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SUMMER 2014

A STUDENT PUBLICATION FOR THE CSUN COMMUNITY

#secret

VICES LIVING A LIFE WHERE #SELFIES, COFFEE AND OBSESSIONS TAKE OVER

ROOFTOP BARS | DAYCATION GUIDE | BULLYING ON CAMPUS


COPYRIGHT © 2014 BY SCENE MAGAZINE ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. SCENE MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY THE CSUN JOURNALISM DEPARTMENT MIKE CURB COLLEGE OF ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION California State University Northridge 18111 Nordhoff Street Northridge, CA 91330-8311 | (818) 677-3135

IN T HIS ISSUE

OU T D O O R A N D RO O F T O P B A R S With summer quickly approaching, the outdoor activities have already begun. Refer to our guide on LA’s greatest outdoor bars with great drinks and breathtaking views.

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PET-FRIEN DLY OU TIN G S

DAYC AT I O N GUIDE

Take a chance to show your pet something other than the usual walk routine. Embark on a hiking adventure to challenge your and your pet physically or have a drink together at a dive bar.

Looking to get out of the city on a budget? Browse through our suggested guide on where to go away on a perfect daycation.

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SOCIA L INJ U STIC E O N CA MPU S We look into how students cope with social injustice in the dorms and with their teammates on campus.

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S E C RE T V I C E S Everyone’s got a guilty pleasure. Read about some vices that people have developed from some of today’s most popular trends.

CO L L E G E T R A N SI T I O N As the end of school approaches and students are ready to graduate, it’s time to adapt to the real world. Here’s some advice on how to financially prepare for life after college.

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STAFF JONATHAN R. DIAZ MELODY CHERCHIAN NEELOFER LODHY JENNIFER LUXTON WHITNEY SHEPARD CHAMPAIGN WILLIAMS JULIO HUERTA TREVOR STAMP JOSHUA PINA JAE Z. KITINOJA

EDITOR IN CHIEF EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR COPY EDITORS COVER PHOTO BACK PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS

RISA AKITA AJWA ALJOUDI LISA ANDERSON ANNE CHRISTENSEN, DIANA CRUZ NEGIN DANESHFAR ASTRID DELGADO MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ GABRIELA RODRIGUEZ EMY SOSA EZRA SHAPIRO

STAFF

ADVISOR


The Veteran’s Park Hiking Trail, located in Sylmar, Calif. makes for a great change of scenery for dog owners and their furry friends. Photo by Emy Sosa.

Stepping out with man’s best friend PET-FRIENDLY OUTINGS FOR YOU AND YOUR POOCH STORY BY MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ, GABRIELA RODRIGUEZ AND EMY SOSA more than a bone this year and take him or her on a Los Angeles adventure. With over 62 percent of American households owning a pet, our sunny-side community has caught on to a growing trend for the four-legged breed. Petco was originally the only doggy haven you could take your beloved pooch to, but now parks, restaurants, and bars are becoming surprisingly pet friendly.

THROW YOUR D OG

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BY E MY S O S A

for many college students to get a workout with hectic work and school schedules. Want to kill two birds with one stone? Take your pet out for a walk and get your workout done by going to Veteran’s Park. While some hiking trails are not pet-friendly because of the wild animals that live in the surrounding habitat, Veteran’s Park allows pets as long as they are on a leash and owners pick up after their furry friends. The hiking trail is located on the north side of the park and runs for about two miles. You and

IT C A N B E DIF F IC ULT


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SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

your pet can choose to go along the paved trail, but if you’re looking for more of a challenge, you can always hike up the dirt trails filled with different elevations. As soon as you reach the top, you and your pet will be rewarded with an overview of the San Fernando Valley. Here, other pet owners take this time to allow their pets to socialize with all the others. Be sure to bring enough water and treats for your pet when you make it to the top. It will need it after the strenuous workout. On the way down, it’s wise to decide to choose the paved path as it continues for a few miles. If you decide to call it a day, you can always go back down to the park to enjoy a barbeque, take a nap, or have fun and play frisbee with your pet.

THRE E DOG B A KE RY 36 W. COLOR A D O B LVD. IN OLD TOW N PA S A D EN A BY G ABRIE L A RODRI G U EZ THE THRE E DOG BAK ERY , also known

as The Dog Bakery, is a must-see destination for pet owners who want to spoil their canine companion and have them indulge in treats made just for them. The first dog bakery was founded

The Three Dog Bakery offers pets a chance to indulge in sweet treats made specially for dogs. Photo by Gabriela Rodriguez.

by two brothers Dan Dye and Mark Beckloff in 1989, who were inspired to make treats for their beloved pooches, Sarah Jean, Gracie, and Dottie. The brothers’ mission was to create the world’s best dog biscuits by having the treats freshly baked and giving dogs a healthy, all-natural and “bonefied” treat. One of the most popular treats that dog owners can get at the bakery is the different sets of cookies available. These treats include blueberry muffin cookies, peanut butter cookies, cheesy beef cookies and more. The cookies don’t include any artificial coating. What makes this bakery a hit is that you can place a cake order for man’s best friend. The cakes can come in different sizes depending on the shape and quantity. The most popular item is the 12-inch shaped bone cake that comes in three different flavors, carob (similar to chocolate), peanut butter, and coconut with pink color coating. More details can be found at www.thedogbakery.com

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outside in the heat would be cruel and walking them after downing a few beers is not the smartest thing to do. But which bars would welcome a 96 pound dog? Tony’s Darts Away in Burbank would! Hidden away on Magnolia Boulevard. This small, yet cozy, dive bar is the perfect location for a dog day out. It’s a good possibility that your waiter will beeline to pet and greet your canine upon your arrival. Water bowls and dog beds are provided for your four-legged friend at your consent and what loving pet owner would deny that amenity? Perhaps one of the best features of the bar is its outdoor seating and shaded by patio umbrellas. This area exudes relaxation. The cushioned benches and water misters are so addicting that your pet would never want to leave. LE AV IN G YO UR P E T


Among the many hidden treasures CSUN has to offer is the Food Garden and Compost Facility, where students and faculty can dig into urban gardening. Photo by Anne Christensen.

Urban gardens

S T U DENT S P L ANT IN C A M P US G A RD E N S STORY BY ANNE CHRISTENSEN W EDG ED BE T W E E N the sports fields and Northridge Academy High School is an unexpected sliver of gardening activity. Freshly cut wood chips surround neat rows of propped-up climbing vines, sprouting lettuce and lavender. CSUN’s very own Food Garden and Compost Facility provides an enticing backdrop for students and faculty interested in urban gardening in the middle of a major metropolis. Engineering student Daniel Aguiar, 27, is the learning site supervisor for the 400square-foot food garden and compost facility located at the far end of campus. Every semester he manages several weekend events in the garden where students meet up. “Our Garden Workdays is the event where we receive the largest amount of volunteers,” Aguiar said. “So during the weekends, we tend to work on the garden beds, amending the soil, mulching and when possible we have master gardeners coming to help and give workshops.” Animation major Lindsey Maldonado

Bazini, 23, signed up to volunteer in the garden as part of a Jewish studies course. She had never been to the garden prior to signing up, but Bazini soon became hooked. “As the semester progressed, I learned about how our current food industry is damaging our environment and the corruption of it all,” Bazini said. “Volunteering at our sustainability garden became more than just an assignment. It became my way of channeling the frustrations that came with acquiring that kind of knowledge.” Channeling the initial frustration into activism, Bazini was inspired to continue her food system education after engaging in a class presentation by the founder of Netiya, a Jewish community gardening network in Los Angeles. “Since volunteering at the CSUN Garden of Sustainability, I have been a part of several beautification projects around LA and plan on interning for Netiya this coming fall,” Bazini said. “CSUN planted the seed, so to speak.” As spring gets underway, so does the CSUN food garden.

Aguiar is getting ready to conduct another workday in April and looks forward to seeing new faces in the crowd. Some of the tasks scheduled for the spring semester include expanding the wooden garden beds to grow more produce, and maybe even creating a compost bin with living worms that eat the food scraps and turn it into fertilizer. “Generally the tasks are assigned to teams and they tend to stay together working on the assignment while having some fun and getting to know each other,” Aguiar said. “The garden activities are a great way to stay in touch with nature, work outdoors, meet some people and overall to have some fun.” For students looking for an urban challenge off campus, the greater Los Angeles area is ripe with community gardens in private lots. Some are located on city-owned land, whereas others flourish because individuals come together to turn empty lots into thriving gardens in agreement with the landowner. Gardens manned by volunteers can agree to donate produce to local food shelters, or share the harvest among the workers.


RESIDENT ADVISORS AND S TUDENT ATHLETES W ORK T O COMB AT SOCIAL INJUS TICES STORY BY NEGIN DANESHFAR, HANNAH LUNA AND CHAMPAIGN WILLIAMS


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

We’re all familiar with it. From elementary school and up, “making fun” of other kids is kind of a necessity for survival. In order to make yourself look “cool,” someone else has to look “uncool.” Among dorm friends or sports teammates, one would expect the joking to be minimal. After all, friends are sensitive to each other’s feelings and would not want to be offensive. And to be sure that things stay under control, staff is trained in social justice awareness, and rules are in place to keep bullying off the agenda. For years, clubs and organizations have made attempts to incorporate social justice into college programs. Social justice education can be seen in the classroom with courses such as Gender and Women’s Studies and Pan-African Studies. But how is social justice education impacting our campus? Is it helping to create a more equal and peaceful community? We talked with sports coaches, athletes, and Residential Advisors (RAs) to see how colleges are working to create a more unified school, and most importantly, a more unified society and nation.

WE’VE ALL DONE I T.

L I V I N G O N C A MPU S Your roommates, the parties, beer pong. It all takes place there. The dorms are a sweet indicator that your childhood has been left behind, and nothing but adulthood and a vast ocean of endless possibilities lie before you. They are necessary if you want to have the ultimate college experience. But what about the aspects of the dorms that the infamous young adult movies don’t tell you about? The arguments with roommates over cleanliness, guests in the rooms, food, etc. Though these truths aren’t widely publicized, they happen more often than not. Usually, many students living in the dorms are placed in a room with a random stranger their freshman year. Because of this, residents may find themselves placed with someone who pushes their comfort level for a variety of prejudicial reasons. Some residents have had little exposure to people of different ethnic backgrounds and sexual orientation. Because of this, it is not uncommon for RA’s, to have to diffuse room and floor conflict among residents. An RA is responsible for approximately 50 residents, and are

T H E DO RM S .

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PHOTO BY JULIO HUERTA

ing because they were concerned about their daughter being in a room with a girl who had come out as lesbian. They RE S IDE N T kept making comments about the roommate not being able to control herself.” The RA calmly let the concerned parent know that what she was suggesting was segregation and that CSUN housing did not support that attitude. When a resident feels uncomfortable with their living arrangements, they may request a roommate change, according to CSUN Student Housing policy, which allows the supervisor to understand the reasons for the room switch. If the supervisor finds that the resident wants to switch rooms for prejudicial reasons, their request is denied and the supervisor will speak with the resident about how their discrimination is harmful to the community. To encourage conflicting students to talk through their problems to find a common ground on their own, new residents must wait three weeks at the beginning of each semester to request a room change. However, the dorms have a zero tolerance policy for residents being physically or mentally hurt, especially on the basis of prejudicial or discriminatory issues. “People are just afraid of what they don’t know, but after they live with it for a few weeks they will realize everything is just fine,” the RA said.

What are you? Gay?” —DO RM

considered peer mentors who serve as a resource, guide and mediator for the residents on their floor. One RA, Zachary Ghamlouch, a sophomore kinesiology major, recalls an incident where in the midst of a conversation a resident blurted out, “What are you? Gay?” Ghamlouch remembered feeling shocked at how overt the statement was. “In training we are taught to deal with insensitive comments that undermine minorities,” he said. “So I just sat and calmly explained how comments like those are not OK.” George Zavala, a liberal arts major and an RA in the freshman dorms, recalls hearing hurtful comments about homosexuality. “I just create programs that stimulate conversation about prejudices and stereotypes,” Zavala said. Most people don’t recognize that they are doing it until you explain how it is wrong. It’s just all about education and people being aware.” Another RA of two years, who asked to remain anonymous, described an unfortunate experience with a resident’s parent. “One night I was on duty and I received a phone call from a parent,” the RA said. “They were call-


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

SP OR T S AND S O CI A L J US TICE IS S UE S

when a team’s excessive bullying pushes one teammate too far? Women’s basketball center Camille Mahlknecht, 20, said she and her team get along very well and that they are more than mere teammates. They are friends. “We all have a great relationship, you know? We spend a lot of time together on the court and we also spend a lot of time together off the court,” Mahlknecht said. “We all live semi-near each other, so (we have) a lot of dinners together and a lot hanging out together.” If only the same were true in the NFL. Jonathan Martin, a linebacker for the Miami Dolphins, walked out on his team during the middle of last season due to the excessive bullying he was receiving from his teammates. Martin said the derogatory jokes and racially offensive slurs made by teammates caused him to feel “trapped,” according to the Los Angeles Times. One team member in particular, guard Richie Incognito, confessed to sending hateful text messages and voicemails to Martin using the word “nigger.” Mahlknecht said that though she was not familiar with the Martin bullying controversy, nothing of the sort has taken place while she has been a member of the team. She explained that if one of her 14 teammates did ever feel bullied or singled out on the team, the entire team would have a group talk. “We don’t want any drama because it will have an effect on the court,” Mahlknecht said. She said if an issue comes up the team takes care of it. Mahlknecht said that the team has regular talks to “get everyone on the same page and focused.” CSUN’s Athletic Department also provides resources to prevent bullying among teammates on the men’s baseball team. Greg Moore, the head coach of the men’s baseball team, said that derogatory teasing regarding race or sexual orientation is not permitted.

B UT W HAT HAPPE N S

The men’s baseball team undergoes a mandatory eight-week course every fall that focuses on empathetic listening and respectful communication. This training is expected to bring the team closer and to prevent miscommunication. The program incorporates workshops that address etiquette and how to treat others on and off the field. Tanner Pollack, junior criminal justice major and team outfielder, said confrontations are dealt with between team players before escalating. “We’ve had a bunch of classes based on etiquette and a main class where they talked on how to be

“We don’t want any drama because it will have an effect on the court.” — C A M ILLE M A H L K NE CHT, WO M E N ’S B A S E B A LL CE NTE R

respectful and how to approach confrontations,” Pollack said. Pollack said that though jokes are often dished, there has never been anything seriously offensive that has taken place. “I mean we’re all competing against each other,” he said. “People get heated, but there has never been a serious matter. Usually we get over it by next practice.” CSUN athletes are expected to learn the tools to communicate about sensitive or difficult matters. The coaches encourage student athletes to work through these issues with the help of each other rather than having to tell them what to do. “Players have fun with each other. They’ll talk about a dropped ball or a pickoff that should have been,” Moore said. “They’ll tease each other a bit there, but it’s the type of healthy jokes that keep a group loose.”

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The Ace Hotel in downtown LA is a perfect outdoor bar to attend with temperatures consistently rising. Enjoy a mixed drink on the roof while taking in a view of downtown. Photo by Neelofer Lodhy.

LA’s best outdoor bars STORY BY NEELOFER LODHY, MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ , JULIO HUERTA, AND AJWA ALJOUDI

THE ACE HOTEL BY NE E LOFE R LODH Y AS THE W E AT HE R continues to stay warm, it entices people to participate in more outdoor activities. Recently opened as of last year, the Ace Hotel in downtown Los Angeles opens its doors to a rooftop bar where visitors can enjoy a chilled beverage, pleasant weather, and a great scenic view of the city. Located in the heart of downtown, the Ace Hotel rooftop bar is a great location to enjoy on warm nights. Entrance to the rooftop bar is gained on the ground level, where the doorman selects a handful of people to ride the elevator at a time. After gaining entrance, it’s a short walk to the elevator alongside the hotel’s critically acclaimed restaurant.

Though the bar is located on the inside portion of the rooftop, the large outdoor seating area offers a pleasant and different environment for the usual bar attendee. Guests are invited to sit on either side of the bar, poolside, or at the many tables, benches, or firepit. Despite not offering beers on draft, they do offer a select variety of beer served in its cooled can. After being shaken or stirred, mixed drinks are cleverly served in the aluminum cups of the shaker. The ambience is finalized by a variety of music played on the outdoor speakers with restrooms conveniently located on the rooftop. Although it can be crowded at 10 p.m. on a Saturday night, the location is surprisingly calmer than expected and there is no cover charge. So use the extra dollars to tip the bartender well and enjoy an ambient night out on the town!

BURBANK BAR AND GRILL BY MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ

can be gruesome. With 100 degree temperatures and sticky humidity, the last thing anyone would want is to go out to a packed nightclub where you’ll be bumping and grinding on sweat-infested bodies. Instead of marching over to your usual watering hole, why not venture outside and check out an outdoor bar? The Burbank Bar and Grill (BBG) has been a popular destination for some time now. Nestled in the city’s downtown location, those visiting the bar will be surprised when the entrance leads them to a set of mysterious stairs. After ascending to the top of

S UM M E R DAYS

the stairs, guests have a choice of dining inside or under the stars. The BBG’s rooftop bar is their most attractive hallmark. Outfitted with fireplaces and misters, this bar is prepared to beat any weather scenario. If you’re wondering how the drinks will arrive at your table, don’t worry, both dining areas are stocked with a full bar. The BBG offers a wide variety of entertainment. Thursday through Saturday, guests can enjoy local artists serenading them with an acoustic performance, or head indoors and rock out to a 1980s cover band. Happy hour aficionados will be pleased with the bar’s $5 martinis and $4 draft beers, along with $6 stacked nachos and pulled pork potato skins. For the late nighters, make sure to order the famous seafood combo platter full of deep fried calamari, shrimp, and cod paired with a cocktail sauce and garlic chipotle aioli.


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

TROPICANA BAR AND POOL BY JULIO HUERTA O NE

OF

HOLLY WOOD ’ S

best kept secrets is the famous outdoor pool bar at the Historic Roosevelt Hotel. Now that summer is around the corner, this bar is the perfect location to enjoy delicious drinks and the weather that Los Angeles is famous for. Surround yourself with lush foliage and relax in the hotel’s elite cabana rooms. The great thing about visiting the Tropicana Bar is that you do not have to be a guest of the Roosevelt Hotel to enjoy all the amenities the place has to offer. Join the party, bring your bathing suit, relax by the celebrated David Hockney pool and enjoy the company of Hollywood’s incrowd. This little tropical oasis

hosts day and night DJ parties and intimate gatherings in a setting that is sure to make you forget about your troubles if only for a short time. The Tropicana Bar and pool is open from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m with poolside dining until 10 p.m. and swimming hours from 7 a.m to 7 p.m.

In the Roosevelt Hotel in Hollywood, is the Tropicana outdoor bar and pool. Hotel guests and patrons are welcome to indulge in a chilled drink poolside. Photo by Julio Huerta.

SKYBAR BY AJWA ALJOUDI T H E W E S T H O LLY WO O D A RE A is well-known for its fan-

cy nightlife. Bars, lounges, and clubs are unique, diverse, and unbelievably active all week long. Outdoor bars are highly recommended not only for the great locations but also for the atmosphere created by the inhabitants of West Hollywood. Skybar is one of the unbeatable day-and-night outdoor bar experiences, located on Sunset Boulevard at the edge of Sunset Hills, in the Mondrian Hotel. Despite that it is on the ground level, it has a breathtaking view where you can enjoy your drink with good company and great weather. It has a clean and lit pool in the center surrounded by tables and comfortable seats. Also you will find huge sofas with big pillows enticing guests to come and

Skybar on Sunset offers guests breathtaking views of Los Angeles. Photo by Ajwa Aljoudi.

take a load off. Skybar is open seven days a week from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. The servers are excellent and consistently come to check the tables’ order every 15 minutes. The bartenders have friendly personas and offer their selection of the best mixed cocktails they have. With the inviting decor, the fantastic overview of Los Angeles, the great drinks and overall fantastic vibe, Skybar is a great outdoor bar to enjoy pleasant summer evenings or summer days. Next time you’re in the West Hollywood area, be sure to check out Skybar.

The Tropicana Bar located in the Roosevelt Hotel on Sunset, makes for a great go-to outdoor bar to relax, enjoy a drink and take in the scenery. Photo by Julio Huerta

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SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

GLU T TO NY IS N OT A

To break the routine of taking normal pictures and to post it to social media whether it’s Snapchat or Instagram, also to cope with this trend. W H AT DO YO U US UA LLY US E T O TA K E S E LF IE S ?

Using my iPhone. W H E RE DO YO U US UA LLY TA K E T H E M? AT H O M E O R JUS T W H E N GO IN G O UT ?

Both actually, when I’m bored at home or while I’m doing something fun. DO YO U A LWAYS DRE S S UP T O TA K E S E LFIE S ?

VIC E — ORSON WELLS

SELFIES, HELLO KITT Y, AND COFFEE: THE GUILT Y PLEASURES OF CSUN S TUDENT S STORY BY AJWA ALJOUDI, GABRIELA RODRIGUEZ AND NEGIN DANESHFAR

S O M E P E O P LE S AY T H AT T H E Y TA K E S E LFIE S A LL T H E T IM E T O C A P T URE T H E M O ME NTS O F T H E IR LIV E S . DO YO U T H IN K T H AT T O O ?

Not really, if I want to capture a moment I would ask someone else to take a picture of me. I think selfies are more of a cool-hip way to take a picture. H OW DID T H AT S TA RT A N D W H E N ?

It started before the selfie hashtag got known. Before owning the iPhone, I used to take selfies in the mirror when my friends were busy. Then I got a semi-pro camera and I started to take selfies when I’m at places I love. In 2009 at Disneyland for example, I remember my friends and I were taking a selfie while waiting in line. DO YO U T H IN K IT ’S T RE N DIN G O N LY WITH A C E RTA IN AGE GRO UP ?

SE LFIE ADDICTI O N

Yes, it’s definitely popular within both genders between 11 and 20 years old and I would say it’s more common between the girls.

BY AJWA ALJOUDI THE CONCE PT O F A S EL F I E is a trending way of taking a picture. According to Instagram, it started off as an Instagram hashtag in January 2011 by user Jeneffer Lee. Selfie hashtag users are now growing by the millions. There’s even a song inspired by selfies called “#Selfie” by the Chainsmokers. The usage of the front camera on smart phones has made the trend grow faster. A few months ago when Ellen DeGeneres took her famous selfie at the Oscars, she broke Twitter’s record for the most retweeted picture. Taking selfies has been incorporated into people’s everyday lives. Akaber Mansour, 21, freshman

Not necessarily, I honestly take it whenever, even if I’m in my PJ’s.

majoring in biology, is addicted to taking selfies whenever and wherever she goes. She’s been spotted taking selfies while walking on campus, working out, and even in the classroom. “There is no wrong or right time and place for a selfie,” Akbar said. Ten pictures are never enough for her as her photo gallery has reached 2,761 pictures in one month! “Nobody looks at me as if I am doing something weird, it became a common phenomenon,” Akbar said.

D O YOU TA K E S E LF IE S O N A DA I LY B A S I S ?

Yes, you can say that.

WH Y D O YOU TA K E A LO T OF S EL F I ES ?


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

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CO F F E E F I E N D

BY NEGIN DANESHFAR

HE LLO KITT Y O B S E S S IO N

BY GABRIEL A RODRIGUEZ C AME LE BE NARDIN O, 22, senior and public health major at Cal State Northridge loves Hello Kitty. Most people oversee Hello Kitty as having a childlike quality but it is because of that innocent quality that Benardino is infatuated with the character. She hopes that by telling her story, people will see that Hello Kitty is more than just a children’s toy. It can be a lifestyle choice and a significant part of people’s lives. H OW DID YOU FIRST F I N D OUT ABOUT HE LLO K I T T Y ?

I was about seven when I was exposed to Hello Kitty and it’s merchandise through friends and the television show. I remember as a young girl watching the Hello Kitty show and thinking that I wanted to be her friend and idolized her. I didn’t really start collecting, until I started high school. WHAT / W HO INFLUEN C ED YO U T O START COL L E CT ING HE LLO K I T T Y MERCHANDISE ?

Believe it or not, my mom; although there are many other factors that influenced me, my mom was the reason why I started to become serious about collecting Hello Kitty merchandise. If you think I’m bad, you should see her Hello Kitty collection. It’s even more noticeable than mine. Still, it’s nice to have someone else understand your craze and to be able to share that same interest.

OF TH E H EL LO K IT T Y M ERC H A N D I S E YO U OW N, WH I C H I S YOU R FAVO RIT E ?

I have many favorites. How can you expect me to just choose one? But if I had to choose one, probably my Chun-Li inspired Hello Kitty plushy, I got from last year’s Comic-Con. The reason is because Chun-Li is my favorite character from Street Fighter and it’s cool that there is a Hello Kitty representation of her. Combining two of my interests is genius. H AVE YOU FAC ED P E O P LE WH O J U D G ED YO U F O R COL L EC TI N G H ELLO K IT T Y M ERC H A N D I S E?

Sadly, yes. I haven’t met many people who blatantly open up about their dislike for Hello Kitty, but I’ve had people tell me from my own family that I need to grow up or that I look childish. It’s funny because I’m a short person so I look like a child anyway. I usually just ignore those types of comments but it used to bother me since I genuinely love Hello Kitty and have identified with it for most of my life. WH AT I S H EL LO K IT T Y T O YOU ?

Hello Kitty is more than just a character, a plushy, and a child’s toy. It is a way of life and a significant figure in my life. She makes up a part of my self-identity, as it is a recollection of my childhood and all things innocent and pure.

W H AT S TA RT E D O UT as a morning wakeup remedy to studying and getting energized, integrated itself as a way to socialize with friends and family. Coffee has become a major form of pop culture for Leslie Pluma, 23, a senior construction management major. To make her coffee she gets supplies at a local cafe. She prefers ground coffee rather than filter packs because the strong and rich flavor leaves an aftertaste that filter packs don’t. W H E N DID YO U S TA RT DRIN K IN G CO F F E E ?

I started to drink coffee in middle school. I drank about six cups a day when I started to make my own coffee. W H AT DO YO U LIK E T H E M O S T A B O UT CO F F E E ?

I like coffee because it’s a great energy drink to do homework and a way to socialize. I like the taste, flavor and it keeps me awake and more energized. It’s like a vitamin or something. It makes me stay awake and have energy up until 2 a.m. W H AT S PA RK E D YO UR CO N N E C T IO N W IT H CO F F E E ?

Whenever my family and I have guests over, I’ll make coffee for them as a tradition, which got me used to making coffee on a regular basis. I got addicted to it and started drinking coffee more at gatherings. W H E N YO U DRIN K CO F F E E , W H AT DO YO U F E E L LIK E DO IN G?

I do homework or clean and organize my closet. I like doing

something and cleaning. Sometimes I like to drink coffee and just relax. W H AT IS YO UR FAVO RITE CO F F E E DRINK ?

The iced caramel macchiato at Starbucks, even though it’s expensive, it’s worth it. I prefer that out of all of them. H OW DO YO U BRE W YO UR CO F F EE ? IS THE RE A S P E C IA L WAY YO U M A K E IT ?

When I buy regular coffee, I prefer blonde roast because it has a lighter taste. I like the taste of a coffee shop’s coffee instead of the regular coffee I make at home. I put a lot of of sugar, milk, whipped cream and caramel drizzle on my coffee. I don’t drink as much as I used to because it’s not very healthy. IN W H IC H O T HE R CAFE S DO YO U GO BU Y YO U R CO F F E E ?

Lucky Loma, a family-owned business with specialty shakes, and smoothies without coffee or vanilla bean. I used to go to Muddhouse Cafe in West Hills for the live band music and open mics. Another one of my favorites is Freudian Sip, I like their happy hour, and Peet’s Coffee and Tea in Tarzana. W H AT UN IQUE BRAND S O F CO F F E E WO U LD YO U S UGGE S T ?

I usually buy Nescafe, because of the brand, my roommate, family and friends also buy it. I also buy Folgers and Ethiopian coffee.


The King Harbor Marina and Pier complex in Redondo Beach is a great daycation for those looking to enjoy a relaxing day by the seaside. Photo by Diana Cruz

Daycation getaways BY NEELOFER LODHY, MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ, GABRIELA RODRIGUEZ, EMY SOSA, DIANA CRUZ AND JONATHAN R. DIAZ months approaching, many of us are already fantasizing about our treasured vacation plans. Whether its frolicking along the beaches of Hawaii or slamming down shot glasses in Mexico, we deserve a break from work and school. Unfortunately, the majority of us don’t have the budget, or the free time. Instead of a vacation, how about a well-spent daycation somewhere away from the usual surroundings?

WITH THE SUMME R

HE ARS T C AS T L E BY NE E LOFE R LODH Y H EA RST CASTLE is a great getaway location for those looking for some serenity. Also known as “La Cuesta Encantada” (The Enchanted Hill), Hearst Castle was designed by architect Julia Morgan for William Randolph Hearst. In 1957, The Hearst Corpora-

tion donated the property to the state of California, and has since been maintained as a historic state park. Tours of Hearst Castle run at the affordable price of $25. Guests can choose to take a tour of the Grand Rooms, the Upstairs Suites, the Cottages and Kitchens, or an evening tour in which the whole estate is lit. Following the tour, guests are invited to roam the grounds of the castle where they can view the illustrious outdoor Neptune Pool, as well as the sensational indoor Roman Pool. The funds used to maintain the property, come from the thousands of eager visitors who flock to see Hearst’s creation in person. The pools only use fresh water from a nearby natural resource, but because of the recent and drastic drought in California, the state has decided to drain the outdoor Neptune Pool until the natural source is

no longer scarce. Not to worry though, the indoor Roman Pool is still full of fresh water, and is as marvelous as ever to observe.

S O LVA N G BY MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ IN T H E S A N TA YN E Z VA LLE Y , lies a town that looks as

if it were plucked from a Walt Disney movie. Founded in 1911 by a group of Danish teachers, Solvang is a refreshing change from our high-rise skyscrapers and smogged air. Decorated with traditional Danish architecture, the streets are filled with numerous bakeries, restaurants and vineyards. In September Solvang celebrates its “Danish Days,” where tourists get a taste of Denmark. Here, locals don traditional costumes, participate in folk dances, and chow on authentic Danish food like frikadeller (meatballs).

During summer, open-air music festivals take the stage, as well as “The Taste of Solvang,” where foodies can dine on delectable desserts and local home grown wines. If you’re a bike enthusiast, don’t fret. Solvang is filled with bike paths that circle around old windmills, horse ranches, and the Old Mission Santa Ines. Venturing through the town, onlookers can spot local landmarks, like the statue of the Little Mermaid and author, Hans Christian Andersen. Only two hours away off the 101 freeway, this can easily be a fun-filled overnight trip, with hundreds of affordable hotels in walking distance of downtown Solvang. Forget about parking your car, instead stroll around and visit the many souvenir shops, and pick up a pair of Danish clogs. Who knows, maybe it’s a custom you’ll grow to love.


VASQUE Z ROCK S

SAN DIEGO

R E D O N D O B E AC H

BY G ABRIE L A RODRI G U EZ

BY EMY SOSA

BY DIANA CRUZ

Natural Area Park, is the ideal place to enjoy the beauty of nature through hiking trails, picnics, and venturing through the rocky terrains. Vasquez Rocks Park is a site located off the high desert near Agua Dulce Springs, featuring 932 acres of rock formations. An interesting fact about the park is that it received its name in 1874 through an infamous bandit named Tiburcio Vasquez. Vasquez used the rocks to run away from the authorities until he was later caught. The Vasquez Rocks Natural Area Park is open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on a weekly basis and has a parking place available. After an expedition of hiking, stop by Sweet Water Cafe in Agua Dulce and quench your thirst through lemonade served in mason jars, and indulge in the cafe’s selective menu of wraps, burgers, sandwiches, and salads.

WE A L L K N OW TH AT

some of the top places that people go to in San Diego are the San Diego Zoo, the San Diego Safari Park and SeaWorld. Yet, there are other places tourists and college students may want to consider when visiting San Diego. The Gaslamp Quarter, is known as one of the top entertainment destinations in San Diego. This is the place to go to when looking for diverse shops, restaurants, nightclubs, bars and lounges. Behind the Gaslamp Quarter, is the Petco Park. Here, visitors can catch a ballgame, or enjoy a nice picnic in the playground located behind the outfield of the stadium. One of the main restaurants, Lolita’s at the Park, offers casual Mexican food and one of their most popular dishes is the Tsunami Fries which have cheese, shrimp, steak, guacamole and sour cream.

THE

VASQ UE Z

ROCKS

RE DO N DO

L O N G B E AC H BY JONATHAN R. DIAZ

B E AC H

King Harbor Marina and Pier complex offers visitors a variety of attractions. Interesting things to do near the Redondo Beach King Harbor include South Bay Galleria for your shopping needs, Gondola Amore for a romantic boat ride and Redondo Boardwalk. On King’s Harbor, Quality Seafood Inc. provides award-winning clam chowder, seafood paella, and fish and chips. Quality Seafood Inc. offers 25 tap beers, 10 bottled beers and four wines. They have the largest selection of live shellfish on the west coast, carrying; dungeness crab, Santa Barbara craband more. They also carry over 12 selections of fish and shrimp. Check out the Nature Cruises the Voyager offers. Passengers have a chance to see dolphins, sea lions and the diverse sea life that inhabit the local waters.

from the valley is the seaside city of Long Beach. Start your day with a mimosa at Schooner or Later. Located on the marina, this family-owned restaurant is only open for breakfast and lunch. If you don’t have reservations, the wait can be a while but it’s worth it when you bite into their signature belgian waffles or omelettes. Keep the ocean theme going by checking out the Queen Mary. You can also take a tour of a Soviet era Russian submarine. Check out the Museum of Latin American Art. The only museum dedicated to modern and contemporary Latin American Art, MOLAA has an impressive collection. If you want a museum for the kids, don’t miss the Aquarium of the Pacific. Take in a show at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center or by having a drink at the bars and clubs that line Pine Avenue.

A N H O UR AWAY

From the pools of Hearst Castle, the bandit legacy at Vasquez and the activities San Diego has to offer, all make for great daycations. Photos by Hearst Corp., Gabriela Rodriguez and Emy Sosa.


ILLUSTRATION BY JOSHUA PINA

Bills, bills and more bills AS THE YEAR ENDS, STUDENTS CONSIDER THE FINANCIAL RESPONSIBLITIES THEY’LL HAVE AFTER GRADUATING COLLEGE

BY L ISA ANDE RSON & C H AMPAIGN W ILLIA M S PREPARING TO G R A D UAT E college is exciting. No more

late-night cramming sessions. No more group projects. No more hoping and wishing that a professor will accept your late assignments. Once you graduate you’re a free agent. Or are you? You still have to climb the ladder of success in the workforce. Financial aid and loans will no longer be disbursed every four to five months to assist with large bills. Think about it. You have to eat. You need a place to

sleep, so an apartment is kind of mandatory. If you plan to stay in the greater Los Angeles area, you’ll need a car. Which then tacks on both car insurance and gas money. Phone bill. Cable bill. Wifi bill. Water. Electricity. And the list goes on. Shanteria Golston began thinking about the responsibilities that would be hers after college during her final semester at CSUN in fall 2013. “At the time I was really nervous and worried. I was like, ‘Oh my God how am I going to support myself? I have to find a job quick.’ (But) I just took it one step at a time,” Golston said.

Most students have a side job while in college, in order to have a few bucks in their pocket. But once you graduate, you need to turn your side job into a fulltime job. Alumni Relations and N-Reach coordinator Jonathan Adrias, 23, works alongside CSUN’s Alumni Association to put on events that will assist current and soon-to-be alumni in transitioning from college to the workforce. “Back when I was in college I’d learn things like ‘What president was the 49th president of the United States?’ but I never learned things like reducing

debt, planning for retirement, paying back your loans, buying your first car. We (the alumni association) have a lot of programs that help bridge that gap,” Adrias said. Only four months after her graduation, Golston is now the administrative assistant for Subway Corporate Headquarters. “Start saving early on. Don’t wait until the last minute,” Golston advises all soon-tobe graduates. “Put that refund check in a savings account and only go into that savings account when you really need something. Once you graduate, and you don’t have any other in-


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

come, you’re going to need it.” Whether your parents are paying for everything now, or you’re reliant on financial aid there are a few useful tips that you may want to consider before you graduate. Food and rent will likely prove the most burdensome. On a Gallup poll from 2012, young Americans ages 18 to 29 were found to spend an average of $173 per week on food, versus $151 for the average American. There’s something to be said for learning how to grocery shop and not eating out as much. Even savvy shopping skills are in vain if you’re paying too much for rent, transportation, cell phones etc. Look up the average cost of rent and utilities for your area if you’re going to move out right away and start keeping track of how much money you’re spending every day for at least a week--that’s the starting point. Avoid debt at all costs and don’t rely on your credit card. As Mike Myatt from Forbes says, “Don’t fall prey to challenges; learn from them.” Kevin Kiani, who just graduated from CSUN last Fall, adds that you should brace yourself for rejection. “There’s a lot of different qualifications for different jobs,” Kiani said,“Don’t be afraid of rejection, because it’s going to happen. You have to put forth a lot of effort to even get a job. I didn’t think it was easy but, you’re going to get rejected a lot and I wish I was a little more of that.” Kiani is gratefully taking advantage of his parents’ kindness and saving up money now so when he moves out after his graduation ceremony, he won’t have to live paycheck to paycheck. Most online resources also seem to agree that if you can stay at home, take advantage of this transitioning time period like Kiani is, whether it’s to save up money like him or simply to build your resume with an internship or two. BY ANNE CHRISTE N S EN & NEGIN DANE SHFAR A D IFF ICULT DE CI S I ON awaiting thousands of graduating college students ready to enter the professional job market is how to navigate the ubiquitous

work commute with very little cash on hand. Those who land jobs within walking, biking, or bus-riding distance can get by with a new pair of trainers or a bicycle helmet. But as Los Angeles highways enjoy better funding than bicycle paths or bus routes, the majority of recent graduates may need to invest in four wheels instead of two: say hello to car ownership. Sociology student Christopher Lawrence, 28, will soon join LA’s commuting workers in their average 29 minute journey to work, according to the US Census Bureau, and he isn’t excited about the prospect of car shopping. “I probably won’t be looking for a new car for a few years,” Lawrence said. Students ready to head out to the car sales lot might take comfort in the recent popularity of compact cars in the competitive auto market. With fewer bells and whistles than high-end luxury cars, compact vehicles display impressive gas mileage, and efficient use of cabin space, making them a serious contender for first-time car buyers. Before signing, purchasing or leasing contracts, however, it’s advisable to do some homework. Linda Bradley, assistant professor with CSUN’s Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, recommends evaluating your financial situation, including your credit score, in addition to the safety and performance ratings of the vehicle before even setting foot on the car lot. “First-time buyers need to make sure they do pre-shopping research prior to physically shopping for a car. Buyers should take stock of their needs and wants first, then examine their budget to determine what they can actually afford,” Bradley said. “Compact cars that are environmentally friendly—good gas mileage or use of alternative fuel sources—are always a good choice if they fulfill the needs of the buyer.” Small cars may be more fuel efficient, but some also come with a higher upfront price tag. An economy sedan starts at $10,000 and goes up to $40,000 for a luxury model, according to the online car resource Edmunds.com, and only gets 31 miles combined per gallon.

TOP 3 COMPACT & FUEL-EFFICIENT CARS FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS: BY A N N E C H RIS T E N S E N

SM A R T C AR P URE COU PE

M A N U FAC T U R E R ’S S U G G E S T E D R E TA IL P R IC E ( M SRP) $ 1 3, 2 7 0 M IL E S P E R GA L LO N ( MPG ) 3 4 C I T Y & 3 8 H I G H WAY S A FE T Y R AT IN G 1 5/ 2 0

F IAT 5 0 0

MSRP $ 1 6, 1 9 5 M IL E S P E R GA L LO N ( MPG ) 3 1 C I T Y & 40 H I G H WAY S A FE T Y R AT IN G 19/20

T OYOTA YARIS MSRP $ 14,43 0 MIL E S P E R GA L LO N ( MPG ) 3 0 C I T Y & 3 7 H I G H WAY S A FE T Y R AT IN G 18/20

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READ AS WE COMPARE GROUND-BREAKING AR TIS T S FROM THE PAS T T O THE PRESENT STORY BY RITA AKITA, MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ, MELODY CHERCHIAN, ASTRID DELGADO AND NEELOFER LODHY D O YOU LOVE listening to music, but you’re tired of the same routine? Well, here’s a guide to upgrade your daily soundtrack without compromising the artists you love and the genres that get you grooving. From contemporary to old school, there’s bound to be a track on the list to get your toes tapping and your hands clapping.

BY RISA AKITA

ARC ADE F IRE A ND THE TE M P TATIO N S group The Temptations, may not seem to have much in common with the 2000s Grammy award-winning Indie band Arcade Fire, but they are surprisingly similar. Both groups have embracing mellow vocals and a distinguishing sound of musical instruments, helping them obtain versatility. The Temptations sang melodious chorus tunes with solid bass lines, and occasional orchestral settings featuring strings in their songs such as,“I Wish it Would Rain,” and “I Know I’m Losing You.” Arcade Fire similarly weaves melancholic and emotional melodies in their hit songs, “Wake Up,” “Crown of Love” and “Neighborhood #3 (Power Out).” If you know The Temptations’ song, “My Girl,” listen to the beautiful, nostalgic, and dramatic “The Suburbs I” by Arcade

THIS 1960S SOUL C H ORU S

E D I T H PI A F A N D J A N I S J O PL I N WH I L E O N E M AY never even consider comparing artists Janis Joplin and Edith Piaf, both musicians sing songs like storytellers. Joplin, an American blues singer, sings about women who are lonely and besotted with love in her songs “A Woman Left Lonely,” and “Cry Baby.” Piaf, a French chanson diva, similarly sings about women who are lonely, filled with love and sorrow in “L’accordeoniste” and the timeless “La Vie En Rose.” While both artists have a completely different style of music, their vocals share a texture which can be both feminine and masculine. Joplin’s husky voice and Piaf ’s deep bass voice deliver the women’s rapture, wailing and murmuring. BY MICHELLE DOMINGUEZ

T H E B L AC K K E Y S AND OTIS REDDING TH E B L AC K K E YS ’ delicious mix of psychedelic rock and indie blues is a refreshing change to today’s autotuned vocals. Their unique guitar riffs and pounding drum synths have placed them in the same league as soul singer, Otis Redding. Sharing the

same gritty voice and brassy arrangements, it doesn’t take long for your ears to sync these two musicians together. Listening to The Black Keys’ “Little Black Submarine,” and Otis Redding’s “Try a little Tenderness,” is hypnotic. Though Redding was a powerhouse in the 1960s, his hallmark raw voice lingers with The Black Keys frontman, Dan Auerbach. Close your eyes and you can instantly hear the emotional lyrics in these two blues rock masters.

K AT Y PE R RY A N D D E B B I E H A R RY this famous lyric, “I Kissed a Girl, and I Liked it,” the chances are you know who Katy Perry is. She’s transformed herself into one of the most successful pop artist of all time, much like her 1970s counterpart, Debbie Harry, a.k.a. Blondie. With her wild stage moves, edgy voice and signature blonde hair, Harry quickly became a pop culture icon. “Heart of Glass” and “Call Me” by Harry’s band Blondie, paved the way for female empowerment, just like Katy Perry’s “Roar” and “Part of Me.” Both artists share a love for non-traditional clothing. Harry brought an unpolished glamour into the punk-rock world, wearing hot pants and oversized t-shirts while Perry’s fantasy-inspired frocks, like her cupcake bra and swirling peppermint dress, have her labeled as the queen of

IF YO U’V E E V E R H E A RD


SCENE MAGAZINE • SUMMER 2014

quirk. Both artists share a tongue in cheek humor with their songs, using disco, pop, rock and punk influences. BY MELODY CHERCHIAN

B RUN O MAR S A ND B UDDY H O L LY like “Grenade” and “Runaway Baby,” thriving musician Bruno Mars has made his way into the hearts of many swooning young women. With his love songs and ballads, Bruno has made doo-wop and blues a more relevant genre for the new generation. But Bruno wasn’t the first to do it. If you like Bruno’s style, you should check out oldies artist Buddy Holly. From their suits and ties to their rhythmic beats, these two gentlemen share a lot more than most would expect. With rock ‘n roll undertones and influences like Elvis Presley, both Bruno and Buddy are quite the performers. Listen to “That’ll Be the Day” and “Peggie Sue” by Holly to see where all the charm began.

WITH T OP HIT S

KE NDRICK L A M A R AND N .W. A WITH HIS L AT E ST album “Good Kid, m.A.A.d. City,” Kendrick Lamar has proven old-school rap isn’t dead. Kendrick utilizes strong beats and rich bass to relay political messages. His aggressive, blunt lyrics and tendency to question the world he lives in, make him one of the greatest rappers of our generation. Being compared to past legends like the Notorious B.I.G. and N.W.A, Kendrick has listed both artists as an influence when writing Compton-based songs. What Kendrick and N.W.A have in common is that they defy the system and incorporate their struggles into highly relatable songs for their audience. Listen to Kenrick’s “M.A.A.D City” and N.W.A’s “Straight Outta Compton,” it becomes clear that the west coast runs in both artists’ veins.

BY ASTRID DELGADO

CEE LO GREEN AND ARETHA FRANKLIN is the “Queen of Soul” and an influence to artist Cee Lo Green’s music. While Franklin’s music is more gospel-charged than Green’s funk and hip-hop influenced sound, both are fullon soul. Green’s “Fuck You” and Aretha Franklin’s “Respect,” both big hits in their own respect, are full of soul, funk, and have that feel-good, bad-ass attitude. If you like Green’s funky sound, you’ll love Franklin’s original take on soul.

A RETH A F RA N K LIN

TAY L O R S W I F T A N D STEVIE NICKS Taylor Swift’s songwriting style and country-influenced songs, try listening to Stevie Nicks’ legendary music. Swift has regarded Nicks as one of her childhood heroes, and her music shows the influence Nicks has had on her. While not as poppy as Swift’s sounds, Nicks has that country feel, in a much more grown up package. Nicks’ music also has a much more heavy rock and folk influence to it then Swift’s, yet both artists make subtle use of vocal harmony.

I F YOU LIK E

BY NEELOFER LODHY

J US T I N T I MB E R L A K E A N D MI C H A E L J AC K S O N F ROM T H E E A RLY 6 0 S T O T O DAY , Michael Jackson’s music can still be heard anywhere worldwide. Making a name for himself since his pre-teen years in the Mickey Mouse Club, Justin Timberlake can join the likes of Michael Jackson, as one whose music will prevail, even after he’s gone.

Jackson and Timberlake easily show their passion for music through their similarly high-pitched vocals, along with their skill in dance. Both entertainers appeal to international audiences and have a consistency to make great and memorable tracks. With chart-toppers from Jackson’s “Thriller,” to Timberlake’s “Cry Me a River,” it can easily be said that both entertainers know how to rock our bodies.

ILLUSTRATION BY JAE KITINOJA

L A DY G AG A A N D DAV I D BO W I E of time, generations have been able to witness several unique musicians. In the late 60s and early 70s, the world got to witness the greatness that is David Bowie as he emerged into the music scene of glam rock era. Though he was commonly referred to as his alter ego Ziggy Stardust, the world knew him as David Bowie, the experimental art rock musician. Like Bowie who chanelled his art rock days in the 70s, pop artist Lady Gaga has just entered her days of art pop. Gaga recently released the album ‘Artpop,’ a worldwide success, and keeps delivering cranium-yanking hits. Both artists are similar in terms of appearance, theatrically of course, as well as tone. Bowie delivers strong, yet low and powerful notes while Gaga follows and occasionally hits a high tone. Like Bowie, Gaga embraces the colorful and eccentric aspect of music, which both artists like to wear on their sleeves, literally.

OV E R T H E CO URS E

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CSUN Scene, Summer 2014