Enough kvetching. Chill out. Don’t be uncool After all, talk is cheap. OK C U, AOK? Disconnect! ~ MARVIN HERSHORN


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

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PAGE

42B

CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

912518A11_FCB Dec 18, 2012 TDCT_P2033_US Initiative Phase 2 P2033_US_News_D_1_ST

Canadians in Florida can find a TD Bank as easily as they can find a golf course

Great service and convenience for Canadians at over 1,300 TD Bank locations in the U.S. With TD Cross-Border Banking you can enjoy the convenience of over 1,300 TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank® locations in the U.S., from Maine to Florida. Open a U.S. TD Bank account today and you can enjoy the benefits of easily transferring money between your Canadian based TD Canada Trust account and your TD Bank account in the U.S. You can also apply to TD Bank for a U.S. mortgage1 and credit card2 based on your Canadian and U.S. assets, income and credit history. All while being able to view both your TD Canada Trust and TD Bank accounts online on the same web page. Get the convenience you’ve come to expect in Canada while in the U.S.

Visit a TD Bank for all your cross-border banking needs. Visit tdbank.com/locator to find the location nearest you. Call 1-877-700-2913 for more information.3

TD Bank is TD Bank, N.A., a wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. Member FDIC. Accounts issued by TD Bank, N.A. are not insured by Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation. 1. Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Mortgages limited to property located in U.S. state where . 2. Subject to credit approval and other conditions. Applicants must be a resident of Canada or a U.S. state where TD Bank, N.A. has locations. 3. TD Bank, N.A. is located in the United States and its support line and stores are serviced in English. TD Bank, N.A. has locations. Equal Housing Lender ®/ The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or a wholly-owned subsidiary, in Canada and/or other countries.

P2033_US_News_D_1_ST.indd 1

12/18/12 3:44 PM


JANUARY 2013

CVE REPORTER

PAGE

43B


PAGE

44B

CVE REPORTER

JANUARY 2013

1/1 Garden Units

I WaterView. Immaculate.White Appliances. Encl. Patio. WaterView

$ 47,850

Newport A A Must See. Totally Renovated. New Kitchen.

$ 42,500

Prescott

Markham E Gr. Fl. Unit. Immaculate. Water View. Tiled. Furnished. Encl. Patio

$ 29,000

Harwood A Gorgeous Corner Unit. Water View. Walk to Pool & Clubhouse. Furnished $ 44,850

Tilford

G “RENTAL BLDG.”. Water View. Lift In Place. Furnished. Immaculate

$ 29,900

Tilford

A Fantastic Water View. Needs Some TLC. Make Your Best Offer.

Ventnor

J Pristine Condition. 2nd. Fl. Lift In Place. Tiled Throughout. Encl. Patio $ 25,900

Tilford

B Most Serene Water View. Price Is Sure to Sell Fast. Country Living On A Budget $ 34,900

1/1.5 Garden Units Upminster A Spotless Corner. Walk To Plaza. Renovated Kitchen. Furnished. Must See $ 49,850 Prescott

N AllTiled. Immaculate Unit. Encl. Patio. NothingTo Do Here.WaterView $ 35,000

Durham

W Corner Unit. Gr. Fl. Central Air. Furnished. Walk To Clubhouse & Pool.

Tilford

D Gr. Fl. Corner. Renovated Baths. Unit Is Ready For Your Personal Touch $ 29,850

Durham

I Prime Durham Area. Lift In Place. Steps To Pool & Clubhouse. Immaculate $ 29,850

$ 34,850

1/1.5 Highrise Units

$ 39,500

2/1.5 Highrise Units Grantham F Gr. Fl. Open Kit. Stainless Appliances. Ceramic & Carpet. Just Move-In $ 79,900 Berkshire A Renovated Kitchen. Stainless Appliances. Easy Walk To Plaza. Do Not Miss $ 69,900 Cambridge D 2nd. Fl.Tile & Carpet. CloseTo Plaza & Clubhouse.WaterView. Encl. Patio $ 64,900 Newport G 3rd. Fl.Water & PreserveView. Encl. Patio.Tile & Carpet.Well Kept Bldg. $ 47,500 Cambridge A Ready For Your Occupancy. Updated Kit. Glassed In Patio. Priced To Sell $ 59,900

Grantham F Move-In-Condition. Fully Furnished. Tiled. Near Pool & Clubhouse

$ 56,750

2/2 Luxury Highrise Units

Cambridge G 3rd. Fl. Gem. Remodeled Kitchen. Stainless Appliances. Water View

$ 55,000

Oakridge F Open Kitchen. Granite Counters. Tiled. Preserve View . Encl. Patio. Near Pool $ 99,000

Oakridge A Gr. Fl. Mostly Furnished. Galley Kit.Top Notch Oakridge Bldg.WaterView $ 49,900

Lyndhurst N. Completely Redone. New Kit. New Baths. Tile, Furnished. Encl. Patio $ 89,500

Swansea A Don’t Miss This One”. Steps To Plaza & Pool. Laminate Floors. Encl. Patio $ 49,900

Oakridge V Best Water View. All Tiled. This Unit Has Everything. Sliders On Patio

Swansea B Pristine Condition. Gr. Fl. StepsTo Plaza. Laminate Flooring. Encl. Patio $ 42,500

Upminster J Light, Bright, Corner. Redone Kit. Move-In Condition. Encl. Patio. Near Pool $ 79,900

Newport Q Fully Furnished 2nd. Fl. Central Air. Tiled. Encl Patio, Rentable At This Time $ 36,850

Lyndhurst H PricedTo Sell Fast. Upgraded.Tiled, Contemporary Furniture, Encl. Patio $74,900

$ 79,980

Upminster J 2nd. Floor. Fully Furnished. Screened Patio. Ceramic & Carpet. Great Price $ 69,900

2/1.5 Garden Units

Lyndhurst K Corner Overlooking Pool, Clubhouse & Golf Course. Priced To Sell

$ 69,900

Farnham H 2nd. Fl. Corner. All Tile. New Kit. Cabinets. Stainless Appliances. Has A Lift $ 54,000

Ventnor

$ 69,850

Westbury B 2nd. Fl. Corner. Steps To Pool. Short Walk To Plaza. Encl. Patio. Move-In $ 47,900

Upminster J Priced To Sell Fast. Enclosed Florida Room. Will Not Last. Make An Offer $ 59,900

Westbury J 2nd. Fl. Furnished. Steps To Pool. ”Unit Is As Neat As A Pin”. Encl. Patio $ 47,900

Oakridge U 3rd. Fl. Best Water View In Century Village. Tiled. Enclosed Patio

$ 69,900

Markham C 1st. Fl. Tiled. Newer White Appliances. Water View. Short Trip To Clubhouse $47,900

Ventnor

$ 79,900

Newport E Total Renovation. Open Kitchen. New Cabinets. Baths Redone. Encl. Patio $ 75,000

H Gr. Fl. Corner. Golf Course View. Newer White Appliances. White Tile.

H Gr. Floor. Mint Condition. Magnificent Furniture. Tiled. Move Right In

Come On Down. Accurate Can Help You Enjoy Living In Florida At Century Village We Have Friendly Experienced Agents Who Will Help You With All Of Your Needs.

ACCURATE IS LOOKING FOR AGENTS: DESKS ARE AVAILABLE STOP BY OR CALL US AT 954-428-1434 Knowledge Of French Or Spanish Language Would Be Helpful. Come Join The Accurate Family.

FORGET THE REST... GO WITH THE BEST!

Reporter January 2013 Volume 36 Number 4  

Welcome to the newly improved website of your Century Village East Reporter. Our mission is to be an information provider for the residents...