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THE ARTS AT MARQUETTE & IN MILWAUKEE

IS IT ART?

Lady Bugs & Those Glittery Flags

WEBSTER X Mke Musician

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GRIND IT OUT! coffee shops for finals week

2015

HATE IT OR LOVE IT?

Bronze Fonz & That Orange Thing

REGINALD BAYLOR BY THE NUMBERS EBONY AT THE MAM


Contents 118

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NOTE FROM THE STAFF WWWW & W Cultura?

Graffiti

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Is It Art? Prius-sized lady bugs

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Is It Art? The silver glitter flags

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There’s a Word for It: En Pointe

by Lisa Michel

DEPARTMENTS Program Notes Which coffee house for you? The Great Lakes Environmental Film Festival. Cool jewelry. The perfect MU day. Good Company @ Helfaer. End the semester on a high note: spring concerts. Hate It/Love It: the Bronze Fonz & The Orange Thing. On the Menu: 6 eats under $6. Date Night: Meet, eat, repeat. And more! Writers Paulo Acuña, Catherine Gabel, Lisa Michel, Caitlin Miller, Ethan Niquet, Lauren Papucci, Madeline Pieschel, Adam Pulte, Ian Schaak, Eva L. Sotomayor, Alexandra Whittaker; Assigning Editor Lisa Michel, Copy Editor Joe Kaiser, Traductores Sebastián Fuentes, Sergio Becerra Ramírez, Lisa Michel, Paulo Acuña, Eva L. Sotomayor

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Writers Ian Schaak and Caitlin Miller, Assigning Editor Alexandra Whittaker, Story Art Director Eva L. Sotomayor and Ian Schaak

Writer Madeline Pieschel, Assigning Editor Ethan Niquet, Story Art Director Adam Pulte, Fact Checker Madeline Pieschel, Copy Editor Eva L. Sotomayor, Managing Editor Ian Schaak, Art Staffer Joe Kaiser, Traductores Cristina Nieves, Ana Silva

Writer Lauren Papucci, Assigning Editor Caitlin Miller, Story Art Director Ian Schaak, Fact Checker Adam Pulte, Copy Editor Madeline Pieschel, Managing Editor Joe Kaiser, Art Staffer Catherine Gabel

Writer Adam Pulte, Assigning Editor Eva Sotomayor, Story Art Director A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Fact Checker Paulo Acuña, Copy Editor Catherine Gabel, Managing Editor Joe Kaiser, Art Staffer Catherine Gabel, Traductores Alejandro Rodriguez, Marisol Madrigal


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There’s a Word for It: En Français

Writer Eva L. Sotomayor, Assigning Editor Adam Pulte, Story Art Director Ethan Niquet, Fact Checker Catherine Gabel, Copy Editor Paulo Acuña, Managing Editor Alexandra Whittaker, Art Staffer A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor

Vintage Art: The designs of MU BB unis over the years

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Writers Caitlin Miller and Paulo Acuña, Assigning Editor Catherine Gabel, Story Art Director Caitlin Miller

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Writer Joe Kaiser, Assigning Editor A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Story Art Director Paulo Acuña, Fact Checker Alexandra Whittacker, Copy Editor Ethan Niquet, Managing Editor Caitlin Miller, Art Staffer Ian Schaak

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The clock strikes 12—again and again in the history of Cinderella

A Day In the Life: Twenty four hours with a Milwaukee Ballet dancer

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50

Writer Alexandra Whittaker, Assigning Editor Ian Schaak, Story Art Director Adam Pulte, Fact Checker Lauren Papucci, Copy Editor Madeline Pieschel, Managing Editor Ethan Niquet, Art Staffer Joe Kaiser, Traductores Sergio Becerra Ramírez, Sebastián Fuentes

How to attend a classical music concert

Writer Eva Sotomayor, Assigning Editor Paulo Acuña, Story Art Director Catherine Gable, Fact Checker Caitlin Miller, Copy Editor Alexandra Whittaker, Managing Editor Madeline Pieschel

PROFILES Reginald Baylor by the numbers: A visit with the iconic Milwaukee artist

Writers Paulo Acuña and Madeline Pieschel, Assigning Editor Madeline Pieschel, Story Art Director Alexandra Whittaker, Fact Checker Joe Kaiser, Copy Editor Caitlin Miller, Managing Editor Catherine Gabel, Art Staffer A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor

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How Sam Ahmed Became WebsterX. And launched an electric music career Writer Alexandra Whittaker, Assigning Editor A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Story Art Director Madeline Pieschel, Fact Checker Paulo Acuña, Copy Editor Ethan Niquet, Managing Editor Adam Pulte, Art Staffer Ethan Niquet

Writer Caitlin Miller, Assigning Editor Catherine Gabel, Story Art Director Caitlin Miller, Copy Editor Paulo Acuña

SERVICE How to get a song recorded

Decorate that grad cap! Tips, tricks, and inspiration to give the MU seagulls a great view Writers Paulo Acuña and Alexandra Whittaker, Assigning Editor Lisa Michel, Story Art Director A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Copy Editor Joe Kaiser

Writer Paulo Acuña, Assigning Edtor Lauren Papucci, Story Art Director Alexandra Whittaker, Fact Checker Eva L. Sotomayor, Copy Editor Adam Pulte, Managing Editor Ian Schaak, Art Staffer Madeline Pieschel, Traductores Emily Castillo, Daisy González, Daniel Carcamo

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Where to dine for graduation when the ’rents are footing the bill

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Curtis Carter: Where did the Haggerty come from? PLUS: Keith Haring was here—and he painted! Writer, Assigning Editor, and Story Art Director Madeline Pieschel

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Undercover artists among us: The hidden talent at MU

Writer Adam Pulte, Assigning Editor Madeline Pieschel, Story Art Director A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Fact Checker Caitlin Miller, Copy Editor Lauren Papucci, Managing Editor Eva L. Sotomayor, Art Staffer Alexandra Whittaker, Traductores Jeydelyn Martínez, Francisco Roque

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Contents 100 Biografía de Diego Rivera por Daniel Fernandez Guerra Copy Editor Lisa Michel

102 104

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Edited by Joe Kaiser, Story Art Director A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor

140

Oodles of doodles

Writers Adam Pulte and Lauren Papucci, Assigning Editor Lisa Michel, Story Art Director Madeline Pieschel, Copy Editor Joe Kaiser

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REVIEWS Glen Hansard @ The Pabst

Ebony at the MAM: Inside the famed mag’s Fashion Fairs

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An authentic kiss at El Beso

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Liberty’s ghost: Enrique Chagoya at the Haggerty

Alert the Trekkies: Marquette has its own holodeck! Tour engineering’s astonishing cave

Down in the vault: What it takes to hang art

Writer Caitlin Miller, Assigning Editor Alexandra Whittaker, Story Art Directors Caitlin Miller, Madeline Pieschel and A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Fact Checker Ian Schaak, Copy Editor Adam Pulte, Managing Editor Eva L. Sotomayor, Art Staffer Lauren Papucci, Traductores Stacy Vargas, Emanuel Hernández, Cynthia Anaya

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You could minor in it: The MIAD-Diederich partnership

Writer Caitlin Miller, Assigning Editor A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Story Art Director Lauren Papucci, Fact Checker Madeline Pieschel, Copy Editor Ian Schaak, Managing Editor Adam Pulte, Art Staffer Eva L. Sotomayor, Traducido por Ketty Alvarado

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Clear Picture: Bi-lingual, multi-disciplinary, and all artsy

Writer Adam Pulte, Assigning Editor Madeline Pieschel, Story Art Directors Madeline Pieschel and A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Copy Editor and Fact Checker Lauren Papucci

FEATURES #MUHaiku

Writer and Assigning Editor Alexandra Whittaker, Story Art Director A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Fact Checker Catherine Gabel, Copy Editor Paulo Acuña, Managing Editor Caitlin Miller, Art Staffer Eva L. Sotomayor

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Writers Eva L. Sotomayor, Alexandra Whittaker, and Ian Schaak; Assigning Editor Lisa Michel, Story Art Directors Ian Schaak and A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Copy Editor and Fact Checker Joe Kaiser

by Eva L. Sotomayor

by Gabriela Ferreira

by Eva L. Sotomayor, traducido por Brenda Brambila

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Hearing voices: C.J. Hribal’s fiction by Jose Kaiser


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from the staff

A

t Cultura, we’re on a mission—to capture and critique, to celebrate and share the delightful, ineffable, electric thing that is art. Art at Marquette University and art in the city of Milwaukee. Who are we, you ask? We are journalism students at Marquette’s Diederich College of Communication, and we created Cultura as part of our senior capstone. For the past four years, we’ve called this university and the city of Milwaukee home, soaking in the rich arts and culture scenes of both. We’ve drooled over the crème brûlée at Coquette, admired the graffiti art around town, and scratched our heads at that weird orange sculpture down by the lakefront. And we want to chat with you about it. Whether you are an arts enthusiast or a casual observer, we’ve got you covered.

We’ll help you find the coziest restaurant on date night (page 9), teach you how to dress for a classical concert (page 50), and keep you in the loop on upcoming Marquette and Milwaukee arts events. Thanks to the help of students in Dr. Julia Paulk’s Spanish classes, we are excited to bring some of our stories to you in both Spanish and English. Our goal is to honor the Marquette values of multiculturalism and collaboration, and to appreciate art that comes in all languages, shapes, and colors. We live in a community that’s bright with talented, creative folks who paint, cook, write, sketch, film, and photograph things worth talking about. In this first issue, we dive in. Join us, won’t you? THE CULTURA STAFF

PHOTO BY DR. PAMELA HILL NETTLETON

CULTURA STAFF AT WORK 6

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meet the staff Editor-in-Chief/Jefa de Redacción Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton Managing Editor/Editora de Redacción Lisa Michel Art Director/Directora de Arte A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor Journalism Magazine Capstone Students/Estudiantes de Periodismo Writers, Assigning Editors, Fact Checkers, Copy Editors, Story Art Directors, and Art Staffers Paulo A. Acuña, Catherine Gabel, A. Martina Ibáñez-Baldor, Joe Kaiser, Caitlin Miller, Ethan Niquet, Lauren Papucci, Madeline Pieschel, Adam Pulte, Ian Schaak, Eva L. Sotomayor, Alexandra Whittaker

Spanish Students/Estudiantes de Español Writers

Ketty Alvarado, Cynthia Anaya, Diana Arreguin, Omar Gómez, Emanuel Hernández Gauben, Lara Roselee Ledesma, Eliza Luvianos, Marisol Madrigal, Jeydelyn Martínez, Esmeralda Nungaray, Alejandro Rodríguez, Francisco Roque, Stephanie Tapia, Stacy Vargas, Sergio Becerra Ramírez, Brenda Brambila, Daniel Carcamo, Emily Castillo, Daniel Fernandez Guerra, Gabriela Ferreira Díaz, Sebastián Fuentes, Daisy Gonález, Cristina Nieves, Aileen Pagán-Vega, Kevin Whatts

Publishers/Editores John Pauly Chair, Journalism and Media Studies & Gretchen and Cyril Colnik Chair in Communication Lori Bergen Dean, Diederich College of Communication Dr. Julia C. Paulk & Dr. Eugenia Afinoguenova Associate Professors of Spanish Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton Assistant Professor, Journalism and Media Studies Cultura is published by the students of the JOUR 4997 Senior Magazine Capstone class in the Diederich College of Communication, Johnston Hall, Marquette University, 1131 W Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53233. Contact us: pamela.nettleton@marquette.edu julia.paulk@marquette.edu eugenia.afinoguenova@marquette.edu

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PROGRAM NOTES

LOVE IT 0r HATE IT THE ORANGE THING LA COSA ANARANJADA PHOTO BY MADELINE PIESCHEL

THUMBS UP

PULGARES ARRIBA “I’ve been living in Milwaukee for three years now, and it’s part of what I think about when someone says ‘downtown.’ It’s a big part of the city.” -Roque Redondo, Junior, Diederich College of Communication

THUMBS DOWN PULGARES ABAJO “The sculpture is really jarring and obstructs the view of the Art Museum. It destroys what would otherwise be a spectacular sight; it’s like a giant orange roadblock right smack in the middle of the view.” -Raul Vasquez, Communications Director, Public Allies

–Eva L. Sotomayor “THE CALLING” BY ARTIST MARK DI SUVERO 8

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CASTING CALL

date night

MORE STUDENTS VISITED MARQUETTE’S HAGGERTY ART MUSEUM IN FALL 2014 THAN EVER BEFORE

NUEVAS CARAS Y UNAS DESPEDIDAS EN EL MUNDO DE ARTE NEIL HOFFMAN After seven years of leadership, Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design President Neil Hoffman retires in May. MONICA OBNISKI The Milwaukee Art Museum welcomed Monica Obniski to its team of super-savvy art people. She became the new curator of 20th and 21st century design in January. AMY JENSEN Skylight Music Theater’s managing director since 2009 bids adieu in July.

by Joe Kaiser

PHOTO BY A. MARTINA IBÁÑEZ-BALDOR

NERVOUS? DON’T BE. WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED FROM FOOD TO FUN ¿NERVIOSO? TRANQUILO. LO HEMOS PLANEADO TODO The doorbell rings

5:15 Suena el timbre

–traducido por Eva L. Sotomayor

7:25

Gulp.

5:30 Where to begin?

¿Dónde empezar? Lakefront Take a stroll along the lake near the Art Museum. Grab a bench and get to know each other. Not clicking? Here’s your chance to get out before sitting through an awkward dinner.

–Lisa Michel

NEIL HOFFMAN Luego de siete años de liderazgo, el Presidente del Instituto de Arte y Diseño de Milwaukee Neil Hoffman planea retirarse en mayo. MONICA OBNISKI El Museo de Arte de Milwaukee y su equipo de arte le dan la bienvenida a Monica Obinski. Desde enero, es la nueva curadora del diseño del siglo 20 y 21. AMY JENSEN Le dirá adios al Teatro Skylight en julio. Jensen ha sido parte del equipo desde el 2009.

A BROKEN RECORD

6:05

Dinner La cena Public Market Lobster, falafel, and truffles, oh my! Not sure what your date likes to eat? Have no fear! The Milwaukee Public Market in the Historic Third Ward has everything. Try Ozzie Lamb at Aladdin’s. Wolf Peach Prefer to sit down and order? Head to Wolf Peach for rustic European cuisine. Order a handcrafted wood-fire pizza. Split one with your date. Or better yet, don’t. Leftovers!

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Now what? ¿Y entonces, qué hacer después? Paint Bar Splash Studio Grab a canvas, brush, and paint away! You’re no Vincent van Gogh and Starry Night may or may not resemble the original, but hey–with a little wine, who knows? Not ready to go home? ¿No estás listo para irte a casa? Red Elephant Cafe Nothing warms the soul like a rich and creamy cup of cocoa or a fistful of gourmet chocolates. It’s going to be hard to choose just one, so don’t! Grab a few to share, but don’t miss the dark chocolate sea salt caramels. The sugar rush may prove useful. Brady Street Dessert not your cup of tea? Good thing Milwaukee offers bar after bar. Head over to Water or Brady St. for a night of laughter, drinks and dancing. –Caitlin Miller

6,081 3,553 visitors

171 students

classes

Un récord roto

EL MUSEO DE ARTE HAGGERTY RECIBIÓ MÁS VISITANTES EN 2014 QUE EN NINGÚN OTRO AÑO

6,081 3,553 visitantes

171 estudiantes

clases

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PROGRAM NOTES

LOVE IT 0r HATE IT THE BRONZE FONZ EL FONZ DE BRONCE PHOTO BY LAUREN PAPUCCI

THUMBS UP

PULGARES ARRIBA “People loved the Fonz and the whole cast of Happy Days. This sculpture is a fun destination for both locals and tourists, and it gives a classic, beloved TV character a real-world ‘rerun.’” -Amanda Keeler, assistant professor of digital media

THUMBS DOWN

PULGARES ABAJO “It’s sad if this is the art that represents Milwaukee. It says that we’re regressive rather than progressive. Plus, the face is not close in likeness, the proportions are off, and the painted bronze makes it look like plastic!” -Lynne Shumow, curator of education at the Haggerty Museum of Art

–Lauren Papucci & Madeline Pieschel “THE BRONZE FONZ” BY ARTIST GERALD P. SAWYER 10

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Grind It Out/MOLERLO FINALS ARE COMING! ENCUENTRA UNA CAFETERÍA QUE TE AYUDE A ESTUDIAR (O PROCRASTINAR)

by Ethan Niquet traducido por Sebastián Fuentes y Sergio Becerra Ramírez

Reel Talk

DON’T MISS MARQUETTE’S GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FESTIVAL • Passionate about sustainability? Check out the work of

filmmaker-activists from around the country

• See three feature length films, shorter pieces, and high school student films. Celebrate afterward at Jackson’s Blue Ribbon Pub

• It’s free! Just show up! • GLEFF motto: “Make

PHOTO BY A. MARTINA IBÁÑEZ-BALDOR

Brew Bayou (AMU) “Just the right amount of distraction”/ “El tiempo adecuado para distraerte” –Adam Pulte, senior Lo bueno: A good mix of studying and socializing, with super-comfy couches! Lo malo: Tables are so close together, it’s as cramped as a McCormick dorm room. Tory Hill Cafe (Marquette Law School) “Turtle mochas are the BOMB!”/“¡Turtle Mochas son la bomba!” –Victoria Lim, senior Lo bueno: Generous portions, cushy bench seats, and lots of outlets! Lo malo: Your t-shirt and sweatpants might look sloppy next to the law students’ suits. Starbucks (16th and Wisconsin) “The nonstop buzz of people coming and going helps me be productive”/“El zumbido de la gente me ayuda ser productiva” –Kelsey Chin, sophomore Lo bueno: The coffee is pretty good. Lo malo: Almost always busy. Brew @ the Bridge (Raynor Library) “The meeting place for all awkward group projects”/“El lugar de encuentro para todos los torpes proyectos de grupo” –Eva L. Sotomayor, senior Lo bueno: Big windows mean great lighting. Lo malo: I mean, who wants to go to the library anyway?

the lakes a place where we can swim without smelling like a wet dog”

• May 1-3 at the

Varsity Theater and Weasler Auditorium. Find out more at www.gleff.org –Adam Pulte

Bling! Amy Mazius, a 23-year-old Whitefish Bay designer, paired with Manhattan resident Randi Tutelman to create Eleanor Kalle, a whimsical and chic jewelry line that was featured in New York Fashion Week. Hit the website (http://eleanorkalle.com/) for costume jewelry and edgy bracelets. The Wisconsin uniform of a comfy sweater, jeans, and boots needs a bold jewelry statement. –Catherine Gabel

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PROGRAM NOTES

End on a High Note BEFORE TRADING YOUR BOOKS FOR BEACH TOWELS, CHECK OUT THESE END-OF-THE-YEAR MUSIC PERFORMANCES ON CAMPUS. Friday, April 17, 7 p.m. Jazz Ensembles Varsity Theatre Sunday, April 19, 2 p.m. Wind Ensemble Varsity Theatre Friday, April 24, 8 p.m. Jazz at the Annex MU Annex Saturday, April 25, 7 p.m. MU Chorus Spring Concert Gesu Church Sunday, April 26, 2 p.m. Orchestra Concert Varsity Theatre More information at http://www.marquette.edu/music/performances.shtml. –Caitlin Miller

MU Symphony GITA LADD CELLO SOLOIST Tired of the deafening bass coming from your roommate’s speakers? Check out the Marquette University Symphony Orchestra, accompanied by cellist Gita Ladd, in its end-ofthe-year concert April 26 at 2 p.m. in the Varsity Theater. Admission is free! Plus, Dr. Jason Ladd, assistant director of instrumental music, says the show will “melt your face off.” -Ian Schaak

PHOTO VIA ENDLESSMOUNTAIN.NET 12

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CITY FASHION Milwaukee is intriguing, diverse, and romantic. A strong sense of culture is showcased in our many neighborhoods. With our eclectic city comes major fashion inspiration. Here are our fashion picks influenced by our favorite areas of Milwaukee. THE EAST SIDE Strolling down Brady Street, grabbing a bite to eat at Comet Café, or relaxing with coffee at Colectivo yields an artistic, takeit-easy vibe that inspires a look Kate Moss would approve of. DOWNTOWN MILWAUKEE Downtown Milwaukee’s bars and restaurants are insta-worthy. Don a sassy dress for Indulge Wine Bar, or rock boyfriend jeans with pumps. THIRD WARD Put on your heels, curl your hair, and grab your statement coat. Milwaukee’s Third Ward is one of the most beautiful places in the city and filled with residents who follow beats from different drummers. WALKING DOWN WISCONSIN We agree with you: there is nothing more comfortable than throwing on Marquette gear and heading out the door. Don’t get more caught up in outfits than homework. Spring 2015 calls for laid-back MU gear. TIP: the spirit shop carries styles that can be pulled off with killer shoes and accessories –Catherine Gabel

PHOTOS VIA CATHERINE GABLE


THE PERFECT MU DAY GETTING “CLOSURE” WITH MKE

PHOTO VIA LACEY MUSZYNSKI

Burger for brunch and a 11 A.M. Bloody Mary at Sobelman’s. Get ready to “carpe diem.”

1

P.M. Head to the lakefront to burn calories and take in one last view of the Calatrava.

Grab a coffee (or a beer — it’s 2 P.M. 5 o’clock somewhere!) at Colectivo

in the Third Ward. See students with heads buried in their books and be relieved you’re almost done. Feeling jealous is okay, too — after all, studying might be better than job hunting!

PHOTO VIA THECOOKINGMOM.COM

Back to campus for Happy 5 P.M. Hour at Caffrey’s. Who needs dinner when you have the popcorn machine?

Catch a show at the Riverside. 8 P.M. Get there just as doors open and snag the ideal spot to cry for your favorite band.

Take a cab to Brady Street and 11 P.M. reminisce at Hi-Hat Garage about your best Milwaukee memories.

End the night with cheese 2 A.M. curds at Dogg Haus. Wave goodbye to Father Marquette in Central Mall. Hey, next year the “fish” at McCormick might even look good.

–Eva L. Sotomayor

PHOTO VIA CAFFREYSPUB.COM 2015

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PROGRAM NOTES

Good “Company”

Helfaer Theatre wraps up its spring season with the Stephen Sondheim classic, “Company.” Director Tony Clements, a Broadway actor for “Mamma Mia!,” brings the award-winning musical to the stage at Marquette. The central character, Bobby, who cannot find a steady relationship, is content as the “11th wheel” among five married couples, who happen to be best friends (not awkward at all!). This is surely one you won’t want to miss. Get your tickets now! “Company” will run from April 9-12 and April 15-19, at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday through Saturday and 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. - Ethan Niquet

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARQUETTE.EDU

6 eats under $6 DATE NIGHT? EMPTY WALLET? SCORE! ¿TIENES UNA CITA ROMÁNTICA? ¿UNA BILLETERA VACÍA? ¡PERFECTO! KOPP’S FROZEN CUSTARD Three scoops in a cone for $4.20. Check out the flavor forecast on their website for your faves. IAN’S PIZZA Regular slice for $2.75. Specialty slices like the delicious mac and cheese for $3.75. GLORIOSO’S ITALIAN MARKET pick up a box of Garofalo farfalline pasta for $3.00. That plus a marathon of “Parks and Recreation” on Netflix makes it a night. 14

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THE WICKED HOP Devour the pretzel platter with stone ground mustard and chipotle-bier-cheese sauce for $6. Can’t go wrong with pretzel bites. BEL-AIR CANTINA Pollo Verde Taco for $2.89 or a Spicy Pollo Tamale for $3.85. Really like your date? Add chips and guac for $1.05. AJ BOMBER’S AJ’s original burger topped with American cheese, lettuce, tomato and bomber sauce is a mere $4.75. FYI: .Peanut allergy? The

millions of peanut shells on the floor make this joint a no-go zone for you. - Lauren Papucci


Where to Write?

COFFEE SHOPS FOR THE POET, THE NOVELIST, AND THE STUDENT LOS CAFÉS IDEALES PARA EL POETA, EL NOVELISTA, Y EL ESTUDIANTE. THE STUDENT/ EL ESTUDIANTE COLECTIVO COFFEE

1701 N. Lincoln Memorial Dr. Troubadour bakery, Letterbox fine tea and locally roasted coffee in 13 different locations. If you’ve yet to go to Colectivo, go down to the lakefront, which was originally built in 1888 as the historic Milwaukee River Flushing Station. Go to Bay View if you want an open view of blueberry muffins being made at Troubadour Bakery. PHOTO BY ADAM PULTE

THE NOVELIST/ EL NOVELISTA ROCHAMBO

1317 E. Brady Street Oddly small tables, uneven floors and rustic walls are as inspirational as their “best Irish coffee since the creation of man.” The coffeeshop stays open till midnight every weekday encouraging Hemingway’s “Write drunk, edit sober” approach. Just don’t drive here. You might be taking a cab home. PHOTO BY ADAM PULTE

THE POET/ EL POETA BREWED ON BRADY 1208 E. Brady Street Bright orange, highlighter yellow and neon green painted walls ought to provide a few colorful rhymes and verses. If the ink isn’t flowing, read the motivational quotes etched into every table and chalkboard in the place. It’s quiet. It’s quaint. It’s poetry.

–Adam Pulte

PHOTO BY ADAM PULTE 2015

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EVENTS

MARQUETTE & MILWAUKEE

COMING UP APRIL 10-26

APRIL 17-18

APRIL 1-19

MAY 14-17

LUCHADORA!

GALLERY NIGHT AND DAY

COMPANY

CINDERELLA

Take a glimpse of the arduous Mexican lucha libre culure as we follow young Vanessa into a journey of self-discovery and intense sequences as she makes it through life all the way up to the boxing ring in none other than a pink wrestling mask. First Stage Theater Marcus Center for the Performing Arts 929 N. Water St.

Get ready for a showcase of some of the city’s most recognized talents in this festival of the arts to be held in the city’s famous Historic Third Ward. It is your chance to take in some of the art that is created in Milwaukee in a festival that is being held for the 27th ocassion. Historic Third Ward

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To conclude Marquette’s theater season and its theme of “home,” Company is an award- winning musical about the ups and downs of finding a place to call home. Written by Stephen Sondheim, it is a comedy encompassing a deeper message sure to tug at the heartstrings. Marquette Theater Helfear Theater 525 N. 13th St.

In the classic tale of love, hope, and dreams, the Milwaukee Ballet brings Cinderella to life through the artistic direction of Michael Pink. The story that taught us that if you keep on believing, all your dreams might just come true. Milwaukee Ballet Uihlein Hall Marcus Center for the Performing Arts 929 N. Water St.


ART

Haggerty Museum of Art 530 N. 13th St.

Clear Picture: Looking at Communities through Art (through May 31) Mila Teshaieva: Promising Waters (Jan. 22-May 31)

MUSIC

Marquette Band Varsity Theater 1326 W. Wisconsin Ave. Symphonic Band Concert (April 12) Spring Jazz Band Concert (April 17) Wind Ensemble Concert (April 19)

The Body, The Self (Jan. 22 - May 31)

Marquette University States of Uncertainty Symphony (Jan. 22-May 31) Orchestra Milwaukee Art Museum

700 N Art Musuem Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair (Feb. 5-May 4)

Milwaukee Public Musueum

Varsity Theater 1326 W. Wisconsin Ave. Orchestra Concert (April 26)

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra

800 W. Wells St.

Marcus Center for the Perrforming Arts 929 N. Water St.

Crossroads of Civilization (Mar. 30 - April 30)

De Wart conducts Mozart (April 10-11)

Historic Third Ward

Disney in Concert: Tale as Old as Time (April 24)

THEATER

DANCE/MISC.

Milwaukee Repertory Theater

Marquette University’s DANCE Inc.

Low Down Dirty Blues (March 20 May 24) Stackner Cabaret 108 E. Wells St.

Spring Showcase (April 18 & 19)

Skylight Music Theater 158 N. Broadway

The Skylight Ring (May 15- June 7) Into the Woods (May 22 - June 14)

Marcus Center for the Performing Arts 929 N. Water St.

Men Are From Mars... Women Are From Venus: LIVE! at Wilson Theater in Vogel Hall (April 9-12) Disney in Concert at Uihlein Hall (April 24-26)

Weasler Auditorium 1506 W. Wisconsin Ave.

Milwaukee Ballet Marcus Center for the Performing Arts 929 N. Water St. Cinderella (May 14-17)

Harley Davidson

Harley-Davidson Museum 400 W Canal Street (P)art: PhotographsRevealing the Art of Mechanical Form (until May 17)

Comedy

6317 W. Bluemound Rd. The Dangerously Strong Open Micthe longest running comedy open mic night in Milwaukee! (Every Sunday at 7:30 p.m.)

Gallery Night and Day April 17-18)

2015

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GRAFFITI

What’s in by Ian Schaak Photos by Ian Schaak and Caitlin Miller

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n a tag? 2015

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GRAFFITI

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I

f you see them on the street, you wont recognize them. Graffiti artists travel the urban landscape unknown to us. Like ninjas in the night, they now how to travel, and they have a look. If you saw a man with a facemask, a bag full of clanking metal cans, and a hoody covered in speckles of paint, then you saw a graffiti artist. Odds are they just finished some work, and hadn’t yet dawned the civilian disguise. Those creepy buildings surrounded by old rusty fences, decorated with missing breaks, and full of broken glass are home to a tagger. They don’t see the fear in a place, but rather the opportunity. You may never see a tagger at work, because that is half their game. What you will see is a name, or something that resembles one. Thank god for trains. Imagine trying to leave your mark on the city. Some buildings are dangerous to climb, or walls could be way to visible. The “relic” tag was left on a train cart next to a seemingly abandoned warehouse off the corner of Washington and Washington. A train cart is like a vultures prey. It sits there and waits, helplessly. An 2015

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out of commission train cart soon gets covered with tags. To an early tagger it is practice. More often than not a lone train will not get the artistic appreciation that a true tagger wants. The carts are usually used privately in places people don’t see them, or they could be awaiting oblivion. The real money is a moving train. Think of it like a commercial. The lights go off, the barricade goes down, and alternating bells ring in your ears. That’s right, a train is passing and you can’t go anywhere. Then cart after cart passes, each one covered with a long list of ego drunk names all proud to be read. When a train cart is still in service it is kept with hundreds of other carts. The collection is prime for a tagger. Hiding in a field of train carts is easy, and it gives the artist time to work. This way they write full statements as opposed to small names, and they can stretch their artistic arms. Eventually the cart will be on the tracks, and passing a pedestrian. When it does they can see “Reign” in blue, with a slight gradient, black stroke lines, and even a pink background that complements the work, while getting your attention. More often than not, passing trains have some of the finer graffiti. Taggers must know their work will be seen, and they aspire to impress. Few spots guarantee an audience like this. C 2015

23


IS IT ART?

Is IT Art? Unlocking the mystery behind the giant Third Ward ladybugs by Madeline Pieschel

W

hy are three monstrous ladybugs climbing up the side of a downtown Water Street building? Are they art? Who put them there, anyway? It’s had to bug you at one point or another. The six-foot long ladybugs were added to the building in 1999 by Burke Properties, a real estate development office housed in the ladybug building on 618 N. Water Street. John Burke Jr., the company’s founder, has been in real estate development since 1968 and filled the offices with whimsical art, particularly glass and sculpture. Burke is a passionate art enthusiast who has made a name for himself in the Milwaukee art world, and has ties to one of the greatest works of public art in Milwaukee. The Calatrava wings on the Milwaukee Art Museum are named ‘The Burke Brise Soliel.” The critters were featured on the front page of the Journal-Sentinel immediately after they were mounted on the side of the building and a lively debate ensued that continues to this day. “I love the lady bugs. In fact, I was a regular at the Ladybug Club (a club inside 24

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of the ladybug building), which used to be a salsa place on Friday nights. The ladybugs are fun, quirky and simply one of those additions to downtown that helps make Milwaukee unique. The building owners made the architecture more interesting, and the place a focal point. I applaud the creativity and commitment to the arts that is reflected in the ladybug piece.” — Annemarie Sawkins, Ph.D., a Milwaukee-based independent curator and art historian. “You can call this art. But we forget, just like there are bad basketball teams, there is also bad art. Certainly no one would suggest the ladybugs are of the caliber of, say, Wisconsin’s basketball teams. In fact I am pretty sure the ladybugs would be unranked, all things considered, not even as good as an average high school basketball team in a fairly weak conference. The ladybugs, to extend the basketball analogy past its breaking point, are a guy shooting buckets in his own backyard. Is that basketball? Sure. Are the ladybugs art? Sure.” —Tom Bamberger, Milwaukee artist and art critic. C


PHOTO BY A. MARTINA IBÁÑEZ-BALDOR 2015 25 THE LADYBUGS HAVE BEEN ON 618 N. WATER ST. SINCE 1999


IS IT ART?

Los mariquitas del centro P

by Madeline Pieschel traducido por Cristina Nieves y Ana Silva

or qué razón hay tres monstruosas mariquitas subiendo un edificio del centro de la ciudad en la calle Water? ¿Son ellas arte? ¿Quién las habrá colocado ahí? Te ha tenido que incomodar en algún momento u otro. Las mariquitas de seis pies fueron añadidas al edificio en el 1999 por propiedades Burke, un negocio de desarrollo para bienes raíces localizada en el edificio de las mariquitas en 618 N. Water Street. John Burke Jr., el fundador de la compañía, ha estado dentro de esta rama de desarrollo de bienes raíces desde el 1968 y ha llenado sus oficinas con una variedad de obras de arte caprichosas específicamente de vidrio y esculturas. Burke está grandemente entusiasmado y apasionado con el arte, y por esta razón ha logrado ser distinguido en el mundo del arte de Milwaukee ya que también tiene grandes conexiones con una de las obras mas reconocidas en el arte público de Milwaukee. Las alas Calatrava en el museo de arte de Milwaukee son llamadas en honor a él: ‘The Burke Brise Soliel.” Los insectos fueron presentados en la portada de la revista Journal-Sentinel, justo después de que fueran montadas en el lado del edificio, quienes brindaron un debate que aun existe hoy día. “Me encantan las mariquitas. De hecho, yo era una regular en el Club de mariqui26

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tas (un club en el interior del edificio de las mariquitas), que solía ser un lugar de salsa los viernes en la noche. Las mariquitas son divertidas, peculiares, y simplemente una de esas adiciones al centro que ayuda a que Milwaukee sea único. Los propietarios del edificio han hecho que la arquitectura sea más interesante y el lugar en un punto focal. Aplaudo a la creatividad y el compromiso con las artes que se refleja en la pieza de la mariquita.” — Annemarie Sawkins, Ph.D., curadora e historiadora del arte independiente con sede en Milwaukee “Usted puede llamar esto arte. Pero olvidamos, al igual que hay equipos de baloncesto malos, también hay arte mala. Ciertamente, nadie sugeriría las mariquitas son de la talla de, por ejemplo, los equipos de baloncesto de Wisconsin. De hecho, estoy bastante seguro de que las mariquitas serían las partidas no igualadas, considerando todas las cosas, ni siquiera tan bueno como un equipo promedio de baloncesto de escuelas superior en una conferencia bastante débil. Las mariquitas, para extender la analogía de baloncesto más allá de su punto de ruptura, son un tipo de tiro al aro en su propio patio trasero. ¿Es eso baloncesto? Claro. ¿Son arte las mariquitas? Claro.” —Tom Bamberger, artista y crítico de arte en Milwaukee. C


PHOTO BY A. MARTINA IBÁÑEZ-BALDOR LAS MARIQUITAS HAN ESTADO EN 618 N. AGUA ST. DESDE 1999

2015

27


IS IT ART?

IS it art? What are those silver glittery flag structures in front of Discovery World? by Lauren Papucci

W

alking along the lakefront, you might notice big, silver, glitter-like flags sparkling in the sun. What are they? Why were they put there? Who made them? Are they art? The series of seven “Wind Leaves” were designed by American artist Ned Kahn. They have been stationed in front of Discovery World since 2006. Kahn’s original idea was to place the structures in Veteran’s Park, surrounded by the trees, but the anonymous donor that paid for the sculpture wanted the location changed. Each stands 30 feet tall and is made of stainless steel disks that shimmer when hit by the sun. The disks produce a reflection of the surrounding lakefront. Ball bearings in the column allow each piece to move with the wind. Haggerty Museum head preparatory Dan Herro loves that these pieces are interactive with nature.

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“They are more than just nice to look at, which is something that I like about art,” says Herro. “I think that art has to be aesthetically pleasing, but I really like that they are interactive.” Each of the seven pieces has a crank that can be closed or opened. Next time you are by the lake, stop by and interact with them. See what they can do. “I consider just about anything manmade to be art,” says Herro. “For me, I think that everything is art. Whether I like it or not comes to be subjective. I see art in everything, like a chair or table.” Environmental art, like the Wind Leaves, is meant to be placed where it can interact with nature. “It definitely needs the wind and the weather for it to live up to its full potential and to be what the artist wants it to be,” says Herro. The next sunny day you are walking by the Wind Leaves, make sure to wear those shades. C


PHOTO BY IAN SCHAAK NED KAHN’S “WING LEAVES” HAVE BEEN NEAR THE LAKEFRONT SINCE 2006.

2015

29


WORD FOR IT

En Pointe by Adam Pulte traducido por Alejandro Rodriguez y Marisol Madrigal THE DEFENITION. Pointe ballet is dancing on the extreme tips of the toes. Everything in ballet can be done en pointe, but it is more difficult and more painful. Students can’t attempt it until the bones of the foot are settled, at age 11 or 12. THE REASON. The pointe shoe elongates the dancer’s legs, creating a straight line from toe to knee to hip. Mastery makes for easier, quicker, faster turns. Rising to the toes allows the dancer to appear ethereal, as if she is floating. THE SHOE. The sole is leather and cardboard; the hard toe is layers of glue and fibers. The shoe is finished in canvas and pink satin. THE DIFFICULTY. It’s slippery. It’s balancing on an inch of space. It’s damn difficult and takes strength and intelligence. Because of the way the Achilles tendon works, odd points of weakness create dead zones of weakness?. THE PRIDE. When a teacher invites a student to begin pointe, she is reaffirming that the student has properly studied for at three to four years, that she is strong, and that she is talented. THE HISTORY. Maria Tagliaoni was the first dancer en pointe. She wore regular satin ballet slippers slightly reinforced at the toe. Ballet dancers and the characters they portrayed were thought of as super-human and otherworldly. C

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LA DEFINICIÓN. Ballet de pointe es bailar con las puntas extremas de los dedos de los pies. Todo en el ballet se puede hacer en pointe, pero es más difícil y más doloroso. El estudiante no puede intentarlo hasta que se forman completamente los huesos del pie a la edad de 11 o 12 años. LA RAZÓN. El zapato de pointe alarga las piernas de la bailarina, creando una línea recta desde la punta del pie hacia la rodilla hasta la cadera. La maestría ayuda a hacer giros más rápidos y fáciles. La elevación de los pies permite al bailarín que aparezca etérea, como si estuviera flotando. EL ZAPATO. La suela es de cuero y cartón; el dedo duro del pie es capas de pegamento y fibras. El zapato está terminado en lienzo y satén rosa. LA DIFICULTAD. Está resbaloso. Es mantener el equilibrio en una pulgada de espacio. Es de lo más difícil y toma fuerza e inteligencia. Por la manera en que trabaja el tendón de Aquiles, los puntos impares de debilidad crean zonas muertas de debilidad. EL ORGULLO. Cuando una maestra invita a una estudiante a empezar pointe, ella está afirmando que la estudiante ya ha estudiado apropiadamente por lo menos tres o cuatro años, que ella es fuerte, y que ella es talentosa. LA HISTORIA. Maria Taglioni fue la primera bailarina en pointe. Ella vestía unas zapatillas de ballet satinado reforzadas en el dedo gordo del pie. Las bailarinas de ballet y los personajes que ellas interpretan eran vistos como súper humanos y fuera de este mundo. C


2015

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WORD FOR IT

EN FRANCAIS

O n , W isco n s in !

Order in French fearlessly

House-Smok

by Eva Sotomayor

Ori

Three Course $34 P

ed Rushing W

Strauss Veal

aters Trout,

Goulash with

L es P re m

Rotkohl, Baco

n

L es E nt re

Kluski Nood

les and

L es D es se

Door County

Les Premiers

Cherry Crè

Quiche du

Jour Served with a Petite Salade dressed in House Dijon Vi naigrette 9.25

House-Smok ed Sa

Les premier (lay pray-meer) Appetizers. The Third Ward’s Coquette Café, 316 N. Milwaukee St., serves food that is too good to be afraid of ordering. Try the house-smoked Rushing Waters trout.

C

lmon Carpac Lemon Dressin cio* g, Pickled Red Onion, Capers, Toasted Hous e-Made Brioche , Petite Salade 11.25 Escargots de

Baked Burgun

rlic-Parsley Bu

11.5

Prince Edward Isl

Curried Mus

and Mussels,

tter

Coquette H

r Goat Cheese, Cape W

sels

Curry Broth, Gr anny Smith Ap

11.95

Mussels in a tra

Alsati

Bourgogne

dy Snails in Ga

Moules Meu

ple

niere ditional White Wine, Cream, Garlic & Thym Served with Po e Broth mmes Frites & Aioli* 14.95

Escargots (es-car-go) Snails cooked in butter and garlic. Be brave. Your shoe would taste good if it was cooked in butter and garlic.

Pan-Seared Le

g of Duck Co Sautéed Brusse nfit ls Sprouts, Lard ons of Bacon, Button Mushr ooms, Pomeg ranate Reducti on 13.5 House-Smok ed Rushing W

aters Trout Rotkohl, Using er’s Bacon, Ch ive Aioli, Caraway Vina igrette, Rye Br ead 11.5 Plateau de

Charcuteries Assorted Hous e-Made Pates, Terrines & Rillett Served with To asted Sourdoug es h, Cornichons & Dijon 14.95

Pommes frites (pom-freet) French fries. None of those flaccid steaky American fries here. Very French: thin, crispy, salty.

Plateau

de Fromages Selection of Fr ench Cheeses with Seasonal Spiced Nuts, Fr Fruit, esh Chutney & Warm Bread 14.95

Traditional Flatb Roa

P

Fennel Sausa

House-M Asiag

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Seared Sp

Zesty Red Green Cherr Field Gre

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Served Me with

se Hou Org a

House-Sm Ovenoked Dri Chicken Bre Grann Pulled Por Dill Pickle &

Feel free to

*Thoroug

Provincial Roa

Open Faced Cou

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Open Face Melted G

Grille

Provincial Pe


Prix fixe (pree-fix) A set, three-course menu of smart choices made by the chef paired with a low(ish) price.

Oix nFix,e W isc on s in ! ie r

Menu

n, Chive Aiol

ee

i, Caraway Vi

d Lemon Brow

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naigrette, Ry e

Les dessert (oh, come on. Don’t you ever eat out?) Go with the classic: crème brulee, custard with a torched sugar crust.

Bread

n Butter Aspa

ragus

ème Brulée

Soupe et Salades Soupe du Jo

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5.25

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Classic French

Onion Soup wi 7.5

th Melted Gruy

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House Salade

Field Greens wi

th House Dijon

ian Flatbreads 5.95

Vinaigrette

Organic Appl

Asiago, Pecans ,

e Salade

and Tarragon

Vinaigrette

9.25 on Pizza * House-Smoked Salm toes, Chive Oil Ro e Toma Grap as n, Onio te d Be rs, Red et Salade Watercress,12.5 Sp

iced Hazelnuts, Feta Cheese, Orange-Garlic e Vinaigrette Flammekuech 9.25 Bacon & Onion bread of Fresh Cheese,

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Leaf Spinach

Sa

la a AuveMus Pizzde rgnehroo map , Red Gr sted age & Roa es, Balsamic Vina e, igr Sauc ett Red e Zesty age, Made Saus 9.5 go Cheese & Provincial Pesto

Pecans, Blue D’

Ca12esar Salade

maine, Grana

Padano, Ga rlicicCrPizz sted Garl outoans pinach & Roa9.5

d Sauce and Fontina Cheese 10.75

Salade Niç

oi 10se Bean du s, Ni a ço Pizz iseJour Olives, Hard-B oiled Egg, ry Tomato, W ine Potato, Fla geolets & eens with Grain y Mustard Dres sing 10.25 Add Grilled Ch icken Breast 6 Add Grilled Tu na Filet 8 Ad Grille h dwic d Sa a*lmSan Tun on Ro Grillded ulade 9 Ad Leg ofon e-Made Bun Hous Duack ediumd-Rare Confi t8 h Cucumber & Remoulade 13.5

Milieu du Pain

House-Sssan Sandwich mokted e-Made Croi anic Ch s, Brie Cheese icke Crea n med BreaLeek d Salmon, st Salade ied Tomato11.95

& Baby Spinach stuffed east, Field Gree ns, Ca ndied Walnut ano e Cub ny Coq s, Smithuett Apple, Goat Ch Chee eese & se, try Ham, WI Swiss rk,TaCoun rrago n Vinaigrette 10.75 ise & Cilantro-Cumin Mayonna 16.95

inquire Bag Pan abou t Glnat

uten Free Dis ni gh coo g of ng ccia Coquette’ Foca s on foods fro Vegetable astedkin m animal origin 9.25

Croque Monsieur

untry Ham Sandwich with Dijon

& Gruyere

10.25

Dijon, ed Country Ham Sandwich with 10.75 Gruyere & a Fresh Basted Egg*

ed Chicken Breast Sandwich .75

Poulet Rôti

Chicken, Half of a Provincial Herb Roasted mary Jus Garlic Mashed Potatoes & Rose 20.25

Arugula

Les entrée (lay on-tray) Main course. Try the veal goulash with kluski noodles. Klushi? A Polish name for soup. Poland is near France, right?

Coq au Vin

rooms, Red Wine Braised Chicken, Mush c Mashed Potatoes Pearl Onions, Usinger’s Bacon, Garli 21.95

Ratatouille & Ravioli

and Goat Cheese Ravioli, Zucchini, House-Made Caramelized Onion Red Peppers, Roasted Eggplant, to, Toma ted Roas Yellow Squash, no Cheese, and Basil Pada a Gran uts, Toasted Waln 21.95

Trout á la Grenobloise

Watercress, Glazed Radishes, Lemo

n Brown Butter

22.75

Grilled Atlantic Salmon

c, rling Potatoes, Truffle Buerre Blan Herbes de Provence spiced Finge Basil Oil ers, Pepp Bell Red ted Roas and Marinated 23.95

Pan Seared Red Snapper

Spinach, Marinated Potatoes &

Pear Peppercorn Sauce 21.95

Grilled Berkshire Pork Loin

ned Pickle, Stone Ground Mustard Leek Confit, Mustard Spaetzle, Julien22.95

Bacon Wrapped Strauss Veal

Bean Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Green

Sauce

Meatloaf

s, Porcini Reduction 19.95

Strauss Veal Goulash

Brown Butter Asparagus with Kluski Noodles and Lemon 21.95

Braised BBQ Short Ribs

ots, Parsnip Puree, Lime Crème Sautéed Green Beans with Shall 22.95

Grilled Hanger Steak

Red Wine Shallot Sauce, Pommes

Croque Madame

esto, Wisconsin Provolone, Baby

L es E nt re es

25.95

Frites and Garlic Aioli*

Macaroni & Cheese

Rose Roasted Chicken, Goat Cheese &

mary Oil 18.95

t Casserole of Sautéed Eggplan

Tomato Concassé and Parmesan

Custard 17.95

Bonne nuit (bon-newt) Good night, but for family or special friends. Bid the waiter “bonsoir” (bon-sewer): good evening. 2015

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VINTAGE ART

From Bumblebee to Jumpman MU hoops uniforms through the decades by Joe Kaiser

A

l Mc Guire left Marquette after the 1976-77 season to become the vice chairman of Milwaukee-based Medalist Industries, a small manufacturer of athletic apparel and machine tools. But even before he officially held a post, his connections with the company led to innovative, sleek uniforms that broke away from college basketball norms. 1969-72 Starting in the late 60s, Medalist introduced home and road jerseys that made Marquette stand out from any other program. The white home jersey featured each player’s jersey number in a colored circle on the front with no “Marquette” name anywhere to be seen. The navy blue road jerseys, dubbed the “bumblebee” jerseys, featured flashy, horizontal gold stripes, and the Warriors sported both jerseys en route to a 1970 National Invitational Tournament championship that tipped off the most successful decade in program history. 1972-74 The NCAA outlawed the bumblebee jerseys after the 1971-72 season for being too “disorienting” to opposing teams when Marquette players jumped up and down. Marquette moved to a new design with the introduction of powder blue jerseys. The last time Marquette would wear these would be in the 1974 National Championship game loss to 34

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North Carolina State. 1974-84 McGuire turned to an unexpected source for the program’s next jersey design—star forward Bo Ellis. Ellis was taking fashion-design courses at Mount Mary College at the time, and one night at Schroeder Hall, he sketched out one of Marquette’s most unique and wellknown designs. The “untucked” jerseys, which featured the school name on the bottom of the jersey. The jerseys became the topic for Marquette Alums Danny Pudi and Chris Marr’s film “Untucked,” which aired on ESPN. The Warriors would wear these during their 1977 National Championship victory, but the NCAA banned the untucked jerseys in 1984. Today The banning of the flashier jerseys led to more traditional looks for the next decades, in which Marquette changed its mascot and began to succeed again on the court. By making the Final Four in 2003, Marquette became a “Nike Elite” team and wore a new line of Nike gear until 2007. After 2007, Marquette signed with Converse and became the first and only team to wear Brand Wade, named after Dwyane Wade, former Marquette standout and three-time NBA champion. The Golden Eagles stuck with Brand Wade when Wade switched from Converse to Michael Jordan’s Nike Jumpman line in 2009. C


1969-72 1974-84 Today

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES, MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY SPIRIT SHOP. 2015

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VINTAGE ART

Behind the glas slipper

65 years of happy endings, a ne movie in March, and Milwauke Ballet’s Cinderella in May by Paulo A. Acuña

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d ss r

ew ee

T

he glass slippers, the fairy godmother, the dress, the stroke of midnight. For generations, the story of a young, earnest girl has captivated audiences around the world. Cinderella is a timeless tale of love, ambition, and dreams, a tale that has touched the lives of millions. Oppressed by her evil stepmother and stepsisters, Cinderella never stops believing that she will get to her happy ending. After slaving away for a trio of spoiled and vile women, she makes it to her happy ending and marries the handsome prince. Endless renditions and versions of this legendary tale exist, following the same general plot line. Myths which resemble the story of Cinderella can be traced to ancient times and back to Egypt and China. The Egyptian story of Rhodopis is one of the first myths bearing similarities to Cinderella. One of the earliest recognized written versions is from 1634, collected by Giambattista Basile and published posthumously. Titled Lo cunto de il cunti (The Story of Stories), this collection featured the tale of “Cerentola,” who was tormented by an evil stepmother and stepsisters, but eventually ends up with Prince Charming. Perhaps the most influential written version of the story was published in Histoires ou contes du temps passé in 1697 by Charles

CINDERELLA 2015 OFFICIAL MOVIE POSTER 2015

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VINTAGE ART Perrault. Perrault's version, published under the name “Cendrillon,” is the one that most people remember when they think of Cinderella. In this version, under the dreadful supervision of her mother, Cinderella attends two separate balls. At the second ball, she leaves her glass slipper and the prince travels the kingdom to find the beautiful maiden that fits into it. As Cinderella falls in love, her evil stepsisters ask Cinderella for forgiveness and leave aside their jealous rage. Another popular written version of the tale is that of the Grimm brothers, Aschenputtel. Still, it is Perrault's version of the story that continues to inspire the countless fresh renditions of the classic. According to fairy tale website SurLaLune, Perrault, “influenced by the French salons and the fairy tale writers of the late seventeenth century, added descriptive flourishes, romance, and humor to the story.” The fairy godmother, the carriage rides, the glamour, and the elegance which characterizes the modern remembrance of the tale was all a creation of Perrault. Perrault's version inspired the film version of Cinderella, perhaps one of the most memorable and successful Disney animated films of all times. It was produced by Walt Disney, a production company still suffering the strains of World War II burdened with $4 million dollars of debt. Disney needed to act fast, so he put together a team of animators to create what he hoped would be their saving grace. On February 15, 1950, Cinderella made its debut. The film, following Perrault’s plot, became a cinematic success. It was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Music, Original Song for “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo.” The soundtrack was released by Walt Disney Records on February 4, 1997. The American Film Institute named “Cinderella” the 9th greatest film in 38

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The film became a cinematic success. It was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Music, Original Song for “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo” the animation genre and it has consistently been nominated as one of the best American films ever made. On March 13, 2015, the story of Cinderella will once again come to life on the screen, this time in a live-action format starring Cate Blanchett, Lily James, and Kenneth Branagh. And in May, the Milwaukee Ballet performs its rendition of the story directed by Michael Pink, with a score performed by the Milwaukee Ballet Orchestra. Whether it is told through literature, film, music, and whether it is antique or modern, the story of Cinderella is the story of a dream, a fairy tale through which we see ourselves escaping from the troublesome realities of life. The tale of a girl who wished for it all is a reflection of those who dream with their hearts, those who wish their lives could end up as picture-perfect as Cinderella's. The story teaches us that it never hurts to dream, and sometimes, with the help of a kind stranger, if you keep on believing, all your dreams may just come true and maybe even your own personal “happily ever after.” C


ILLUSTRATION BY MARY BLAIR 2015

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VINTAGE ART

Detrás d zapato d cristal

65 años de finales felices, una nu película en marzo, y en el ballet Milwaukee la Cenicienta en may

by Paulo A. Acuña traducido por Emily Castillo, Daisy González and Da 40

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del de l

ueva t de ayo

T

odos conocen los zapatos de cristal, la hada madrina, el vestido, y el toque de la medianoche. Durante generaciones, la historia de una chica joven ha cautivado al público de todo el mundo. La Cenicienta es un cuento eterno de amor, ambición, y sueños, un cuento que ha tocado la vida de millones. Oprimida por su malvada madrastra y hermanastras, Cenicienta nunca deja de creer que va a tener un final feliz. Después de trabajar como sirvienta para un trío de mujeres mal agradecidas y viles, ella llega a su final feliz y se casa con el príncipe guapo. Existen muchas versiones de este cuento legendario, siguiendo la misma línea argumental general. Mitos que parecen a la historia de Cenicienta pueden ser rastreados a tiempos antiguos hasta Egipto y China. La historia egipcia de Rhodopis es uno de los primeros mitos que tiene semejanzas con Cenicienta. Una de las primeras versiones escritas reconocida es del año 1634, de una colección de Giambattista Basile que fue publicada póstumamente. Bajo el título Lo cunto de il cunti (El cuento de los cuentos), esta colección contiene el cuento de “Cerentola,” quien fue atormentada por una malvada madrastra y hermanastras, pero termina en los brazos del príncipe encantador. Quizá la versión más influyente

aniel Carcamo​ CINDERELLA 2015 OFFICIAL MOVIE POSTER 2015

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VINTAGE ART escrito de la historia fue publicada en Histoires ou contes du temps passé en 1697 por Charles Perrault. La versión de Perrault, publicada bajo el nombre de “Cendrillon,” es la que la gente más recuerda cuando piensa en Cenicienta. En esta versión, bajo la supervisión de su madre terrible, Cenicienta asiste a dos bailes separados. En el segundo baile, deja su zapatilla de cristal y el príncipe recorre el reino para encontrar a la hermosa dueña de la zapatilla en que cabe sólo ella. Mientras Cenicienta se enamora, sus malvadas hermanastras le piden a Cenicienta que las perdone y dejan sus celos. Otra versión popular escrita de la historia es la de los hermanos Grimm, Aschenputtel. Sin embargo, es la versión de Perrault la que sigue inspirando muchas versiones nuevas del cuento clásico. Según el sitio web de cuento de hadas SurLaLune, Perrault, “inspirado por los salones franceses y los escritores de cuentos de hadas de finales del siglo XVII, agregó toques floridos, romance, y humor al cuento.” La hada madrina, los paseos en carruaje, el encanto, y la elegancia que caracterizan el recuerdo moderno del cuento era una creación de Perrault. La versión de Perrault inspiró la versión cinematográfica de la Cenicienta, tal vez una de las películas más memorables y exitosas de animación de Disney de todos los tiempos. Fue producida por Walt Disney, una compañía de producción que aún sufría las tensiones de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y que cargaba $4 millones de dólares en deuda. Disney tenía que actuar con rapidez, por lo que él reunió a un equipo de animadores para crear lo que esperaba que fuera su gracia salvadora. En el 15 de febrero de 1950, Cenicienta hizo su primer aparecimiento. La película, siguiendo la trama de Perrault, se convirtió en un éxito cinematográfico. Fue nominada para 42

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La versión de Perrault inspiró la versión cinematográfica de la Cenicienta, tal vez una de las películas más memorables tres premios de la Academia, incluyendo Mejor Música, Canción Original para “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo.” El audio fue lanzado por Walt Disney Records el 4 de febrero de 1997. El Instituto de Cine Americano llamó “La Cenicienta” la novena mejor película de género de animación y de manera consistente ha sido nominada como una de las mejores películas americanas que se han hecho. En el 13 de marzo de 2015, la historia de la Cenicienta una vez más va a volver a la pantalla, esta vez en un formato de acción real protagonizada por Cate Blanchett, Lily James, y Kenneth Branagh. En mayo, el Ballet de Milwaukee realiza su interpretación de la historia dirigida por Michael Pink, con una puntuación interpretada por la Orquesta Ballet de Milwaukee. Tanto si está contada a través de la literatura, el cine, la música, y si es antigua o moderna, la historia de Cenicienta es la historia de un sueño, un cuento de hadas a través del cual nos vemos escapar de las realidades problemáticas de la vida. La historia de una niña que deseaba por todo es un reflejo de los que sueñan con el corazón, los que desean que su vida termine como la vida de Cenicienta. La historia nos enseña que nunca le hace daño soñar, y a veces, con la ayuda de un extraño, si sigues creyendo, todos sus sueños pueden hacerse realidad y tal vez incluso su propio “colorín colorado.” C


ILLUSTRATION BY MARY BLAIR 2015

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Pirouetting Toward Perfection An inside look at what it takes to become a ballet dancer by Caitlin Miller

F

irst position, second position, third position. Plié, arabesque, pirouette. These positions and movements are engrained in the brains of ballet dancers. You see them on the stage, effortlessly transforming and contorting their bodies. Moving to the music. Moving as one with each other. It is a part of them, a second nature to the way they maneuver. The effort that goes into becoming a ballet dancer can best be summed up in one word – strenuous. Tom Seiff and Hannah Rosenfeld are first-year dancers at the Milwaukee Ballet Company II. At 21 and 18 respectively, they have been training for years, pushing their bodies to unimaginable limits. Ballet dancers, no matter the gender, train on similar levels. Equally different can best describe the parallel between them. Each participates in vigorous training programs individually, and in school to master the techniques. The only variant in the training is the emphasis of focus. Male ballet dancers focus on partnering and building muscle in the gym so they are able 44

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to lift, turn and jump, often with another dancer. Female ballerinas focus on footwork and the vast amounts of dedication it takes to articulate. The dance form is not easier for one or the other. One gender does not put more effort into it than the other. They both work toward one goal – to achieve perfection. Ballet dancers have to “be able to do anything and everything,” says Rosenfeld. The sheer amount of dedication to the art form can be measured on a mental level as well. They visualize concepts in their head and apply them to their bodies. It is a like an intricate puzzle. All the pieces need to fit together to achieve the final product, the beautiful creation that took hours of dedication to create. Ballet dancers are also spirited in their love for the arm form. They dedicate a majority of their lives to perfecting the techniques as closely as they can. They makeplentiful sacrifices, often giving up what other see as everyday aspects of their lives to pursue their passion of dance. Rosenfeld followed in her older sister’s footsteps. She was just four years old when


PHOTO BY JENN MAZZA, COURTESY OF MILWAUKEE BALLET II

PHOTO BY ALEX CLARK, COURTESY OF MILWAUKEE BALLET II

2015

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PHOTO BY ALEX CLARK, COURTESY OF MILWAUKEE BALLET II TOM SEIFF, LEFT, PERFORMS WITH THE MILWAUKEE BALLET II AT THE SOUTH MILWAUKEE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

she began taking ballet classes in her hometown of Indianapolis, Indiana. She fell in love with it and continued classes, dedicating six weeks of her summers to attend training programs. At 15, Rosenfeld moved to Chicago – by herself – to continue with her passion. A new city, away from her family, with no idea what the future had in store --a thought that seems foreign to most people. We live with our families until we graduate high school and then go off to college. Leaving home at just 15 years old with no idea what the future has in store? That is dedication at its finest. Seiff began his ballet career at 16 in 46

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classes at the Center of Creative Arts in his hometown of St. Louis, Missouri. At University of North Carolina School of the Arts, a boarding high school, Seiff pushed his limits even further. The typical age to begin ballet classes is between four to ten years old; Seiff was a late starter and had to work hard. He eventually wound up in the second company of the Nashville Ballet. But Seiff wanted to see what else was out there so he came to one of the most reputable companies – Milwaukee. His dedication to the art form remains strong even when he acquired a spot in one of the most prestigious companies. Seiff’s fellow dancers describe him as hardcore;


A Day in the Lfe of Tom Seiff

one of the most dedicated individuals. Even before stepping into the studio, Seiff wakes up on any given weekday to crosstain on his own. Crazy, right? One would think the rigor from an eight-hour day would break someone down, day after day. But not for Seiff. The pre-class warmup and mile long swim he so often engages in helps him to excel. It takes physical and mental stamina to be a ballet dancer. Being at one with your body. Moving and contorting, making imagined movement physical. It’s tiring. It’s strenuous. The sacrifices are endless. But, as Rosenfeld says, “You do it because you love it.” C

5 a.m.

Wake up. Have a cup of coffee with a banana and peanut butter or steel cut oatmeal with walnuts and blueberries.

6:50 a.m.

Head to Wisconsin Athletic Club for a swim. Start with 1,000 meters of free, kick for 500 and then sprint last 100 with fly.

7:50 a.m.

Stop by Starbucks if time before heading home to get ready for the day and take morning vitamins (fish oil for inflammation)

9:15 a.m.

Class. Start at barre for 30 to 45 minutes of individual work. Afterward, we move to center with the company.

11 a.m.

Break. Usually have an emergen c in my water. Will eat some trail mix, granola bar or fruit.

11:15-2:15 p.m.

Rehearsals. Varies between blocking and dancing – periods of standing and heavy dancing.

2:15-3:15 p.m.

Lunch. Usually run to Colectivo for coffee or smoothie and wrap or salad.

3:15-6:15 p.m.

More rehearsals

6:15-7:15 p.m.

Lift weights or just walk on treadmill to lengthen out my legs from the day’s strain. Otherwise, head home and cook dinner. Roll out on my foam roller or use a tennis or lacrosse ball to get deep into the muscle tissue of my legs.

7:15-10 p.m. Try to watch some good Netflix

or go out with friends – normal stuff. Prepack lunch for next day.

10 p.m.

Bedtime 2015

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SERVICE

So you want to

Entonces tú quieres g

Mistakes, and how to not make the

by Alexandra Whittaker traducido por Ser Mistake #1: Asking for the wrong thing If it’s just you and a guitar, it’s called a “documentary case” and is cheapest. If you want layers of background music and singers added, that’s a “production case”—expect to pay. Figure out which you want ahead of time or risk paying big bucks for booking the wrong appointment. Mistake #2: Running up the clock “Time is money”, never more true than in a recording studio. Daniel Zelonky of National Recording LLC in Milwaukee charges $50 an hour. Don’t tweak lyrics while the engineers strum their fingers. Show up ready to rock. Mistake #3: Thinking instrumentals live in the studio If your song desperately needs more cowbell but you’re lacking a Will Ferrell in your band, tell the recording studio ahead of time so they can make that happen. No advance notice, no additional instruments.

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Mistake #4: Choosing the wrong studio Ask the recording studio staff for an example of work they’ve done for a song similar to yours before recording. Most are happy to give out old demos, and you’ll find out by listening to it if it meets your standards. And if the place only has rap demos to offer? You might want to record your opera album elsewhere.


recorD A song

grabar una canción

em/ Errores, y como no cometerlos

rgio Becerra Ramirez y Sebastián Fuentes Error #1: Preguntando por la cosa equivocada Si estás solo con tu guitarra, se llama un “caso documentario” y es lo más barato. Si también quieres grupos musicales, eso es un “caso de producción”— anticipa un costo alto. Averigua cual caso quieres antes de hacer la cita, o correrás el riesgo de pagar más. Error #2: La marcha del reloj “El tiempo es dinero”, nunca es más cierto que en un estudio de grabación. Daniel Zelonky de Grabación Nacional LLC en Milwaukee cobra $50 a la hora. No ajustes la letra mientras los ingenieros rasguean sus dedos. Llega listo para trabajar. Error #3: Pensando en el uso de instrumentos en vivo en el estudio Si tu canción ocupa un poquito más de ostentación y no tiene a un Will Ferrell en la banda, asegúrense de notificar al estudio con anticipación para que lo tomen en cuenta. No habrá instrumentos adicionales si no se notifica previamente. Error #4: Escogiendo el estudio equivocado Pregúntale al personal del estudio demostraciones de trabajos pasados que son similares a la canción que quieres grabar. La mayoría está dispuesto de compartir grabaciones, y te darás cuenta si el trabajo corresponde con tus estándares. ¿Y si el estudio solamente tiene canciones de rap? Quizás sea mejor grabar tu álbum de opera en otro lugar. C

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SERVICE

How to attend a classicAL music concert And not embarrass yourself by Eva L. Sotomayor

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t’s parents weekend and you want to convince your mom and dad that you’re an actual adult. The Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra is playing. What better way to show them how grown up and mature you are than to take them to a classical concert? That’s where adults go, right? Even though your dad might fall asleep halfway through the concert and blame it on “a long day at the office,” classical concerts can be quite enjoyable and your parents will enjoy a grown-up night out with, yes, you. But there are differences between seeing Bleachers at Turner Hall and seeing conductor Edo de Waart at the Marcus Centre, and it’s not just the lack of Pabst Blue Ribbon at the Marcus. Predictable rules apply: phones off, don’t talk, and don’t be rude. But classical music has its own, specific etiquette. The Community Arts Music Association and other music associations have published etiquette guides. And you thought Mumford and Sons was strict because they didn’t allow cameras at their show. Performers at classical concerts prefer quiet audiences so musicians can concentrate. Avoid whispering, leaving your seat while music is playing or between movements in a symphony, and never, ever, unwrap candies or food. Leaving your seat mid-aria to buy a bag of Doritos, and returning to eat said bag of Doritos: no. If

There are differences between seeing Bleachers at Turner Hall and seeing conductor Edo de Waart at the Marcus Centre you have a cough, buy a bag of cough drops and unwrap them before them music begins. Even coughing or sniffling are frowned upon among the classical crowd. Ripped jeans and a vintage Packers hoodie are not what is worn, no matter how much you paid for them at Urban Outfitters. It’s a good time to send your nice pair of pants to the dry-cleaners. Clapping allows classical concertgoers to let loose, but wait until the right moment. Each section of a piece of classical music is called a “movement,” and the audience applauds at the very end of the last movement. Between movements, no matter how fabulous the music is, the audience is expected to sit silently. Once you are at the end, if the symphony was especially amazing or moved you, you can yell: “Bravo!” for male performers, “Brava!” for females. Some fans whistle or hoot. Let ’er rip. It’s all a matter of courtesy. If you’re unsure of the rules, there’s no shame in asking or observing. Enjoy the music and being an adult. See, it’s not that bad! 2015

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Savor the memor

Dining with the ’rents to celebrate your release by Caitlin Miller and Paulo Acuna Photos by Caitlin Miller

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ries

e into reality

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ith graduation looming, families are coming to town. You know what that means? Real food. No more ramen, Jimmy John’s or frozen meals. It’s time to take advantage of your parent’s wallet to explore, for one last time, the variety of food Milwaukee has to offer. From brunch to celebrating Milwaukee’s Old World heritage, we give you an array of unique culinary choices. It’s a journey you don’t want to miss.

A BITE OUT OF BRUNCH Blue’s Egg

317 N 76th St, Milwaukee, WI A short ride to the west of the city lies one of the most recognized restaurants in the area. You know you want to share with family and friends the wonders of brunch, so why not take them to this quaint location serving breakfast favorites at reasonable prices? Try their famous monkey bread or dig into some pulled ham, together with some of their classic omelettes and eggs benedict. Pair it with a satisfying mimosa or bloody mary’s for a meal you will be drooling over.

More Ideas

Cafe Corazon 3129 N Bremen St, Milwaukee, WI Honeypie Cafe 2643 S Kinnickinnic Ave, MIlwaukee, WI 2015

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ODE TO MILWAUKEE’S GERMAN HERITAGE

BREAK THE BANK Karl Ratzsch’s

320 E Mason St, Milwaukee, WI Milwaukee is prided on its German heritage. Say auf widersehen to the city at one of the primer restaurants serving traditional, authentic German food. Karl Ratzsch’s is a landmark known throughout the area for its Old World cuisine. It’s not everyday you’ll be served by waiters in traditional German outfits. Grab a beir and enjoy some schnitzel!

More Ideas

Mader’s Restaurant 1041 N Old World 3rd St, Milwaukee, WI Old German Beer Hall 1009 N Old World 3rd St, Milwaukee, WI

The Capital Grille

310 W Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI A luxury fine-dining experience is just a stone’s throw away from campus! A special occasion like graduation is the perfect excuse to celebrate with a gourmet meal and top-notch service. Classic dishes such as the dry aged porterhouse steak and filet mignon are just a few delectable offerings. End the evening with a savory dessert – the perfect close to a congratulatory feast. From the cheesecake with seasonal berries to their classic crème brulee, there’s no way you can resist. Indulge in high-class style and share all your accomplishments with your closest relatives at The Capital Grille.

More Ideas

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Lake Park Bistro 3133 E Newberry Blvd, Milwaukee, WI Harbor House 550 N Harbor Dr, Milwaukee, WI


SMALL PLATES

More Ideas

Wolf Peach 1818 N Hubbard St, Milwaukee, WI La Merenda 125 E National Ave, Milwaukee, WI

Odd Duck

352 S Kinnickinnic Ave, Milwaukee, WI Not sure what you want? Are you contemplating several dishes? Another Milwaukee hotspot for food, Odd Duck is unique in that the menu changes and is reprinted every night. Small plates are a great way to share with family and friends. This restaurant, located in the hip Bayview area of Milwaukee, offers the very best. The dishes thought out by co-owners Ross Bachhuber and Melissa Buchholz and executed by Chicago-born Executive Chef Dan Jacobs vary. They fuse together typical French cuisine with Mediterranean and Southern European flavors. Make some memories over their wide selection of wines and delicious cheese and charcuterie plates. Pass the plates and be satisfied with the diverse options for you and your family’s enjoyment.

A SWEET TOOTH Leon’s Frozen Custard

3131 S 27th St, Milwaukee, WI You’ve walked across the stage, diploma in hand. Now, it’s time to celebrate with a little sweet treat. Chances are if you’ve made it to the south side, you’ve passed a quaint little family owned and operated custard stand that has been a landmark in Milwaukee since 1942. Open year round, there’s no excuse not to go. Sure there are traditional flavors like vanilla and chocolate and sundaes loaded with sugar. But there are no other options when you have the choice to pick butter pecan. Get a scoop of the butter pecan. In fact, it’s been raved about so much that it’s best to get two. The diet will always be there tomorrow.

More Ideas

Classy Girl Cupcakes 825 N Jefferson St, Milwaukee, WI Simma’s Bakery 817 N 68th St, Milwaukee, WI 2015

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SERVICE

Hats Off! PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA MICHELETZ

Help Mom find you from the bleachers by Paulo Acuña and Alexandra Whittaker BE TRUE TO YOUR SCHOOL Show some spirit! Blue and gold paint or decorations and Marquette symbols and represent your home for the past four years. Uncork the glitter and sparkle! BYE, FELICIA If you hit “next episode” on Netflix more often than you hit the books, salute the shows that got you through finals week. Your cap will stand out, and it might even make your bored younger cousin crack a smile. LOOK TO THE FUTURE Off to grad school or the work world? Tell the crowd you’re ready. If dental students can make teeth look cool, you can rep your plans on a cap, too! HIT THE ROAD No plans after graduation? No worries. J.R.R. Tolkien wrote, “Not all those who wander are lost.” Wear your travel itinerary and take the first step on your journey. THANKS, MOM AND DAD! Give a shout-out to your biggest fans way up in the nosebleeds. Remember all the support, pick-me-ups, and care packages they’ve provided over the past four years? Write thank-you note where they can see it. C 56

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CRAP AND GOWN For every grad cap do, there’s also a don’t

DON’T use tape. Your design will fall apart before you even get to the Bradley Center. Glue guns work best, and tape, if you must, should be duct, not Scotch. DON’T overuse glitter. It’s called “craft herpes” for a reason — it’ll make your outfit shimmer long after you take your cap off. DON’T wait until the night before to decorate. Fire up your glue gun when you get your cap on May 12 or 13. Even better, make the design on cloth or paper (easier to work with that a bulky cap) and glue it to the cap.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LISA MIHELICH

GET STARTED!

DON’T design five minutes before you walk. Let the design set overnight, or risk it coming apart when you walk the stage.

Blick Art Materials has all the glitter, glue, and googly eyes you need to create a clever and memorable cap. Two locations close to campus:

DON’T add weight. Heavy jewels are fab but heavy as the crown jewels. There’s a reason the Queen looks that stiff. Lighter rhinestones are easier to attach and less likely to fall off.

2219 North Farwell Avenue Phone: 414-220-9063 Hours: Mo-Sa: 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Su: 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

DON’T draw on your cap without practicing on paper. If you’re artsy and want to do something dramatic, sketch it on a sheet of paper first. Otherwise, you might be forced to wear a “golden eagle” cap with more droop than dazzle.

242 East Menomonee Street Phone: 414-278-0407 Hours: Mo-Fr: 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Sa: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Su: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 2015

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Reginald Baylor BY THE NUMBERS PROFILES

by Paulo A. Acu単a & Madeline Pieschel photos by Madeline Pieschel

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d

2015

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N

atural light floods through tall windows into Reginald Baylor’s sixth floor studio in the Third Ward’s Marshall Building. He sits in a wheelie chair wearing headphones and listening to The Wood Brothers. Two paintings are in progress: one halfway finished, one just a sketch. His work is a recognizable style of geometric-pop that is energetic, complex, and filled with iconography. “Black and Blond, Blonde and Black Paper Dolls” contains an African-American Marilyn Monroe and playful square basketballs and watermelons are depicted in “Oh Duty, Not Driving,” which is housed at the MAM. He’s also exhibited at our own Haggerty and a number of other museums and galleries locally and nationally. Half-filled mugs cover his computer desk. A number of chairs sit empty, around the room. Sketches and scribbles are taped haphazardly on the walls. His studio space and what is in it are important to him.

Number of colors used IN one painting 120 in Coffee and

Tea with Isabel

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2015

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Number of computers used to complete one painting

4 desktops + 1 graphic designer

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Method

Paint containers numbered to match spaces on canvas 2015

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Favorite trick Masking tape makes perfectly clean lines 64

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Fluid Ounces per painting

50

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Best sketching tool Mechanical pencils and erasers save time

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Beverage

Black coffee and green tea all day 2015

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MUSIc

Hobby

Playing guitar 68

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1 musician or

band per painting


Number of step stools used to reach the highest area of canvas 5 each a

different height 2015

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PROFILES

Dreaming B How Milwaukee born-and-bred Sam Ahmed became WebsterX and ignited the local music scene

by Alexandra Whittaker

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am Ahmed wanted a different life. Last year, he went to class at UW-Milwaukee by day, walking around campus through the winter sludge with a coffee in hand, dreaming at night about performing sold-out rap music concerts. Music comes naturally to Ahmed, and growing up with Ethiopian music playing in his home on the North side of Milwaukee helped influence this passion. He only recently spun his love for acoustic guitar, Ethiopian music, and The Grateful Dead into reality by quitting school and becoming professional rapper WebsterX. “It was only, like, 12-15 months ago that I really started seeing this as a serious, full-blown career,” says Ahmed. And now, in the midst of a bitter cold February wind, he’s perched on the edge of a rickety chair in Colectivo, nursing a coffee, nonchalantly bringing up that time he opened for Riff Raff at The Rave and that time Entertainment Weekly wrote about the music video for his song “Doomsday” when it hit over 20,000 views on YouTube. He’s making it happen, and he’s making it happen big.

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WebsterX electrifies a crowd. When he opened for Riff Raff with his song “Desperate Youth” at The Rave in February, Ahmed bounced around stage, his back hunched over to be eye-level with the packed crowd, calling out, “Come on!” and waving. He dived off the stage into the crowd, which The Rave staff immediately scolded him for, so the next time he just hopped off down to the sticky Rave floor. On stage, a group of his friends jumped around and danced with him while he performs. “I really believe in this idea of the people as the publicist,” says Ahmed. Word-of-mouth has helped spread awareness of his music. He prefers playing venues where the audience isn’t sitting at tables drinking beer but is instead paying full attention to the music and lyrics. To Ahmed, concert spaces aren’t places to casually listen, but where musicians and music-lovers enjoy a shared passion. What he’s doing seems to be working. Ahmed’s newest song, “Doomsday,” has


Big

GRAPHIC BY MADELINE PIESCHEL 2015

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PROFILES

Being here, people don’t think you can make it, and they always think you need to move and leave to go onto bigger things 72

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been listened to more than 33,000 times on SoundCloud in the two months it’s been online, and Ahmed has signed on a music manager to help handle incoming interview, performance, and collaboration requests. An aspiring musician in Milwaukee might jump ship to a bigger city at the slightest flickering of a spotlight, but Ahmed believes in the Milwaukee music scene. “During the Riff Raff show, people would be like, dude, you’re from LA, right?” says Ahmed. “No. I live right here. And this is a proven fact that you could do this too if you just live in this city. Being here, people don’t think you can make it, and they always think you need to move and leave to go onto


PHOTO COURTESY OF WEBSTERX

bigger things. I know I can thrive here.” Milwaukee inspires some of his songs, including “Desperate Youth.” Same kids giving out the money Pushing this art to be known Wauwatosa used to be the safest home. Ahmed has heroes: Bob Marley’s for his inclusive stage presence, Ne-Yo for his individuality, A Tribe Called Quest for its socially aware messages, and Jimi Hendrix for his brilliant live performances. They helped shape Ahmed as a performer, and

their influence is evident. Ahmed and Hendrix are particularly similar. Lyrically, they both favor songs with passionate cries for change, as in Ahmed’s “Renaissance.” Trying to break the gate to the white kids I’m well spoken token You been hoping he’ll croak Then this city will be free, full of cream-colored poets. C 2015

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PROFILES

PHOTO VIA MAM.ORG

CURTIS C

The man behin

by Madelin

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CARTER

nd the museum

ne Pieschel

hungry 15-year-olds stomping down a runway,” says Morgan. “Eunice embraced different sizes on the runway because not everyone watching the show was the same size, and she wanted everyone to be involved and represented.” The Ebony shows created a community of people who changed the landscape of fashion and what was considered beautiful. At MAM, docent-led tours through Inspiring Beauty explore how societal definitions of beauty are informed by power, and how these definitions then

PHOTOS BY MADELINE PIESCHEL THE FOUNDER OF THE HAGGERTY IN FRONT OF “24:00:01” MADE BY SHILA GUPTA 2015

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C

urtis Carter loves a challenge. He is drawn to places that need attention and work. In 1971, when he was just leaving graduate school with a doctorate in aesthetics, Carter was determined to find the perfect habitat for his ambitions. He wanted to teach in a philosophy of art program at a university where he could lead and develop arts education over the long-term. Marquette University was that place. At that time, Marquette offered little formal instruction in arts and culture, had no museum or resource center where art was displayed, and had little-to-no involvement in the Milwaukee arts community. Carter was initially hired as a philosophy professor for aesthetics, but eventually founded the Haggerty Museum of Art on campus and served as its director from 1984-2007. And forty-six years later, Carter is still at Marquette teaching and researching, with the same ambition he had in1969 at the start of his career. His passion for art has not stopped burning for even a minute. He’s warm and approachable, yet fervent and rambunctious. Yes, that’s a portrait of him hanging just inside the entrance. How in the world does someone start an art museum? Besides passion and money, it takes vision and planning. Carter chaired a Marquette fine arts committee of community volunteers in 1975, which gave him the support and courage to integrate new arts-related projects on campus. A small body of works that had been given to the University was open to the public at the library about once a week for three hours. One of the pieces included the first painting that Marquette University ever received, and it’s still in the permanent collection of the Haggerty: Rev. Stanislaus L. Lalumiere, S.J., donated Pere Marquette and the Indians by Wilhelm Lamprecht in 1889. Carter’s first act was to open it seven days a week and extend its hours. 76

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CARTER’S PORTRAIT IN THE ENTRANCE OF THE HAGGERTY.

Eventually, he says, he had an “aha!” moment when he realized the campus needed its own art museum. “There was a need,” Carter says. “There were many great programs at Marquette, but there was a serious deficiency in the arts. I decided that a museum needed to built and I was going to see it happen.” He researched. He visited art museums all over the world. All sizes. All purposes. He


spoke with curators, directors, and those who knew how museums worked. Marquette University women’s council group asked him to give a presentation about art. They liked the idea of building an art museum. He invited a member of the women’s council, the vice president of Marquette, an art critic from the Milwaukee Journal, a few students, and a friend from New York to form a feasibility study

I decided that a museum needed to built and I was going to see it happen 2015

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committee for the museum. They organized a one-year plan to visit seven different universities with museums to study how they worked, their facilities, staffing, budgets, and educational programming. University administration, says Carter, was getting a little nervous. An art museum takes a significant financial investment. “It’s not wrong to say that the idea was not entirely welcome, but we proceeded anyway,” Carter says. The project eventually did receive University approval and the women’s

The museum could have never begun or sustained without him 78

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council accepted it as their funding project. “We were given certain limitations,” says Carter. “The museum couldn’t be bigger than such and such, there was a budget limit, and we couldn’t touch any existing donors. The University was reasonably sure that that would take care of it.” Those obstacles seemed likely to stop the project in its tracks. But Carter had made it too far to give up. He began contacting donors. “Something special about Curtis that no one can match is his fundraising ability,” says Lynne Shumow, the current curator of education at the Haggerty. “He had the skill to really make the museum financially sound and most people can’t do that. He’s an amazing fundraiser.” Patrick Haggerty was a Marquette engineering graduate who co-founded and was president of Texas Instruments. He and


CARTER PSUHED FOR THE MUSEUM AT MARQUETTE AFTER IDENTIFYING THE UNIVERSITY’S DEFICIT IN THE ARTS.

his wife, Beatrice, had a passionate interest in art and architecture. The Haggertys were good friends of Carter’s and he knew they would be supportive of his idea. “Patrick Haggerty opened up the door and didn’t even say hello,” says Carter. “He said, ‘So, what are your ideas for the museum?’” Haggerty recommended architect O’neill Ford from San Antonio, a leading architect in the Southwest. O’neill’s style combined modernism with indigenous qualities of early Texas architecture. Carter wanted to make sure a local architect was involved, too, an architect who knew the area well. He chose David Kahler, who worked on monumental Milwaukee buildings like the Milwaukee Art Museum and the Petit National Ice Center. The funding came through and things took off. “Once it got built, there was no person prouder than Father Raynor, who was not

keen on the idea when he initially heard the plan,” says Carter. “Father Raynor once asked me what the greatest priorities are for the arts at Marquette were. I said, ‘Well, we need a museum or gallery.’ He said, ‘Well, send me a plan.’” Carter did, and “a polite refusal came months later. So I went right against that, of course. Aside from basketball, it’s one of the greatest things we offer the community, which is why, after it was all said and done, Father Raynor liked the museum so much.” One of Carter’s central concepts was to bring artworks into Milwaukee that weren’t otherwise known, particularly contemporary experimental art. In the early days, several exhibitions premiered at the Haggerty and toured the country. The famous Cuban artist, Wilfredo Lam, opened a major exhibition at the Haggerty, as did French artist Jean Fautrier. Today, the Haggerty 2015

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AS A PROFESSOR, CARTER CONT 80

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TINUES HIS MISSION TO EDUCATE PEOPLE ABOUT ART AND PHILOSPHY.

houses exhibitions from all over the world, including an impressive permanent collection that includes pieces from Warhol, Dali, Haring, and Chagall. “Curtis made it a very international museum,” says Shumow. “We are well outside of only being a local museum. We deal nationally and internationally and he set that tone.” Shumow characterizes the museum’s origins as “not an academic birth. “The administration didn’t quite understand how to incorporate art into education. That was Curtis’s specialty. He was a driving force with having that happen and that’s how he always envisioned the museum working.” Today, Marquette professors use it as a course resource, and students use it for classroom assignments as well as enjoyment. From theology to English to philosophy, professors are able to draw useful parallels between art and whatever subject is being studied. For example, journalism students and Spanish students are currently curating a show at the museum. The students are challenged to think critically about the art and meaning behind the pieces while learning how to convey those thoughts into a review, an arts catalog, or a press release. Learning to analyze a piece of art is a skill that can transfer to other disciplines. “We can really integrate art into any kind of classroom,” says Shumow, “The more we do with classes, the more people get it.” As a philosopher, Carter lives and breathes this idea. For him, art is a way to talk about, well, almost anything. The Haggerty turns 30 this year. A new director will be hired in June and a proposal for renovation that includes better facilities for education is in the works. Carter set a high standard, shaping the museum’s vision into something global and adaptable. “The museum could have never begun or sustained without him,” says Shumow. After nearly five decades of hard work, Carter continues to pursue his mission of 2015

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arts education and philosophy. He is a professor in the College of Arts and Sciences and teaches the Philosophy of Art course and the Art in a Democratic Society course through the Les Aspin Center for Government program. His face lights up when he talks about his students. “Most students come into the classes knowing very little about art, perhaps not fully understanding its place in our lives and society,” says Carter. “But once they have the experiences of going to the theater, ballet, opera and the art museum through taking my classes, they have a wholly different view. I know very few students who didn’t come out having a positive view and wanting more art in their lives.” Carter has written four books and more than 50 exhibition catalogs. He has been featured in more than 20 publications, essays, and books, lectured at nearly 30 seminars and conferences, and curated close to 100 exhibitions. One coup: He got artist Keith Haring to come to Marquette’s campus in 1983 to paint a mural before the opening of the Haggerty. Carter often work in China, delivering lectures and attending seminars at prestigious universities. He was on the cover of a Chinese magazine that is the equivalent to Time magazine and is an intellectual celebrity in China. A new research project on aesthetics and urban life will take him to Beijing and Belgrade in the fall. He’ll be leading a conference at Marquette in 2017 on aesthetics and urban life, as well. Where did Carter get his love of art? “I was born that way,” he says. “I just have a passion for it. Every great society has to value and support art in order to grow.” This is a philosophy he has made relevant to Marquette and his impact on our campus and community continues to flourish. “He’s 100% dedicated to the mission of the museum and the university,” says Shumow. “He has a true passion.” C 82

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HARING WORKING ON THE MURAL WHILE CARTER OBSERVES.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE HAGGERTY MUSEUM


Babies, Dogs, and Break Dancers HARING AT MU

HARING WORKS ON THE MURAL AS PEOPLE PASS BY.

THE MURAL FEATURES IMAGES OF DOGS AND BABIES TO SIGNIFY LIFE AND EXUDE A SENSE OF ENERGY.

YOUNG CARTER AND HARING AT THE MURAL SITE.

Curtis Carter brought Keith Haring to Marquette University’s campus in 1983, and Haring left behind a custom-created mural. While developing exhibitions for the Haggerty, Carter was often in New York City establishing networks of contacts. At the time, Haring’s work was rising in popularity. Carter noticed his work in New York City subway stations, clubs, and galleries and he wondered if he could get Haring to come to Milwaukee to make an appearance. Carter called Haring up the next day and asked him to paint a mural on a construction wall for the Haggerty site. “I told him we didn’t have much money, but we would cover his airfare,” says Carter. Haring and his partner, a DJ, enthusiastically agreed to come. “Keith was a very nice person,” Carter says. “He barely let me buy him his meals while he was here. He also met with my classes at the time and he was always very articulate. He knew exactly what he was saying without ever being egotistical.” The construction fence was 8 feet high and 96 feet long. It took Haring about four days to paint giant figures on both sides. Marquette students in Fine Arts took part in the painting preparation and Haring let volunteers and students paint certain sections of the fence. His partner set up music and several hundred students and community members gathered around to watch. Visitors continuously streamed in and out of the site, turning it into something of a performance. Haring painted simple images of babies, dogs, and break-dancing figures. He wanted to use images that celebrate life and energize people, and believed babies to be the most affirmative symbol of the meaning of human life. The mural was received enthusiastically by the Marquette and Milwaukee communities for the three months it stood outside. Although it was patrolled by campus security, a concern remained that it might be a target for vandalism, However, not one person made the attempt. It served as a vivid centerpiece for the opening ceremony of the Haggerty on April 25, 1983. When Haring came to Marquette, he was just beginning to be recognized as a rising international artist. The week he arrived in Milwaukee was the same week he was featured in Newsweek. After Haring’s untimely death from AIDS-related complications in 1990, his work became widely recognized for its political themes and lively energy. The Haggerty mural painted by Haring has been exhibited around the world. It is a well-known and well-documented piece of work, and is now a part of the Haggerty’s permanent collection. —Madeline Pieschel ISSUE ONE 2015

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Underco artists We poked, prodded and discovered where artists are hiding at Marquette. Meet three of Marquette’s undercover creators: Bryan Audia, Laree Pourier, and Daniel Barrett. by Adam Pulte

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over PAINTING BY BRYAN AUDIA 2015

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PROFILES

BRYAN AUDIA

I

YEAR: JUNIOR MAJOR: ADVERTISING HOMETOWN: INDIANAPOLIS, IN MEDIA: GRAPHIC DESIGN

’ve always been interested in art and design. I don’t think I have a lot of technical skill as an artist, but I do think I have an eye for good design and that’s something I’ve always been passionate about. I took drawing and graphic design courses in high school, where I developed some fundamentals for artwork, and in the past year it has evolved with my graphic design. Now with so many online sources displaying artwork, it has been easier for me to see different styles and become inspired. I get a sense of relief when I see good design. It gives me a sense of order and satisfaction. It’s a very cool feeling when I have a jumbled idea in my head of something I want to make, and then I can put it together in a clean and good-looking way. There’s no one else who can do it the same exact way as me. I see artists and designers make super-complex and interesting things and I am inspired by the design of those things, but the subject and meaning behind them doesn’t necessarily connect with me. When I make the pieces I get to draw inspiration from the design of those other artists and I can add my own humor or personal touch to what I’m making. My style is simple and geometric. I like polygons and blank space. Given my technical limitations, I have to strive for simplicity. My artistic style is to visualize humor. I like taking a one-line joke or idea that I think is funny and expressing it visually.

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GRAPHIC DESIGN IS THE PREDOMINANT MEDIUM BRYAN USES TO CREA

HIS ARTWORK UTILIZES SIMPLE, GEOMETRIC SHAPES.


ATE HIS ARTWORK.

2015

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PROFILES

LAREE POURIER

A

YEAR: SENIOR MAJOR: SOCIAL WELFARE AND JUSTICE HOMETOWN: PINE RIDGE, SD MEDIA: COLLAGE, DRAWING, WOODCUTS

rt has always been a part of my life. Many of my elder family members are very artistic, so I’ve always been surrounded by creativity and encouraged to express myself artistically. I started taking art creation more seriously in the past four years or so as I’ve been more politically engaged and have developed a passion for art education. Art provides me with my own space. As an indigenous woman, there aren’t a lot of places where I can find myself, my people or our cultures represented. Art offers me a place to claim space, to celebrate and honor who I am and to demand recognition. I create because I’ve found that art plays a powerful role in activism and education, both of which I am very passionate about. It is a platform for marginalized stories and also an outlet for expression and healing. My dream is to create a space in my hometown, Pine Ridge, South Dakota, for youth to engage in community arts and activism so that they, too, can recognize and utilize their own creativity and voice. I’d describe my artistic style as simple and graphic. I love collage and drawing, and recently fell in love with wood-cut relief printing, which I hope to continue to work with—especially because of it’s ability to be mass produced (a political plus), but to also sustain a certain organic nature.

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ART CONNECTS


S LAREE TO HER INDIGENOUS ROOTS.

LAREE’S PASSION FOR EDUCATION AND ACTIVISM IS REFLECTED IN HER ARTWORK.

HER HOME STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA HAS SERVED AS A MAIN INSPIRATION FOR HER ART. 2015

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PROFILES

DAN BARRETT

S

YEAR: SOPHOMORE MAJOR: ADVERTISING HOMETOWN: MILWAUKEE, WI MEDIA: PHOTOGRAPHY, PAINTING, ILLUSTRATION, POETRY, AND WRITING

ince the beginning of grade school, art has been my go-to. It has always been my hobby and my greatest passion, and as I have gained more experience, it has become a foundation in my day-to-day life and relationships. Art is my escape; it is my punching bag, my pillow to scream in, and my dinner date. Making and creating art brings out everything in me, both my best and worst, and it gives me an outlet to express all the thoughts and feelings that run through my head. Art is as much a dialogue with my audience as it is my own internal dialogue. I have been lucky enough to explore lots of different creative media; including photography, painting, illustration, poetry, and creative writing. I choose these outlets because I am drawn to creative challenges and it’s difficult for me to express everything I am thinking or feeling in only one way. I see myself using art for the rest of my life, both professionally. My style seems to change frequently as I become more knowledgeable about the media I am working with and I am still working on locking in a consistent style in my visual art. If I had to describe my style right now, I would say it is “dark art,” often moody with minimal light and with themes of isolation, especially when it comes to photography. C

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DAN USES A VARIETY OF ARTISTIC MEDIUMS, INCLUDING PHOTOGRAPH

HIS DRAW TO CREATIVE CHALLENGES ENHANCES HIS ARTISTIC STYLE.


HY, IN HIS ARTWORK.

.

HIS PHOTO OF A WOMAN REFLECTS THE “DARK ART” THEME THAT TRANSPIRES THROUGH HIS ART.

DAN CONSISTENTLY CHANGES HIS STYLE AS HE LEARNS MORE ABOUT ART. 2015

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Artistas encubie MU tal vez no ofrezca licenciaturas en artes finas, pero eso no significa que no tenga artistas finos by Adam Pulte traducido por Jeydelyn MartĂ­nez and Francisco Roque

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s ertos PAINTING BY BRYAN AUDIA 2015

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PROFILES

BRYAN AUDIA

S

AÑO: JÚNIOR COLEGIO/ LICENCIATURA: COLEGIO DE COMUNICACIÓN/PUBLICIDAD PROCEDENCIA: INDIANAPOLIS, IN MEDIOS: DISEÑO GRAFICO

iempre he estado interesado en el arte y el diseño. Yo no creo que tenga mucha habilidad técnica como artista, pero sí creo que tengo ojo para el buen diseño y eso es algo que siempre me ha apasionado. Tomé una clase de dibujo y cursos de diseño gráfico en la secundaria, donde desarrollé algunos fundamentos para obras de arte, y el año pasado se ha evolucionado tanto como mi diseño gráfico. Ahora, con tantos medios digitales exhibiendo arte, ha sido más fácil para mí ver diferentes estilos artísticos para inspirarme. Me da una sensación de alivio cuando veo un buen diseño. Un buen diseño me da un sentido de orden y satisfacción. Recibo una sensación muy fría cuando tengo una idea embarullada en mi cabeza de algo que quiero hacer, pero luego lo pongo todo junto de forma limpia y estética. Eso es en lo que me esfuerzo por hacer. Mi arte me brinda la oportunidad de organizar mis pensamientos y sentimientos internos. No hay nadie más que pueda hacerlo de la misma manera que yo. Veo artistas y diseñadores hacer cosas muy complicadas e interesantes y me siento inspirado por el diseño de esas cosas, pero el tema y el significado detrás de ellos no necesariamente conectan conmigo. Cuando las junto yo me inspiro en el diseño de esos otros artistas y puedo añadir mi propio humor o toque personal a lo que estoy haciendo. Mi estilo es simple y geométrico. Me gustan los polígonos y el espacio en blanco. Teniendo en cuenta mis limitaciones técnicas, tengo que luchar por la simplicidad. Mi estilo artístico es visualizar el humor. Me gusta tomar una broma de simple o una idea que creo que es divertida y expresarlo visualmente.

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EL DISENO GRAFICO ES EL MEDIO PREDOMINANTE CON EL CUAL AUDI

SU ARTE UTILIZA FORMAS SENCILLAS Y GEOMETRICAS.


IA CREA SU ARTE.

2015

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PROFILES

LAREE POURIER

E

AÑO: SENIOR COLEGIO/ LICENCIATURA: CIENCIAS Y ARTES/ BIENESTAR SOCIAL Y JUSTICIA PROCEDENCIA: PINE RIDGE, SD MEDIOS DE COMUNICACIÓN: COLLAGE, DIBUJO, GRABADOS EN MADERA

l arte siempre ha sido parte de mi vida. Muchos de mis familiares mayores son muy artísticos, así que siempre he estado rodeada por la creatividad y animada a expresarme artísticamente. Comencé a tomarme más en serio la creación artística durante los últimos cuatro años dado que he estado más comprometida políticamente y he desarrollado una pasión por la educación artística. El arte me ofrece mi propio espacio. Como una mujer indígena, no hay muchos lugares en donde puedo encontrarme a mí misma, a mi pueblo, o nuestras culturas representadas. El arte me ofrece un lugar para mí donde puedo reclamar mi espacio, para celebrar y honrar lo que soy, y para exigir reconocimiento. Creo porque me he dado cuenta que el arte juega un papel importante en el activismo y la educación, dos áreas que me apasionan. Es una plataforma para las historias marginales y también una forma de expresión y la curación. Mi sueño es crear un espacio en mi ciudad natal, Pine Ridge, Dakota del Sur, para que los jóvenes se dediquen a las artes de la comunidad y el activismo para que ellos, también, puedan reconocer y utilizar su propia creatividad y sus propias voces. Yo describiría mi estilo artístico como simple y gráfico. Me encanta el collage y el dibujo, y recientemente me enamoré de la impresión en relieve de madera de corte, y espero seguir trabajando con ella especialmente debido a su capacidad para ser producida en masa (una ventaja política), pero para sostener también una cierta organicidad.

EL ARTE CONECTA A 96

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SU PASION POR LA EDUCACION Y POR EL ACTIVISMO SE REFLEJA EN SU ARTE.

SU ESTADO NATAL DE DAKOTA DEL SUR LE HA SERVIDO DE INSPIRACION PARA SU ARTE.

A LAREE CON SUS RAICES INDIGENAS. 2015

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PROFILES

DAN BARRETT

D

AÑO: ESTUDIANTE DE SEGUNDO AÑO COLEGIO/ LICENCIATURA: COLEGIO DE COMUNICACIÓN/PUBLICIDAD PROCEDENCIA: MILWAUKEE, WI MEDIO: FOTOGRAFÍA, PINTURA, ILUSTRACIÓN, POESÍA, Y LA ESCRITURA CREATIVA

esde el inicio de la escuela primaria, el arte y yo siempre hemos ido juntos de la mano. El arte siempre ha sido mi afición y mi pasión más grande, y como he adquirido más experiencia, se ha convertido en un pilar de mi vida diaria y las relaciones del día a día. El arte es mi escape; es mi saco de boxeo, mi almohada para gritar, y mi cita para cenar. Realización y creación de arte lo ponen de manifiesto todo en mí, tanto mi mejor como mi peor versión, y me da una salida para expresar todos los pensamientos y sentimientos que se ejecutan en mi cabeza. Comprendo el arte tanto como un diálogo con mi público, como conmigo mismo. He tenido la suerte de descubrir diversos medios de comunicación creativos incluyendo la fotografía, la pintura, la ilustración, la poesía, y la escritura creativa. Elijo estos puntos de vista porque me siento atraído por los retos creativos y es difícil para mí expresar todo lo que estoy pensando o sintiendo de una sola manera. La razón por la que he hecho del arte una gran parte de mi vida es porque me veo a mí mismo usando el arte para el resto de mi vida, tanto profesionalmente como personalmente. Hago todo el trabajo creativo que hago porque necesito una manera visual y verbal de expresar mis pensamientos y sentimientos. Todavía estoy aprendiendo y junto con el proceso de aprendizaje viene estableciendo un estilo. Mi estilo parece cambiar con frecuencia cuando descubro más conocimientos sobre los medios de comunicación en los que estoy trabajando y todavía estoy trabajando en aferrarme a un estilo consistente en mi arte visual. Si tuviera que describir mi estilo en este momento, diría que es “arte oscuro,” poco esperanzador con luz mínima y temas de aislamiento, especialmente cuando trabajo con la fotografía. C

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DAN ULITIZA UNA VARIEDAD DE MEDIOS, INCLUYENDO LA FOTOGRAFIA

SU INTERES POR DESAFIOS CREATIVOS MEJORA SU ESTILO ARTISTICO.


A, EN SU ARTE.

ESTA FOTOGRAFIA DE UNA MUJER REFLEJA EL “ARTE OSCURO” QUE SE REFLEJA EN SU ARTE.

.

DAN CAMBIA SU ESTILO CONSISTENTEMENTE MIENTRAS APRENDE MAS SOBRE EL ARTE. 2015

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PROFILES

Biografía de Diego Rivera D

por Daniel Fernandez Guerra

iego Rivera nació en Guanajuato, México, el 8 de diciembre de 1886, en tiempos en los cuales Porfirio Díaz gobernaba al país. El guanajuatense es conocido como el muralista mexicano más importante de la historia, junto a otros importantes muralistas mexicanos como David Alfaro Siqueiros y José Clemente Orozco. Estos tres artistas conforman la tríada de los máximos representantes del muralismo mexicano y han tenido gran impacto en la sociedad actualmente. Rivera ha ganado tanta fama dentro del pueblo mexicano que su retrato aparece en los billetes de $500 (uno de los billetes más transitados en el país). Se puede decir que Diego Rivera nació en un ambiente de muchas posibilidades, y se mudó con sus padres a la Ciudad de México cuando tenía 6 años, ciudad en la cual pasó el mayor tiempo de su vida. Rivera fue formado en la Escuela de Bellas Artes de San Carlos de la capital mexicana, la cual es considerada la mejor escuela de arte en el país. Además, el muralista mexicano tuvo la oportunidad de estudiar y aprender en varios países de Europa (Francia, España, e Italia) durante 15 años. En este tiempo, Rivera se interesó por el arte de vanguardia y abandonó el academicismo. Identificado con los ideales revolucionarios de su patria, Rivera volvió desde Italia a finales de la Revolución Mexicana (1922). Junto con David Alfaro Siqueiros se dedicó a estudiar en

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profundidad el arte maya y azteca, que influirían de forma significativa en su obra posterior. En colaboración con otros destacados artistas mexicanos del momento (como el propio Siqueiros y José Clemente Orozco), fundó el sindicato de pintores, del que surgiría el movimiento muralista mexicano, de profunda raíz indigenista. La fama y el éxito de Diego Rivera se deben a su excelente capacidad para lograr expresarse de manera efectiva con la población a través de sus pinturas en murales (algunos de los gigantescos murales sobrepasan los cuatrocientos metros cuadrados). Además de crear un estilo diferente, el cual se enfatiza con la ruptura de la tradición academicista y la asimilación de las corrientes pictóricas de la vanguardia europea (cubismo, expresionismo), con las que los artistas mexicanos tuvieron oportunidad de entrar en contacto directo, y la integración de la ideología revolucionaria en la pintura, que según ellos debía expresar artísticamente los problemas de su tiempo. No menos importante es el hondo arraigo de su arte en las tradiciones autóctonas de México: la del grandioso pasado artístico prehispánico (donde la pintura mural fue una práctica constante) y la de la estampa popular mexicana (en la que brilla el legado de José Guadalupe Posada). Para finalizar, la fama de este gran artista mexicano influyo en gran parte su relación con Frida Kahlo, los cuales se casaron el 21 de agosto de 1929, se mudaron a diferentes partes de Estados


PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA

Unidos, y duraron solo 6 años juntos, debido a que el muralista fue descubierto por Kahlo en actos amorosos con otras mujeres. Para finalizar su legado, Diego Rivera en la década de los 40s, continuó desarrollando su actividad de muralista en diversos sitios públicos, y sus obras siguieron provocando polémicas; la más famosa de ellas fue su mural “Sueño de una tarde dominical en la alameda central” (1947), retrato de un paseo imaginario en el que coinciden personajes destacados de la historia mexicana, desde el periodo colonial hasta la revolución. En este mural colocó la frase “Dios no existe” en un cartel llamado el Nigromante, hecho por el

escritor ateo, Ignacio Ramírez, hecho que generó irónicas reacciones entre los sectores religiosos del país. El pintor mexicano le otorgó a su México querido todo su legado (obras y colecciones): donó al pueblo un edificio construido por él, la Casa-Museo Anahuacalli, donde se conservan sus colecciones de arte precolombino, y su casa en México D.F. fue convertida en el Museo Estudio Diego Rivera, que alberga obras y dibujos suyos, así como su colección de arte popular. C

2015

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FEATURES

#muhaiku An #MUHaiku Expressing love for MU See below for words edited by Joe Kaiser

Caitlin Miller @caitmarge Where friendships are made Memories are collected Marquette, you are home Alexandra Whittaker @AlexaWhittaker

The line is so long But Schroeder parm rocks I should've come here earlier Alexandra Whittaker @AlexaWhittaker

Someone stole my mug Caffrey's is way too crowded Worst Mug Night ever

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Paulo Acuna @PauloAcuna Marquette is the best No matter where you come from This school feels like home Lauren Papucci @LaurenPapucci Marquette is my home Making friends and memories Be the difference Mark Benson @WaysideWriter Drumming in the Band Look I'm on the jumbotron Face paint FTW. #MUHaiku Pamela H Nettleton @PHNettleton Seagulls overhead Sidewalks & students below No one wearing hats #MUHaiku


Paige W @paige_witty I need more coffee. Can I have an extension? When did I last sleep? #MUHaiku William Moore @William_Moore March Madness Begins All things draw now to a stop May my bracket win #MUHaiku

Emily D @emdev4ev Freshman year flew by challenges and studying, and too much Netflix. #MUHaiku

Mark Benson @WaysideWriter Does Johnston have ghosts I think I will spend the night Oops I slept through class

Rachel D. Berkowitz @RayBerko Dodging seagull poop. How many theologies? Chicken Parmesan.

A.J. Magoon @TheTrueMagoon Closeness is nourished Find home amid urban sprawl Plus, you know, there's class

Emily D @emdev4ev Cold to warm to cold, Beautiful, but quite fickle. What do I wear now?

Rachel Berkowitz @RayBerko 59 days left. Most of me is ready, but... I will miss this place. #MUHaiku 2015

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Marvel a

3D visualization lab delivers sup

by Adam 104

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at MARVL

per heroic learning experience

m Pulte

PHOTOS BY CHRIS LARKEE 2015

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FEATURES

Y

ou’re in a dark room only 18 feet wide, 10 feet deep, and 10 feet tall. In front of you, four screens display 4K resolution with 15.7 megapixels, over three times the clarity of a standard household TV. You can’t see them, but ten projectors hide up in the ceiling, switching back and forth between images over 120 times a second to create a 3D viewing experience. Run by six mega-computers, the technology is so sophisticated that you need a pair of special, box-framed glasses to appreciate it. What is this superhero system, you ask? It’s Marquette’s CAVE, or computer assisted virtual environment, located in Engineering Hall. Not to be confused with Marvel Comics—which brought us Spiderman, Iron Man, and the Hulk—MARVL (MARquette Visualization Lab) runs this mind-blowing 3D presentation space. The CAVE, which opened in January 2014 after a five-year planning and building process, is a state-of-the-art facility. It allows scientists to navigate through virtual blood vessels, transfers nursing students to hospital patients’ bedsides, escorts stationary bicyclists down the winding roads of Hawaii, and constructs buildings without laying a single brick. Academic classes once taught in physical spaces are adapted into virtual realities that promote immersive, interactive learning. The CAVE helps Marquette scientists, engineers, and architects teach students and conduct research, but the marvels of MARVL extend far beyond these uses. This is what the Haggerty Museum of Art proved when it collaborated with the College of Engineering to present 2D work from its permanent collection in 3D. In one project, the CAVE technicians recreated a 96-foot-long by 8-foot-tall plywood mural by Keith Haring, a prolific American artist and social activist. Painted for the Haggerty construction site in 1983, the Marquette

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STUDENTS LOOKING AT A 3D VERSION OF SALVADOR DALI’S “THE MADONNA OF PORT LLIGAT.” 2015

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mural is the only one of Haring’s paintings to be virtually recreated in 3D. Christopher Larkee, visualization technology specialist and alumnus of Marquette’s College of Engineering, uses a controller called a flystick to zoom in on the mural’s rough, wooden texture, highlighting the black drips of paint that lay just as Haring left them. The entire mural was previously featured at a 2005 exhibition, “On the Fence: Keith Haring’s Mural for the Haggerty,” which was dedicated to Haring’s visit in the 80s. Digitally preserving the treasured piece and 108

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displaying it in the CAVE ensures that future students and alumni can appreciate it for years to come. Another project features “The Madonna of Port Lligat” by Spanish artist Salvador Dalí. Though the original painting is only 19-inches-tall by 15-inches-wide, Larkee digitally rendered the masterpiece and separated its individual components so they float in space for you to see. The CAVE’s presentation puts Dalí’s painting in a virtual museum complete with chandeliers and walls covered in information on the


VISUAL TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST CHRIS LARKEE DEMONSTRATING A 3D MODEL OF A PROTEIN

piece’s history and content. The painting can be seen from a variety of angles, including ones that can only be experienced in the digital realm. It almost feels as though you can reach out and hold the baby in the image, glide down the mountain in the background, and touch the ripples on Dalí’s 3D seashell. Due to positive reactions the Haring and Dalí projects have received from teachers and students, the Haggerty plans to continue working with the College of Engineering. Rumor has it their next undertaking will be

the Haggerty’s 15th century Book of Hours. This palm-sized book features incredibly minute, intricate drawings and script normally visible only through a magnifying glass. In the 3D CAVE, it’ll come to life like never before. The digital replication of some of the Haggerty’s most prized artwork provides proof that MARVL is capable of promoting super heroic learning. C

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IMAGINE IT!

Build your own 3D image in the Content Development Lounge by Lauren Papucci Think you got what it takes to create some 3D magic? Next to the CAVE in Engineering Hall there is a workspace where Marquette students (not just engineering majors!) can use software to create 3D images. Essentially a mini version of the CAVE, the lounge contains four computers with Blender and 3D Studio Max. No experience with these programs? Check out some YouTube tutorial videos before your visit. Previous students have created projects like a structural model of an office building, a blood flow simulation, a model of the brain, and a driving simulator. The lounge has been open since January 2014, and about 20 students have taken advantage of the resource. Chris Larkee, MARVL’s visualization technology specialist, says the lab tries to be as welcoming and open to students as possible. Progress enough in the lounge and you might even be granted access to the CAVE! Contact Larkee about starting your own project. Get those creative juices flowing! C 2015

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VINTAGE REVIEW

Inspiring Beauty at the Milwaukee Art Museum spotlights a travelling fashion show that worked to break down racial barriers and expand what it meant to be beautiful in America by Alexandra Whittaker

PHOTO COURTESY OF EBONY 2015

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Patrick Kelly’s “Scandal” dress, which plays with Southern antebellum visuals to poke fun at 70s ideas of beauty. A Tilmann Grawe dress with purple plastic tubes that bounced down the runway with little lights that flickered on and off. An almost entirely see-through Bob Mackie gown and ostrich feather coat that evokes a 1920s Josephine Baker costume or a Rihanna red carpet look. Three haute couture creations that couldn’t be more different from each other, but over a span of fifty years, they all walked down the same runway at the Ebony Fashion Fair, sponsored by the publishing empire that produced and still produces Ebony and Jet magazines. Frustrated by fashion magazines and runways in the mid-1940s that included only white models, Johnson Publishing executive Eunice Walker Johnson put AfricanAmerican women in haute couture on runways in Chicago. She forever changed the world of fashion. In Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of the Ebony Fashion Fair, which runs until May 3, 2015, the Milwaukee Art Museum showcases ensembles from the show, including additional pieces from Mount Mary University’s Historic Costume Collection. The Ebony Fashion Fair was possibly the most influential and underrated fashion show ever. It was a charity event that featured African-American models wearing high-end designer clothing, and it ran from 1950 until 2009, travelling to 180 cities all over the world. More than $50 million was raised for black organizations along the way. According to MAM curator Camille Morgan, the show helped to combat racial stereotypes that were deeply rooted in the fashion industry, including the idea that couture and high fashion did not look 114

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good on brown or black skin. It’s an idea that has been resistant to change, despite Johnson’s pioneering leadership. In the 148 shows from the Fall/Winter 2014 New York Fashion Week Season, 78.69% of the models on the runway were white. The Ebony Fashion Fair came to Milwaukee for forty-six of the fifty years that it travelled. After the Ebony Fashion Fair ended in 2009, Mount Mary University in Milwaukee purchased 13 Fashion Fair costumes. Mount Mary loaned these pieces to the MAM to augment the current exhibit. “One of the really great things about the collection being at the Milwaukee Art Museum is that you can get really close to the costumes,” says Morgan. “There’s usually a bar or laser or barrier preventing that, but there’s none of that here.” That’s probably just the way Eunice Johnson would have liked it. Before Johnson started the Ebony Fashion Fair, runways were sophisticated and sedate. At Ebony Fashion Fairs, models danced down the runway, interacting with the audience.

The Ebony Fashion Fair was possibly the most influential and underrated fashion show ever


PHOTO COURTESY OF MAM.ORG

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PHOTO VIA MAM.ORG

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“[The Ebony Fashion Fair] couldn’t be hungry 15-year-olds stomping down a runway,” says Morgan. “Eunice embraced different sizes on the runway because not everyone watching the show was the same size, and she wanted everyone to be involved and represented.” The Ebony shows created a community of people who changed the landscape of fashion and what was considered beautiful. At MAM, docent-led tours through Inspiring Beauty explore how societal definitions of beauty are informed by power, and how these definitions then contribute to consumer industries such as fashion. “Beauty is a construction,” says Morgan. “There is a link between capitalism, race, and desire. It is important to walk through this exhibit, look at the groundwork Eunice and the Ebony Fashion Fair laid down, and ask yourself, what can you do with your privilege?” C

Beauty is a construction, There is a link between capitalism, race, and desire

IF YOU GO Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair Milwaukee Art Museum February 5-May 3, 2015 Visit mam.org for museum times and ticket information 2015

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Into The Vault Underground secrets of the Haggerty by Caitlin Miller photos by Lauren Papucci

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hree minutes after the machine warms up, the words “I switched on” appear. A few more clicks sound, followed by the words: “my wireless.” You cannot look away. Every few seconds, a flapboard hanging on the wall of the Haggerty Museum scrolls through numbers, letters, and symbols until a message appears. The audience is captivated by the noise and motion; eyes are glued to the piece until the motion stops. Words are misspelled, letters are missing, and distinctive gaps appear between words and phrases. Audiences are captivated by artwork, but rarely recognize the hours of labor that go into displaying exhibits. Stories unfold in the framing, hanging, and displaying of artworks that line the walls of Marquette University’s Haggerty Art Museum. Just as each art piece tells a different story, each exhibit does, as well. A piece of artwork is not just matted, framed, and slapped on the wall. The flapboard hanging near the Haggerty entrance is called “24:00:01” and was made by Shilpa Gupta. It traveled to the Haggerty from Paris where it was previously on display. It arrived in a carefully crafted box, accompanied by an escort, as are all pieces sent out on loan by museums to other museums. To any visitor, it might seem simple enough to operate—plug it in and let the computer generate words. But this piece came from overseas where outlets are designed differently and voltage is a different frequency. All obstacles Haggerty Head Preparator Dan Herro had to overcome. It’s his responsibility to make exhibits a reality. “Here he is, in the basement,” says Curator of Education Lynne Shumow. “No one sees him.” A trip to the hardware store for an outlet adaptor, countless calls to the manufacturing company, a specialty crafted generator later, and finally—three minutes, not three days, what’s this mean? I don’t get it 120

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after being powered on—the flaps started to move. “Sometimes I lose sleep over whether a piece will stay on the wall or not,” says Herro. Imagine how much sleep was lost over the flapboard that almost did not move. Herro works alongside Shumow and Associate Curator Emilia Layden to conceptualize exhibits. The Haggerty strives to mount eight to nine exhibitions each year. The staff begins planning two years in advance.


HALLWAY THAT LEADS TO THE VAULTS

Exhibits at the Haggerty are curated, more often than not, around a theme. Most work is drawn from the permanent collection, although the Haggerty does receive pieces for exhibitions by loan. Once the list of works to be exhibited is finalized, preparing those works is the next objective. Working in the Haggerty basement workshops, Herro creates specialized displays for pieces. He reuses frames and boxes from other exhibits and builds

custom materials as needed. Once pieces are prepared, they are ready to hang on the wall, right? Not so fast. One of Layden’s priorities is to devise a plan of how to display an exhibit. Her decisions are more complicated than which piece looks best next to another. How pieces are put together within an exhibit is dependent upon style, shape, and meaning, among other things. She asks herself: Do these pieces convey different meanings 2015

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Presenting the work like this makes you see it with fresh eyes, without preconceived notions of what it should mean when placed in different groupings? One piece of art “converses” with others that are nearby, and Layden manages those relationships with intention. “I enjoy re-contextualizing the work, as this allows for people to make new connections and create new meanings,” says Layden. “Presenting the work like this makes you see it with fresh eyes, without preconceived notions of what it should mean or how it should be interpreted. This is a thought-provoking experience for me and hopefully that translates to our viewers.” Each piece must be interpreted and understood before it can be placed in accordance with another. Only after these relationships are agreed upon can artworks for the exhibit make their trip up from the basement to the museum floor. Shumow sums up the behind-the-scenes dedication to work that goes into each exhibit: “A lot more goes on than you ever imagine.” Next time you walk into a museum, stop and look around. Look beyond the beauty of the artwork that lines the walls. Look at how those pieces are displayed, what their location is, and notice all the little details that compose the exhibit. Take all these factors into consideration and appreciate the hidden beauty—a real art in itself—that goes into each exhibit. C 122

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BEAUTIFUL ARTWORK LINING THE WALLS OF THE VAULT. 2015

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arte subterrテ] by Caitlin Miller photos by Lauren Papucci traducido por Stacy Vargas, Emanuel Hernandez, y Cynthia Anaya

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neo 2015

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res minutos después de que la máquina se calienta, las palabras “me encendí” aparecen. Unos cuantos clics suenan y enseguida las palabras “mi inalámbrica” aparecen. No se puede mirar hacia el otro lado. Cada segundo, un flapboard colgado en la pared de Haggerty Museum recorre números, letras, y símbolos hasta que aparece un mensaje. El público es cautivado por el ruido y el movimiento; sus miradas clavadas en la pieza hasta que el movimiento se detiene. Las palabras están mal escritas, faltan algunas letras, y espacios en blanco aparecen entre las palabras y las frases. Las audiencias son cautivadas por las obras de arte, pero a veces no reconocen las horas de trabajo detrás de cada exposición. Historias se desarrollan en la colgadera, la colocación del enmarcado, y la exposición de obras de arte que cubren las paredes de Haggerty Museum en la Universidad de Marquette. Así como cada pieza de arte cuenta una historia diferente, cada exposición también tiene una historia. Una obra de arte no es matizada, enmarcada, y plasmada en la pared sin razón. El flapboard colgado cerca de la entrada Haggerty se llama “24:00:01” y fue realizado por Shilpa Gupta. Viajó a Haggerty de París donde previamente había sido mostrando en una exposición. Llegó en una caja cuidadosamente elaborada, acompañado por una escolta, como lo son todas las piezas enviadas en préstamo por los museos a otros museos. Para cualquier visitante, puede parecer bastante simple de operar, enchufarlo y dejar que la computadora genere palabras. Pero esta pieza llegó desde el extranjero, donde los enchufes están diseñados de una manera diferente y el voltaje tiene una frecuencia diferente. El Preparador del Haggerty Dan Herro tuvo que sobrepasar todos los obstáculos. 126

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Es su responsabilidad de hacer realidad las exhibiciones. “Aquí está, en el sótano,” dice el Curador de Educación Lynne Shumow. “Nadie lo ve.” Un viaje a la ferretería para obtener un adaptador, indefinida llamadas a la empresa fabricante, un generador especial después, y por último—tres minutos, no tres días, ¿qué significa esto? Yo no lo entiendo después de ser encendido—las solapas comenzaron a moverse. “A veces me quita el sueño pensar si una pieza se quedará en la pared o no,” dice


EL PASILLO QUE LLEVE A LA BOVEDA

Herro. Imagínense la cantidad de sueño que se perdió por el flapboard que casi ni se movió. Herro trabaja junto a Shumow y Curadora Asociada Emilia Layden para conceptualizar exhibiciones. El Haggerty se esfuerza para montar ocho a nueve exposiciones cada año. El personal comienza a planear dos años de adelantado. Exhibiciones en el Haggerty son curadas, más a menudo que no, alrededor de un tema. La mayoría del trabajo se extrae de la colección permanente, aunque

el Haggerty si recibe piezas para exhibiciones por préstamo. Una vez que la lista de las obras que se expondrán está finalizada, preparar los trabajos es el próximo objetivo. Trabajando en los talleres en el sótano de Haggerty, Herro crea exhibiciones especializadas para piezas. Él reusa marcos y cajas de otras exposiciones y construye materiales personalizados según sea necesario. Cuando las piezas son preparadas, están listas para colgar en la pared, ¿verdad? No tan rápido. 2015

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FEATURES Una de las prioridades de Layden es idear un plan de cómo disponer una exposición. Sus decisiones son más complicados que decidiendo qué pieza se ve mejor al lado de otra. Cómo piezas son puestas dentro de una exhibición depende en estilo, forma, y significado, entre otras cosas. Ella se pregunta a sí misma: ¿Estas piezas transmiten significados diferentes cuando se colocan en diferentes agrupaciones? Una obra de arte “conversa” con otras que están cerca, y Layden gestiona esas relaciones con intención. “Disfruto la re-contextualización de la obra, ya que esto permite que la gente haga nuevas conexiones y crea nuevos significados,” dice Layden. “Presentando la obra así hace que la veas con ojos nuevos, sin nociones preconcebidas de lo que debe significar o cómo debe ser interpretado. Esta es una experiencia estimulante para mí y espero que eso se traduzca a nuestros televidentes.” Cada pieza debe ser interpretada y comprendida antes de que pueda ser colocado de acuerdo con otra. Sólo después de estas relaciones se pongan de acuerdo es que obras de arte pueden hacer un viaje desde el sótano hasta el piso del museo. Shumow resume la dedicación de detrás de las escenas al trabajo que va en cada exhibición: “Mucho más va en lo que nunca imaginarías.” La próxima vez que entras en un museo, para y mira a tu alrededor. Mira más allá de la belleza de la obra que recubre las paredes. Mira cómo se muestran las piezas, lo que su ubicación es, y observa todos los pequeños detalles que componen la exhibición. Tome todos estos factores en cuenta y aprecia la belleza oculta—un verdadero arte en sí mismo—que entra en cada exhibición. C

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BELLAS PIEZAS DE ARTE QUE SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA BOVEDA. 2015

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Think Different MU fine arts minors study outside the box

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by Caitlin Miller

arquette University offers four fine arts minors—studio art, photography, graphic design or motion narrative—in collaboration with the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, located in the Third Ward. This curriculum is open to any student within the University with an artistic interest he or she would like to pursue. Mara Thompson, a fifth-year senior working toward a Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering major and a Biological Sciences and Interdisciplinary minor, is concentrating in Industrial Design through MIAD. Thompson worked closely with faculty to create a program specifically tailored to compliment her major and the sector she hopes to work in upon graduation. Her experience with the fine arts minor has significantly benefitted her education. “Even though it has been one of the hardest things I have ever tackled in my entire life, this minor has made me a happier person,” says Thompson. Thompson admits she came to Marquette with no knowledge of the fine arts minor, let alone even knew what MIAD was. Her experience with the program is one she would recommend to students with an interest in the subjects. “If you stay focused and strong, you can get so much out of this experience,” she says. “You learn a new culture, how to talk

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to people, how to relate to them, how to become a leader, and how to balance your life. Most of all, you learn more about yourself and your talents than you will ever get by just going with the grain.” Julie Posh, senior advertising major in the College of Communication, began classes toward her communication design minor in the second semester of freshman year. That’s when students are first eligible to register for courses. The opportunity to take classes at a respected art school initially drew Posh to Marquette. “Pursuing a graphic design minor has introduced me to a new passion,” Posh says. “I always loved painting and drawing, and graphic design has become another way I love to create. It’s helped direct my career path, and also given me a more well-rounded view of concepts and applications in the classroom.” Five years ago, there were only 15 to 20 students with a fine arts minor. In the 201415 school year, 72 Marquette students across all colleges have declared fine arts minors. Marquette continues to work with MIAD to grow the program, but course availability and class sizes set limits on the number who can be admitted. There are concrete benefits to a fine arts major. “Creative thinking is going to be the skill set of the future,” says Dr. Grow. “Innovation comes from creative thinking.”C


PHOTOS BY MADELINE PIESCHEL

Interested in learning more about the fine arts minor at Marquette? Visit diederich.marquette. edu/COC/fiar-minorprogram.aspx 2015

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Pensar diferente Bellas artes: Desde otra perspectiva

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by Caitlin Miller traducido por Ketty Alvarado

arquette University ofrece cuatro carreras de bellas artes, estudio de arte, fotografía, diseño gráfico, y movimiento narrativa—en colaboración con el Instituto de Arte y Diseño de Milwaukee (MIAD), ubicado en el Third Ward. Este programa está abierto para cualquier estudiante de la universidad con un interés artístico que él o ella quisiera seguir. Mara Thompson, una estudiante de quinto año trabajando hacia un título de Biomédica e Ingeniería Mecánica y un minor en Ciencias Biológicas e Interdisciplinarias, se concentra en Diseño Industrial en el MIAD. Thompson trabajó estrechamente con la facultad para crear un programa específicamente diseñado para complementar su especialización y el sector que espera trabajar después de graduarse. Su experiencia con las bellas artes menores ha beneficiado significativamente a su educación. “Aunque ha sido una de las cosas más difíciles nunca me he rendido, este minor me ha hecho una persona más feliz y más equilibrada,” dice Thompson. Thompson admite que ella vino a Marquette sin el conocimiento de las bellas artes menores, sin mencionar que ni siquiera sabía lo que era el MIAD. Su experiencia con el programa es algo que recomendaría a los estudiantes con interés en los temas previamente mencionados. “Si te encuentras concentrado y motivado, puedes obtener mucho de esta experiencia,” dice. “Uno aprende una nueva cultura, cómo hablar con la gente, cómo relacionarse con ellos, cómo convertirse en un líder, y cómo

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equilibrar tu vida. Sobre todo, aprendes más sobre ti y tus talentos que te ayudarán a s entirte con más confianza “ Julie Posh, alumna de cuarto año en la carrera de Publicidad de la Facultad de Comunicación, comenzó clases hacia su minor en el segundo semestre del primer año de diseño de comunicación. Es entonces cuando los estudiantes son elegibles para inscribirse en cursos. La oportunidad de tomar clases en una escuela de arte al inicio de su carrera, eso fue lo que motivo a Posh elegir Marquette. “Siguiendo un minor en Diseño Gráfico se me presentó una nueva pasión,” dice Posh. “Siempre me gustó la pintura y dibujo, y diseño gráfico se ha convertido en otra forma que me encanta crear. Ha ayudado a dirigir mi trayectoria profesional, y también me dio una visión más equilibrada de los conceptos de arte gráfica y aplicaciones en el aula.” Hace cinco años, sólo hubo 15 a 20 estudiantes con un minor en bellas artes. En el año escolar 2014-15, 72 estudiantes de Marquette a través de todas las facultades han declarado su minor en bellas artes menores. Marquette continúa trabajando con MIAD para aumentar el programa, pero la disponibilidad del curso y el tamaño de las clases establecen límites en el número de los que pueden ser admitidos. Hay beneficios concretos para los que se especializan en bellas artes. “Pensamiento creativo va a ser el conjunto de habilidades del futuro,” dice Dr. Grow. “Innovación viene de pensamiento creativo.” C


PHOTOS BY MADELINE PIESCHEL

¿Interesado en aprender más sobre las bellas artes menores en Marquette? Visita la siguiente página web. http://Diederich. Marquette.edu/ COC/fiar-minorprogram.aspx 2015

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Underground secrets of the Haggerty Spanish & journalism students curat by Caitlin Miller photos by Lauren Papucci

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By Adam

photos by Mad


Picture

te a Haggerty exhibit on community

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he museum becomes a multidisciplinary classroom. This was the goal when Dr. Eugenia Afinoguenova, associate professor of Spanish in the Klingler College of Arts and Sciences, and Dr. Pamela Hill Nettleton, assistant professor of journalism and media studies in the Diederich College of Communication, proposed a project that would give students the opportunity to curate an art exhibit over the span of two semesters. Dr. Julia Paulk, associate professor of Spanish, was also involved during Spring 2015. The student-curated exhibit, called “Clear

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Picture,” is meant to engage with issues of diversity, inclusion, and exclusion in the communities of the world. Each piece of art tells its own story. Students acted as exhibit curators, choosing and then championing their favorite pieces in a group decision-making process with Haggerty staff and with each other. The works are diverse, representing many styles, mediums,, artists, and time periods. Paintings, sculptures, photography, drawings, and sketches found their home in Clear Picture. The exhibit taught students that a community—in this case, the community of combined classrooms—is


:AMERICAN� BY NICHOLAS HERRERA ON DISPLAY AT THE HAGGERTY MUSEUM

a collaboration of many voices with different perspectives. Afinoguenova and Nettleton made the exhibit bilingual, featuring both Spanish and English versions of website information, guided tours, and catalog descriptions. The classes met and collaborated with each other several times throughout the semester to make this possible. Not only did Spanish students learn how to write artistic analyses in Spanish, but journalism students learned how to write for a bilingual audience alongside non-journalism colleagues. C

I was excited to be a part of a project that was off-the beaten path and learn some lessons outside a classroom -Paulo A. AcuĂąa

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FEATURE

“DEAR HILLARY: I’LL BE HOME LATE” BY NICHOLAS HERRERA ON DISPLAY AT THE HAGGERTY MUSEUM


The clear picture crew speaks

Daniel Reiner

“For me, “Clear Picture” is a collection that brings all aspects of the world together, through happiness and heartbreak.”

Sophia Boyd

“For me, curating the Haggerty reminded me that art is subjective. I realized that my ability to voice my interpretation did help others to see the same painting in a different way.”

Ariel González

“In a project like this, you will never have unanimous agreement of what should and should not be included because art is subjective and each person has his own interpretation. This connects to the concept of compromise and respect in a community because everyone has a right to his own opinion.”

Lynne Shumow, Curator of Education at the Haggerty Museum

“The project has been great in every way; it has truly exceeded all expectations.”


Oodles of Doodles

See what MU students do in the margins. by Ian Schaak

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nother 4 minutes pass, but it felt like 20. The teacher has changed topic long ago, and there is a big blank spot right where the pen is resting. This is the moment of inception for a doodle. The teacher catches a glimpse of some distorted scratchy illustration and shoots a disapproving look. In the margins of notebooks, students make beautiful pieces of expression that could actually do more good for them than the tortures of mid-class boredom. Some teachers would say that doodling has no place in the classroom. The point is valid. Class time should be used to learn, take notes, and pay attention. Unfortunately students get distracted, and eventually their attention span is bound to bring them elsewhere. Linda Menk, professor of Visual Communications at Marquette encourages her students to doodle. “There are many students who are medicated for ADHD

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when they shouldn’t. Our bodies are meant to move—sitting still is not their intelligence makeup. We’re medicating very creative people,” says Menk. In her own classroom, Menk encourages students to use their creative outlets. She believes in the multiple intelligence theory. The theory states that an individual’s intelligence can be varied and specialized for specific purposes. A musician understands music better than a businessman, and vice versa. Encouraging creative expression allows a student to expand their intelligence outside their comfort zone and find new intelligence within themselves. Building confidence is the first step. “I ask the students, ‘Are you creative?’ and very few people raise their hands,” says Menk.

Linda Menk

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Benjamin Hoffman

To get the gears going Menk’s first assignment is a mind map. She encourages the students to map out their identity. In the middle they write their name, write a phrase that describes them, or draw picture. From there they expand the map, putting more of their own persona into it. “You have no idea how many students have come up to me after class and said to me, ‘Oh my gosh this is me. This is so me!’” says Menk. Once a student is able to see the value in expression, they began to understand the reasoning. Doodles often get stigmatized because they look poor in quality. Most are intimidated to draw because they think they can’t. Menk says, “The first thing they inevitably say to you is ‘I can’t draw.’ But it’s not a matter of that. Anyone can draw. If you can draw a few standard shape, you can draw.’” To convey this idea, Menk assigns students a tea drop. The shape is abstract, but the student can see something in it. A few lines to add some depth, and suddenly the drop is a light bulb, or a rabbit. This is just the beginning. Benjamin Hoffman, a student in the school of Communication has found a lot of significance in doodling. “If I am starting an essay, and I can’t think of any

way to get it going, I’ll just start doodling. I draw a face and work with it until I get an idea of where to go.” Says Hoffman. As a student, Hoffman has found a way that allows him to tap into his creative side. The creative thought process allows for more consideration. Hoffman says, “thinking creatively means seeing all the possible solutions to a problem, weighing out which ones could work, and deciding the best path to take.” An avid doodler himself, Hoffman allows his ideas to develop. He starts with a simple doodle. At first he focused on mountains, then moved to buildings, now he draws whatever. If it looks promising, he expands the idea in a larger sketchbook. Hoffman believes that more creative initiative could only help the community. To encourage this at Marquette, Hoffman is looking into a monthly doodle competition at the Haggerty Art Museum. The idea is only in the initial planning phases, but the goal is to make students a creative resource for the museum.

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Andrew Taylor


Whoodles Quiz by Alexandra Whittaker

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f you’ve seen the drawings on the tables at the Brew, or the sketches on the AMU bathroom walls, it should be no surprise to hear that Marquette has its fair share of doodlers. What you might not know, though, is that this group includes everyone from the Haggerty staffers to President Lovell. Can you figure out which of these familiar Marquette faces drew what? __. Dan Herro __. President Lovell

A.

B.

__. Rev. Ronald R. Bieganowski __. Apiew Ojulu

D. C.

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D. Dan Herro, B. President Lovell, A. Rev. Ronald R. Bieganowski, C. Apiew Ojulu

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Andrew Taylor

Katherine Hauger

Keep Calm and Doodle On

Arianna Lee

by Eva Sotomayor

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ecent research suggests that doodling can lead to better attention and can help you focus and remember things. So instead of staring at the clock and counting down the minutes until lecture is over, try a few doodles. Although the reasons are still not very clear, a recent study showed that people who doodled while being read a list of names remembered more names than those who didn’t. “[The benefits of doodling] don’t seem to work if the attention or learning task is also visual, though; it works better for being able to listen, like during a lecture,” says Kristy A. Nielson, professor of psychology at Marquette University. Nielson explains that some people draw abstract doodles that keep them calm and focused on a lecture and others may use them to help organize their thoughts about the lecture.

“Some people even report using it to recall the lecture itself, something like a mnemonic device,” said Nielson. “So for all of those who thought that people who doodle are just spacing out or ignoring their professor, that may be true for some, but for many, it may actually be helping!”

Olivia Bolton

Benjamin Hoffman Katherine Hauger

Madeline Pieschel ISSUE ONE 2015

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Once more, please GLEN HANSARD By Eva L. Sotomayor

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walked into Glen Hansard’s sold-out concert at The Pabst Theater on February 14 with the expectation of a good show. Still, no amount of watching and re-watching and crying over and crying over again the film “Once,” in which Hansard appears, prepared me for the magical night. Milwaukee was Hansard’s last stop on his Winter 2015 tour, and he said he wanted to make the night special. He performed for more than two hours, including an unplugged, offstage encore. Hansard opened with “High Hope” from his solo album, “Rhythm and Repose.” From the opening notes, it was apparent that the audience was in for a special treat. The Pabst Theater’s ornate decor and intimate atmosphere suited Hansard just fine, and his voice was powerful and easily heard. Pianos, amplifiers, and other instruments were arranged casually, almost scattered, as though we were in a recording studio rather than a concert hall. Hansard and his band seemed like good friends jamming out, perfectly in sync and at ease with one another. He joked about his music being “songs about feelings,” and broke up the sets with quips about what inspired his songwriting process and stories of his time in New York City and his hometown of Dublin. The crowd, however, hit a few false notes. Some presumably drunk audience members screamed song requests and mid-story interruptions that Hansard handled with

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PHOTO VIA SARA BILL PHOTOGRAPHY

good humor, though they clearly made him uncomfortable. He performed everything from his catalog, from solo records to songs recorded with The Swell Season. “You Will Become,” was complemented by a gorgeous violin and muted lighting and was a highlight of the evening. “Falling Slowly,” the Oscar-winning song from “Once,” was a crowd-pleaser. Every note and every lyric told a story, and Hansard wove them together skillfully. The night ended with “The Auld Triangle,” a traditional Irish song. Hansard brought crew members onstage to sing verses and encouraged the crowd to sing along. Hansard is an incredible singer, songwriter, musician, and storyteller. C


The authentic kiss MKE’S EL BESO By Gabriela Ferreira

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PHOTO VIA ELBESOMKE.COM

he first time I came across Mexican restaurant “El Beso,” its colorful and creative exterior captivated me. The bright colors and decorative flowerpots reminded me of the lovely colorful houses I often saw in the small towns of Mexico. This unique representation of Mexican history and culture is one of the things I love about this restaurant. As soon as you walk into the restaurant, you notice beautiful murals and Mexican ornaments. Waiters are dressed in a uniform similar in fashion to traditional Mexican clothing and you will enjoy a wide variety of Mexican music as you eat. The restaurant also has a large bar with more than thirty different types of tequila, a patio for those who wish to eat outside, and a small store that sells bottled hot sauce and desserts to go. El Beso serves some of the most authentic Mexican food in Milwaukee. Many Mexican restaurants offer complimentary salsa with chips that is often watered down and tasteless. The salsa served in El Beso, however,

has such a rich and thick consistency that I can’t stop myself from finishing a small bowl or two. My favorite dish is Pechuga El Beso, a grilled chicken breast topped with poblano peppers, mushrooms, and Chihuahua cheese. Many dishes include this combination of poblano peppers and Chihuahua cheese, two popular ingredients used in Mexican cuisine. Another popular ingredient in the menu is Chile de Arbol, a spicy pepper used to make a fiery but flavorful hot sauce. As much as I love their food, I’m not a fan of El Beso’s drinks—the flavored water drinks are too sweet or concentrated—and the food is a bit overpriced. Several dishes cost over fifteen dollars, pricey compared to other Mexican restaurants in Milwaukee. Even though eating at El Beso can be expensive, the portions are large and it’s worth the money. The staff is friendly and attentive. Overall, El Beso is an excellent Mexican restaurant that offers high quality food and service. C 2015

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Liberty’s Ghost

Enrique Chagoya at the Haggerty by Eva L. Sotomayor

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nrique Chagoya doesn’t just create art—he re-imagines cultural images, language, and history to create new meaning out of the expected and the known. “The Ghost of Liberty” (2004), the Mexican-born artist’s sixth codex, is currently on display at the Haggerty Museum of Art as part of the “Clear Picture Exhibit.” The color lithograph, printed in thirteen colors, is an accordion book of vignettes of cultural and historical situations. In it, Chagoya uses images from George W. Bush in a pathetic,

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sad, scene to a Hollywood cowboy captioned with phrases in Chinese to a dragon mashed with an indigenous face to ask, “What is liberty?” Chagoya studied political economy at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. His father taught him painting and color theory. After Chagoya’s move to the United States, he blended both his interests and began creating cartoons for newspapers, especially union and student newspapers. He is a full-time art history professor at Stanford. C


El Fantasma de la Libertad

Enrique Chagoya en el museo Haggerty by traducido por Brenda Brambila

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nrique Chagoya no sólo crea arte— él re-imaginá imágenes culturales, lenguajes, e historia para crear un nuevo significado de lo anticipado y lo conocido. “The Ghost of Liberty” [El Fantasma de la Libertad](2004), el sexto códice del artista mexicano, es actualmente expuesto en el museo de Haggerty de Arte como parte de la exhibición, “Clear Picture.” El color litográfico, impreso en trece colores, es un libro de acordeón de viñetas culturales y situaciones históricas. En la obra, Chagoya usa imágenes de George W. Bush en una

escena patética y triste, un vaquero de Hollywood con una leyenda de frases chinas y un dragón machacado con cara de indígena quien pregunta, “¿Qué es libertad?” Chagoya estudió economía política en la Universidad Autónoma de México. Su padre le enseñó a pintar y la teoría de colores. Después que Chagoya se mudó a los Estados Unidos, mezcló ambos de sus intereses y empezó a crear caricaturas para periódicos, en especial los de los sindicatos y los estudiantiles. Es un profesor de historia de arte por tiempo completo en Stanford. C

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Hearing Voices C.J. Hribal on empathetic imagination by Joseph Kaiser

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n C.J. Hribal’s fiction writing courses, he talks about voice. Utilizing a character’s voice in a novel or short story, he tells students, can drive the narrative. You wouldn’t know it if you just visited his office, which is neat, unassuming, and not littered with visible leftovers of short-story drafts, but this Midwestern-born, 58-year-old English professor adopts many different voices himself—in his work. In his 2000 book, “The Clouds in Memphis: Stories and Novellas,” Hribal inhabits a mother coping with the loss of one of her children who was killed by a hit-andrun driver, a real estate developer trying to smooth over everyone’s feelings after a drowning in one of his subdivisions, and a young woman trying to find out the real story behind her sister’s death in an industrial accident. The book he is working on now, which he hopes to complete this summer, is a woman’s thought process as she realizes that she has cancer. 148

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“I had previously written and published a story with that same title, about a woman discovering a lump in her breast,” Hribal says. “The range of emotions someone goes through when a possibly calamitous event occurs was what I wanted to express. Later, when my own fiancée was diagnosed with cancer, I found myself going back to that earlier story as a means of further exploring the emotions we were both going through.” Hribal’s fiancée, University of WisconsinMilwaukee professor Donna Decker, died of cancer in 2013. His new book, “The Other Life,” is divided into three parts to show the range of emotion in a journey with cancer. “When I’m writing, it is an act of empathetic imagination,” he says. “I am trying to imagine other people’s lives—people who don’t actually exist—with such telling detail and empathy that it feels to the reader as though these characters are real.” C


PHOTO BY CAITLIN MILLER

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