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Serving Foggy Bottom & the West End

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Vol. VIII, No. 4

The Foggy BoTTom CurrenT

Board hears moratorium testimony

E L L I N G T O N AT 4 0

■ Adams Morgan: Diverse

views aired on ABC licenses By GEORGE ALTSHULER Current Correspondent

At a hearing of the D.C. Alcoholic Beverage Control Board last Wednesday, community members divided into three camps regarding the moratorium that since 2000 has capped the number of establish-

ments serving alcohol in Adams Morgan. A group led by six out of seven of the Adams Morgan advisory neighborhood commissioners proposed lifting the moratorium for restaurants while keeping in place the limit on tavern and nightclub licenses. “The previous version of the moratorium can be credited for stopping things from getting worse,” said Billy Simpson, the chair of the neighborhood commission. “But it is

the view of ANC 1C that the current moratorium hasn’t succeeded in making things better.” Simpson warned that certain restaurants and pubs, which he called “bad actors,” overstep their licenses and act as noisy nightclubs that bring problems to the neighborhood. The commission hopes that under its plan new restaurants would force out the problematic establishments. “At the same time that the moraSee Moratorium/Page 5

Church hotel aims to break ground soon By KAT LUCERO Current Staff Writer

Brian Kapur/The Current

Duke Ellington School of the Arts presented “An Evening at the Opera, From ‘La Bohème’ to ‘Rent’” on Friday night as part of the Burleith school’s Ellingtonia! Fabulous@40 Festival.

Developers of the controversial Adams Morgan hotel at the site of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, are hoping to begin two years of construction this summer. Steve Harloe of the New York-based Sydell Group, the hotel development company that will operate the forthcoming “The Line DC,” said his firm has “essentially advanced the design” and is also working on contracts and permitting. Located at 1780 Columbia Road, the luxury boutique hotel will offer 220 rooms inside a new 72-foot, sevenstory structure. The new building will connect to the adjacent century-old church building at 1770 Euclid St., which will house the lobby and restaurant. Although developers anticipate two years of construction work, Harloe, the D.C.-based director of development, said the hotel won’t open immediately after its See Hotel/Page 5

Brian Kapur/The Current

The former First Church of Christ, Scientist, building will serve as the lobby and restaurant of The Line DC hotel at Euclid Street and Columbia Road.

New survey highlights District’s historic alleys

Joseph’s House among seven finalists for design assistance

By KATIE PEARCE

■ Contest: Local nonprofit

Current Staff Writer

Despite its usual vigilance in documenting and preserving its historic buildings, D.C. is only now starting to account for hundreds of structures concealed from plain view — the old stables, homes, warehouses and garages that line its back alleys. The first formal attempt to survey these buildings, launched in 2011, is now detailed in a new report from the D.C. Historic Preservation Office. The effort focuses not only on preservation, but also rediscovery and reinvention of these hidden networks of the city. In the future, the report suggests, D.C.’s alleyways could play host to new types of development, heritage tours, public art, festivals and urban farming, among other opportunities.

NEWS

seeks help to beautify garden

By KAT LUCERO Brian Kapur/The Current

Georgetown’s Congress Court/Oak Alley system is one of eight areas suggested as potential “case studies” for alley revitalization.

The survey documented 1,249 surviving alley structures over 50 years old within established historic districts in and around the L’Enfant city. Of the neighborhoods reviewed, Capitol Hill has the highest concentration of alley buildings, with 519 total. Next are GeorgeSee Alleys/Page 15

EVENTS

Mayoral nominee tells Democrats to boost voter turnout — Page 2

New York troupe to stage ‘Cymbeline’ at Folger Theatre — Page 21

Current Staff Writer

A healing garden at an end-oflife facility in Adams Morgan and the C&O Canal mule yard in Georgetown are among the seven finalists in a new design studio’s contest, which will donate thousands of dollars in services to the winner. MakeDC is behind this challenge as part of its official launch.

At Saturday’s pitch night event, each of the seven groups will make their case to the five judges using 20 slides shown for just 20 seconds apiece. The winner will receive $20,000 worth of the firm’s time and resources. Members of the public will also have the opportunity to vote for their favorite project. According to its website, MakeDC is the city’s first publicinterest design firm. For architects Scott Walzak and Gregory Wilkie, an interest in humanitarian work led them to this path of working on projects with socially and/or enviSee Design/Page 7

INDEX

NEWS

Storytelling event airs origins of pride day at Wilson High — Page 3

Calendar/18 Classifieds/28 District Digest/4 Exhibits/19 Foggy Bottom News/11 In Your Neighborhood/14

Opinion/8 Police Report/6 Real Estate/13 School Dispatches/10 Service Directory/25 Theater/21

Tips? Contact us at newsdesk@currentnewspapers.com


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The Current

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Two Ward 3 ANCs oppose city’s school boundary overhaul proposals By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

Over the months that it was charged with redrawing school boundaries and feeder patterns, a task force under the deputy mayor for education grappled not only with where to relocate students to address capacity issues but also with broader policy questions of how to assign students to schools. Among the three options released last month were two that would substantially reduce the role of geography in determining

which school a student attends, creating lotteries to determine admission. Those proposals released a gale of criticism that such systems would undermine the strength of neighborhood schools and the communities around them. At a meeting last Thursday, the Tenleytown/Friendship Heights advisory neighborhood commission leveled an additional criticism against the proposals. The commission said the task force put forward a half-baked scheme for boundary and feeder pattern tweaks because it wasted too much time reviewing the

lottery options. The commission voted 4-0 to ask that the next mayor review the current boundary recommendations only as one piece of the puzzle as the process starts over. “We’re saying take this and everything else off the table — that the current mayor should take no action and the next mayor should start again,” said commissioner Jonathan Bender. Bender’s commission also said that the next boundary review should begin only once there’s a plan in place to improve schools across the city, so that all residents can be more

comfortable with their in-boundary option. That same night, the Glover Park neighborhood commission also voted to oppose any plans that would eliminate by-right public school options for specific communities. The Glover Park resolution also specifically opposes any proposal that would affect the Stoddert Elementary boundaries in the neighborhood or remove matter-of-right access to Hardy Middle and Wilson High. Although the resolution didn’t have the same citywide emphasis as that of the TenleySee Schools/Page 5

Bowser looks to boost turnout in November By GRAHAM VYSE Current Staff Writer

Lamenting low turnout in last month’s primary election, Democratic mayoral nominee Muriel Bowser is urging her party to improve its voter outreach before D.C. residents head to the polls again in November. “I think we can do better,” the Ward 4 D.C. Council member said during a speech to the Ward 4 Democrats last Wednesday night. Bowser expressed gratitude for those citizens who voted, but she said “it wasn’t nearly enough of them.” (Only 81,145 of the city’s 337,980 registered Democrats cast a ballot in the primary.) “What that suggests to us is that we have a lot of work to do to demonstrate to people across the city — in every ward — how important this election can be,” she said. “This is a high-stakes election. Don’t let anyone suggest to you that it’s a walk in the park. I don’t feel that way.” Bowser faces a general election contest against atlarge D.C. Council member David Catania, an independent, but she has indicated that she will not campaign against him until he qualifies for the ballot in August.

Polling by local news organizations earlier this year showed Bowser leading Catania by at least 20 points. There didn’t appear to be any Catania supporters at Wednesday’s partisan gathering, but several party loyalists said they believed he would mount a credible challenge to their nominee, even with the District’s heavily Democratic electorate. “Catania is definitely going to give her a run for her money,” said Pedro Rubio, a board member of the Democratic group D.C. Latino Caucus who ran for D.C. Council this spring. Rubio, who supports Bowser, said he is troubled by the fact that Catania is a former Republican, but he acknowledged that the at-large council member’s voting record is consistent with Democratic Party ideals. “If he was a Democratic candidate, he would be a progressive Democrat,” Rubio said. Bowser has sought to unify the Democratic Party around her candidacy since she emerged victorious from a crowded primary field last month. She is set to address the Ward 3 Democratic Committee May 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Methodist Home of D.C., 4901 Connecticut Ave.

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The Current

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Aging-in-place group opens Wilson teacher recalls roots of gay pride event office at church on K Street By GRAHAM VYSE Current Staff Writer

Current Staff Report Over 40 residents celebrated the new office of the Foggy Bottom West End Village at St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish Saturday afternoon. Like other villages, the Foggy Bottom group, which launched in October, helps its 119 members “age in place� — providing services like house repairs, rides to doctors’ appointments and social activities so seniors can avoid having to move to retirement homes. The village now is renting a former storeroom at St. Paul’s, 2430 K St. NW, as office space. Thanks in part to a $100,000 grant from George Washington University — provided as an amenity of a commercial development in the neighborhood — the village can afford the $1,200 monthly rent, which also covers use of other church facilities. The group ultimately hopes to have 200 members to be largely selfsufficient, with dues covering about

80 percent of the costs, said executive director Robert McDonald. A capital fundraising campaign is planned to help cover expenses. Treasurer Rebecca Coder said dues cost $600 per year for individuals or $900 for a household, with about 20 percent of the current members paying reduced fees based on need. The group also has 37 “social members,� who don’t need physical services and whose dues are partially tax-deductible. Seventy volunteers help out. McDonald touted the group’s social programs, including lectures, museum tours, potluck dinners and concerts. There are also health-related programs covering diet, exercise, hearing loss, vision issues and more. Every Thursday, barring rain or snow, a group of members go on a walk together. Another group has been participating in a “balance program� that aims to help prevent falls.

To hear Chris Obermeyer tell it, the story of the first gay pride day at a D.C. public school began with a single email — a private, personal message from a parent to a teacher. The note appeared in Obermeyer’s inbox in October 2012, early into his second year teaching science at Wilson High School, he explained during a SpeakeasyDC monologue Friday night at the Atlas Performing Arts Center in Northeast. Hearing from parents still made him nervous back then, and in this instance there was genuine cause for alarm. The email read, “My son is being bullied and harassed in your classroom for his perceived sexual orientation.� Obermeyer was devastated, he said at the event, co-sponsored by the social justice education group Teaching for Change. He recalled painful teasing and name-calling from his own experience as a gay kid, and he emailed the parent back with a promise: “I’m going to fix this.� Wrestling with the idea of coming out to his students, Obermeyer worried about losing his job. Then one morning not long after he received the initial email, Obermeyer gave his first class of the week a special timed writing prompt: “Tell me about

a time when you felt judged for the way you looked, acted or actually were.� The responses from students left him profoundly moved. One girl said she was routinely followed when she was shopping because security guards thought she was going to steal. A boy described how women clutched their purses extra close whenever he walked onto a Metro train. “I was humbled by their honesty,� Obermeyer told the crowd at the Atlas. “And so I took a deep breath and I sat down on my desk and I said, ‘Let me tell you about a time I felt judged.’� The reaction to Obermeyer’s coming out was overwhelmingly positive. One class gave him a round of applause. The student whose parent had emailed about bullying? He was moved to tears. He started visiting with Obermeyer during lunch periods, and within months he had come out to all of his friends and family members, finding broad acceptance in the process. Last June’s Pride Day at Wilson — the first event of its kind at a public high school in D.C. — was the result of Obermeyer working with parents, teachers and students. Over 1,000 students signed pledges to practice tolerance. Obermeyer said he was especially moved that the student who had been responsible for bullying in his classroom signed his name. “That’s when I knew it was all worth it,� he said.

The week ahead Wednesday, May 14

The Ward 4 Education Alliance will host a meeting to discuss draft concepts for a new middle school at the MacFarland School site; the need for a middle school in northern Ward 4; and possibilities for a modernized Roosevelt High School. Speakers will include D.C. Public Schools officials Emily Durso and Dan Gordon. The meeting will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at Powell Elementary School, 1350 Upshur St. NW. â– Ward 3 D.C. State Board of Education member Laura Slover will hold a meeting to hear feedback on the proposed changes to Ward 3 school boundaries and feeder patterns. The meeting will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. in the auditorium at Wilson High School, 3950 Chesapeake St. NW.

Thursday, May 15

The Cleveland Park Citizens Association will hold a community meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. The agenda will include planned upgrades to the Fort Reno Pumping Station and replacement of water mains under several neighborhood streets. ■The D.C. Preservation League, the D.C. Office of Planning and the Daughters of the American Revolution will host the D.C. Awards for Excellence in Historic Preservation. The ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. at DAR Constitution Hall, 1776 D St. NW. To RSVP, visit dcpreservation.org. ■ The Chevy Chase Citizens Association and Northwest Neighbors Village will host a discussion with Washington Post columnist Michelle Singletary and certified elder law attorney Bill Fralin on “Planning for Aging: Making Wise Decisions.� The event will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW.

Saturday, May 17

The D.C. Department of Health will host animal health fairs in wards 1 and 2. The events will feature dog licensing, free vaccinations, veterinary advice, and information on emergency preparedness and animal laws. The Ward 1 event will be held from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Walter Pierce Dog Park near Adams Mill Road and Calvert Street NW; the Ward 2 event will be held from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Shaw Dog Park, 11th Street and Rhode Island Avenue NW. â– The Ward 2 Education Network will host a meet and greet with elementary school principals whose campuses serve the Logan Circle, Dupont Circle and Foggy Bottom/West End neighborhoods. The meeting will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Garrison Elementary School, 1200 S St. NW.

Monday, May 19

The architect team of Martinez + Johnson Architecture and Mecanoo will present preliminary design ideas for the renova-

tion of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library. The forum will begin at 6 p.m. at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. For details visit dclibrary.org/mlkfuture.

Tuesday, May 20

The D.C. Federation of Citizens Associations will hold its monthly meeting from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 1114, One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St. NW. Washington Times opinion writer Deborah Simmons will discuss the upcoming mayoral race, front-burner election issues, candidates’ positions and predictions for the next administration. ■The Chevy Chase Citizens Association will hold its annual meeting on public safety and crime prevention, as well as the election of offers. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. ■ The Cleveland Park Historical Society will hold its annual meeting for current members at 7:30 p.m. in the Tregaron building at the Washington International School, 3100 Macomb St. NW. Speaker Nore Winter will discuss progress on drafting design guidelines for the Cleveland Park Historic District to refine those of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the D.C. Preservation Review Board to reference the features that make Cleveland Park unique.

Wednesday, May 21

The Crestwood Citizens Association will hold its annual elections and planning meeting. D.C. Deputy Mayor for Education Abigail Smith will attend as a guest speaker to talk about school boundary issues. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at Grace Lutheran Church, 4300 16th St. NW.

Thursday, May 22

The D.C. Historic Preservation Review Board will meet at 9 a.m. in Room 220 South, One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St. NW. â– The Ward 3 Democratic Committee will hold a special meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Methodist Home of D.C., 4901 Connecticut Avenue NW. The featured speaker will be Ward 4 D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser, the Democratic Party nominee for mayor.

   

 



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Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3C will hold a special meeting to discuss D.C. Public Schools boundary issues and feeder patterns as they pertain to schools serving Cleveland Park, Woodley Park, Massachusetts Avenue Heights, Cathedral Heights and McLean Gardens. D.C. Deputy Mayor for Education Abigail Smith will attend as guest speaker. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the Community Room, 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW.

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The CurreNT

District Digest Cheh studies needs at pools, spray parks

Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh launched a “pool readiness tour� yesterday, visiting three spray parks and two outdoor pools to ensure they’ll be ready to open for the Memorial Day weekend. Officials from the departments of General Services and Parks and Recreation joined the council member as she toured the Chevy Chase,

Friendship and Palisades spray parks and the Upshur and Banneker pools, looking for problem areas. “It’s sort of anemic,� she said after flushing a urinal in the men’s room at Upshur Pool, later referring to some concrete benches as “sort of Soviet-like.� Over the next week, Cheh, who heads the council committee that oversees recreation facilities, will visit the rest of the city’s spray parks and pools. The new tour adds

to a longtime effort in which the council member visits all Ward 3 schools each August. At Upshur yesterday, Cheh asked about pool programs (there are water safety classes), staffing (they’re still hiring lifeguards) and the safety of in-pool drains (all were replaced after high-profile cases elsewhere in the country of swimmers drowning because their hair was caught). She also sought clarification of policies on what visitors

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can wear on the pool deck, and asked officials to provide lists detailing who is responsible for what aspects of maintenance, such as changing light bulbs. Outdoor pools, which are free for D.C. residents, will open Memorial Day weekend and remain open only on weekends until schools close. Then each will operate six days a week. Specifics will be available at dpr.dc.gov. — Beth Cope

Kalmia Road bridge reopens after work

The bridge linking Kalmia Road east of Rock Creek Park with West Beach Drive to the west reopened last week after a nearly six-month reconstruction project. The culvert — which pipes the Fenwick Branch of Rock Creek under the roadway — partially collapsed in 2009, and after delays, the city began rebuilding it last fall. The $2 million effort installed a new, larger bridge that allows more water underneath, thus decreasing overflows, according to a news release. Workers also added an extra westbound traffic lane and a wider pedestrian walkway. To speed the effort, the department used a “quick bridge� construction method in which large components were made off-site.

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ASSISTED LIVING FOR INDEPENDENT PEOPLE

The National Park Service has lifted advisories that affected parts of the Capital Crescent Trail and the C&O Canal in the aftermath of a recent sewage spill. The multiuse Capital Crescent Trail was closed for over a week between Fletcher’s Cove and Water Street in Georgetown, while the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority

The CurreNT

Delivered weekly to homes and businesses in Northwest Washington Publisher & Editor Davis Kennedy Managing Editor Chris Kain Assistant Managing Editor Beth Cope Advertising Director Gary Socha Account Executive Shani Madden Account Executive Chip Py Account Executive George Steinbraker Advertising Standards

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worked on cleanup, decontamination and repairs. On Friday, the Park Service announced that the area was safe for public use. The sewage spill also impacted waters of the C&O Canal below Lock 7, which the Park Service cleared as safe on Monday based on water quality tests. The agency also said that a second round of tests would take place this week to confirm further drops in bacteria levels. The spill occurred during recordbreaking rains on April 30, when a rupture in a large interceptor sewer caused an estimated 5 million gallons of combined overflow to run overland and into the Potomac.

City launches redo of dc.gov website

The city launched a new dc.gov home page this week, aiming to offer “a more user-friendly experience.� The home page and the websites for all D.C. government agencies are migrating to a new contentmanagement system as part of the overhaul, and over 100 have already done so. Designers reorganized the types of information available, made tweaks to allow for easy viewing on various devices, simplified navigation with drop-down menus, improved search functions, simplified the design and highlighted key services, among other changes.

Local village marks its fifth anniversary

The Northwest Neighbors Village celebrated its fifth anniversary yesterday, marking half a decade of helping local seniors remain in their homes as they age. Journalist Ray Suarez was scheduled to host a party at Blue 44 restaurant, with D.C. Council members Mary Cheh, Muriel Bowser and David Catania attending. Since its launch in March 2009, the village has grown tenfold from 22 members to more than 220, and from 30 volunteers to over 125. Volunteers help seniors with services and visits, and social events to each other and the broader community. The group serves residents of Chevy Chase, American University Park, Forest Hills, Friendship Heights, North Cleveland Park and Tenleytown. Blue 44 owner Chris Nardelli, a longtime village supporter, donated his restaurant for the evening.

Correction

In the May 7 issue, an item on the new Chevy Chase restaurant Macon Bistro & Larder misstated the address. It is 5520 Connecticut Ave. NW at the Chevy Chase Arcade. The Current regrets the error. As a matter of policy, The Current corrects all errors of substance. To report an error, call the managing editor at 202-567-2011.


The Current

SCHOOLS: Proposal debated From Page 2

town/Friendship Heights commission, Glover Park chair Brian Cohen echoed his counterparts to the north in an interview. “It’s a mystery to me how we got from a few schools needing to address overcrowding problems to a potential full-scale, soup-to-nuts modification of District of Columbia school feeder patterns,� said Cohen. Matt Frumin, chair of the Tenleytown/Friendship Heights commission, also serves on the school boundaries task force. (He abstained from the commission’s vote.) Frumin urged residents and his col-

leagues to wait for a new version of the boundary proposal that’s due in June, which he said will be vastly improved based on community input and newly crunched data on school populations. “The truth is going to be in what comes out next,� he said. “You have been heard, and the test of that is coming.� In an email after the meeting, Bender said he was comfortable that the commission’s laboriously edited letter and resolution protects the interests of those residents as well as other parents across the city. Staff writer Graham Vyse contributed to this article.

MORATORIUM: Hearing held From Page 1

torium stops new bad actors from coming to Adams Morgan, it also protects existing bad actors from competition,� said Simpson. Other residents, led by the Kalorama Citizens Association, advocated leaving the regulations unchanged. In the petition submitted to the alcohol control board, the neighborhood group argues that the commission’s proposal will take Adams Morgan back to the “mess� that existed before the moratorium. Specifically, the petition warns that there are already too many alcohol licenses in the moratorium area and that the commission’s plan wouldn’t necessarily bring in desirable restaurants. Yet another group, consisting of business owners and residents, advocated lifting the moratorium entirely, arguing that it stifles competition. “We are stuck with mediocrity,� said Lars Etzkorn, an Adams Morgan resident and business owner. “However well-intentioned, the moratoriums have enshrined the status quo.� Etzkorn and other business owners also argued that the police and a street cleaning effort by the local business group are addressing the nightlife problems. Despite the incompatibility of these stances, there was general agreement that city alcohol authorities have not adequately enforced license regulations in the moratorium area. At one point during the hearing, board member Hector Rodriguez drew applause from the 50 or so people in the room when he asked whether the current moratorium would be effective if his board

came down harder on violators. Ted Guthrie, the Adams Morgan neighborhood commissioner who opposed his colleagues’ proposal, said he doesn’t believe new rules would be enforced. “The regulatory bodies that should be in our neighborhood have been falling short — considerably short,â€? he said. The neighborhood commission’s plan requires that the alcohol board not grant any more entertainment licenses to the area’s restaurants and pubs. Without these licenses, restaurants would be prevented from having cover charges, musical performances, DJs and dancing. In an interview after the hearing, Simpson said that the commission’s plan depends on consistent enforcement of regulations. “There is a perception that enforcing the law is anti-business,â€? he said. “But the message we’re trying to send is that failing to enforce the law is anti-business.â€? Simpson framed the commission’s plan as a measure that could revitalize the neighborhood’s commercial district. Throughout the hearing, which stretched over half the day, community members echoed the sentiment that the neighborhood’s business district has stagnated. “Today there’s a complete disconnect between the ever-moredynamic condo and rental market ‌ and the moribund commercial area of Adams Morgan,â€? said longtime Adams Morgan resident Lisa Duperier, who advocated for eliminating the regulations. The current moratorium is set to expire on July 12, and a board official said a ruling could come anytime on or before that date.

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HOTEL: Developer describes construction timeline From Page 1

completion. He told the Adams Morgan advisory neighborhood commission last week that operational matters, such as staff training, will still need to be finalized. The first steps of the construction will include demolishing the former Washington City Paper building at 2390 Champlain St., a process that will likely last about two months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been released yet by the District, but we think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fairly close because the building has been vacant since May of last year,â&#x20AC;? Harloe said of the raze permit application, which was filed early in 2013. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the process of disconnecting the utilities in the building.â&#x20AC;? Next, the site behind the church will be dug up to make way for the new hotel tower. Once Harloeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team secures building permits, constructing the ground level will take around five months, he said. Once that is complete, construction of the full hotel building will take place at the same time as the renovation of the

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historic church. For many years, the hotel project faced considerable controversy in the Adams Morgan community. Concerns centered around the increase in traffic, feared displacement of longtime residents and the hotel towerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed height, which developers lowered twice during the planning process. The projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $46 million property tax abatement, approved by the D.C. Council in 2010, was also controversial. While it was granted on the condition the project and the hotel operations hire most of the staff from Ward 1, critics questioned whether a subsidy was appropriate for a luxury development. Ward 1 D.C. Council candidate Brianne Nadeau, who defeated incumbent Jim Graham in the April Democratic primary, supports the hotel project as a whole. However, on her campaign website she notes her concern that Graham offered the abatement â&#x20AC;&#x153;too readily without requiring community benefits to fully offset the loss of tax revenue.â&#x20AC;?

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Supporters of the project say the new hotel will pump up commercial activity in Adams Morgan. An agreement between developers and the community also includes funding for more than $1 million worth of community amenities, including a long-term commitment to the Adams Morgan Youth Leadership Academy. But at last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborhood commission meeting Harloe said he hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;come fully prepared to discussâ&#x20AC;? those plans since his team hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet met with the affected organizations. Harloe gave the example of Unity Park, a city-managed parcel across the church, which his company has vowed to maintain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to involve discussions among the community. We need to set up those timelines,â&#x20AC;? he said. Commissioner Marty Davis, however, pushed for more information soon, given the thousands of dollars in obligations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could at your earliest convenience give us some idea on how you can address those [amenities],â&#x20AC;? he told Harloe.

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To Benefit the Diabetes Research & Education Program

Georgetown University Children's Medical Center Entertainment for the Entire Family NinnJazz Band ‘Capital Tap’ Dance Troupe TMD and the Brass ‘Soul-ution’ Blues Alley Vocalist Beverly Cosham Scrumptious Buffet Dinner Live Auction: Including, Vacations, Restaurants, Sports Memorabilia

HELP SUPPORT DIABETES RESEARCH & EDUCATION!! Where:

The Georgetown Conference Center, Georgetown University 3800 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC 20007

(Parking at Leavey Center, Entrance 1)

WHEN: June 14, 2014, Saturday, 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. COST:

Individual Admission: Adults-$40, $35 Before May 21 Children Under 16 Yr-$15, Family $125, Reserved Table (10 admissions) $300

For Tickets: http://georgetownannualdiabetesgala.eventbrite.com Or send check (Georgetown University –DREP) To: Barbara Runner Georgetown Medstar Pediatrics 4200 Wisconsin Ave. NW Wash DC 20016 FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL (202) 342-2400

The Current

Police Report This is a listing of reports taken from May 5 through 11 in local police service areas.

psa PSA 101 101 ■ downtown

Robbery ■ 1000-1099 block, K St.; 11:15 p.m. May 6. Motor vehicle theft ■ 11th and F streets; 5:55 a.m. May 10. Theft ■ 900-999 block, F St.; 10:01 a.m. May 7. ■ New York Avenue and 11th Street; 11:44 a.m. May 7. ■ 400-499 block, 12th St.; 11:56 a.m. May 8. ■ 500-599 block, 14th St.; 5:08 p.m. May 8. ■ 14th and H streets; 2 a.m. May 9. ■ 500-599 block, 11th St.; 5:25 p.m. May 9. ■ 600-699 block, 12th St.; 4:12 p.m. May 11. Theft from auto ■ 900-999 block, New York Ave.; 9:37 a.m. May 6. ■ 900-999 block, H St.; 8 a.m. May 9. ■ 1300-1399 block, New York Ave.; 7:33 p.m. May 9. ■ 1200-1299 block, L St.; 11:49 p.m. May 9. ■ 6th Street and Constitution Avenue; 11:40 a.m. May 11. ■ 12th Street and New York Avenue; 4:37 p.m. May 11.

psa 102

■ Gallery PSA 102 place

PENN QUARTER

Robbery ■ 400-499 block, 8th St.; 5:09 p.m. May 7. Sexual abuse ■ 400-457 Massachusetts Ave.; 8:35 a.m. May 7. Theft ■ 703-799 block, 9th St.; 3:50 p.m. May 5. ■ 400-499 block, 7th St.; 3:51 p.m. May 6. ■ 400-457 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 10:15 p.m. May 6. ■ 400-499 block, 7th St.; 10:25 a.m. May 8. ■ 8th and D streets; 6:21 p.m. May 9. ■ 700-800 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; 7 p.m. May 9. ■ 400-499 block, K St.; 5:48 p.m. May 10. ■ 400-457 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 7:20 p.m. May 10. ■ 900-999 block, 9th St.; 3:46 p.m. May 11. Theft from auto ■ 400-499 block, H St.; 3:58 p.m. May 7. ■ 800-899 block, 6th St.; 4:50 p.m. May 10. ■ 4th and L streets; 5:06 p.m. May 10. ■ 400-499 block, I St.; 11:06 p.m. May 10. ■ 600-699 block, I St.; 10:48

a.m. May 11.

psa PSA 206 206

■ georgetown / burleith

Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 3100-3199 block, M St.; 3:15 a.m. (with knife). Motor vehicle theft ■ 1026-1099 block, 31st St.; 4:02 p.m. May 8. Theft ■ 3100-3199 block, K St.; 1:54 p.m. May 5. ■ 3200-3275 block, M St.; 3:35 p.m. May 5. ■ 1000-1099 block, Thomas Jefferson St.; 5:08 p.m. May 5. ■ 3520-3699 block, Whitehaven Parkway; 7:58 p.m. May 7. ■ 3900-4399 block, Reservoir Road; 9 a.m. May 8. ■ 3800-3899 block, T St.; 10:23 a.m. May 8. ■ 1224-1299 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 6 p.m. May 8. ■ 1200-1237 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 3 p.m. May 9. ■ 1851-2008 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 3:49 p.m. May 9. ■ 3300-3399 block, M St.; 1 p.m. May 10. ■ 3200-3275 block, M St.; 2:44 p.m. May 10. Theft from auto ■ 1000-1099 block, Thomas Jefferson St.; 9:44 a.m. May 5. ■ Water and 33rd streets; 2:46 p.m. May 8. ■ 1600-1642 block, 31st St.; 11:30 a.m. May 10.

psa PSA 207 207

■ foggy bottom / west end

Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 2100-2199 block, F St.; 11:17 a.m. (with gun). Burglary ■ Unit block, Washington Circle; 12:19 a.m. May 6. ■ 1000-1099 block, 25th St.; 11:38 p.m. May 9. Theft ■ 800-899 block, New Hampshire Ave.; 7:52 p.m. May 5. ■ 1700-1799 block, K St.; 11:40 a.m. May 6. ■ 2100-2155 block, Constitution Ave.; 12:15 p.m. May 8. ■ 1100-1199 block, Vermont Ave.; 1:56 p.m. May 8. ■ 900-999 block, 23rd St.; 2:40 p.m. May 8. ■ 1100-1129 block, 17th St.; 7:24 p.m. May 8. ■ 2200-2299 block, I St.; 10:29 a.m. May 9. ■ 1400-1499 block, Jefferson Drive SW; 10:43 a.m. May 9. ■ 1900-1999 block, E St.; 5:23 p.m. May 9. ■ 500-599 block, 19th St.; 6:30 a.m. May 10. ■ 1000-1099 block, Connecticut Ave.; 2:20 p.m. May 10. ■ 2431-2479 block, Virginia Ave.; 10:22 p.m. May 10. ■ 2000-2099 block, M St.; 1:48 p.m. May 11.

Theft from auto ■ 700-799 block, 24th St.; 12:29 a.m. May 10. ■ 2100-2199 block, G St.; 1:51 p.m. May 10. ■ 2600-2699 block, L St.; 11:35 p.m. May 10.

psa 208

■ sheridan-kalorama PSA 208

dupont circle

Robbery ■ 1300-1499 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 1:29 p.m. May 9 (with knife). ■ 1700-1799 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 8:53 p.m. May 10. Burglary ■ 2016-2099 block, O St.; 10:34 p.m. May 7. Motor vehicle theft ■ 2100-2119 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 5:45 a.m. May 9. Theft ■ 1700-1799 block, Rhode Island Ave.; 11:25 a.m. May 5. ■ 1400-1499 block, P St.; 2:41 p.m. May 6. ■ 1500-1599 block, New Hampshire Ave.; 9:04 a.m. May 7. ■ 1700-1799 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:10 p.m. May 7. ■ 1600-1699 block, P St.; 6 a.m. May 9. ■ 1300-1699 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:44 p.m. May 9. Theft from auto ■ 2300-2399 block, Kalorama Road; 3:43 a.m. May 6. ■ 1800-1899 block, Swann St.; 9:34 a.m. May 6. ■ 17th Street and Rhode Island Avenue; 11:52 a.m. May 7. ■ 1400-1499 block, 16th St.; 1:36 p.m. May 7. ■ O and 16th streets; 11:58 a.m. May 10. ■ 1500-1599 block, N St.; 10:55 a.m. May 11. ■ 1400-1425 block, R St.; 3:35 p.m. May 11. ■ Corregidor and N streets; 11:56 p.m. May 11.

psa PSA 301 301

■ Dupont circle

Robbery ■ 1500-1599 block, Q St.; 3:27 a.m. May 11. ■ 1900-1921 block, 17th St.; 6 a.m. May 11. Sexual abuse ■ 1400-1499 block, V St.; 10:05 p.m. May 6 (with knife). Theft ■ 1700-1799 block, T St.; 7:36 p.m. May 6. ■ 2100-2199 block, 14th St.; 1:24 p.m. May 9. Theft from auto ■ R and 14th streets; 10:30 a.m. May 5. ■ 1500-1599 block, R St.; 10:57 a.m. May 10.

psa PSA 303 303

■ adams morgan

Robbery ■ 1800-1810 block, Columbia Road; 11 p.m. May 7. Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 2201-2299 block, Champlain St.; 4:30 a.m. May 11 (with knife). Motor vehicle theft ■ 1800-1881 block, Kalorama Road; 11:07 a.m. May 6. Sexual abuse ■ 2322-2499 block, Ontario Road; 5:44 a.m. May 11. Theft ■ 1847-1999 block, Calvert St.; 11:47 a.m. May 6. ■ 2200-2260 block, Champlain St.; 7:19 p.m. May 9 (with knife). ■ 2416-2499 block, 19th St.; 2 p.m. May 10. Theft from auto ■ 1800-1899 block, Wyoming Ave.; 12:30 p.m. May 5. ■ 1800-1899 block, Belmont Road; 11:21 p.m. May 6. ■ 1700-1799 block, California St.; 1:30 a.m. May 9. ■ 1800-1899 block, California St.; 4:17 a.m. May 10. ■ 2200-2260 block, Champlain St.; 8:22 a.m. May 10. ■ 1690-1741 block, Lanier Place; 9:10 a.m. May 10. ■ 1690-1741 block, Lanier Place; 11 a.m. May 10. ■ 1800-1899 block, Vernon St.; 9:32 a.m. May 11.

psa PSA 307 307

■ logan circle

Robbery ■ 1101-1199 block, 11th St.; 3:45 p.m. May 9 (with gun). Burglary ■ 1300-1399 block, Rhode Island Ave.; 1:46 p.m. May 9. ■ 900-999 block, N St.; 3:30 p.m. May 9. Theft ■ 1000-1099 block, O St.; 6:49 p.m. May 6. ■ 1100-1199 block, 14th St.; 10:26 a.m. May 9. ■ 1400-1499 block, 9th St.; 8:48 p.m. May 9. ■ P and 14th streets; 10:22 p.m. May 10. Theft from auto ■ 1100-1127 block, 13th St.; 12:23 p.m. May 5. ■ 1000-1099 block, L St.; 8:12 a.m. May 6. ■ 1300-1399 block, 10th St.; 9:28 p.m. May 6. ■ 1300-1399 block, R St.; 2:21 p.m. May 7. ■ 1108-1199 block, 12th St.; 8:07 a.m. May 8. ■ 1400-1499 block, 12th St.; 1:20 p.m. May 9. ■ 900-999 block, M St.; 3 p.m. May 10.


The Current

d

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

f

7

DESIGN: Nonprofit projects get boost from competition for $20,000 of pro bono work

From Page 1

ronmentally responsible goals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and for a price lower than other design outlets. At Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House, the Adams Morgan finalist, the healing garden surrounds the 1730 Lanier Place nonprofit that provides care for homeless men and women who are dying from AIDS or cancer. The 1,500-square-foot outdoor space is in need of upgrades to create a more welcoming spot for all members of its community, said deputy director Scott Sanders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the big problems is that [the garden] is not accessible for people with wheelchairs,â&#x20AC;? who comprise much of the population at Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House, he said. Sanders also said the area is underutilized since there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough places to sit, and drainage issues lead to muddy spots. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House has wanted to pursue this plan, but the staff didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to proceed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; until MakeDC contacted Sanders, asking if the organization had a design concept to enter

into the contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to work with someone to see what the options would be,â&#x20AC;? he said, adding that professional landscape design services would help the organization create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;healing retreat and outdoor gathering space.â&#x20AC;? In Georgetown, the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business improvement district wants to enliven the C&O mule yard, an outdoor space adjacent to the canal and between 30th and Thomas Jefferson streets. About a half acre in size, it used to hold stables back when the National Park Serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mule-drawn boat tours were still operating, according to Josh Hermias, the BIDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic development director. This attraction used to draw thousands of tourists; now, the number has dropped dramatically. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an underutilized area, and public spaces in Georgetown are limited,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s this one area in Georgetown thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open, so we applied to the competition â&#x20AC;Ś [to make it] a community gathering spot.â&#x20AC;?

While the BID doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have â&#x20AC;&#x153;100 percent clarityâ&#x20AC;? yet in terms of this vision, Hermias said some ideas include rest areas and a historical interpretation of the canal. Revitalizing the C&O Canal is a goal of the business groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Georgetown 2028 plan, which seeks to improve the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial district. Another planned feature is a kayak dock to allow more boating activities. The BID has also worked with MakeDC in draft-

ing schemes for improvements along the canal. The five other finalists are the Friends of Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, the D.C. Youth Orchestra, the new Anacostia Business Improvement District, Kid Power and the Latin American Youth Center. Even if Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t win, Sanders is hopeful that the contest will expose the project to other designers. He said the application process also allowed his organiza-

tion to lay out a better vision for the healing garden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beauty is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help us with the design community,â&#x20AC;? he said. As for the BID, the group is creating a nonprofit to work on the C&O Canal improvements. Called Georgetown Heritage, the group has an educational mission to â&#x20AC;&#x153;interpret Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic and cultural resources,â&#x20AC;? according to Hermias. Visit makedc.org to view all seven projects.

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8

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The Foggy Bottom

Current

Davis Kennedy/Publisher & Editor Chris Kain/Managing Editor

Speeding up bus service

We appreciate the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority’s current effort to improve bus service along Wisconsin Avenue. The agency proposes removing about 40 stops and altering routes in an effort to speed bus traffic. Proposed changes would shorten the 31 route, combine the 32 and 36 and shorten their path, and create new 30S and 30N lines — running once an hour — to cover the entire length that the 32 and 36 now run. The agency also intends to eliminate pairs of stops (northbound and southbound), decreasing the number per mile from about seven to five. A spokesperson said there’s another stop within a block or so of those suggested for removal. The agency has also said it intends to maintain stops that serve a school, recreation center or place of worship. While some will undoubtedly oppose aspects of the plan — and perhaps for good reason — the overall concept seems appropriate. Many people rely on these Wisconsin Avenue routes, even in areas also served by a Metrorail stop, and with improved service we imagine the numbers could grow. For outreach, the agency says it will post signs on buses and at stops next month and launch a website. Metro has already provided preliminary information to advisory neighborhood commissions. The Georgetown group has opposed elimination of a stop at Dumbarton Street, and the Glover Park commission cited a preference for eliminating only the northbound stop at W Place and keeping southbound in favor of a removal at 35th Street. A collaborative approach is essential. All bus riders — or prospective riders who might start if they see improvements — should consider weighing in before the plans become official in mid-July. Over in the Dupont area, ongoing tweaks to 16th Street buses seem to be improving the rider experience, and residents have come up with their own solutions to ease extreme overcrowding — indicating that crowdsourcing can yield excellent results.

A town-gown model

The Current

f

Two years ago, Georgetown University and its residential neighbors ended a rancorous battle over the school’s campus plan by unveiling a broadly supported compromise. The school committed to more on-campus housing and amenities to pull students out of neighborhood residences. Today, the university and community groups collaborate on achieving short-term goals and crafting a 20-year plan for the university that will run from 2017 to 2037. The results seem positive for all involved. In particular, we congratulate the university’s Lauralyn Lee and Michael Durso for their outstanding job at building a positive relationship with the community, and the Georgetown advisory neighborhood commission, Citizens Association of Georgetown and Burleith Citizens Association for their tireless efforts to find a viable solution for their neighborhoods. The process hasn’t gone quite as smoothly at American and George Washington universities. Both institutions have made meaningful strides, but many of their neighbors are still smarting from hard-fought battles. In Foggy Bottom, George Washington received unpopular approvals in 2007 for large-scale growth without community amenities sought by many residents. Initially, there were efforts to re-fight this battle every time the university needed any approvals, and the school dug in against the opposition. But today we see a more productive working relationship. The neighborhood commission now evaluates zoning cases on their own merits rather than offering knee-jerk opposition, and a Community Advisory Committee lets university officials discuss issues with and take feedback from residents. George Washington hasn’t yet developed the collaborative approach that brought Georgetown University and its neighbors together. Nor have Foggy Bottom community leaders always gone the extra mile to identify and achieve shared goals with the school. But we applaud the progress. American University, too, continues to make strides. Its campus plan, approved in 2012, was scaled back from earlier proposals but didn’t address many residents’ fundamental objections. The school aims to reduce its community impact by placing more students on campus — but does so largely by building dorms on a parking lot that abuts single-family homes. With construction set to begin next month, American has made an effort to communicate its plans to neighbors. Sadly, some inaccurate information has been disseminated, and some changes to the plans came as a surprise to the community. It’s hard to imagine this happening in Georgetown, where stakeholders make decisions together before announcing them to the public. Nor would Georgetown commissioners likely adopt the scolding, scathing tone that often emerges from their counterparts around American. We recognize that the situations aren’t always the same, but Georgetown shines as an example of a town-gown partnership worth trying to emulate.

Up in smoke … D.C. style … ?

I

t’s not surprising. Many people in our mostly liberal little city say they favor our new law “decriminalizing” small amounts of personal marijuana possession for use in the home. Never mind where you get that pot — buying and selling remains illegal. But instead of jail time for possession, you will be risking only small fines (hence, decriminalization). It’s not law yet. Congress is still sniffing around a possible challenge before the new D.C. law goes into effect in July. Still, for the law to be derailed, the House and the Senate would have to each vote it down and President Obama would have to sign the disapproval resolution. D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton said at a Hill hearing last Friday that everyone should keep his or her mitts off local D.C. laws. She sounded like she meant it. But if you’re paying attention — and we realize some of you have trouble paying attention — you’ll know there’s another marijuana battle underway right here, right now. And, so far, it has nothing to do with the feds. The shoestring D.C. Cannabis Campaign is trying to collect 24,000 valid voter signatures to supersede the “decriminalization” law almost before the first one starts. In its place would be a law with legal pot similar to Colorado — regulated and taxed by the District. Most D.C. elected officials shied away from that outright legalization, not because they were opposed but because they thought it was a reach too far. Well, it turns out some citizens on the street may be in favor but aren’t so ready to put their own names down. Activist Adam Eidinger has been working the streets for more than a month trying to gather signatures. But many sympathetic folks aren’t signing. “What we hear a lot is, ‘I work for the government,’” Eidinger told NBC4. “‘I have a contract with the government; I don’t want to sign it.’ ‘I’m a schoolteacher; I don’t want to sign it.’”

Eidinger is the intense but friendly activist who has been at anti-war, civil rights and other demonstrations. He says many people thought it would be “a piece of cake” to gather ballot signatures for marijuana in the District. But not so. He says his group needs more funds. Eidinger hopes to collect nearly 60,000 signatures before July 8 to make certain at least one third of them are valid. That’s right — whenever you do a petition drive, the error rate can be sky high, to use a common phrase. Among those who do sign, some aren’t registered to vote even though they say they are. Some think they’re helping even by making up a name or an address. But back at the headquarters, a few volunteers laboriously type in the names and check them against the voluminous election rolls. Some eager volunteers drop by and pick up dozens of blank petition sheets with room for 20 names per sheet. But thousands of those sheets haven’t been turned in. “We want ’em back,” Eidinger told us. And he wouldn’t mind a few more volunteers. ■ Closing for good. The District’s celebrated Hospitality High charter school is going out of business. But that doesn’t mean the programs will disappear. The school is sponsored by the restaurant industry, and it is voluntarily giving up its charter after the 2015-2016 academic year. That might be a first time a charter school voluntarily has surrendered its paperwork. An agreement is in the works for Hospitality High to continue operating, but merge into the D.C. Public Schools system. For more than a decade, the restaurant industry has supported education and training in the food industry, a mainstay of the city’s growing economy. “We hope to continue to provide our students with the exposure and access to our industry that they deserve,” said Solomon Keene, president of the Hotel Association of Washington, D.C. Tom Sherwood, a Southwest resident, is a political reporter for News 4.

TOM SHERWOOD’s

Notebook

Letters to the Editor Full accessibility is key at restaurants

My late father, William Cochran, was an architect who early in his career specialized in barrier-free design [“Campaign pushes restaurant accessibility,” May 7]. He was involved with an advocacy group called Mainstream in the early- to mid1970s, and went on to be on panels involved in drafting the Americans with Disabilities Act. In the last 10 years of his life he designed many D.C.-area restaurants. After his sudden passing in 2001 at age 60, to celebrate his life I took my young children out to a restaurant he had designed, the then-new Bethesda Cafe Deluxe. When my children and I were exiting the bathroom, I stayed back to hold the door open for a woman in a wheelchair. She smiled at me and told me that I did not need to hold it for her, and then, completely unprompted, said, “This is one of the only restaurants where I can

be totally independent.” It was the perfect thing to hear on an evening when we were celebrating my father’s life and work. I wish he were here to continue the work of barrier-free design and inclusion for all people in this city. Michelle Cochran Tenleytown

Affordable-housing bill needs revisions

On May 29 the D.C. Council’s Committee on Economic Development is scheduled to take up the Affordable Homeownership Preservation and Equity Accumulation Amendment Act of 2013 (B20-604). This wellintentioned legislation threatens to deplete the District’s affordable-housing stock. The worthy purpose of this bill is to provide needed relief to homeowners who find it difficult to resell homes for which Housing Production Trust Fund subsidies financed or partially financed construction. It does this by capping — and in some neighborhoods shortening — the required affordability period for such homes. But the legislation

goes too far. It fails to balance the homeowners’ need to build wealth and the city’s need to preserve our stock of affordable housing. The current requirement that subsidized homes remain affordable for at least 15 years should not be eliminated, but exceptions should be made for certain neighborhoods. For distressed neighborhoods with weak housing markets, instead of specifying a cap, allow for shortening the required period of affordability (some have suggested five or 10 years). However, the definition of distressed neighborhoods in the legislation should be significantly narrowed. It now includes neighborhoods such as Mount Pleasant, where homes are selling for more than their asking prices. It is important to reduce the burden that the length of affordability requirements places upon some owners of homes financed by the Housing Production Trust Fund. But we must do it in a way that preserves our stock of affordable housing. Barbara Yeomans Elinor Hart Chevy Chase


The Current

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s erase the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement gap VIEWPOINT jack mccarthy

T

here is growing recognition among academics and political leaders that early learning may be the key to closing the achievement gap. Our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital has the largest achievement gap among 20 U.S. urban areas, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress. The gap is often the difference between the academic performance of students who are economically disadvantaged and their more affluent peers. Research reveals that children growing up in lowincome families hear, by age 3, roughly 30 million fewer words than their more advantaged counterparts. Because disadvantaged children arrive at kindergarten millions of words behind their classmates and lacking early learning skills, they generally donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t perform as well at school. Erasing the achievement gap in preschool could break the endless cycle of â&#x20AC;&#x153;school turnarounds,â&#x20AC;? high-school dropouts, wasted lives and lost potential that typically costs society many more resources later. D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement gap is revealed in citywide standardized test scores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 92 percent of white students are at or above grade level in reading, compared to 39 percent of their African-American counterparts; the figures for math are 91 and 40. These deficits, if unaddressed, compound into adulthood: Six in 10 District AfricanAmerican students graduate high school on time, compared to nine in 10 white students. Multiyear statewide research from New Jersey conducted by the National Institute for Early Education found that investing smartly and early produces significant dividends. Over two years, New Jerseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early learning initiative closed about half of the achievement gap between children from low-income families and their more privileged counterparts. Charters have provided a useful strategy for implementing evidence-based, innovative early education in D.C. Here, preschool and pre-K charters receive robust public funding that provides the resources to implement the kinds of early language and preliteracy interventions that dramatically raise the trajectory of childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s learn-

Letters to the Editor D.C. market right for micro apartments

We write in response to Mr. Crockettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recent letter regarding the redevelopment of the Latham Hotel: The demographics of the District of Columbia have been evolving. Much of the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth between 2000 and 2010 was from young adults ages 20 to 34, whose numbers swelled by 23 percent, and that trend has continued into this decade. The growth is driven by younger professionals, a cohort with a considerably different lifestyle than previous generations. These are individuals from around the world who prioritize smaller units in vibrant neighborhoods and prefer to (sustainably) navigate the city by foot, bike, bus and Metro rather than car. Frank Saul III and I founded SB-

ing so they enter kindergarten ready to thrive. D.C. charter schools are blending the wraparound services of Head Start with data-driven, evidence-based early intervention â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and seeing impressive gains in precursors to reading comprehension, early math skills and the social-emotional skills like grit that are identified with school success. Every Child Ready, an instructional program that won a federal Investing in Innovation award, includes what to teach, how to teach and how to tell itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being accomplished. In D.C., it is being implemented in five charter school networks, and disadvantaged kids are benefiting. After two years, students enrolled in AppleTree Early Learning Public Charter School show marked improvements in key early literacy skills. The majority â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most of them economically disadvantaged â&#x20AC;&#x201D; start below the national average in vocabulary, but they complete their enrollment well above the average 4-year-old in vocabulary and word recognition. AppleTree alums also significantly outperform their nonAppleTree peers in oral reading fluency in first and second grades. More than half of AppleTreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-year-olds, when first enrolled, are far below the normal range (on normreferenced standardized assessments), which puts them at great risk of being identified for special education. After two years, most perform well above average. This approach defines quality early learning in terms of important measurable outcomes in the skills related to school success. The growing cohort of five D.C. public charter schools implementing this data-driven approach to early learning is getting the attention of policymakers and practitioners. Early learning is even being used as a school turnaround strategy in D.C. It makes sense to increase the school readiness of kindergartners as a first step toward improving student outcomes across the board. In a city as divided as D.C., effective early education is an opportunity to give children from high-poverty Ward 8 to highly affluent Ward 3 the chance to begin school with the same readiness. Charters are showing themselves to be an effective vehicle for providing quality, effective early learning to those children. Jack McCarthy is president and CEO of the AppleTree Institute for Education Innovation.

Urban to respond to these powerful trends with environmentally sustainable development. Adapting buildings in urban infill settings makes use of existing transportation infrastructure, and by providing housing for people without cars we minimize vehicular trips, resulting in less traffic and a smaller carbon footprint. Washington ranks second only to New York in the percentage of households that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t own cars, and second only to Boston in the percentage of people who walk to work. 3000 M St. boasts a â&#x20AC;&#x153;WalkScoreâ&#x20AC;? of 100, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paradise.â&#x20AC;? With its abundance of amenities, varied transit options and proximity to the workplace, 3000 M St. is a perfect location for people without cars who want to live and shop in Georgetown and work nearby. This redevelopment works only if we remove the existing parking ramp (and the garage it serves) to open up common areas of the building to daylight, the park and the C&O Canal. Without those changes

supporting a residential use, the building would be returned to its higher-traffic-generating hotel use. Supporting the sustainable habits of our residents, we will provide bicycle facilities and offer SmarTrip cards, Capital Bikeshare memberships and car-share memberships (Zipcar or Car2Go) to all residents. We will install transit screens displaying bus and train schedules, as well as bike availability. We agree with Mr. Crockettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on not adding to Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking problem. Buildings on the 3000 block of M Street are not eligible for Residential Parking Permits. Our residents will use car-share when they drive (rarely), and they will not park on the street. Georgetown has been a dynamic and cherished neighborhood since before the automobile. Our project builds a bridge to both the past and the future, and will be a vibrant contributor to Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continuing appeal for all its residents. Michael S. Balaban President, SB-Urban

Letters to the editor The Current publishes letters and Viewpoint submissions representing various points of view. Because of space limitations, letters should be no more than 400 words and are subject to editing. Letters and Viewpoint submissions intended for publication should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Current, Post Office Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400. You may send email to letters@currentnewspapers.com.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

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20 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Continued From Page 19 setts Avenue NW. 202-333-4730. The festival will continue Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 7 p.m. Films â&#x2013; The National Archives will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gift,â&#x20AC;? the second episode of Ken Burnsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz: A Film.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Family Movie Night: Creature Featureâ&#x20AC;? will present short films starring magical monsters, garden critters, barnyard animals, family pets and other furry creatures. An art activity and opportunity to stroll the estate or picnic in the gardens will precede the films. 5:30 to 8 p.m. $5; free for ages 2 and younger. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202686-5807. â&#x2013;  The Freer Gallery will present Mike Leighâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1993 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naked.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202633-1000. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Alohaâ&#x20AC;? Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i Festival will feature the 2013 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Ras-

&

The Current

Events Entertainment muson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013; The Washington DC Scandals Rugby Football Club will present Scott Gracheffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rugby Player,â&#x20AC;? about the lives of Mark Bingham, one of the passengers of United Flight 93 on 9/11, and his mother, Alice Hoagland, a former United Airlines flight attendant. 7 and 9 p.m. $15. Burke Theater, U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. rugbyplayer.eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  The Golden Cinema Series will kick off with Rob Reinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1995 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The American President,â&#x20AC;? starring Michael Douglas and Annette Bening. 7:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangledc.com. Meetings â&#x2013;  A weekly bridge group will meet to play duplicate bridge. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $6; free for first-time players. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. 301-654-1865. â&#x2013;  Overeaters Anonymous will host a

671-3122. â&#x2013; The group Friends of the Takoma Park Library will host a used-book sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. Front lawn, Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252.

beginnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting. 6:30 p.m. Free. St. Margaretâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 1830 Connecticut Ave. NW. Performances â&#x2013; The Dance DC Festival 2014 will open with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enchantments of the East,â&#x20AC;? featuring a colorful display of Middle Eastern, Indian, Asian and European flare by the Silk Road Dance Company, the Ancient Rhythms Dance Company and other performers. Reception at 6 p.m.; performance at 7 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. dancedcopening.eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  The National Symphony Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Moves: symphony + danceâ&#x20AC;? festival will feature Adamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Violin Concertoâ&#x20AC;? featuring violinist Leila Josefowicz with original choreography by Jessica Lang performed by her company. 7 p.m. $10 to $85. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. The performance will repeat Saturday at 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Washington Improv Theater will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;WITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous Road Show of Longform Improv Comedyâ&#x20AC;? with various ensembles. 7:30 and 10 p.m. $8 to $15. DC Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. 202-462-7833. Performances will continue on Friday and Saturday nights through May 31. â&#x2013;  The fourth annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dramathonâ&#x20AC;? will feature local actors and Theatre Lab students in staged readings of new short plays by accomplished local playwrights. Proceeds will benefit the Theatre Labâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scholarship fund. 10:30 p.m. $15. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-824-0449. Reading â&#x2013;  Winners of the KidsPost Poetry Contest will read from their work. 4 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Sale â&#x2013;  St. Columbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;New to Youâ&#x20AC;? yard, bake and book sale will feature a large selection of new or gently used clothes (adult and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s), toys, tools, housewares, sporting goods, furniture, collectibles and books. Customers are encouraged to bring their own bags. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free admission. St. Columbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle St. NW. 202-363-4119. The sale will continue Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Special events â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Endangered Species Day Festivalâ&#x20AC;? will feature childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities focused on endangered plants and pollinators and provide information on everyday actions that can help protect the planet. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. Conservatory, U.S.

    

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013; A park ranger will lead a planetarium program about distant galaxies, nebulas and other deep space objects (for ages 7 and older). 4 to 4:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. The program will repeat Sunday at 4 p.m.

Saturday, may 17 â&#x2013; Concert: Cellist Ana Topalovic will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mosaique,â&#x20AC;? a solo program of Spanish dances and melodies. 7:30 p.m. Free. Church of the Holy City, 1611 16th St. NW. 202-4626734. The concert will repeat Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. â&#x2013;  A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;iâ&#x20AC;? festival will feature opportunities for visitors to try their hand at kapa (bark cloth) stamping, Hawaiian kite making, lei making and traditional games. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. The festival will continue Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. â&#x2013;  Dance Placeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Step It Up DCâ&#x20AC;? event will feature arts and crafts activities; beginner, advanced and openlevel step workshops; and an informal performance by the Dance Place Step Team and class participants. 6 p.m. $5 to $12; free admission to arts and crafts activities. Brookland Artspace Lofts, 3305 8th St. NE, and Edgewood Arts Center, 3415 8th St. NE. danceplace.org. â&#x2013;  The CityVision Spring 2014 Final Presentation will feature presentations by students at Cesar Chavez Parkside Middle School and Stuart-Hobson Middle School on their plans for reusing and adapting the Franklin School, the Uline Arena and the Old Post Office. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. Sporting events â&#x2013;  The Washington Mystics will play the Minnesota Lynx. 7 p.m. $15 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 800-745-3000. â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play the New York Mets. 7:05 p.m. $10 to $90. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Saturday at 4:05 p.m. and Sunday at 1:35 p.m. Tour â&#x2013;  Biochemist Beth Burrous will lead an evening tour of the U.S. Botanic Garden Conservatory highlighting plants from around the world that impart flavor to sweet foods. 5 to 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. Saturday, May 17 Saturday may 17

 

    

   

Book sales â&#x2013; The group Friends of the Mount Pleasant Library will hold a used-book sale with most titles priced at less than $2. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free admission. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-

Classes and workshops â&#x2013; A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk Photographyâ&#x20AC;? workshop will focus on sports photography and how to get great action photos. After the workshop and a break for lunch, participants will walk to the Dragon Boat Races to take photos. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202-724-8707. â&#x2013;  Art therapist Rebecca Wilkinson will lead a workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reducing Stress: How to Feel Happier and Increase Well-Being.â&#x20AC;? 10 to 11:30 a.m. Free; reservations suggested. Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-352-5225. â&#x2013;  Choreographer Diane Coburn Bruning, founder and artistic director of the D.C.-based Chamber Dance Project, will lead a seminar and interactive studio session on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding Ballet: Classical to Contemporary.â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $87 to $130. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Takoma Bicycle will present a bike repair workshop with advice on performing basic maintenance, preparing for emergencies and changing a flat tire. 10:30 a.m. Free. Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252. Concerts â&#x2013;  The Adams Morgan Summer Concert Series will feature singer-songwriter Rochelle Rice performing a mix of jazz, soul, pop and rock. 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Public plaza in front of BB&T Bank at Columbia Road, Adams Mills Road and 16th Street NW. 202-997-0783. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Alohaâ&#x20AC;? Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i Festival will feature a concert by KĹŤpaoa, the husband-and-wife duo of LÄŤhau Hannahs Paik and Kellen Paik. 5:30 p.m. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  The School Without Walls High School Concert Choir will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Institute of Musical Traditions will host the Mid-Atlantic Song Contest Winners Showcase. 7:30 p.m. $12 to $18. Seekers Church, 276 Carroll St. NW. 301960-3655. â&#x2013;  Fred Tackett and Paul Barrere of Little Feat will perform backed by the New Orleans Suspects in â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Tribute to Little Feat.â&#x20AC;? 8:30 p.m. $35 to $40. The Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW. thehamiltondc.com. â&#x2013;  Solo artist Willie Watson (shown) and the band Mandolin Orange will perform. 9 p.m. $12 to $15. Gypsy Sallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Mark N. Ozer will discuss his book See Events/Page 21


10 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The Current

Spotlight on Schools British School of Washington

Recently, British School of Washington students were excited by visits from D.C. United, to help us understand a number of different aspects of the world of professional sport. Our first visitor was Talon, the team mascot, who came to meet all the children in both the primary and secondary school. Then on Tuesday, the older students were given the opportunity to learn about what happens behind the scenes in the business arena of running a team. On Wednesday youth coaches helped members of our school soccer teams develop our skills at controlling the ball and working as a team to achieve the best results. On Thursday, Lewis Neil, a player from the senior team, came to talk to us about what the life of a professional soccer player is like and what he enjoys about it. He also signed autographs for his current and newly gained fans. The week ended with a group of about 100 students, parents and

School DISPATCHES

teachers attending the Major League Soccer match against Chicago Fire. Despite the bad weather our group had an amazing time, with 30 of our children being chosen to form the high-five tunnel to welcome the players onto the pitch at the start of the game. Although the match ended in a 2-2 draw it was a great experience to end an exciting week of fantastic learning opportunities. — Cameron Cullen and Sander Somers, Year 9 Seattle (eighth-graders)

Deal Middle School

Spring is finally here! With it comes Deal’s annual spring musical, and this year, you’re off to see the wizard with this year’s musical being “The Wizard of Oz.” This cast of about 180 students is made up of dance troupes, singers and, of course, the main characters. Some of the most inspiring songs include “Somewhere Over The

WWXX

Rainbow,” “Jitterbug” and “Follow the Yellow Brick Road.” Opening night was a sold-out show and received a standing ovation after a musical filled with passion, happiness and drama. Of course, it wasn’t like this in the beginning. This took many months of rehearsals and hard work, but it all paid off in the end. — Aidan Moorehead, sixth-grader

of wolves and when Gaston and villagers were going to break into the castle. I also liked the background, which was a real-live picture of the woods that made you feel like you were there. I thought the beast and Belle were very convincing and believable. They were good at dancing toward the end. — Zachary Isaacs, third-grader

Eaton Elementary

At Burke we have many different clubs. These clubs are suggested and formed by students at the beginning of the year. The faculty must approve of the club and if they do you’re set. To introduce the new clubs and the ones that appear every year, the whole school meets to look over what is available. Each club has a table with a sign-up sheet and several current club members or founders. These leaders are happy to discuss what will be the focus of the club for the year and try to get you interested. I am in the Gaming/Minecraft Club, which has been good fun this year. Other popular clubs are the Movie Club, Math Club, French Club, Music Club and many others. Each room that the students occupy to participate in the club must have a teacher. The gaming club is nor-

At John Eaton, if you want to be in the school play, you have to be in fourth or fifth grade. Since I’m a third-grader, I couldn’t be in our school’s production of “Beauty and the Beast” but I got to see it twice, once during school and also this past Saturday. The play was amazing! Everyone did a great job with their part. “Beauty and the Beast” is about a girl named Belle from a small town who gets captured by a beast who is really a prince under a spell. They fall in love and the spell is finally broken when the beast becomes a nice person. I think some of the characters were funny, especially Lefou, Gaston, Cogsworth and Lumiere. I liked the way the characters were acting on stage but also ran through the audience when they were a pack

Edmund Burke School

mally overseen by Alex White, a member of the tech department. Clubs, which meet once every seven days, are an important part of Burke because students meet others who they didn’t know but who share the same interests. It is another part of community-building at Burke. — Emmett Roddy-Johnson, sixth-grader

Jewish Primary Day School

Each year, third-graders get to do a project about the 50 states. Students learn about their states for three months. First, each child reads a book about his or her state and composes four questions. After that, it’s time to start to make our own books. Students write about what their state is most famous for, the Native Americans who lived in their state, interesting places to visit, four questions about their state, basic facts and state symbols. Students also get to work on a creative display of their state. The display must include what their state is most famous for, an interesting thing to do there and/or something fun they have learned throughout their project. The displays get put in the hallway on See Dispatches/Page 29


The CurrenT

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 11

F

Published by the Foggy Bottom Association – 50 Years Serving Foggy Bottom / West End The Neighbors Who Brought You Trader Joe’s!

Vol. 56, No. 21

FBN archives available on FBA website: www.foggybottomassociation.com/fbn/

May 14, 2014

ARTS IN FOGGY BOTTOM BIENNIAL SCULPTURE EXHIBITION OPENS MAY 17

MAY FOGGY BOTTOM ASSOCIATION MEETING SCHEDULED

SATURDAY, MAY 17, 4:00 PM Corner of New Hampshire and I Streets NW Arts In Foggy Bottom Biennial Sculpture Exhibition Opening The opening day festivities will include a tour of the sculptures. The artists will be stationed at their respective pieces and will discuss them as attendees reach their sites. Following the tour, there will be a reception for artists, homeowners, and attendees at the Watergate Gallery. The exhibition will continue until Saturday, October 25, in front of homes and businesses between 24th & 26th Streets NW, and H & K Streets NW, day and night. This is the fourth iteration of the awardwinning Arts in Foggy Bottom outdoor sculpture biennial—one of Washington’s leading programs for presenting public art. The 2014 exhibition, Sculpted: Histories Revealed, will feature 16 contemporary sculptures by 15 artists, most nationally recognized. Funding for the 2014 exhibition has been provided by a Planned Unit Development (PUD) amenity from the Hilton Garden Inn at 2201 M Street, NW. The Foggy Bottom Association Defense and Improvement Corporation made the three prior biennials possible. For more information, visit http://www. foggybottomassociation.com/arts/

THURSDAY, MAY 22, 6:45 PM (Note date change and earlier start time) School Without Walls, 2130 G St NW On the agenda: ! Report on FBA Membership Survey Results !""Discussion with senior GW staff on potential proposal to adjust GWPD responsibilities regarding students who live off campus Hope to see you there.

RESCHEDULED! FOGGY BOTTOM WEST END VILLAGE & FOGGY BOTTOM ASSOCIATION CO-SPONSOR EVENING WITH JOHN L. LEWIS TUESDAY, MAY 20, 7:00 PM The Village 2430 K St NW (enter through the Atrium on K St) Free of charge – light refreshments served The Foggy Bottom West End Village and the Foggy Bottom Association announce a rescheduled special appearance by The Honorable John Lewis, Member of Congress, 5th District of Georgia. Congressman Lewis will share his insights and thoughts about the history and future of civil rights. His courage and life-long devotion to individual freedoms and liberties have inspired others and brought him world-wide recognition, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. RSVPs recommended - info@fbwevillage.org

WARD 2 EDUCATION NETWORK SCHEDULES EVENTS SATURDAY, MAY 17, 10-11:30 AM Garrison Elementary School, 1200St St NW Meet & Greet & Introduction of Center City Elementary School principals SATURDAY, JUNE 14, 10-11:30 AM LOCATION TBD Introduction of New DCPS Ombudsman, Joyanna Smith

WEST END LIBRARY NEWS THURSDAY, MAY 15, 7:00 PM Cycling Safety and the Legal Rights of Cyclists in Washington, DC Talk featuring Myron Lehtman, former president of the National Capital Velo Club; and Bruce Deming, attorney at law, competitive cyclist, and author of Surviving the Crash: Your Legal Rights in a Bicycle Accident, in celebration of May as National Bike Month and as a tie-in with Tour de DCPL, a libraryoriented bicycle ride of Washington, DC, stopping at five branches, to be held Saturday, May 17. FRIDAY, MAY 9, 2:00 PM TED Talks – On Health TED is a global set of conferences owned by the private non-profit Sapling Foundation, under the slogan “ideas worth spreading.” Each Friday in May, the Library will host a series of talks on a specific topic. SATURDAY, MAY 17, 10:00-11:30 AM Photography workshop with photography pro Vincent Knaus, plus a photoshoot of Dragon Boat races on the Potomac River (12:30-3pm) in celebration of May as National Photography Month SUNDAYS, MAY 18, JUNE 1 & JUNE 15, 2:00 PM West End Crochet & Knit Club

MORE FOGGY BOTTOM NEWS ON NEXT PAGE

THE FOGGY BOTTOM NEWS – Published weekly by Foggy Bottom Association, PO Box 58087, Washington, DC 20037. All rights reserved. Comments, letters, and story ideas welcome. Send to editor@foggybottomassociation.com or leave a voice mail at (202) 630-8349. FB News reserves the right to edit or hold submissions.


FBN 03-19-08

3/19/08

7:26 PM

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12 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The CurrenT

SPORTS PHOTOS From Previous

CURRENT NEWSPAPERS

Photos are available from kapurphotography.smugmug.com www.mattpetros.zenfolio.com

A Legal Practice for the Family and the Smaller Business Owner including

Wills, probate, divorces, collection matters and contract disputes. Conveniently located in Georgetown. Legal work rendered in a professional and personal way. Practicing since 1972.

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!"!"FOGGY BOTTOM NEWS

May 14, 2014

WARD 2 EDUCATION NETWORK SCHEDULES EVENTS TUESDAY, MAY 20, 12:30 PM West End Book Club Discussion of The Burgess Boys by Elizabeth Strout FRIDAY, MAY 23, 2:00 PM TED Talks – On Food TED is a global set of conferences owned by the private non-profit Sapling Foundation, under the slogan “ideas worth spreading.” Each Friday in May, the Library will host a series of talks on a specific topic. The above events will take place at the Library, 1101 24th St NW.

VISIT THE FOGGY BOTTOM FRESH FARM MARKET Every Wednesday, April 2-November 26, 3:00-7:00 pm I Street Mall at 23rd Street NW Visit www. FRESHFARMMARKETS.org or call (202) 664-0352 for more information.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21, 7:00 PM St Mary’s Court, 725 24th St NW Screening and discussion of The Jilting of Granny Weatherall, adapted from the short story by Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Katherine Anne Porter, in celebration of May as Older Americans Month

DC PUBLIC LIBRARY LAUNCHES DISTRICT OF CHANGE SERIES WITH “MAKING DC BETTER FOR THE ARTS” WEDNESDAY, MAY 21 AT 7 PM Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St NW The District has a rich musical and artistic history. As the city continues to grow and becomes more culturally connected, can artists still find a welcoming home in DC? How can the city continue to foster these sorts of creative movements? Hosted by Matthew Yglesias, former Slate correspondent and current Executive Editor of Vox Media. Panelists include Holly Bass, a multidisciplinary artist, writer and director; DC musician and former Fugazi drummer, Brendan Canty; and Victoria Reis, Co-Founder and Executive & Artistic Director for Transformer DC, a nonprofit that supports and promotes local artists. Upcoming topics for District of Change will include education, gentrification, transportation and more. RSVP at districtofchange. eventbrite.com or by calling (202) 727-1183.

F B A President Secretary Treasurer At Large

JOIN THE FBA!

Serving Foggy Bottom & West End Membership gives you a voice to influencing city government, to supporting the West End library, local artists and retailers, and to keeping our neighborhood green. Your membership card opens the door to discounts through our Local Merchants Program, access to the GWU Gelman Library and updates on local events and activities. NAME: ADDRESS: TELEPHONE: EMAIL: MEMBERSHIP:

$15 per year per person ($25 for 2 years)* Full-time college student: $5 per year* * Effective March 1, 2014, Foggy Bottom Association membership dues will be as follows: !""GW Student one-year - $10 (must provide a copy of a current GW ID) !""General one-year - $20 !""General two-year - $30 Beat the price increase and renew now. If you have questions, please contact Ray Maxwell at membership@ foggybottomassociation.com or leave a voice mail at (202) 630-8349. TOTAL ENCLOSED: Join online at: www.foggybottomassociation.com/join-us/ or mail this form with your check to FBA Foggy Bottom Association: Membership Post Office Box 58087 Washington, DC 20037-8087 a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization Membership is for a calendar year. Mail requests are usually processed within 2 weeks. Email membership@foggybottomassociation.com to check on membership status or for membership questions.

B O A R D

O F

Marina Streznewski Monica Martinez Jessie Spressart McDonald Robert DePriest

D I R E C T O R S At Large At Large At Large At Large At Large

2 0 1 4

Peggi Fisher Patrick Kennedy Ray Maxwell Catherine Pitcher Bob Vogt


A Look at the Market in Northwest Washington

May 14, 2014 â&#x2013; Page 13

Spring Valley Colonial features bold classic details

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lassical architectural features abound throughout a grand Colonial home that sits on an elevated one-third-acre lot in Spring Valley. Set in the middle of the white-

ON THE MARKET kat lucero

washed-brick facade is a circular portico, with trimmings and ironrod railings that match the details of the second-level balcony above it. Mature trees and stone pathways also enhance the timeless curb appeal of this 1930s dwelling. Inside, the home is filled with bold custom millwork, hardwood floors and sun-flooded rooms. With six bedrooms, eight bathrooms and one half-bath, this property at 4929 Glenbrook Road is now on the market for $4,495,000. The wide reception hall features white crown molding and paneled walls that run throughout the entire 6,000-square-foot home. While the hall divides the main floorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s living areas, its sheer width â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at 26 feet â&#x20AC;&#x201D; almost creates a free-flowing scheme. The entrance faces north to the family roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stone-framed gas

fireplace. Its white wall cladding continues up to the prominent coffered ceilings. The blanched woodwork also complements the dark-hued built-ins, one of which can accommodate a large flat-screen television. This rear section of the residence was part of a massive 2007 renovation that created an open floor plan spanning both east and west ends. This addition also unites the side terrace with the kitchen and much of the house, creating a homey atmosphere. Spacious and bright, the kitchen also exudes sophistication thanks to custom cabinetry that synthesizes with the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature white millwork. Beige subway backsplash tiles and honed marble counters complete the look. A large island serves both as a prep and eating station. Gourmet appliances include a six-burner Wolf gas range with a custom hood, a Miele dishwasher, Sub-Zero refrigerators, and a Sharp drawer microwave and warmer. The adjacent butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pantry is

Photos courtesy of Washington Fine Properties

This six-bedroom home on Glenbrook Road in Spring Valley is priced at $4,495,000. also outfitted with high-end appliances, along with rich cherry cabinets. Its galley layout connects to the main hallway and the dining room. Facing Glenbrook Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treetops, the dining area has a fireplace with a custom white cladding that unifies the roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bold moldings. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also access to a side porch that overlooks the driveway. The living room sits on the other side of the hallway, offering another entry to the side flagstone terrace. An additional fireplace graces this area, which also connects to the library, powder room and creampaneled sunroom.

SELLING THE AREAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINEST PROPERTIES

Up the fold-back staircase are six bedrooms with their own baths â&#x20AC;&#x201D; four on the second floor and two on the third. Taking over the rear and parts of the east end of the second level, the multi-room master suite features a bedroom with vaulted ceilings, two bathrooms and two walkin closets. One is large enough to be a dressing room, decked with walls of paneled closets and a marble-clad island. This polished marble also covers the adjoining large bathroom, which features an

antique-style tub and separate shower. The den and game room are on the lower floor. This level also has a guest room with a private bath, a laundry room and access to the three-car garage. This six-bedroom, eight-bath and one half-bath home at 4929 Glenbrook Road is listed for $4,495,000. For details, contact Washington Fine Properties agents William F.X. Moody, Robert Hryniewicki or Adam Rackliffe at 202243-1620.

     

y, nda n Su 1-4 e p O y 18 Ma

Stately Elegance

Custom & Choice

Kenwood, Chevy Chase, MD. This Chevy Chase, MD. Rollingwood. impressive residence features 8 BRs, 6.5 BAs Handsome Colonial on 17,000 sf lot. 4 BRs & rear stairs on a 2/3 acre lot. $2,595,000. include MBR suite w/ study & top flr retreat. Updated TS kit, LL rec rm. 2 car garage. Ted Beverley 301-728-4338 7308 Pomander Lane

Patricia Lore 301-908-1242

Nancy Wilson 202-966-5286

Flair & Style

Colonial Village. Stone fronted Colonial on quiet cul de sac. Updated w/6 BRs, 4.5 BAs. 2 MBR suites. Finished LL. Surrounded by Rock Creek Park. $1,299,000

Lee Goldstein 202-744-8060 Dina Paxenos 202-256-1624

 

 

One Of A Kind

Urban Style

Rock Creek Forest. Soaring ceilings, exquisite Dupont/West End. Bright corner 1 BR apt details & new designer kitchen in this 5 BR, in small bldg. Open kitchen, brkfst nook. 4.5 BA home. 7500+ sf of living space. 3 car Updated BA. Walk score 98! $309,000 garage. $1,795,000 Guy-Didier Godat 202-361-4663

Drew Gibbons 301-538-0477

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Vintage Charm

Kalorama. Perfect studio at the fabled Altamont coop. 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceilings, crystal chandelier, sep. kitchen & refinished flrs. $199,900

Sammy Dweck 202-716-0400



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14 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

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The Current

Northwest Real Estate

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ANC 1C ANCMorgan 1c Adams

â&#x2013; adams morgan

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 4, at Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, 2355 Ontario Road NW. For details, call 202-332-2630 or visit anc1c.org.

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ANC 2A ANCBottom 2A Foggy

â&#x2013; Foggy bottom / west end

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 21, at School Without Walls, 2130 G St. NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013; public safety report. â&#x2013;  update on the New Hampshire Avenue streetscape project. â&#x2013;  report from the office of Ward 2 D.C. Council member Jack Evans. â&#x2013;  report from the Ward 2 Education Network. â&#x2013;  announcements. â&#x2013;  public comments. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Zoning Commission application from George Washington University and Hillel seeking zoning relief and a related campus plan amendment for 2300 H St. â&#x2013; Â consideration of a new Class D liquor license application and a request for a stipulated license from Bread & Chocolate, 2301 M St. â&#x2013;  consideration of an application from River Inn, 924 25th St., for a substantial change to an existing Class CH liquor license, and a stipulated license for installation of a 44-seat sidewalk cafe with daily hours from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. The commission will also consider the restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Public Space Committee application for the sidewalk cafe. â&#x2013;  consideration of a request for a letter of support for the Jewish Community Center Park Concert. For details, visit anc2a.org. ANC 2B ANCCircle 2B Dupont â&#x2013;  dupont circle The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 14, at the Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  announcements. â&#x2013;  consideration of an Alcoholic Beverage Control application for a substantial change to an existing settlement agreement for Heritage India, 1901 Pennsylvania Ave. (update to promoter language and inclusion of a security plan). â&#x2013;  consideration of an Alcoholic Beverage Control application for a new restaurant-class license for DC Pizza, 1103 19th St. (quick-service pizzeria with 24-seat sidewalk cafe; no entertainment; occupancy of 45 with seating for 20; hours of operation, alcohol sales and consumption, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. daily). â&#x2013;  consideration of an Alcoholic Beverage Control application for a new restaurant-class license for MANI LLC, 1140 19th St. (new restaurant serving Greek cuisine with a 36-seat sidewalk cafe; no entertainment; total occupancy of 150; hours of

operation for inside premises and sidewalk cafe, Sunday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. and Friday and Saturday from 7 a.m. to 3 a.m.; hours of alcohol sale and consumption, Sunday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. and Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3 a.m.). â&#x2013; consideration of an application by Herbal Alternatives II LLC for a medical marijuana dispensary at 1710 Rhode Island Ave. (approved previously at 1147 20th St.). â&#x2013;  consideration of an application by National Holistic Healing Center for a medical marijuana dispensary at 1718 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for a valet staging area at Al Tiramisu, 2014 P St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for renewal of a valet staging area at Vidalia, 1990 M St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for a valet staging area at Kellari Taverna, 1700 K St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for an unenclosed sidewalk cafe at Native Foods Cafe, 1150 Connecticut Ave. (facing 18th Street just south of M Street). â&#x2013;  consideration of a resolution regarding expansion of the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early childhood programs. â&#x2013;  declaration of a vacancy in singlemember district 2B02 and appointment of a liaison. â&#x2013;  consideration of a resolution supporting the repeal of prostitution-free zones. â&#x2013;  consideration of revisions to the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policies and procedures manual. The commission will hold an overflow meeting at 7 p.m. Monday, May 19, in Room 500, Bernstein-Offit Building, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1717 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  consideration of a request for amendments to existing voluntary agreements (dated 2002 and 2007) with Local 16, 1602 U St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a new Alcoholic Beverage Control application for a tavern license for Saloon 45, 1821 18th St. (including 36-seat summer garden; hours of operation, Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 2 a.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 3 a.m.; total occupancy of 85). â&#x2013;  consideration of a Historic Preservation Review Board application for construction at 1337 22nd St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Historic Preservation Review Board application for construction at 3 Dupont Circle. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Historic Preservation Review Board application for construction at 1620 Q St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application for construction at 1528 Church St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application for construction at 1815 Riggs Place. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application for construction at 1512 P St.

For details, visit dupontcircleanc. net. ANC 2D ANC 2D Sheridan-Kalorama

â&#x2013; sheridan-kalorama

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, May 19, at Our Lady Queen of the Americas Church, California Street and Phelps Place NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013; government reports. â&#x2013;  police report. â&#x2013;  discussion of the D.C. Department of Motor Vehicles identification requirements. â&#x2013;  open comments. For details, visit anc2d.org or contact davidanc2d01@aol.com. ANC 2E ANC 2E Georgetown â&#x2013;  Georgetown / cloisters Cloisters burleith / hillandale The commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 2, at Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School, 1524 35th St. NW. For details, call 202-724-7098 or visit anc2e.com. ANC 2F ANCCircle 2F Logan â&#x2013;  logan circle The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 14, at the Washington Plaza Hotel, 10 Thomas Circle NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  welcoming of new commissioners for single-member districts 2F03 and 2F08. â&#x2013;  consideration of Alcoholic Policy Committee matters, including a settlement agreement for Lost and Found, 1240 9th St. â&#x2013;  consideration of Community Development Committee matters: Historic Preservation Review Board application for massing, concept and design approval for 917 M St. and 1212 9th St.; Historic Preservation Review Board application for massing and concept approval for 13081310 Q St.; and a public space application for valet parking service at Pearl Dive, 1406 Corcoran St. â&#x2013;  update from the Crime and Public Safety Committee. â&#x2013;  consideration of Education Committee matters, including a resolution on the right to quality neighborhood schools across all eight city wards. â&#x2013;  consideration of a settlement agreement with The American, 1209-1213 10th St. â&#x2013;  discussion of a grant process. For details, call 202-667-0052 or visit anc2f.org. ANC 3B ANCPark 3B Glover â&#x2013;  Glover Park / Cathedral heights The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 12, at Stoddert Elementary School and Glover Park Community Center, 4001 Calvert St. NW. For details, call 202-338-2969, email info@anc3b.org or visit anc3b. org.


The CurreNT

wedNesday, May 14, 2014

15

Northwest Real Estate ALLEYS: Report highlights potential ways to bring new appreciation to hidden areas

From Page 1

town (253), Dupont Circle (101) and then U Street (82). The buildings catalogued â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the main types, in order of prevalence, are garages, stables, dwellings, workshops/warehouses, and studios/ sheds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; date back as far as 1863. Although their location within neighborhood historic districts provides protections, the alley buildings actually didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t factor into the formation of those districts. That oversight â&#x20AC;&#x153;was the main impetus for the [new] survey,â&#x20AC;? said Kim Protho Williams, the architectural historian who led the study. The exception is the Blagden Alley-Naylor Court area of Shaw, which is recognized as its own historic district due to its intact alley network and collection of old buildings, including 24 former stables. The report notes that this area is seeing a renaissance today, as its alleyways thrive with residences, restaurants and shops. Naylor Court resident David Salter, who runs a blog called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Preserving DC Stables,â&#x20AC;? helped push for the launch of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s survey. He said the documentation makes D.C. alley structures â&#x20AC;&#x153;more protected than they were beforeâ&#x20AC;? and also heightens awareness of â&#x20AC;&#x153;new areas for people to live in and developâ&#x20AC;? in the increasingly dense city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New residents are just starting to venture into the alleys, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I never knew this existed.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Salter said in his own alley neighborhood, redevelopment has been â&#x20AC;&#x153;like a slingshotâ&#x20AC;? following the recession. But an active preservation-minded community has steered developers and architects â&#x20AC;&#x153;to design things that are sensitive to the alley,â&#x20AC;? he said. The new report also points to the reactivation of Cadyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alley in Georgetown, where the â&#x20AC;&#x153;formerly under-utilized collection of 19th cen-

tury stables, warehouses and alley dwellings has been converted into an exclusive shopping district.â&#x20AC;? The alley structures remaining today in D.C. reveal only a shade of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s broader history with alleyways, which the report recounts in detail. Starting out as a way to increase housing options and landlord incomes in a growing city, D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alleyways transformed after the Civil War into slum areas housing predominantly African-American residents. These neighborhoods, lacking adequate sewer and water connections, were known for their substandard conditions. In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt denounced the alleyways as â&#x20AC;&#x153;breeding grounds of vice and disease.â&#x20AC;? Over the years several formal efforts were launched to condemn and eradicate alley buildings. In 1934 Congress established the Alley Dwelling Authority, which aimed to clear all D.C. alley homes of their occupants within a decade. The advent of World War II ultimately derailed that goal, and the act was later repealed due to the activism of affluent white residents then living in renovated alley homes in Georgetown, Capitol Hill and Foggy Bottom. The new survey found 108 alley buildings that originally served as residences â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most in the aforementioned neighborhoods. Williams noted that this is only a 3 percent survival rate, based on figures from a 1912 survey. One notably intact cluster remains in Foggy Bottom, along Snows Court and Hughes Mews. Looking forward, the Historic Preservation Office hopes to expand its survey to more areas outside of the Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Enfant Plan, including Sheridan-Kalorama and Mount Pleasant; and beyond that to neighborhoods like Petworth and Bloomingdale that

arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t formally recognized as historic. (Williams mentioned that a number of alley residents in Bloomingdale have been talking about pursuing their own historic district.) Williams also said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see a website or virtual tour devoted to the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alleyways. From an urban planning perspective, the report lays out various recommendations, including activating

the spaces for uses like art, street fairs and community gardens. To increase the visibility of alleyways, the report suggests granting them all official names and signage, and promoting tourism opportunities. Williams said inspiration for such approaches comes from other U.S. cities working to activate historic alleyways, such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Denver.

The D.C. report also points to eight areas that could serve as targeted â&#x20AC;&#x153;case studiesâ&#x20AC;? for alley revitalization. Those include St. Matthewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court in Dupont Circle, Congress Court/Oak Alley in Georgetown, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Square 242â&#x20AC;? near 14th Street. The full survey is available online at tinyurl.com/dcalleysurvey or through the D.C. Office of Planningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, planning.dc.gov.

   

 

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16 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The CurrenT

GEORGETOWN, DC BROKERAGE | +1 202 333 1212 DOWNTOWN, DC BROKERAGE | +1 202 234 3344 MARYLAND BROKERAGE | +1 301 967 3344 McLEAN, VIRGINIA BROKERAGE | +1 703 319 3344 ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA BROKERAGE | +1 703 310 6800

©MMXIV TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, licensed real estate broker. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal housing opportunity. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Price and availability subject to change.

McLEAN, VA $9,995,000 | ttrsir.com/id/4PDXKP Riverfront estate on 5.4 gold coast acres. Awarded one-level residence has barrel-vaulted, domed ceilings, Pelion stone floors imported from Greece, cast-in-place concrete walls. River Room’s floor-to-ceiling arches overlook 378 feet of gorgeous Potomac frontage. Indoor lap pool opens to elegant terrace.

McLEAN, VA $5,495,000 | 6461kedlestoncourt.com This 6BR estate on 1.4 acres on a most prestigious street boasts a gracious entry hall, richly detailed public rooms, an indoor pool with cover, tennis court and an elevator. PENNY YERKS +1 703 760 0744

PENNY YERKS +1 703 760 0744

ALEXANDRIA, VA $2,995,000 | ttrsir.com/id/NL5KK3 Elegant waterfront retreat minutes from historic Old Town Alexandria and a short drive to Reagan Airport and the Nation’s Capital. Dramatic 2-story entrance with a gracefully curved staircase, over 5800 sf of beautifully finished space, lovely river views, glorious sunrises and brilliant sunset skies. 300’ dock with 2 boat slips. JEANNE WARNER +1 703 980 9106

PALISADES $2,495,000 | ttrsir.com/id/QK74S8

Recently completed stone and cedar craftsman style home tucked away on a pretty tree lined street and finished to perfection. This exquisite new home features richly detailed millwork, custom built-ins, chef’s kitchen, large deck and tranquil views of the reservoir from the screened porch and luxurious master suite.

BILL ABBOTT +1 202 903 6533

Wednesday, May 14, 2014 17

The CurrenT

ttrsir.com

BETHESDA, MD $3,150,000 | ttrsir.com/id/6YRHX5 Exceptional 6BR, 7BA + 2 half BA estate on over an acre of land in Burning Tree. Built in 1990 this home has all high-end amenities while retaining comfort and warmth of a welcoming family retreat. 3 expansive levels perfect for formal or casual entertaining. Pool, terrace, large windows, 10/11 foot ceilings, oak floors, 3 car garage.

SPRING VALLEY $1,799,000 | ttrsir.com/id/TR9XW2 Renovated 5BR, 4.5BA on tree-lined street, open floor plan, large gourmet eat-in kitchen, finished basement, 2 fireplaces, landscaping, two patios with flagstone and brick, 2 car attached garage.

WESLEY HEIGHTS $1,425,000 Remodeled 4BR, 3.5BA with stunning formal dining room, gourmet kitchen attached to great room, spacious living room with fireplace, sun filled library, large deck off 3 rooms. Beautifully finished. 1 car garage.

SHAW $1,025,000 | ttrsir.com/id/JH3DRS Easy walking to Shaw metro and new O Street development. Sleek, all new contemporary 2000 sq ft home featuring 3BR, 2.5BA. 2 balconies overlook south-facing walled front garden Rear private parking. Optional roof deck with Monument views.

NICHOLE NORTON +1 703 585 6925

NICHOLE NORTON +1 703 585 6925

SHERYL BARNES +1 202 262 3542

LEDROIT PARK $990,000 | ttrsir.com/id/SGJB35 Rare opportunity to purchase a loved and well-cared for home with high-quality appointments on the best block in Ledroit Park. Rich wood floors throughout, open floor plan, exposed brick. Charming table space brick patio off kitchen with mature landscaping. 4 blocks to metro.

KALORAMA $949,000 | ttrsir.com/id/BMC38L New Listing! 3BR, 2.5BA duplex with parking in historic Woodward Condominium. Approximately 2000 sq ft with high ceilings, spacious rooms. SW exposure, great views in treasured building.

LOGAN CIRCLE $949,000 | ttrsir.com/id/36JB7S

COURTNEY ABRAMS +1 202 253 0109 ELLEN ABRAMS +1 202 255 8219

McLEAN, VA $2,995,000 | ttrsir.com/id/KCENQD Langley Ordinary has a perfect blend of historical charm and character with modern conveniences. Sited on 1 acre of landscaped grounds in one of the most sought after areas of McLean. Newly built 3-car garage with spacious carriage house. Guesthouse with living room, loft, bedroom and full bath. PENNY YERKS +1 703 760 0744

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE $1,995,000

ttrsir.com/id/LD244J Expanded 5BR, 4.5BA Colonial with family room featuring a wall of windows facing yard and koi pond. Formal living room, separate dining room, updated kitchen. 1-car garage and off-street parking.

JONATHAN TAYLOR +1 202 276 3344

KALORAMA $2,650,000 | ttrsir.com/id/V32YVQ This stately 1922 townhouse was recently renovated, adding contemporary spaces to this classic home. Dramatic and architecturally rich details are featured throughout this approximately 4,000 square foot home. MICHAEL RANKIN +1 202 271 3344

GEORGETOWN $1,995,000

This elegant semi-detached bay front townhouse features high ceilings, period details, an in-law suite and two-car parking.

MICHAEL RANKIN +1 202 271 3344

SHERYL BARNES +1 202 262 3542

AMERICAN U. PARK $895,000 ttrsir.com/id/KSKYF6 Meticulously maintained side hall colonial with 4 finished levels on beautifully landscaped lot with garden, .9 miles to Friendship Heights shops and metro. Kitchen recently updated and expanded with breakfast area. 4BR, including an attic level bedroom with full bath en suite. Finished lower level perfect for in-law suite. KATHERINE BUCKLEY +1 202 255 6536

This 2BR, 2BA + loft unit features an incredible 2-story living room. Wood floors, gas fireplace, open kitchen, and a master bedroom suite with balcony. Low condo fee. 2-car tandem parking included.

DIANA HART +1 202 271 2717 MICHAEL MOORE +1 202 262 7762

MAXWELL RABIN +1 202 669 7406

CHEVY CHASE $829,000 | ttrsir.com/id/VJPJSR

WATERGATE $650,000 | ttrsir.com/id/SVQS4S

The Harrison is a boutique condo just 2 blocks from Friendship Heights metro, shops, restaurants. This unit is one of largest in building, with approximately 1370 square feet, plus patio. 2BR, 2BA, open floor plan, oversized chef’s kitch and expansive living and dining area. 1 car parking included. Pets allowed.

KATHERINE BUCKLEY +1 202 255 6536

This 1BR + loft penthouse is on the 15th floor of an exclusive building and features high-specification contemporary interiors, generous outside space and breathtaking panoramic views. The property comprises a large living room, contemporary kitchen with an open-plan dining space, spacious wall space for art and renovated high-end bathroom.

STAN KELLY +1 202 997 1872


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18 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Wednesday, May 14

Wednesday may 14 Classes and workshops ■ Science of Spirituality instructors will present a class on Jyoti techniques to deepen and stabilize meditation practices. 7 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. ■ Experienced career mentor Joe Ryan will lead a workshop on “Ways People Find Work” as part of a seven-session series on job seeking skills. 7 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. megan.mcnitt@dc.gov. ■ The Vajrayogini Buddhist Center will host a weekly class on meditation. 7 to 8:30 p.m. $12 per class. Vajrayogini Buddhist Center, 1787 Columbia Road NW. 202-986-2257. Concerts ■ The Washington National Opera will present highlights from its 2014-2015 season, including selections from “La bohème,” “Cinderella,” “The Flying Dutchman,” “Florencia in the Amazon” and “Dialogues of the Carmelites.” 6 p.m. Free. Opera House, Kennedy Center. 202-4674600. ■ The Steel Wheels will perform bluegrass and Americana. 8:30 p.m. $12 to

Events Entertainment $15. Gypsy Sally’s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. Discussions and lectures ■ The West End Library Friends’ monthly series “Sometimes Strange Meetings: Visual Art in Western Literature” will feature Georgetown University theology professor Ori Z. Soltes leading a discussion on Tracy Chevalier’s “Girl With a Pearl Earring.” 6:30 p.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202-724-8707. ■ The Tenley-Friendship Library and the group Friends of the Tenley-Friendship Library will present Carleton College professor emeritus Anne E. Patrick discussing “Pope Francis and Prospects for Women in the Catholic Church” and her book “Conscience and Calling: Ethical Reflections on Catholic Women’s Vocations.” 7 p.m. Free. Large Conference Room, Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202727-1488. ■ Biographer Nigel Hamilton will discuss his book “The Mantle of Command: FDR at War, 1941-1942.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW.



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202-364-1919. ■ “A Nation of Immigrants: How They Have Shaped America” will feature Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Nick Kotz as moderator and journalists Steve V. Roberts and Sanford J. Ungar as panelists. 7 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. ■ Tim Townsend will discuss his book “Mission at Nuremberg: An American Army Chaplain and the Trial of the Nazis.” 7 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-1161. ■ Natasha Trethewey will conclude her tenure as the 19th U.S. poet laureate with a lecture on the state of poetry and the role of the poet as public intellectual. 7 p.m. Free. Coolidge Auditorium, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202707-5502. ■ “Culture Heroes: Saving the Past,” a panel discussion, will feature Fredrik Hiebert, a National Geographic archaeology fellow who has played a part in the repatriation of looted artifacts; Sarah Parcak, a National Geographic fellow who uses space imagery to track the destruction of cultural heritage sites; Corine Wegener, a cultural heritage preservation officer for the Smithsonian Institution’s new initiative on disaster response for cultural heritage; and Fernando Paiz, president of the La Ruta Maya Conservation Foundation. 7:30 p.m. $24. Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic, 1600 M St. NW. 202-857-7700. Films ■ At-large D.C. Council member David Grosso will host a screening of the Dream Defenders documentary “School to Prison Pipeline.” Afterward, a panel discussion will feature Thena Robinson Mock, project director of Ending the Schoolhouse to Jailhouse Track initiative of the Advancement Project; Ian Roberts, principal of the Academies at Anacostia; and Eduardo Ferrer, legal and policy director of DC Lawyers for Youth. 6 p.m. Free; reservations required. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-724-8105. ■ The J-Film series will feature Hirokazu Kore-eda’s 2011 film “I Wish,” about two brothers whose lives are turned upside down when their parents’ divorce and custody arrangements split them up. 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Japan Information and Culture Center, 1150 18th St. NW. www.us.emb-japan.go.jp/jicc. ■ The “In Focus” series will feature Richard Goldgewicht and Jeremy Goldscheider’s 2012 documentary “Lost Town,” about one man’s search to get closer to his deceased father by uncovering the story of his family’s town of Trochenbrod. A post-screening Q&A will feature D.C. resident Avrom Bendavid-Val, the film’s historical consultant and subject. 8 p.m. $8.50 to $11.50. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. Performance ■ The four-day Voices of Now Festival will feature original works of theater written and performed by youth ensembles. 7:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Arena Stage, 1101 6th St. SW. 202-488-3300. The festival performances will continue Thursday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Reading ■ The Graywolf Poetry Tour will feature

$10 to $15. Gypsy Sally’s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. Demonstration ■ Writer Adrienne Cook and nutritionist Danielle Cook will present ideas on how to cook with strawberries. Noon and 12:45 p.m. Free. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. The program will repeat May 22 at noon and 12:45 p.m.

Thursday, may 15 ■ Discussion: The Cottage Conversations series will feature a book talk by Stephen Mansfield, author of “Lincoln’s Battle With God: A President’s Struggle With Faith and What It Meant for America.” Reception at 6 p.m.; lecture at 6:30 p.m. $10 to $20; reservations requested. President Lincoln’s Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home, Upshur Street at Rock Creek Church Road NW. 202-8290436, ext. 31232. readings by Hailey Leithauser, Mark Wunderlich and Saskia Hamilton. 7 p.m. Free. Comet Ping Pong, 5037 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Thursday, May 15 Thursday may 15 Children’s program ■ Chris Van Dusen will discuss his book “President Taft Is Stuck in the Bath” (for ages 5 through 8). 10:30 a.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Classes ■ The Georgetown Village aging-inplace group will present a weekly class on stress reduction through tai chi and qi gong. 2:15 to 3:15 p.m. $15 to $20. St. John’s Episcopal Church, Georgetown, 3240 O St. NW. 202-999-8988. ■ The Golden Triangle Business Improvement District will present a “Pilates in the Park” class led by a certified instructor from Yoga District. 5:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangledc.com. Classes will continue each Tuesday and Thursday through June 19. Concerts ■ The René McLean Quintet will perform. 5 to 8 p.m. Free. Kogod Courtyard, Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G streets NW. 202-633-1000. ■ Oud musician Fuad Foty will present “Nakba Commemoration: A Musical Journey Through Palestinian History.” 7 to 9 p.m. Free; reservations required. The Jerusalem Fund, 2425 Virginia Ave. NW. 202338-1958. ■ The Embassy Series will present “Evening of Operetta,” featuring Hungarian soprano Krisztina David (shown) and Austrian tenor Michael Heim in an array of arias and duets. 7:30 p.m. $65. Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Court NW. 202625-2361. ■ The Congress will perform. 8:30 p.m.

Discussions and lectures ■ Timothy Mousseau, professor of biological sciences at the University of South Carolina at Columbia, will discuss “Biological Consequences of Nuclear Disasters: From Chernobyl to Fukushima.” 11:30 a.m. Free. Mumford Room, Madison Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE. 202-707-5394. ■ Richard Moe, former president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, will discuss his book “Roosevelt’s Second Act: The Election of 1940 and the Politics of War.” Luncheon at 12:15 p.m.; program at 1 p.m. $10 to $30. Woman’s National Democratic Club, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-232-7363. ■ “Brown at 60: Is Full Equality Within Our Grasp? A Conversation on Zero Tolerance, Segregation, and the Promise of Justice” will feature Catherine Lhamon, assistant secretary for the Office of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education; Dennis Parker, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Racial Justice Project; and Laura Murphy, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Washington Legislative Office. 7 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. ■ Biographer Nigel Hamilton will discuss his book “The Mantle of Command: FDR At War, 1941-1942.” 6 p.m. Free. McEvoy Auditorium, National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. ■ CQ Roll Call and Hooks Books will present a talk by Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes, authors of “HRC: State Secrets and the Rebirth of Hillary Clinton.” 6 to 7:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. tinyurl.com/HRC-HillCenter. ■ Food historian Joyce White will discuss “Taking Tea: Teatime Across the Centuries.” After the presentation, attendees will sample hot tea, scones, 19th-century Lady Newport teacakes and lavender shortbread. 6 p.m. $10 to $20; reservations required by May 14. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. 202-337-2288. ■ Jefferson Glassie will discuss his book “Heaven Is Everywhere.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ David Downing will discuss his book “Jack of Spies.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. ■ Attorney Bruce Deming and former National Capital Velo Club president Myron Lehtman will discuss “Bicycling Safety and the Legal Rights of Cyclists in Washington, D.C.” 7 p.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202-724-8707. ■ The Center for Inspired Teaching will present a town hall discussion with “Dream City” authors Harry S. Jaffe and Tom Sherwood on D.C.’s status as a “divided city” and how educators can make the District’s complex local history come alive for teens. The discussion will feature two D.C. teachers using excerpts See Events/Page 19


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Continued From Page 18 from the book in their classes. 7 p.m. Free. Room A-5, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202727-0321. â&#x2013; Experienced career mentor Joe Ryan will lead a support group for job seekers. 7 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. megan.mcnitt@dc.gov. â&#x2013;  The Classics Book Group will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Viletteâ&#x20AC;? by Charlotte BrontĂŤ. 7 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202347-0176. â&#x2013;  Northwest Neighbors Village and the Chevy Chase Citizens Association will present a talk by Washington Post columnist Michelle Singletary (shown) and elder law attorney Bill Fralin on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Will Take Care of Us When We Get Older? How Will We Pay for It?â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. nvnv.org. â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Book Club will discuss Jhumpa Lahiriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lowland.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. â&#x2013;  The Palisades Book Club will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look at Meâ&#x20AC;? by Anita Brookner. 7:30 p.m. Free. Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. 202-282-3139. Films â&#x2013;  The Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library will present a horror film series. 6 p.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. â&#x2013;  The Cinema Club will present Aktan Arym Kubatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Light Thief,â&#x20AC;? featuring remarks by Marlene Larelle, director of the Central Asia Program at George Washington University. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Suite 412, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, 1957 E St. NW. go.gwu.edu/light. â&#x2013;  Filmmaker Marvin Jones will present his documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oral Histories of the Gold Coast,â&#x20AC;? about African-American families living along the 16th Street corridor. After the screening, Jones will discuss the film and documentary work. 7 p.m. Free. Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. 202-243-1188. Performance â&#x2013;  Synetic Theater will present a preview of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Music Box,â&#x20AC;? a collection of comedic vignettes set to music. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Special events â&#x2013;  Actors will bring select oral histories of the 1930s alive at an event celebrating the 75th anniversary of â&#x20AC;&#x153;These Are Our Lives,â&#x20AC;? a 1939 book of life stories gathered by the Federal Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Project. As part of the event, David Taylor, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soul of a People: The WPA Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Project Uncovers Depression America,â&#x20AC;? will introduce Ann Banks, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;First-Person America,â&#x20AC;? and Virginia Millington, director of the StoryCorps archive. Noon. Free. Mary Pickford Theater, Madison Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE. 202707-1519.

The Current

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Events Entertainment â&#x2013; A poetic evening of readings and music will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Czech author Bohumil Hrabal and the launch of Hrabalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly published book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harlequinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Millions,â&#x20AC;? translated by Stacey Knect. The event will feature opening remarks by Pulitzer Prizewinning Washington Post book critic Michael Dirda and a performance by Czech-Argentine classical pianist Fabio Banegas Jiricek. 6 p.m. Free; reservations required by May 13. Embassy of the Czech Republic, 3900 Spring of Freedom St. NW. tinyurl.com/hrabel-event. â&#x2013;  The monthly â&#x20AC;&#x153;History & Hopsâ&#x20AC;? event will feature 3 Stars Brewing Co. and three of the local craft breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beers. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $30. Heurich House Museum, 1307 New Hampshire Ave. NW. heurichhouse.org. â&#x2013;  Cultural Tourism DCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth annual Embassy Chef Challenge will feature more than a dozen entrants presenting small plates to showcase their countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature delicacies. The event will include judging by a panel of celebrity chefs and food critics, open voting for the Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choice Award, and live and silent auctions. 6 to 9:30 p.m. $250. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-661-7581. â&#x2013;  ZooFari 2014 will feature food from 100-plus area restaurants, wine, entertainment, animal demonstrations and a silent auction. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. $150 to $200. National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. nationalzoo.si.edu. Friday, May 16

Friday may 16 Concerts â&#x2013; The Arts Club of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Friday Noon Concert series will feature narrator Meghan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell and pianist Audrey Andrist (shown) presenting â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Story of Babar,â&#x20AC;? featuring words by Jean de Brunhoff and music by Francis Poulenc. Noon. Free. Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202331-7282, ext. 3. â&#x2013;  The Friday Morning Music Club will present a concert of works by Maiko Chiba, DvorĂĄk and Grieg. Noon. Free. Calvary Baptist Church, 755 8th St. NW. 202333-2075. â&#x2013;  National Symphony Orchestra violinists Nurit Bar-Josef and Teri Lee, pianist Jessica McKee, clarinetist Eugene Mondle, violist Abigail Evans and cellist James Lee will perform works by Frolov and Mozart. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Middle C will present a piano, saxophone, clarinet and flute recital by students of Helen West. 6 to 7 p.m. Free. Middle C Music, 4530 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-244-7326. â&#x2013;  The Embassy Series will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evening of Operetta,â&#x20AC;? featuring Hungarian soprano Krisztina David and Austrian tenor Michael Heim in an array of arias and duets. 7:30 p.m. $90. Embassy of Hungary, 2950 Spring of Freedom St. NW. 202625-2361. â&#x2013;  Trumpeter Arturo Sandoval, a 10-time Grammy Award winner, will perform. 8 and 10 p.m. $45. Blues Alley, 1073 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-337-4141. The concert will repeat Saturday and Sunday at 8 and 10 p.m. â&#x2013;  Pianist Kris Bowers will perform. 8:30 and 10:30 p.m. $20 to $25. Bohemian Caverns, 2001 11th St. NW. bohemiancaverns.com.

19

Artist explores patterns

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transpositions,â&#x20AC;? featuring colorful patterned paintings by Edith Kuhnle, will open tomorrow at Addison/Ripley Fine Art with an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The exhibit will continue through July 12. Located at 1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW, the gallery is open

On exhibit

Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 202338-5180. â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x153;ReFresh IV,â&#x20AC;? presenting works by gallery favorites, will open tomorrow at Long View Gallery with a reception from 6:30 to 8 p.m. On view through June 8, the show highlights artists Steven Kenny, Jason Wright, Gian Garofalo, Takefumi Hori, Eve Stockton, Ryan McCoy, Mike Weber, James Hunter, J. Jordan Bruns, Steve Griffin, Zachary Oxman, Sondra N. Arkin and Colin Winterbottom. Located at 1234 9th St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. 202-232-4788. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hothouse Video: Brandon Morse,â&#x20AC;? a Washington Project for the Arts exhibit of five videos by University of Maryland at College Park digital media associate professor Brandon Morse, will open tomorrow in the lobby of the Capitol Skyline Hotel with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The videos can also be viewed 24/7 in the lobby through June 20. The hotel is located at 10 I St. SW. 202-488-7500. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chromatisms,â&#x20AC;? featuring new paintings by Javier Cabada, will open tomorrow at Aaron Gallery with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will continue through June 30. Located at 2101 L St. NW, the gallery is open by appointment only. 202-234-3311. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Between Us: Variance Invariance Project by Judy Rushin &,â&#x20AC;? presenting modular paintings and their collaborative compositions by Judy Rushin and various participants, will open Friday at Flashpoint Gallery with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will continue through June 21. Located at 916 G St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202-315-1305. â&#x2013;  On the Bus, a Grateful Dead tribute band, will perform. 9 p.m. $10 to $15. Gypsy Sallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Another Historic First: President Nixon and DC Home Ruleâ&#x20AC;? will feature panelists Egil â&#x20AC;&#x153;Budâ&#x20AC;? Krogh, Donald Santarelli and Sallyanne Payton discussing how the Nixon administration was able to achieve legislative success on the matter while past efforts had failed. 10 a.m. Free.

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Edith Kuhnleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Song,â&#x20AC;? acrylic on canvas, is part of an exhibit at Addison/Ripley Fine Art. â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Far Out Fashions,â&#x20AC;? featuring fashion photographs made between 1966 and 1970 by the late Fred Maroon, will open Friday at Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proof and continue through June 1. Located at 3323 Cadyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alley NW, the gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 202-803-2782. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Memory of Harry Karpowitz,â&#x20AC;? presenting new works by Tania Karpowitz,â&#x20AC;? will open Friday at the Washington Studio School and continue through June 28. The artist will give a talk Sunday at 2 p.m., and there will be an artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reception May 30 from 6 to 8 p.m. Located at 2129 S St. NW, the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 202-234-3030. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpted: Histories Revealed,â&#x20AC;? the fourth Arts in Foggy Bottom outdoor sculpture biennial, will open Saturday at 4 p.m. with a festive opening and art walk, with artists on hand to describe their respective pieces and a post-tour reception at the Watergate Gallery. Curated by public art expert Deirdre Ehlen MacWilliams, the exhibit will continue through Oct. 25. Monthly tours will be held on June 14, July 11, Aug. 9, Sept. 12 and Oct. 18. For details, visit foggybottomassociation.com/arts. â&#x2013;  The Mid City Artists Open Studios, a biannual event now in its 11th year, will take place Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. in the Dupont Circle and Logan Circle neighborhoods. For more information, including studio locations, visit midcityartists.com.

McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013; Society of the Cincinnati executive director Jack Warren will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Amended Institution of the Society of the Cincinnati,â&#x20AC;? about the controversy in 1783 and 1784 over hereditary succession within the organization. 12:30 p.m. Free. Society of the Cincinnati, Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-7852040. â&#x2013;  Michael K. Kellogg will discuss his

book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Roman Search for Wisdom.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Festival â&#x2013; St. Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral will hold its annual spring festival, featuring Greek food and pastries, a Greek market, international arts and crafts, religious icons, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities and live Greek music and dancing. Noon to 10 p.m. Free admission. 36th Street and MassachuSee Events/Page 20

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Continued From Page 19 setts Avenue NW. 202-333-4730. The festival will continue Saturday from noon to 10 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 7 p.m. Films â&#x2013; The National Archives will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gift,â&#x20AC;? the second episode of Ken Burnsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz: A Film.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Family Movie Night: Creature Featureâ&#x20AC;? will present short films starring magical monsters, garden critters, barnyard animals, family pets and other furry creatures. An art activity and opportunity to stroll the estate or picnic in the gardens will precede the films. 5:30 to 8 p.m. $5; free for ages 2 and younger. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202686-5807. â&#x2013;  The Freer Gallery will present Mike Leighâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1993 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naked.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202633-1000. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Alohaâ&#x20AC;? Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i Festival will feature the 2013 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Ras-

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The Current

Events Entertainment muson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013; The Washington DC Scandals Rugby Football Club will present Scott Gracheffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rugby Player,â&#x20AC;? about the lives of Mark Bingham, one of the passengers of United Flight 93 on 9/11, and his mother, Alice Hoagland, a former United Airlines flight attendant. 7 and 9 p.m. $15. Burke Theater, U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. rugbyplayer.eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  The Golden Cinema Series will kick off with Rob Reinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1995 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The American President,â&#x20AC;? starring Michael Douglas and Annette Bening. 7:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangledc.com. Meetings â&#x2013;  A weekly bridge group will meet to play duplicate bridge. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $6; free for first-time players. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. 301-654-1865. â&#x2013;  Overeaters Anonymous will host a

671-3122. â&#x2013; The group Friends of the Takoma Park Library will host a used-book sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free admission. Front lawn, Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252.

beginnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting. 6:30 p.m. Free. St. Margaretâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 1830 Connecticut Ave. NW. Performances â&#x2013; The Dance DC Festival 2014 will open with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enchantments of the East,â&#x20AC;? featuring a colorful display of Middle Eastern, Indian, Asian and European flare by the Silk Road Dance Company, the Ancient Rhythms Dance Company and other performers. Reception at 6 p.m.; performance at 7 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. dancedcopening.eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  The National Symphony Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Moves: symphony + danceâ&#x20AC;? festival will feature Adamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Violin Concertoâ&#x20AC;? featuring violinist Leila Josefowicz with original choreography by Jessica Lang performed by her company. 7 p.m. $10 to $85. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. The performance will repeat Saturday at 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Washington Improv Theater will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;WITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous Road Show of Longform Improv Comedyâ&#x20AC;? with various ensembles. 7:30 and 10 p.m. $8 to $15. DC Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. 202-462-7833. Performances will continue on Friday and Saturday nights through May 31. â&#x2013;  The fourth annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dramathonâ&#x20AC;? will feature local actors and Theatre Lab students in staged readings of new short plays by accomplished local playwrights. Proceeds will benefit the Theatre Labâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scholarship fund. 10:30 p.m. $15. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-824-0449. Reading â&#x2013;  Winners of the KidsPost Poetry Contest will read from their work. 4 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Sale â&#x2013;  St. Columbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;New to Youâ&#x20AC;? yard, bake and book sale will feature a large selection of new or gently used clothes (adult and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s), toys, tools, housewares, sporting goods, furniture, collectibles and books. Customers are encouraged to bring their own bags. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free admission. St. Columbaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle St. NW. 202-363-4119. The sale will continue Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Special events â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Endangered Species Day Festivalâ&#x20AC;? will feature childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities focused on endangered plants and pollinators and provide information on everyday actions that can help protect the planet. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. Conservatory, U.S.

    

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013; A park ranger will lead a planetarium program about distant galaxies, nebulas and other deep space objects (for ages 7 and older). 4 to 4:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. The program will repeat Sunday at 4 p.m.

Saturday, may 17 â&#x2013; Concert: Cellist Ana Topalovic will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mosaique,â&#x20AC;? a solo program of Spanish dances and melodies. 7:30 p.m. Free. Church of the Holy City, 1611 16th St. NW. 202-4626734. The concert will repeat Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. â&#x2013;  A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;iâ&#x20AC;? festival will feature opportunities for visitors to try their hand at kapa (bark cloth) stamping, Hawaiian kite making, lei making and traditional games. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. The festival will continue Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. â&#x2013;  Dance Placeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Step It Up DCâ&#x20AC;? event will feature arts and crafts activities; beginner, advanced and openlevel step workshops; and an informal performance by the Dance Place Step Team and class participants. 6 p.m. $5 to $12; free admission to arts and crafts activities. Brookland Artspace Lofts, 3305 8th St. NE, and Edgewood Arts Center, 3415 8th St. NE. danceplace.org. â&#x2013;  The CityVision Spring 2014 Final Presentation will feature presentations by students at Cesar Chavez Parkside Middle School and Stuart-Hobson Middle School on their plans for reusing and adapting the Franklin School, the Uline Arena and the Old Post Office. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. Sporting events â&#x2013;  The Washington Mystics will play the Minnesota Lynx. 7 p.m. $15 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 800-745-3000. â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play the New York Mets. 7:05 p.m. $10 to $90. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Saturday at 4:05 p.m. and Sunday at 1:35 p.m. Tour â&#x2013;  Biochemist Beth Burrous will lead an evening tour of the U.S. Botanic Garden Conservatory highlighting plants from around the world that impart flavor to sweet foods. 5 to 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. Saturday, May 17 Saturday may 17

 

    

   

Book sales â&#x2013; The group Friends of the Mount Pleasant Library will hold a used-book sale with most titles priced at less than $2. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free admission. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-

Classes and workshops â&#x2013; A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk Photographyâ&#x20AC;? workshop will focus on sports photography and how to get great action photos. After the workshop and a break for lunch, participants will walk to the Dragon Boat Races to take photos. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202-724-8707. â&#x2013;  Art therapist Rebecca Wilkinson will lead a workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reducing Stress: How to Feel Happier and Increase Well-Being.â&#x20AC;? 10 to 11:30 a.m. Free; reservations suggested. Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-352-5225. â&#x2013;  Choreographer Diane Coburn Bruning, founder and artistic director of the D.C.-based Chamber Dance Project, will lead a seminar and interactive studio session on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding Ballet: Classical to Contemporary.â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $87 to $130. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Takoma Bicycle will present a bike repair workshop with advice on performing basic maintenance, preparing for emergencies and changing a flat tire. 10:30 a.m. Free. Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252. Concerts â&#x2013;  The Adams Morgan Summer Concert Series will feature singer-songwriter Rochelle Rice performing a mix of jazz, soul, pop and rock. 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Public plaza in front of BB&T Bank at Columbia Road, Adams Mills Road and 16th Street NW. 202-997-0783. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Alohaâ&#x20AC;? Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;i Festival will feature a concert by KĹŤpaoa, the husband-and-wife duo of LÄŤhau Hannahs Paik and Kellen Paik. 5:30 p.m. Free. National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  The School Without Walls High School Concert Choir will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Institute of Musical Traditions will host the Mid-Atlantic Song Contest Winners Showcase. 7:30 p.m. $12 to $18. Seekers Church, 276 Carroll St. NW. 301960-3655. â&#x2013;  Fred Tackett and Paul Barrere of Little Feat will perform backed by the New Orleans Suspects in â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Tribute to Little Feat.â&#x20AC;? 8:30 p.m. $35 to $40. The Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW. thehamiltondc.com. â&#x2013;  Solo artist Willie Watson (shown) and the band Mandolin Orange will perform. 9 p.m. $12 to $15. Gypsy Sallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Mark N. Ozer will discuss his book See Events/Page 21


Continued From Page 20 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washington DC and the War of 1812,â&#x20AC;? at 1 p.m.; Scott Martelle will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Admiral and the Ambassador: One Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Obsessive Search for the Body of John Paul Jones,â&#x20AC;? at 3:30 p.m.; and Elizabeth Drew will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washington Journal: The Watergate Scandal, 19731974,â&#x20AC;? at 6 p.m. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013; Curator Danielle Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Steen will discuss the exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brink and Boundary.â&#x20AC;? 4 p.m. Free. American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-8851300. â&#x2013;  Writer/artist cousins Jillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki will discuss their graphic novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;This One Summerâ&#x20AC;? (for ages 15 and older). 7 p.m. Free. Children & Teens Department, Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-3641919. Festival â&#x2013;  The ninth annual Fiesta Asia Street Fair will feature more than 1,000 performers on five stages, as well as PanAsian cuisine, a shopping bazaar, kidfriendly activities, a talent competition, a parade, Bollywood street dancing, and traditional and contemporary Asian crafts. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Free admission. Pennsylvania Avenue between 3rd and 6th streets NW. AsiaHeritageFoundation.org. Films â&#x2013;  The Opera in Cinema series will present a production of choreographer Rudolf Nureyevâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Don Quixote.â&#x20AC;? 11 a.m. $18.80. West End Cinema, 23rd Street between M and N streets NW. 202-419-3456. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artists, Amateurs, Alternative Spaces: Experimental Cinema in Eastern Europe, 1960-1990â&#x20AC;? will feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;Workshop of the Film Form and Beyond: Shorts From 1970s Poland,â&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m.; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Enthusiasts Archive â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Polish Amateur Films,â&#x20AC;? at 4 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-7374215. Performances â&#x2013;  Crash of Rhinos will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sacred Cows,â&#x20AC;? an irreverent comedy by Mario Baldessari and Jim Helein that skewers religious intolerance. 7:30 p.m. $15. National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts, 1556 Wisconsin Ave. NW. theconservatory.org/rhinos.html. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;David T. Littleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soldier Songs,â&#x20AC;? a multimedia event with elements of theater, opera, rock-infused concert music and animation, will explore perceptions of soldiers versus reality, loss and exploitation of innocence, and the difficulty of expressing the truth of war. 8 p.m. $20 to $43.50. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. The performance will repeat Sunday at 4 p.m. â&#x2013;  Dance Place and Kyle Abraham/ Abraham.In.Motion will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! The Realest MC,â&#x20AC;? a new ensemble dance work that sets the characters of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pinocchioâ&#x20AC;? in an industrial dystopia and investigates gender roles in the black community. 8 p.m. $15 to $30. Ira Aldridge Theater, Howard University, 2455 6th St. NW. 202269-1600. The performance will repeat Sunday at 4 p.m. Special events â&#x2013;  Rock Creek Park and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center will host an International Migratory Bird Day festival with

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Events Entertainment childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arts and crafts activities, guided bird walks for advanced and beginning birders, live shows featuring birds of prey, informational booths and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. Outside the Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. â&#x2013; The Dance DC Festival 2014 will present a day of interactive workshops â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Capoeira DC,â&#x20AC;? focusing on an Afro-Brazilian martial art incorporating rapid kicks, acrobatics, trickery and music, at 11 a.m.; â&#x20AC;&#x153;DC Casineros,â&#x20AC;? featuring Cuban dance, at noon; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music 2 Your Feet â&#x20AC;Ś Soul Line Dancing,â&#x20AC;? incorporating step-by-step instructions on the latest line dances, 1 p.m.; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sylvia Soumah â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Coyaba Dance Theatre,â&#x20AC;? featuring African dance, music and culture, at 2 p.m.; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Radiant Movement,â&#x20AC;? presenting dancehall fusion with Caribbean dances from the past and present, at 3 p.m.; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Da Originalz,â&#x20AC;? focusing on a rhythmic percussion-dependent style of dance known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beat Ya Feetâ&#x20AC;? that originated in D.C. and is performed to go-go music. Free. Edgewood Arts Center, 3415 8th St. NE. dcarts.dc.gov. Sporting events â&#x2013;  The annual DC Dragon Boat Festival on the Potomac River will feature a sport that began in China more than 2,000 years ago. The 45-foot-long boats, painted to resemble the scales of a dragon, will race along a course between the Kennedy Center and Thompson Boat Center. 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Thompson Boat Center, Virginia Avenue and Rock Creek Parkway NW. dragonboatdc.com. The festival will continue Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. â&#x2013;  D.C. United will play the Montreal Impact. 7 p.m. $25 to $55. RFK Stadium, 2400 East Capitol St. SE. 800-745-3000. Teen program â&#x2013;  Jonathan B. Tucker will host a youth open mic poetry event with teen members of the DC Youth Slam Team. 9 to 11 p.m. $5. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. Tours and walks â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Georgetown Garden Treasuresâ&#x20AC;? will feature guided tours at Tudor Place and Dumbarton Oaks led by the horticulturists who oversee and care for them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Suzanne Bouchard, director of gardens and grounds at Tudor Place and Gail Griffin, director of gardens and grounds at Dumbarton Oaks. 10 a.m. to noon. $10 to $15. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. tudorplace.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cymbelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to visit D.C. Folger Theatre will present a limited engagement of the New York troupe Fiasco Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cymbelineâ&#x20AC;? May 28 through June 1. Winner of the 2012 Off-Broadway Award for Best Revival,

On stage

Fiascoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of one of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last plays â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and one of his most fanciful â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is a music-filled rendering performed with just six spirited actors. Tickets cost $54 to $72. Folger Theatre is located at 201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077; folger.edu/theatre. â&#x2013; The Keegan Theatre will present the world premiere of Irish playwright Rosemary Jenkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Midsummer Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Riotâ&#x20AC;? May 16 through June 5. The one-man play explores the lack of opportunities for the youth of Belfast. Ross dreams of being the famous professional golfer Rory McIlroy. But living in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cluan Place neighborhood means Ross has no cash for golf clubs and no place to practice but in the middle of the nightly street riots. Tickets cost $25 to $30. The Keegan Theatre is located at â&#x2013;  Washington Walks will present a tour of Watts Branch and Marvin Gaye Park, the site of D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest-ever community park revitalization. 11 a.m. $15. Meet outside the Capitol Heights Metro station. washingtonwalks.com. â&#x2013;  National Portrait Gallery senior historian David Ward will lead a tour of the exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Face Value: Portraiture in the Age of Abstraction.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202-6331000. Sunday,may May 1818 Sunday Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs â&#x2013;  A park ranger will lead a planetarium program about springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brightest stars, planets and constellations (for ages 5 and older). 1 to 1:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kamishibai Story Theater,â&#x20AC;? a Japanese-style storytelling event, will feature the tale of Momotaro and a craft activity. 2 p.m. Free. Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. 202-282-3139. Classes â&#x2013;  The Vajrayogini Buddhist Center will host a workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Learn How to Meditate: The Basics.â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. $25. Vajrayogini Buddhist Center, 1787 Columbia Road NW. 202-986-2257. â&#x2013;  Instructor Jeanne Benson will lead a hands-on seminar on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pen and Ink Designs for Quilting.â&#x20AC;? 10:15 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. $100 to $146. S. Dillon Ripley Center,

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Fiasco Theater will stage Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fanciful â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cymbelineâ&#x20AC;? May 28 through June 1. 1742 Church St. NW. 703-892-0202; keegantheatre.com. â&#x2013; Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre Society will present musical comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Beeâ&#x20AC;? through May 17. Tickets start at $18. Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre is located at 511 10th St. NW. 202-347-4833; fords.org. â&#x2013;  Busboys and Poets will present a workshop production of Motti Lernerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Admissionâ&#x20AC;? through May 18 at the Studio Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mead Theatre. Tickets cost $25 to $35. The Studio Theatre is located at 1501 14th St. NW. theadmission.bpt.me.

1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. Concerts â&#x2013; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Music of Friends,â&#x20AC;? a chamber music concert benefiting Friendship Place, will feature the Potomac Trio with Charles Niles performing works by Rossini, Beethoven, Bach and Meyer. 3 to 4:30 p.m. $35. Embassy of France, 4101 Reservoir Road NW. friendshipplace.org. â&#x2013;  The DC Chamber Orchestra will perform works by DvorĂĄk, Rossini and Haydn. 3 p.m. Free. Church of the Holy City, 1611 16th St. NW. dcchamberorchestra.org. â&#x2013;  Winners from the Washington Performing Arts Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Misbin Family Memorial Competition will perform. 3 p.m. Free. West Garden Court, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-842-6941. â&#x2013;  Pianist Tanya Bannister will perform music by Handel and Beethoven, as well as new works by Harold Meltzer and Sidney Corbett. 4 p.m. $15 to $30; reservations suggested. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/music. â&#x2013;  The Cathedral Choral Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clas-

sical Showcaseâ&#x20AC;? will feature works by Beethoven, Mozart and Haydn. 4 p.m. $15 to $25. Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin avenues NW. 202-537-2228. â&#x2013; The Thomas Circle Singers will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Choral Celebration: 25 Years of TCS Favoritesâ&#x20AC;? in celebration of artistic director James Kregerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25 years with the choral ensemble. 4 p.m. $15 to $20. National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-232-3353. â&#x2013;  The Gay Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chorus of Washington, DC, will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Gay Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide to Broadway,â&#x20AC;? featuring guest vocalist Laura Benanti. 4 p.m. $25 to $78. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Citizens Association of Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th annual Concerts in the Parks series will feature local singer-songwriter Rebecca McCabe and Human Country Jukebox. 5 to 6:30 p.m. Free. Volta Park, 34th and Q streets NW. 202-337-7313. â&#x2013;  The professional Choir of Christ Church will perform the music of Philip Radcliffe, Charles Villiers Stanford and GerSee Events/Page 22


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22 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Continued From Page 21 ald Near. 5 p.m. Free. Christ Church, Georgetown, 31st and O streets NW. 202333-6677. â&#x2013; Middle C will present a recital by students of Mandy Brown. 5 to 6 p.m. Free. Middle C Music, 4530 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-244-7326. â&#x2013;  The City Choir of Washington, soprano Danielle Talamantes, mezzo-soprano Kathyrn Honan-Carter, tenor Matthew Smith and bass Kerry Wilkerson will perform Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grand Mass in C Minorâ&#x20AC;? and Brittenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Psalms.â&#x20AC;? 5 p.m. $15 to $50. National Presbyterian Church, 4101 Nebraska Ave. NW. 301-572-6865. â&#x2013;  Pianist MĂ­cĂŠal Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke will perform works by John Field and other composers. 6:30 p.m. Free. West Garden Court, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-842-6941. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Rev. Sharron Dinnie and visitors from the Kwasa Centre in Springs, South Africa, will discuss their early childhood

Events Entertainment education program, which is supported in part by St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square. 10 a.m. Free. St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 16th and H streets NW. 202-347-8766. â&#x2013; Theodore Reff, professor emeritus of European painting and sculpture at Columbia University, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Degas and Women.â&#x20AC;? Noon. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-7374215. â&#x2013;  Patty Stonesifer, CEO of Marthaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Table and former CEO of the Gates Foundation, will discuss hunger and poverty in the District and how people can make a difference. 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. Free. Stone Hall, National Presbyterian Church, 4101 Nebraska Ave. NW. nationalpres.org/greatdayofservice. â&#x2013;  Robert K. Musil, former CEO of Physicians for Social Responsibility, will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rachel Carson and Her Sisters: Extraordinary Women Who Have Shaped Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Environment,â&#x20AC;? at 1 p.m.; and Georgetown University law professor Sheryll Cashin will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Place, Not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America,â&#x20AC;? at 5 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919.

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August 19-25

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â&#x2013; Richard Meryman â&#x20AC;&#x201D; biographer and lifelong friend of Andrew Wyeth and reporter, correspondent, editor and staff writer for Life magazine â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Andrew Wyeth: A Spoken Self-Portrait.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. â&#x2013;  Author, traveler and adventurer L. Peat Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pyrenees Pilgrimage: Walking Across France.â&#x20AC;? 2:30 p.m. Free. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-671-3121. â&#x2013;  Registered dietitian Leslie Adams will discuss health and nutrition for senior adults. 3 p.m. Free. Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252. â&#x2013;  Pamela JP Martin will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;niggamayi.â&#x20AC;? 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. Films â&#x2013;  Pianist and composer Andrew E. Simpson will premiere his original score for the 1925 epic adventure film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ben-Hurâ&#x20AC;? during a screening of the rarely shown masterpiece of early cinema and the silent era. 1 p.m. Free; tickets distributed in the G Street Lobby beginning at 12:30 p.m. McEvoy Auditorium, National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  The Freer Gallery of Art will present Hiroshi Teshigaharaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rikyu,â&#x20AC;? with remarks by curator Louise Cort on connections between the 1989 film and the exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chigusa and the Art of Tea.â&#x20AC;? A tea tasting will precede the film. Tea tasting at 1 p.m.; film at 2:30 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  The Palisades Library will present its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Classic Movies in the Afternoonâ&#x20AC;? series. 2 p.m. Free. Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. 202-282-3139. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinemaâ&#x20AC;? will feature Jerzy Kawalerowiczâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1966 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pharaoh,â&#x20AC;? a sweeping dramatization of ancient Egyptian intrigue. 4 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. â&#x2013;  The Washington Ethical Society will present Michael P. Nashâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Climate Refugees,â&#x20AC;? about how extreme events such as flooding, drought, wildfires and more intense hurricanes uproot populations and exacerbate political instability. 6:45 p.m. Free; donations welcome. Washington Ethical Society, 7750 16th St. NW. kenrawie@erols.com. Performances â&#x2013;  Comedians Dan Soder and Carson Gross will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Capital City Showcase will present a variety show featuring rock band The Mercy Alliance and comedians Pete Bergen, Chris DeBord, Pat Riley and Haywood Turnipseed Jr. Proceeds will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project. 7:30 p.m. $10 to $15. DC Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. 202-431-4704. Reading â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunday Kind of Loveâ&#x20AC;? will feature

ly yoga class led by instructor Francesca Valente. 6 to 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Suite 400, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, 5100 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-686-2210. â&#x2013; The group Yoga Activist will present a weekly yoga class. 7 p.m. Free. Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-3080.

Sunday, may 18 â&#x2013; Discussion: The Willard InterContinental and Politics and Prose Literary Series, offering teas and luncheons with notable authors and thinkers, will feature a talk by journalist Cokie Roberts, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Founding Mothers: Remembering the Ladies.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. $110; reservations required. The Willard InterContinental, 1401 Pennsylvania Ave NW. 202-364-1919. emerging and established poets, followed by an open mic segment. 5 to 7 p.m. $5. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. Special events â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Lutheran Church, the oldest Lutheran congregation in the District, will celebrate its 245th anniversary with a festive service focusing on the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history and incorporating a scripture reading and the Lordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prayer in German in reference to the congregationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heritage. A bratwurst dinner will follow. 10 a.m. Free. Georgetown Lutheran Church, 1556 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-337-9070. â&#x2013;  The National Museum of Women in the Arts will celebrate Art Museum Day with free admission. Noon to 5 p.m. Free. National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. 202-783-7370. â&#x2013;  The Capital Memorial Seventh-day Adventist Churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Vegetarian Food Fair will feature samples of authentic international cuisine. 1 to 4 p.m. $10 to $15; free for ages 10 and younger. Capital Memorial Seventh-day Adventist Church, 3150 Chesapeake St. NW. 202-362-3668. â&#x2013;  The Dance DC Festival 2014 will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Jitterbug to Hand Dance,â&#x20AC;? celebrating D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native dance style with performances, instruction and an open dance floor. 6:30 to 9 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Carnegie Library, 801 K St. NW. dancedcclosing.eventbrite.com. Tours â&#x2013;  The inaugural Forest Hills Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Studio Tour â&#x20AC;&#x201D; featuring Joan Danziger, Setsuko Ono and Annette Polan in their studios â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will benefit the Forest Hills Connection e-newsletter and website. 1 to 4 p.m. $25. Locations provided upon registration. denise.warner29@yahoo.com. â&#x2013;  The Shepherd Park Citizens Association will host its 10th annual garden tour, a self-guided visit to homes in Shepherd Park, Colonial Village and North Portal Estates. 2 to 5 p.m. $7 to $15. Shepherd Elementary School, 7800 14th St. NW. shepherdpark.org. Monday, May 19 Monday may 19 Classes â&#x2013;  The nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine will host a week-

Concerts â&#x2013; National Symphony Orchestra Youth Fellows will perform works by Piazzolla, Gaubert, Berlioz and Schubert. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  New York Concert Artists & Associates will present pianist Hee-Youn Choue performing works by Haydn, Schumann, Chopin and Tchaikovsky/Pletnev. 7:30 p.m. $25. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Welsh singer-songwriter Judith Owen and bassist Lee Sklar will perform in promotion of Owenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new release â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ebb and Flow.â&#x20AC;? 8:30 p.m. Free; tickets required. Gypsy Sallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys. com. â&#x2013;  The Howlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Brothers will perform. 9 p.m. $10. Hill Country Live, 410 7th St. NW. 202-556-2050. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  In honor of Jewish American Heritage Month, Holocaust scholar Diane Afoumado, radio host Martin Goldsmith and veteran journalist Marvin Kalb will discuss the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Voyage of the St. Louis,â&#x20AC;? a ship that left in May 1939 from Hamburg, Germany, with over 900 Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazis but returned to Europe after being turned away from Cuba, the United States and Canada. Noon. Free. Whittall Pavilion, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202-707-9897. â&#x2013;  Sanford Sternlicht will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tenement Saga: The Lower East Side and Early Jewish-American Writers.â&#x20AC;? Noon. Free. African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202707-3780. â&#x2013;  The Ward Circle Chapter of AARP will present a talk on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dragons in Artâ&#x20AC;? by Bela Demeter, a docent at the National Gallery of Art. Social time at 12:30 p.m.; program at 1 p.m. Free. Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church, 3401 Nebraska Ave. NW. 202-363-4900. â&#x2013;  The American Folklife Center will launch the online Civil Rights History Project website with a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Streets of Greenwoodâ&#x20AC;? and a round-table discussion on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mississippi Freedom Summer, 1964: Memory, Legacy and the Way Forward.â&#x20AC;? Speakers will include Robert Moses of the Algebra Project, Charlie Cobb of Brown University and Wesley Hogan of Duke University. 1 p.m. Free. Montpelier Room, Madison Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE. 202707-5510. â&#x2013;  The Dupont Circle Village Live & Learn seminar series will feature a talk on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shopping and Cooking for Singles.â&#x20AC;? 3:30 to 5 p.m. Free for Dupont Circle Village members; $10 for others. General Federation of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clubs, 1734 N St. NW. 202-234-2567. â&#x2013;  The Fiction Loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book Club will discuss Marianne Szegedy-Maszakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Kiss Your Hands Many Times.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Popular Library, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202727-1295. â&#x2013;  Evan Osnos will discuss his book See Events/Page 23


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The Current

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 22 “Age of Ambition: Chasing Fortune, Truth, and Faith in the New China.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. ■ The Friendship Hospital for Animals Client Education Series will focus on pet allergies and common skin conditions. 7 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1225. ■ The History/Biography Book Club will discuss “When America First Met China” by Eric Jay Dolin. 7 p.m. Free. TenleyFriendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1225. ■ Irish author Darragh McKeon will discuss his novel “All That Is Solid Melts Into Air.” 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202387-7638. Films ■ The Chevy Chase Library will host the “Marvelous Movie Mondays” series. 2 and 6:30 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. ■ The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library’s “Fantasy Flicks” series will feature Steven Spielberg’s film version of Michael Crichton’s novel “Jurassic Park.” 6 p.m. Free. Room A-5, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-7270321. ■ A “Blue Note at 75” film series on the history of jazz will feature Uli Gaulke’s 2013 film “As Time Goes By in Shanghai.” 6:30 p.m. $4

to $7. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. 202-289-1200. ■ The “Cool Hand Paul” series will feature Sidney Lumet’s 1982 film “The Verdict,” starring Paul Newman, James Mason and Jack Warden. 6:30 p.m. Free; tickets distributed 30 minutes before the screening. National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-783-3372. ■ The gender and sexuality series Zami will feature Be Steadwell’s film “Vow of Silence,” followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker and cast. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. ■ The Folger Shakespeare Library will host a preview screening of “Still Dreaming,” about a group of retired actors, dancers and musicians at the Lillian Booth Actors Home who stretch physical, emotional and mental limits to perform Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” A talk with the film’s creators will follow. 7 p.m. $15 to $20. Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. folger.edu. ■ The Royal Shakespeare Company will present David Tennant in a live recording of “Richard II” from Stratford-upon-Avon. 7 p.m. $18.80. West End Cinema, 23rd Street between M and N streets NW. 202419-3456. The film will be shown again May 24 at 11 a.m. ■ The Washington DC Jewish Community Center will present three episodes of the new hit Israeli television series “Shtisel.” 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $12.50. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. The final three episodes will be shown May 26. Performance ■ A semi-staged concert of Stephen

CHAMBER’S

Schwartz’s joyous and inspirational musical “Children of Eden” will feature Broadway veterans Ron Bohmer (shown), Ashley Brown, Charl Brown, Rebecca Naomi Jones and Jeremy Jordan. 8 p.m. $49 to $110. Eisenhower Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Sporting event ■ The Washington Nationals will play the Cincinnati Reds. 7:05 p.m. $10 to $90. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Tuesday at 7:05 p.m. and Wednesday at 4:05 p.m. Tuesday, May 20

Tuesday may 20 Benefit ■ An extended rooftop happy hour will benefit the DC Social Innovation Project’s grants for community programs tackling pressing social issues. 6 to 9 p.m. $20; reservations required. Local 16, 1602 U St. NW. sunandfun.splashthat.com. Children’s program ■ Marine biologist Andrew Wilson will present “Under the Sea,” featuring live sea animals (for ages 7 through 13). 4:30 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1225. Classes ■ The Georgetown Library will present its “Take an Om Break” lunch-hour yoga series. 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. erika.rydberg@dc.gov.

■ Cartoonist and journalist Josh Kramer will lead a class on “Anyone Can Make Comics.” 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. knowledgecommonsdc.org. Concerts ■ The Tuesday Concert Series will feature the Washington Chorus in the Frederick Hartt 100th Anniversary Memorial Concert. 12:10 p.m. Free. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635. ■ National Symphony Orchestra Youth Fellows will perform works by Kummer, Wiren and Mendelssohn. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-4674600. ■ The Embassy Series will present the Arabella Quartet performing works by Mendelssohn, Webern, Schubert, Nielsen, Shostakovich, Wolf, Puccini and Dvorák. 7:30 p.m. $150. European Union Ambassador’s Residence, 2534 Belmont St. NW. 202-625-2361. ■ The Fortas Chamber Music Concert series will feature pianist Marc-André Hamelin and the Pacifica Quartet performing Leo Ornstein’s rhythmically engaging “Piano Quintet” and Dvorák’s “Piano Quintet.” 7:30 p.m. $32. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. ■ Musician Joe Craven will present “The Solo Joe Show.” 8:30 p.m. $10 to $14. Gypsy Sally’s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. ■ Gypsy Sally’s Vinyl Lounge will host an open mic show. 9 p.m. Free. Gypsy Sally’s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com.

Discussions and lectures ■ Charlie Cob will discuss his book “This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible.” Noon. Free. Whittall Pavilion, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202-707-5510. ■ Historian Dan McMillan will discuss his book “How Could This Happen: Explaining the Holocaust.” Noon. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. ■ Tebelo Mazile Seretse, ambassador of the Republic of Botswana to the United States, will discuss “Women’s Empowerment in Botswana in 2014.” Luncheon at 12:15 p.m.; program at 1 p.m. $10 to $30. Woman’s National Democratic Club, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-232-7363. ■ Harvard University fellow Sreemati Mitter will discuss “A History of Money in Palestine: The Case of the Frozen Bank Accounts of 1948.” 12:30 to 2 p.m. Free; reservations required. The Palestine Center, 2425 Virginia Ave. NW. 202-338-1290. ■ A panel discussion on U.S. military bases in Okinawa and Japan will feature Susumu Inamine, mayor of Nago City; Denny Tamaki, a member of the Japanese House of Representatives; and journalist David Swanson. 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ Peter Van Buren will discuss his book “Ghosts of Tom Joad: A Story of the #99Percent.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. ■ Philippe Petit will discuss his book “Creativity: The Perfect Crime.” 7 p.m. See Events/Page 24

2014 Event & Technology Sponsor

SMALL BUSINESS AWARDS & EXPO

May 22, 2014 | 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Renaissance Washington, DC Downtown Hotel | 999 9th St NW, Washington, DC

Join us in recognizing and celebrating the major contributions of our city’s small businesses. BUSINESS EXPO This year we will continue our Small Business Expo — the prime Expo event for companies looking to showcase their products and services.

VIP LUNCHEON < Introduction of our new president & CEO, Harry Wingo.

VIP Luncheon keynote speaker, Daymond John

Founder, president and CEO of FUBU and star in the ABC reality hit show, “Shark Tank”

< First-ever business expo VIP Luncheon with very special guest speaker Daymond John, founder, president and CEO of FUBU and star in the ABC reality hit, “Shark Tank” Cindy Bates, vice president of SMB&D at Microsoft; Derek Kennedy, partner and managing director at

Boston Consulting Group; and some of the most prominent business leaders in the District to discuss the impact technology has on small business in five global markets.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS < Four breakout panel discussions covering international expansion, the SBA and 8a process, Affordable Healthcare Act—what it means to your small business, and running your small business via the cloud. Really, something for everyone! VIP Luncheon is an additional charge, while the panels, expo and evening reception with awards presentation reception are complimentary for members. VIP LUNCHEON, MEMBER PRICE: $100 VIP LUNCHEON, NON-MEMBER PRICE: $150

For tickets and exhibit space information, please visit our website at www.dcchamber.org. Questions, please call 202.624.0613

Awards Sponsor

Awards Sponsor

Expo Sponsor

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24 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

The Current

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 23 Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013; Sophie Clark, executive director of the National Alliance of Mental Illness, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mental Health 101â&#x20AC;? in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month. 7 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  The Foggy Bottom West End Village and the Foggy Bottom Association will host a talk by U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Civil Rights: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. The Village on K Street, St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parish Hall, 2430 K St. NW. fbwevillage.org. Films â&#x2013;  The Global Lens Film Series will feature Zhang Yuanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beijing Flickers.â&#x20AC;? 1:30 p.m. Free. Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. 202-282-3139. â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly May film series will focus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Silver Screen,â&#x20AC;? featuring movies about aging. 6 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St.

NW. 202-727-0232. â&#x2013; The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library will present its weekly Pop Movies series. 6 p.m. Free. Room A-5, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  To kick off the 2014 March on Washington Film Festival, the National Archives will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solomon Northupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Odyssey,â&#x20AC;? directed by the legendary African-American director and cinematographer Gordon Parks and starring Avery Brooks. A postscreening discussion on â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Story, Which Story, and Whose Story Is Being Toldâ&#x20AC;? will feature Warrington Hudlin, founder of the Black Filmmaker Foundation; Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; and William Jelani Cobb, associate professor of history at the University of Connecticut. 6:30 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  Filmmaker Marvin Jones will present his documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oral Histories of the Gold Coast,â&#x20AC;? about African-American families living along the 16th Street corridor. After the screening, Jones will discuss the film and documentary work. 7 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut

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Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. â&#x2013; ITVS will present a Community Cinema screening of Yoruba Richenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Black,â&#x20AC;? about how the African-American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the gay marriage movement. A Q&A with Samantha Master of the Human Rights Campaign will follow. 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. 202-549-4172. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Film and Beerâ&#x20AC;? series feature the classic Czech comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lemonade Joe.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Bistro Bohem, 600 Florida Ave. NW. bistrobohem.com. â&#x2013;  Director Anna Wexler will present her 2013 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unorthodox,â&#x20AC;? about three rebellious Jewish teenagers in their yearlong rite-of-passage journey from high school to Israel. A Q&A with Wexler will follow the film. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $12.50. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. â&#x2013;  The Adams Morgan Partnership Business Improvement District and the Marie Reed Learning Center PTA will present an outdoor film series. 8:30 p.m. Free. Soccer field, Marie Reed Learning Center, 18th and California streets NW. 202-9970783. Performances â&#x2013;  Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bolshoi Ballet will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giselle,â&#x20AC;? about a simple peasant girl who falls for a dashing prince in disguise. 7:30 p.m. $34 to $165. Opera House, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. The performance will repeat Wednesday through Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday at 1:30 and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 1:30 p.m. â&#x2013;  The Washington Improv Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harold Nightâ&#x20AC;? will feature performances by Breaker Breaker and another team, followed by an improv jam. 9 p.m. By donation. Source, 1835 14th St. NW. washingtonimprovtheater.com.

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Special event â&#x2013; Docs in Progress will commemorate its 10th anniversary with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Decade of Docs,â&#x20AC;? featuring an awards ceremony and a panel discussion on the future of documentary film and filmmaking. 7 to 10 p.m. $35 to $60. Jack Morton Auditorium, Media and Public Affairs Building, George Washington University, 805 21st St. NW. docsinprogress.org. Special event â&#x2013;  The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., will celebrate its 120th birthday and present the first Visionary Historian Award to Kathryn Schneider Smith. 6 p.m. $35 to $50. Carnegie Library, 801 K St. NW. historydc.org/events/celebrations.aspx. Tour â&#x2013;  A guided garden tour will trace the history and horticulture of centuries-old trees, heirloom plants and flowers, and English boxwood. 11:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. $10; free for members. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. tudorplace.org. Wednesday, May 21 Wednesday may 21 Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  Kripalu yoga teacher Eva Blutinger will lead a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yoga in the Galleriesâ&#x20AC;? class. 10 a.m. Free. American University Museum, Katzen Arts Center, American University,

Tuesday, may 20 â&#x2013; Discussion: Politics and Prose will present a talk by Walter Mosley on his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Debbie Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do It Anymore,â&#x20AC;? about a sharp-tongued porn star who decides sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready for another kind of life when her husband suddenly dies. 7 p.m. Free. Great Hall, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-364-1919. 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-8851300. Concerts â&#x2013;  The Happenings at the Harman series will present the Washington Performing Arts Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Men and Women of the Gospel Choir. Noon. Free; reservations suggested. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. 202-547-5688. â&#x2013;  As part of the Happenings Happy Hour series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Coward Cabaretâ&#x20AC;? will feature singers Barbara Papendorp and Amy Conley celebrating the wit and romance of Noel Coward. 5:30 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. 202-547-5688. â&#x2013;  The Wilson High School Concert Choir, Vocal Ensemble, Treble Choir and Jazz Combo will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-4674600. â&#x2013;  As part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blue Note at 75â&#x20AC;? celebration, the German Historical Institute and the Austrian Cultural Forum will present a concert lecture on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Classical Music of Globalization,â&#x20AC;? featuring University of Salzburg historian Reinhold Wagnleitner and New Orleans jazz pianist Tom McDermott. 6 p.m. Free; reservations required. German Historical Institute, 1607 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-387-3355. â&#x2013;  The Washington Performing Arts Society will present violinist Stefan Jackiw (shown) and pianist Anna Polonsky performing works by Mozart, Lutowslawski, Saariaho and Brahms. 7:30 p.m. $35. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-785-9727. â&#x2013;  A singer-songwriter showcase will feature the Hummingbirds, Victoria Vox and Alan Barnosky. 8 p.m. Free. Vinyl Lounge, Gypsy Sallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 3401 K St. NW. gypsysallys.com. â&#x2013;  Organist Iveta Apkalna will perform works by Escaich, Bach, Kalejs, Liszt and Thalben-Ball. 8 p.m. $15. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Country star LeAnn Rimes will perform a benefit concert for Bread for the City. 8 p.m. $50. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 877-987-6487. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Carol Joyntâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Q&A Cafe series â&#x20AC;&#x201D; now

in its 13th year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will feature New Orleansbased writer Julia Reed. Noon. $35. The George Town Club, 1530 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-333-9330. â&#x2013; Bangladeshi-American poet Tarfia Faizullah will discuss her first collection of poetry, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seam.â&#x20AC;? 4 p.m. Free. Pickford Theater, Madison Building, Library of Congress, 101 Independence Ave. SE. 202707-5394. â&#x2013;  The Chevy Chase and Georgetown chapters of National Active and Retired Federal Employees will present a talk by financial adviser Mark Keen on how to prepare for a prosperous retirement. 6 p.m. Free. Second-floor Meeting Room, TenleyFriendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-387-7936. â&#x2013;  A panel discussion on new play development in D.C. will feature Linda Lombardi, literary manager at Arena Stage; Ari Roth, artistic director at Theater J; Gwydion Suilebhan, playwright and D.C. representative to the Dramatists Guild; and Helen Hayes Award-nominated playwright Caleen Sinnette Jennings, professor of theater at American University. 6:30 p.m. By donation; reservations requested. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/events. â&#x2013;  John R. Wennersten will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Historic Waterfront of Washington, D.C.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Room 316, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  Alexander Nagel, research associate at the National Museum of Natural History and curator of the exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Nile and Ancient Egyptâ&#x20AC;? at the Freer Gallery, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washington and the Art of Ancient Egypt: A Monumental Obsession.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. $20 to $25. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-6333030. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;District of Change: Making D.C. Better for the Artsâ&#x20AC;? will feature host Matthew Yglesias, executive editor of Vox Media, and panelists Holly Bass, writer, director and multidisciplinary performance and visual artist; Brendan Canty, musician, composer, producer, filmmaker and former Fugazi drummer; and Victoria Reis, executive and artistic director of Transformer D.C., a nonprofit that supports and promotes local artists. 7 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. districtofchange.eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  Lisa Robinson will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;There Goes Gravity: A Life in Rock and Roll.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  The D.C. Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Books & Barsâ&#x20AC;? modern-day book club will discuss Herman Kochâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Dinner.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Bistro dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Oc, 518 10th St. NW. kari.mitchell@dc.gov. â&#x2013;  The Tenley-Friendship Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Prose Book Group,â&#x20AC;? for ages 21 through 35, will meet to discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Fault in Our Starsâ&#x20AC;? by John Green. 7 p.m. Free. Kitty Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sheaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s D.C., 4624 Wisconsin Ave. NW. megan.biggins@dc.gov. â&#x2013;  Sherill Tippins â&#x20AC;&#x201D; recipient of the 2013 Marfield Prize, a national award for arts writing awarded by the Arts Club of Washington â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legendary Chelsea Hotel.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202-331-7282. Sporting event â&#x2013;  D.C. United will play the Houston Dynamo. 7 p.m. $25 to $55. RFK Stadium, 2400 East Capitol St. SE. 800-745-3000.


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The Current

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DISPATCHES tables where all the other grades can see them! The final part of the project is a presentation to the class. Students talk about the things they learned and give out tiny souvenirs that are either from their state or represent it. I picked New Jersey because I have a lot of cousins, aunts and uncles who live there and we visit them a lot. This week, students in my class did presentations about New Mexico, Hawaii, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin, California, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, South Dakota, Oklahoma and New Jersey. After our presentations, we talked together about our states. We learned a lot and are very proud of our work. — Sarah Breeze, third-grader

school. Many friends and family traveled from near and far to help us celebrate our First Communion. All of our grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins were there from North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. It made us feel very special. Everyone dressed up — the boys in suits and ties and the girls wearing white dresses. We were both nervous about reading, but it went just fine. We felt great receiving Communion with our mom and dad. Afterward, our whole class and everyone at church went to Hess Hall for cupcakes and treats. Then our whole family went to our house and had a giant meal. Both our favorite things were fruit and pasta salad. We opened up gifts from our family that will always remind us of this special day. — James M. and Owen M., second-graders

National Presbyterian

St. Albans Lower School

From Page 10

Fifth grade at National Presbyterian School is racing toward the finish line of another year. Though the fifth-graders are almost done, they still have a lot to do. The main project that they are working on is called the Greek ABC Book. In this project, they must write 26 paragraphs about Greece in an ABC book format. Some topics include Alexander the Great, the Hellenistic Period and the Golden Age of Athens. This will replace the normal social studies curriculum for the time being. In math, students are studying volume. Many of them also participated in the spring musical with some of the fourth- and sixth-graders last Thursday and Friday. The musical was “Oz”! It was based off of L. Frank Baum’s “The Wizard of Oz” and adapted by our drama teacher, Stephanie Kilpatrick. The songs came from “The Wiz,” “The Wizard of Oz” and “Wicked.” In reading class, they are studying Greek myths. In music class, they are studying the Baroque period. They are doing a very special project in art: a copy of Babylonia’s Ishtar Gate around the fifth-grade doorway. They will use tiles to create reliefs of animals seen on the Ishtar Gate. Fifth grade will continue to be busy as the year draws to a close. — Sofia Flynn, fifth-grader

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THE CURRENT

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

May 4 was a very special day for the second-graders at Our Lady of Victory. We celebrated our First Holy Communion. We spent many weeks preparing for this special day. We learned that one of the ways God shows His love for us is giving himself to us through Holy Communion. We practiced receiving bread and wine. We made an altar cloth with our hand prints in gold paint and we each made a banner with symbols of Communion and our names. We learned a song to sing at Mass too. We both read a Petition at Mass, so we practiced that at home and at

Form II’s annual Woodlands trip began on a warm and breezy Monday morning. Upon arriving we split up into two groups. One was to go to Calleva’s Adventure Island, a ropes course-type campground in the middle of the Potomac River, and the other to Annapolis Rocks, a destination on the Appalachian Trail. The island group set off in a canoe, and saw Robert Griffin III at the Donald Trump Golf Course. While singing the national anthem the boys saw RGIII walk over the top of a hill and wave at them. Over at the rocks we endured a 2.5-mile hike with heavy packs to get to the campgrounds. Once there we rappelled and climbed on the crags. The spectacular panoramic view was short-lived, however, as it began to rain. Both groups soon became the victims of a torrential downpour. The next morning, amid grumbling and complaining, the counselors and teachers decided to haul the entire Form back to Calleva’s headquarters. Soaked to the bone, we made our way to the barn to rest. The next day both groups went caving, which for most was a new, yet fun (or terrifying), experience. Lastly, we went rafting on the Potomac. Soaked and tired, but somehow still energetic, we arrived at our take-out point for rafting and departed Calleva. Some would say we went to hell and back on Woodlands, but in the middle of a busy school life Woodlands was a polarizing yet memorable experience. — Jasper Boers, Form II (eighth-grader)

St. Albans Upper School

This week was a huge one for St. Albans athletics. Both the varsity and junior varsity baseball teams clinched first seed in the upcoming IAC tournament. The varsity lacrosse team upset Georgetown Prep in an overtime win of 8-7. The baseball teams each had wins over Landon and Bullis this week to clinch first seed in the IAC

29

tournament, which starts this Saturday. Second-round games will be this upcoming Wednesday, and the championship game will take place next Saturday. In one of the biggest upsets in St. Albans’ history the varsity lacrosse team beat the undefeated Georgetown Prep team 8-7 in overtime. St. Albans was ranked No. 726 in the nation but still beat the No. 2 ranked team in the nation. All seemed lost for the Bulldogs, who were down 7-3 in the fourth quarter, but a huge surge allowed St. Albans to tie the game at 7-7 with just five minutes left in the game. Prep held the ball for most of the remaining five minutes, taking multiple shots on the St. Albans goal. They all missed. The game headed to overtime where on St. Albans’ first possession Cormac Dugan zipped the ball to the cutting Armin Mortzavi, who put the ball in the lower lefthand corner of the goal to secure the sudden-death victory. The St. Albans student section, “the Dog Pound,” raced onto the field to congratulate the victorious Bulldogs, as all Georgetown Prep could do was watch in shock. — Sterling Myhre, Form III (ninth-grader)

Stoddert Elementary

Today we had a breakfast for our mothers and for Teacher Appreciation Week. Students got to eat, too. We had bagels, bacon, muffins, fruit, water, juice and chocolatecovered marshmallows. We sang three poems. There was one poem called, “Mother Dear, I Love You.” We painted a glass vase for our moms. We also wrote to them. We wrote about why our moms are special. My mom is special because she cooks me delicious food. My mom is special because she lets me play on school days. Moms take care of us and they’re the one lady that takes care of us more than any other lady, and they show us lots of love. They take care of us as much as they can. We appreciate our teachers because they teach us new things and they teach us how to read and do math. — Sitara Mazumdar and Alana Quarles, kindergartners

Washington Latin Public Charter School

On May 1, Washington Latin held its annual Multicultural Night. Many families, teachers and students set up booths that represented their heritage or a culture they enjoy. There were tables from India, Australia, France, Japan and so many more nations. There was music, food and ethnic clothing. Latin’s Bhangra team performed and taught a mini dance lesson. Later in the night there was stilt dancing accompanied by African drumming done by an eighth-grade family. We even had a section of library books from ancient cultures to keep with our school’s classical theme. — Niara Tarleton-Allen, 10th-grader


30 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

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Wednesday, May 14, 2014 31

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COLUMBIA HEIGHTS, WASHINGTON, DC Expansive and updated row house on quiet oneway street. Main part of home has 4BR and 3.5BA, hardwoods, gourmet kitchen, two rear balconies & patio. Separate 2BR/1BA basement unit. $1,099,000 Joe O’Hara 703-350-1234

BETHESDA, MARYLAND 4 bedroom, 3 full bath light-filled contemporary. Open layout with newly renovated gourmet kitchen, family room, master suite, lower-level rec room. Wonderful treed lot. $989,500 Doc Keane Mark McFadden 703-216-1333

PENN QUARTER, WASHINGTON, DC Ideal 2BR, 1BA unit in the sought-after Lafayette. Prime location! Large living space with HW floors, gas fireplace, granite kitchen and new bath. Building gym, pool and roof-top. $585,000 Matthew McCormick Ben Roth 202-728-9500

Nancy Taylor Bubes

202-386-7813

INTERNATIONAL OFFERING

Margot Wilson

INTERNATIONAL NET WORKS AND OFFICES


32 Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Old Town Alexandria, VA

The CurrenT

$445,000

St Asaph Square – Best location in Old Town with 2 garage parking spaces! Very spacious 2-bedroom, 2-bath. Walk score of 99. Pool, grill area.

Delaine Campbell 703.299.0030

Forest Hills, DC

$3,850,000

3 levels of elegant living space, state-of-the-art kitchen, 5 bedrooms, 6.5 redone baths, pool.

$1,295,000

Bethesda, MD

$3,500,000

Elegance and style throughout this spacious home with show-stopping gardens, garage. On a delightful tree-lined street in a super location.

European inspired, custom home on one acre lot with pool and extensive stone terraces. Expansive spaces, 6 bedrooms, 5 full and 1 half baths.

Rina Kunk 202.489.9011

Bret Brown 202.409.4338

Chevy Chase, MD

$5,500,000

Stunning residence in Parc Somerset. 4500+ SF including master suite with his & hers luxury baths, dressing rooms and private study.

Bret Brown 202.409.4338

Logan Circle, DC

$389,000

Charming 1-bedroom, 1-bath condo in elegant period boutique building. Expansive & secluded patio with lush plantings and sunny exposures.

Jessica Monat 202.725.6306

SU OP N EN .5 H /1 O 8 U 1- SE 3P M

Andy Hill 301.646.3900 Sue Hill 202.262.4961

AU Park, DC

Kensington, MD

$529,900

Sun-filled colonial features 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood floors, and new lower level. Custom landscaping, stone walls and deck.

Mark Hudson 301.641.6266

Bryce Resort, VA

$219,500

Tree-top living in pretty setting. Pristine home w/.76 acres of woodland grace. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, generous decks & screened porch.

Kate & Kevin Brennan 240.888.3603

Silver Spring, MD

$399,000

4315 50th Street NW • Washington, DC

$1,329,000

Built for dramatic entertaining - 12ft ceilings, large cook’s kitchen, skylights, wood floors, outdoor dining area, park views. 2-car garage. Close to Metro.

Kathy Byars 240.372.9708

Joan Fallows 301.526.0744

Silver Spring, MD

$519,000

Dupont/West End, DC

$675,000

3-bedroom colonial with 2 full baths upstairs. New appliances & granite counters in kitchen, finished basement, 2 fireplaces, large backyard.

2-bedroom, 2-bath condo, close to Dupont Circle, Georgetown, Rock Creek Park, & two Metro stops. New kitchen, washer/dryer, wood floors, parking.

Dave Kolakowski 301.445.8525

Santiago Testa 202.552.5624

McEnearney.com

202.552.5600

Cleveland Park, DC

4-bedroom, 2-full bath home. Huge 2-car garage. Beautiful complete renovation. Close to Metro, shopping. Super Value! 2903 Parker Ave

PREFERRED LENDER ®

Fb 05 14 2014  

The Foggy Bottom Current

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