Student/Faculty Internship Guide

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CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS

Internship Guide FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF


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CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


T A B L E O F C O N T E N T S  What is an Internship

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Important Roles

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Obtaining Academic Credit

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Virtual Internships

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Faculty Guide

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Additional Resources

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Important Campus Resources

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FAQs

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Definitions of Experiential Learning Terms

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Appendix

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CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty

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PA RT N E R W I T H U S Career Development & Alumni Engagement (CDAE) at CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) welcomes experiential learning opportunities for students from employers offering internships. Internships are valuable experiences in which students can apply their academic knowledge in a professional setting and foster their development while making industry-specific connections. CDAE advances the mission of the University by providing opportunities for students to engage in real-world experiences that enhance academic learning, develop professional networks, foster active engagement in the community, and prepare for careers to meet the emerging workforce needs of the region. We are committed to providing high-quality services focused on development leading to student career success. By working together with our employer partners, we continue to educate the future workforce while building community leaders who are prepared to meet employer needs and serve as engaged citizens in our region and beyond. Please reach out to our team should you have any questions. Go Dolphins!

Danielle Quillan Internship Program Analyst (805) 437-2665 Danielle.Quillan@csuci.edu

Amanda Asquith-Caya, M.S., M.A. Coordinator of Employer Relations (805) 437-8493 amanda.asquith-caya@csuci.edu

Amanda Carpenter, Ed.D. Director of Career Development & Alumni Engagement (805) 437-3565 Amanda.Carpenter@csuci.edu

OUR COMMITMENT TO OUR STUDENTS & INTERNSHIPS We understand this informational guide can be a useful resource but may not answer all of your questions pertaining to internships. The Career Development & Alumni Engagement team is committed to supporting your internship interests and we are available to assist students, faculty, and staff with any internship-related questions or concerns. We believe internships are an excellent way to begin building important connections that are invaluable in developing and maintaining a strong professional network between local employers and our CSUCI students. For further assistance, please contact us regarding your internship-related questions and needs.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT & ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT Division of University Advancement California State University Channel Islands One University Drive, Bell Tower 1548 | Camarillo, CA 93012 (805) 437-3270 | INTERNSHIPS@CSUCI.EDU 2

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


W H AT I S A N I N T E R N S H I P ? An internship is any career-related work or service experience in a professional setting in which a student has specific learning outcomes and reflects actively on the learning process. The experience must be supervised by professional staff who provide ongoing training for the benefit of the intern. Internships can provide real world experience to explore and gain relevant knowledge and transferable skills required to enter the working world. Internships should provide the following:
 • Opportunities to work in pre-professional positions and apply your academic skills to practical work-based projects. • Intentional learning goals outlined to benefit you through the mentorship and guidance of an expert in their industry. • Foster professional development to make networking contacts in your field of interest. • An avenue to explore different career choices, while gain work experience specific to your intended industry/ field of study. Other pre-professional experiential learning opportunities and industry training programs: • Research/field/laboratory assistant programs • Leadership development programs • Fellowship with short-term work experience in nonprofit, government, or academia • Classroom-related experience such as externships, practicum, or cooperative education • Leadership training and rotational programs for recent college graduates A well-designed internship will provide students with professionally oriented activities and experience similar to that of an entry-level professional in the field however, the student will not assume work that a regular employee would routinely perform.

W H AT I S N O T C O N S I D E R E D A N I N T E R N S H I P?

• • •

Part-time job with tasks unrelated to career experience and growth with minimal opportunities to learn about student’s career interests Primarily clerical or unskilled labor A vague, undefined, unsupervised experience with no training

C R I T E R I A FO R A N E X P E R I E N C E TO B E D E F I N E D A S A N I N T E R N S H I P

(NAC E, 2019)

To ensure that an experience—whether it is a traditional internship, or one conducted remotely or virtually—is educational, and thus eligible to be considered a legitimate internship, all the following criteria must be met : 1 The experience must be an extension of the classroom—a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform. 2 The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings. 3 The experience has a defined beginning and end, and a job description with desired qualifications. 4 There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic course work. 5 There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience. 6 There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor. 7 There are resources, equipment, and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals. If you have any questions regarding an internship opportunity, please contact us at internships@csuci.edu.

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T H E I M P O RTA N C E O F I N T E R N S H I P S
 For students, internships provide an opportunity to see if a particular career path or field of study is right for them and hone their skills. Academic credit internships integrate the students’ academic study with practical experience in cooperating organizations. Through the integration of practical and academic experience, students enhance their academic knowledge in their area of study, their personal development, and their professional preparation. The teaching faculty and the on-site supervisors share in the educational process of interns. Academic • Enhance classroom learning by integrating academic curriculum and real-world experience. • Require a variety of learning styles challenging students to use new ways of learning and thinking. • May increase academic motivation and clarity about academic goals. • Provide opportunities to work with equipment or technology that may not be readily available on campus. • Improve critical thinking, problem-solving, and retention of concepts. Personal/Professional • Increase research skills, teamwork, interpersonal communication skills, and self-confidence. • Personalize learning by providing relevance, meaning, and context. • Frequently challenge attitudes, beliefs, and worldviews. • Help students grow emotionally by providing opportunities to learn from failure and success. • Provide networking and mentoring opportunities. • Increase employment opportunities. Internships also benefit the University and academic departments: • Validates the university’s curriculum in a work environment. • Broadens students’ learning opportunities. • Creates opportunities for faculty and employers to exchange ideas, research, and expertise. • Contributes to student retention. • Connects faculty to current trends within their professional field. • Develops more competitive and employable graduates. • Improves post-graduation statistics for the university. • May accelerate corporate fund-raising efforts. • Increases community engagement opportunities for faculty and university. 4

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


ALL INTERNSHIPS SHOULD A

* Include a signed Internship Placement Agreement with a senior representative of the partner agency or corporation and the University procurement officer as designated signature authority. In this agreement, it must be stated that the university assumes no risk or liability and that the sponsoring agency/ corporation assumes full responsibility for the liability of the intern, affirming that they have requisite insurance to cover any potential harm to the intern, and include basic information such as location, contact person, and organization description.

B Include a learning agreement signed by the student, sponsoring faculty, and placement supervisor listing the learning goals of the internship and the duties and responsibilities of each party, notifying the student of the assignment of liability, terms and conditions and the listing of relevant agency policies, and the date the internship begins. This includes mention of whether the intern is paid and conditions for receiving academic credit.
 Faculty and/or programs must maintain a file of the signed forms. The Dean of Faculty will also retain a sample copy of internship forms that are used. *This requirement is pursuant to Executive order 849, page 6: “Student placement agreements must be in writing and shall specify minimum insurance requirements applicable to the contracting parties and appropriate hold harmless provisions based upon the needs of the contracting parties. The following hold harmless provisions may be used as a minimum: Hold Harmless Provision: CI shall be responsible for damages caused by the negligence of its officers, employees and agents. Trustees shall be responsible for the damages caused by the negligence of its officers, employee and agents. The intent of this paragraph is to impose responsibility on each part for the negligence of its officer’s employees and agents.”

I M P O R TA N T R O L E S Role of Career Development & Alumni Engagement Staff Our role is to assist students and faculty in connecting to employers and alumni through events and workshops and provide career counseling services. Staff will assist students with career assessments, exploration, resume/ cover letter review, and job/internship search strategies. Role of the Intern For the intern, the internship is an opportunity to integrate classroom theory, gain practical skills and develop career-related work experience. It is the sole responsibility of the student to initiate the process to earn academic credit for an internship. Role of the Faculty Ensure the students are gaining a quality educational and pre-professional experiential learning opportunity through the academic credit process. Role of the Employer • Ensure the internship they are offering is meaningful and will serve to enhance the student’s educational experience and career development. • Establish learning objectives and development skills in relation to the internship experience and then structure and supervise the internship to meet the outlined objectives. Additional departmental specific outcomes may be required for Academic Credit Internships.

TYPES OF INTERNSHIPS

Paid Internships A paid internship would be arranged between the intern and employer. The pay may be in the form of an hourly wage or salary. It will be up to the intern and employer to negotiate the pay and terms of agreement for this type of internship. The university has no role in this negotiation.
 Academic Credit Internships An academic credit internship would be arranged between the intern, employer and sponsoring faculty/ course instructor. The prospective intern must take the initiative to prepare the paperwork and documents necessary for academic credit.

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L E G A L C O N S I D E R AT I O N S
 An unpaid internship can be in violation of The Department of Labor Fair Labor Standards Act, and all faculty/staff and students should understand laws surrounding internships.
 Department of Labor Requirements • The U.S. Department of Labor has created guidelines for employers who utilize interns to determine whether an intern must be paid. These guidelines dictate how interns must be compensated. • All interns must be paid, UNLESS ALL criteria outlined in The Department of Labor Fair Labor Standards Act is met • The Department of Labor Fair Labor Standards Act is available at https://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/ compliance/whdfs71.pdf

L O C AT I N G I N T E R N S H I P S
 The Career Development Center provides resources, workshops, and services for you to learn about job/internship opportunities and interact with recruiters. It is recommended that you utilize multiple job/internship search strategies to maximize your efforts. Ultimately, internships are self-sought and secured individually by the student. The following list are resources to help you secure a quality internship: • • • •

Drop-In Career Counseling Resume Resources Brand Yourself As a Professional Networking and Fairs

Additional Tips • Check with faculty in your academic department for leads to other possible internship opportunities.
 • Talk to professionals in the field (ask friends and family or networking opportunities), join student professional organizations, and tell your own personal network of family and friends about your desire for an internship. • Make the most of your internship. CandidCareer.com has thousands of videos from industry professionals for you to view topics such as interviewing, career pathways, resume writing, etc.

O B TA I N I N G A C A D E M I C C R E D I T An academic credit internship would be arranged between the intern, employer and sponsoring faculty. The

prospective intern must take the initiative to prepare the paperwork and documents necessary for academic credit. Academic credit for internships is available only as arranged on an individual basis by students and their academic department. This is a contractual agreement between the prospective intern, sponsoring faculty member, and internship supervisor. The following guideline will help students initiate Academic Credit: • Intern is offered a position by the internship supervisor. • Intern identifies a faculty sponsor within their academic discipline and completes the Self-Selected Internship Placement Site Agreement form. • Intern and faculty sponsor develop internship agreement for academic credit. • Intern presents the internship agreement to the internship supervisor. • Intern coordinates with sponsoring faculty and internship supervisor to complete and submit all required paperwork to earn academic credit.
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CSUCI Internship Toolkit Guide for Students & Faculty


PROJECTED DEADLINE TO SUBMIT ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP AGREEMENT Semester Date Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer Semester

Within 2 weeks of the first day of class Within 2 weeks of the first day of class Prior to May 1

VIRTUAL INTERNSHIPS A virtual or remote internship is a unique opportunity for you to work without visiting a physical office. Virtual internships require increased planning and consideration by both the intern and supervisor, but they can still be a great way to gain skills and make connections. Here are some helpful tips to ensure your virtual internship is a success! 1

Schedule your time. The ability to work independently is vital to a virtual internship. Your Site Supervisor/ Manager and colleagues need to know when you’ll be working. Set a schedule for your intern hours and make sure to communicate that plan to everyone who needs the information. Then stick to it. Creating a schedule for yourself and sticking to it will keep the work manageable and help you avoid a last-minute crunch right before a deadline. Make sure you devote the required time necessary to complete projects by the deadline your supervisor established.

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Avoid distractions. Set up a workspace that will allow you to be efficient. Turn off the television and set aside social media. Make sure you can focus during your work hours.

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Be professional. You’ll be tempted to work from bed in your pajamas at times, but you’ll be more productive if you get /up and dress as if you were going to an office. This will also come in handy when you are asked to participate in an unexpected videoconference. When talking on the phone or participating in a conference call, make sure to choose a location that is noise free and allows you to focus all of your attention on the task at hand.

Much of the communication during your virtual internship will be through email. Keep your writing professional and appropriate for the workplace. Your Site Supervisor will appreciate messages that are clearly written and to the point.

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Communicate. Communication between you and your Site Supervisor is imperative in a virtual internship. You’re trying to make a good impression, so make sure your Site Supervisor and colleagues know what you’re doing. Find out when and how they prefer to hear from you, and always keep them in the loop. When you receive a message from your boss, respond as quickly as possible. Pro Tip: Consider setting up a meeting at the same time each week so that you can monitor your progress, discuss on-going tasks, and keep your Site Supervisor up to date. There are a variety of ways to stay in touch with your Site Supervisor. Make sure you have the proper tools for successful virtual communication. A microphone ⁄ headset combination will alleviate background noise and improve the clarity of your conversations.

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Use a task list. Write down what you need to accomplish before you start working for the day, then refer back to your list often as you get things done. Balance out your tasks and don’t try to do everything at once. Be patient, thorough, and take advantage of the flexibility of working from home. Plus, it will help you feel accomplished as you cross completed items off your list! Consider using an organizational tool such as Google Calendar or Evernote to help you stay on top of things.

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Ask questions. If you’re confused about an assignment or unsure what to do next, don’t be afraid to ask your Site Supervisor/Manager or colleagues for help. There are no stupid questions! Clarifying your tasks now will help you be successful in completing them.

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Take breaks. If you’ve never worked remotely, you may find yourself getting sucked into a project and working for long stretches without a break. That’s OK occasionally, but you’ll likely be more effective if you rest and recharge every hour or two. Schedule a few break times, and don’t ignore them. Be sure to eat throughout the day as well.

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Consider a change of scenery. You may also find that sitting in the same room of your home all day is making you a bit stir crazy. If so, pack up your stuff and head to a coffee shop, library, or other location that offers a good work environment (after social distancing is over!). Right now, a change of scenery can mean outside to sit in your garden or patio or moving from your bedroom to your couch.

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Go the extra mile. Don’t be afraid to pitch new ideas to your employer and work collaboratively with the rest of the team. Surpass expectations and look for unique ways to do more than just the required work. For example, if you notice the company could benefit by using another social media platform, mention it to your Site Supervisor and suggest an action plan.

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Know your resources. CSUCI has many resources for you while you navigate working remotely. Be sure to check in with the Career Studio, (805) 437-3270 or career.services@csuci.edu, if you have any questions about your remote/virtual internship. Or check in with your major chair or academic adviser.

If you follow these guidelines, you will maximize your productivity during your internship and showcase your skills. That could be the key to landing your first full-time job or stepping into a new career, so it’s definitely worth the effort.

R E S O U R C E S FO R YO U R R E M O T E/V I RT UA L I N T E R N S H I P Virtual Communication Tools Resources for delivering a virtual internship experience: • Face to Face Communication: GoToMeeting, Zoom, FaceTime, WebEx, Zoho Meetings, Skype, etc. • Other communication tools: Slack, Email, Instant Messenger, etc. • Free Project Management Tools: Asana, OpenProject, nTask, Monday, Smartsheet, etc. • Online file sharing: DropBox, Box, GoogleDrive, GoFile, etc.

V I RT UA L N E T WO R K I N G Use this opportunity to network with not only your site supervisor but also other interns and employees at your internship. Creating a profile on a site like LinkedIn will help you establish an online professional network so that the relationships you develop during your internship last long after the semester is over. Additionally, CSUCI has its own networking platform—Dolphin Connect—to assist you in connecting with other Dolphins (alumni). Dolphin Connect is connecting the Dolphin Network through mentoring and purposeful connections. By joining Dolphin Connect, you will be able to network with Dolphins in your industry, share career advice or gain insights from experienced professionals, and access career development resources. Read more about how to create a LinkedIn account on the Career Development Page and more tips about networking on Dolphin Connect.

V I RT UA L A S S I STA N C E Working remotely can be a big adjustment if you’ve never done it before, so don’t worry if you need to take some time to get used to it. You can ask for support from your manager or mentor, or make an appointment with a Career Counselor from the Career Development Center to discuss any challenges you’re having or how to make the most out of your internship. 8

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


F A C U LT Y G U I D E

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G U I D E F O R F A C U LT Y The University is committed to supporting students in participating in various experiential learning opportunities. As such, the internship process is an opportunity for students to apply their classroom knowledge to the field of work. It is a way for students to gain “real-world” experience and skills in a career area or job function of interest. Likewise, employers see an internship as an integral step in the hiring process, as a student who has interned can poses the qualities they seek for employment their opportunities. Therefore, the role the faculty serves is critical to the students’ overall learning and internship experience. The Career Development & Alumni Engagement team values the mentorship and role that faculty to play and are available to provide guidance to the community on the internship experience. Please contact us at internships@csuci.edu.

FAC U LT Y S U P E R V I S O R R O L E The faculty supervisor role is an important component of the student’s learning and internship experience. The faculty supervisor does not have to be the student’s academic advisor but must be a full-time professor at CSU Channel Islands. Adjunct faculty can serve as a faculty supervisor with the permission of the department head. Below are some suggestions, considerations, and responsibilities of the faculty supervisor.

M E N TO R S H I P Students can greatly benefit from the mentorship of a faculty member because it enhances student learning by linking academic study to specific career fields. It is recommended that the faculty supervisor keep in contact with the student throughout the term of their academic credit internship by setting a meeting schedule at the beginning of the semester for the purposes of monitoring the intern’s progress and providing feedback and guidance. Meeting with a faculty supervisor gives interns the opportunity to process what they are learning and receive valuable insight about their field of interest.

AC A D E M I C C O M P O N E N T Similar to an Independent Study, faculty supervisors lead the academic component of the academic credit courses. Faculty supervisors will determine what the academic component will be and should outlined in a Learning Plan. Typical academic assignments have included: • Research paper related to the field • Journal or series of reflection papers • Portfolio of completed work/assignments at the internship 10

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


The faculty supervisor will instruct the student as to what evidence they require in order to evaluate the student’s academic learning for the course. The faculty supervisor will determine if the student’s completion of the academic component warrants receiving credit and will submit a grade at the end of the semester.

ALL INTERNSHIPS SHOULD Include a signed Internship Placement Agreement with a senior representative of the partner agency or corporation and the University procurement officer as designated signature authority. In this agreement, it must be stated that the University assumes no risk or liability and that the sponsoring agency/corporation assumes full responsibility for the liability of the intern, affirming that they have requisite insurance to cover any potential harm to the intern, and include basic information such as location, contact person, and organization description. Include a learning agreement signed by the student, sponsoring faculty, and placement supervisor listing the learning goals of the internship and the duties and responsibilities of each party, notifying the student of the assignment of liability, terms and conditions and the listing of relevant agency policies, and the date the internship begins. This includes mention of whether the intern is paid and conditions for receiving academic credit. Faculty and/or programs must maintain a file of the aforementioned signed forms. The Dean of Faculty will also retain a sample copy of internship forms that are used. Student Internships Executive Order No 1064 (CSU Office of the Chancellor) Policy on Academic Responsibilities Regarding Internships, SP 16-03 (CSUCI Academic Senate)

AC A D E M I C C R E D I T I N T E R N S H I P P R O C E S S An academic credit internship is arranged between the intern, employer, and sponsoring faculty. The prospective intern must take the initiative to prepare the paperwork and documents necessary for academic credit. Academic credit for internships is available only as arranged on an individual basis by students and their academic department.

ST E P S TO C O M P L E T E AC A D E M I C C R E D I T I N T E R N S H I P S 1

Obtain the Academic Internship Agreement located on Risk Management’s website at: https://www.csuci.edu/rm/programs/contract.htm

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Complete the Self-Selected Internship Placement Site Agreement with the student.

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Submit the agreement to Procurement & Contract Services to complete the “authorized signatory” section at the end on behalf of CSU Channel Islands.

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Procurement & Contract Services will maintain record of the agreement and submit a copy of the executed agreement to the academic departments for recordkeeping.

Please note, a two-week minimum is required for review and processing from the time it is received by Procurement & Contract Services before the agreement is enforced. Finalizing a written agreement may involve proof of insurance coverage required by both parties and/or negotiation of agreement elements with the placement site. A student should not begin their internship until the signed and executed agreement is received from Procurement & Contract Services to the academic department. *A learning agreement should be completed and signed by the student, sponsoring faculty, and placement supervisor. This document should be retained within each academic department and by the sponsoring faculty.*

EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING MODULE Contact the Career Development & Alumni Engagement team to learn more about the Experiential Learning Module on Dolphin CareerLink. The module allows students to track their hours, complete a midterm and final program evaluation, while also allowing the employer partner (Site Supervisor) to approve student submitted hours, and complete a midterm and end of the semester intern performance evaluation. The Experiential Learning Module also has the ability to compile an end of the semester report for each student in your academic credit course. If you are interested in the utilizing the Experiential Learning Module, please contact us at internships@csuci.edu. CSUCI Internship Toolkit for Students & Faculty

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P R E S E N TAT I O N S & WO R K S H O P S The Career team is also here to support your course with presentations, workshops, and integrated assignments. We have formatted presentations to provide an asynchronous and synchronous educational and interactive experience for students. The following career education materials and topics include: • Connecting with CDAE • Career Exploration- Design Your Life • Career Exploration- Focus 2 • Resume/Cover Letter • Career Fair Success • Getting Started with LinkedIn • Interviewing with Confidence • Meyer Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) • Networking Like a Pro Complete the online Presentation Request Form to schedule a virtual or in class presentation.

R E D F L AG S During the course of the internship, the student might encounter some issues with their site and/or supervisor. While we encourage the student to seek advice, there are situations that warrant a call or visit to the internship site. In some instances, a termination of the internship is in the best interest of all parties. The following are some warning signs that might need further exploration:

• The student is overwhelmed with the duties/responsibilities that are assigned to them • The supervisor is never available to provide guidance and feedback to the intern’s work • The duties carried-out are dramatically different than advertised or have changed to include work that is not project-based or outside the scope of the intern’s knowledge/abilities • The intern is working long hours or more than agreed upon • The internship is interfering and adversely affecting the student’s academic course work • The on-site supervisor is treating the intern as an employee • The work environment of the internship is over stressful or unsupportive If you are not able to assist the student seeking advice, please contact your department chair. The Career Development & Alumni Engagement team is also available to assist in recommendations for the best resolution for the issue at hand. Please contact us at internships@csuci.edu.

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LEARNING OUTCOMES I M P O RTA N C E O F L E A R N I N G O U TC O M E S A N D A S S E S S M E N T Experiential education settings provide a strong context for rich learning opportunities through exposure to new environments, skills practice and development, real-world scenarios, and reflection upon “critical incidents” or learning moments. A key benefit of the academic internship experience is the opportunity for faculty mentoring and oversight in addition to that of the site supervisor. Course design and personal learning objectives are integrated to frame the student’s entire reflective learning process to reach desired outcomes. Individual achievement of learning objectives related to the course objectives and combined in a class setting with the group benefits of peer-to-peer learning and faculty facilitation, will constitute the true benchmarks of a student’s success. In order for the student’s experiential education activities during their internship to provide real personal and academic learning and development, prior planning must occur on the part of the student and educator. Establishing clear objectives, designing activities tied to the objectives, and critical assessment of not only the technical skills developed by the activities, but also critical reflection on self-awareness, interpersonal skills development, values, failures and successes is the foundational process that will readily lead to the testing of ideas in action and benefitting new learning (NSEE Foundations Document Committee, 1997). Therefore, four key steps to ensuring a successful experience are: • Goal and outcome setting inclusive of industry knowledge, skills to develop, application to academic theory, communications to transpire, and reflection on the relevance of education, prior life experience and future aspirations, should be co-designed by student and faculty. • Objectives coinciding with those goals and outcomes must be written to reflect what the student wants to learn, how the student will learn it, how the student will demonstrate the learning, and how the student will consider the impact of their learning. Objectives must be relevant, prioritized, and dynamic, open to modification as necessary. • Activities should be identified that will support these objectives. They should be developed from formal resources such as a job description, and informal resources such as conversations about upcoming projects with the site supervisor. • Assessment by both the employer and the faculty should flow from the development of learning objectives, how the student meets those objectives, and how the student demonstrates or presents learning. A student’s personal assessment is inherently needed in experiential education programs and can be demonstrated through self-evaluations, portfolio development, critical written reflections, or verbal presentations of cumulative learning on the job.

L E A R N I N G O U TC O M E S, O B J E C T I V E S, A N D AC T I V I T I E S The institution shall ensure that credit is granted to students who have achieved the stated objectives of each learning activity, in addition to completing the required number of hours at the internship site. Activity design should match the institutional, program of study, and course outcomes set forth in the academic catalog, departmental assessments, self-studies, or related institutional materials. The course syllabus must include learning outcomes, objectives and activities as well as an evaluation method to assess the quality and quantity of the learning achieved. Evaluative criteria should be held to the same academic rigor as courses in the traditional classroom setting. Learning outcomes focus on the end result of a learning experience. They describe ‘exit behaviors’ or broad aspects of desired behaviors that demonstrate the significant learning of a set of essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes. They will be transferable to a wide range of work settings and are usually accomplished over time in several learning experiences. Learning objectives tend to describe specific, discrete units of knowledge and skills and are associated with activities or specific workplace tasks to be completed, usually within a short time frame. Learning objectives and activities will support the demonstration of broader learning outcomes. As a way of comparison, an example of a learning outcome for a graphic design internship could be: • Demonstrate familiarity with a variety of tools and techniques in the process of producing professional work in the fields of graphic design, advertising, and illustration. Specific objectives which support this outcome could be: • Conceptualize and develop preliminary construction plans and build mock-ups of three-dimensional communication design projects using two different materials and techniques. CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty

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• Students will identify specific cultural, social and psychological aspects of advertising design expressed in different mock-ups.

DEVE LOPMENT OF LEARNING OUTCOMES, ACTIVITIES, AND OBJECTIVES Students and faculty share in the design of learning outcomes and objectives, as relevant to the course objectives, a student’s personal goals, and the job activities listed in the job description. However, there are several national and local educational and professional bodies that have established quality standards for colleges and universities level, experiential education internship and programs relevant to employer-identified 21st Century workplace competencies. Among these are the Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS) and the National Society for Experiential Education (NSEE). Integrative Thinking — centers on the methodologies from various disciplines to solve complex, real-world problems and to create new solutions. Such skills allow graduates to be successful in an ever-changing world. • Critical Thinking and Informed Decision-Making — root causes, multiple perspectives, abstraction • Creativity and Innovation — continuous improvement, dynamics of change, originality • Problem Solving — test hypotheses, learn from mistakes, persistence • Systems Thinking — holistic view, actions and unintended consequences to the whole Civic, Organizational, and Career Competencies — encompass a range of personal, interpersonal, and group behaviors that are required to be an effective and successful citizen and worker in any organizational and/or career setting. • Relevance of Education/Lifelong Learning— global/workforce trends, career knowledge • Civic and Social Responsibility — effective citizens, ethics • Personal Responsibility — choices, actions, values, personal compass • Workplace Skills — accountability, goals, project management, dependable workplace habits • Teamwork/Collaboration — navigating conflicts, leadership, respect, responsibility Academic learning outcomes for the student internship are intended to include the following: • Develop technical skills and professional communications in a work setting. • Understand industry and organizational structures, culture, and ethics. • Apply and reflect on the connections to academic theory and practice. • Strengthen critical thinking, research skills and problem-solving skills. • Develop a greater awareness and appreciation of self, others, and social responsibility in a work, career, and global context. • Establish a network of professional contacts, mentors, and references.

LEARNING PLAN A Learning Plan worksheet has been developed and is available for your course.

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CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

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TIPS FOR A SUCCESSFUL INTERNSHIP 1

Be Positive — Tackle every project with a positive attitude and enthusiasm. It is not uncommon for interns to start out with some grunt work. Try to prove yourself with each project, chances are exciting, interesting and challenging projects will come.

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Listen Carefully — Without a doubt, the best way to learn and get things right the first time is to listen carefully. Use a notepad to capture important details. Ask if you can repeat directions: “May I repeat that back to you to see if I have it correct?”

3 Manage Your Time — The obvious first step here is to get to work on time and prioritize. If possible, weekly meetings may be helpful to with your boss to go over important information and to provide updates on your work.

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Don’t be Afraid to Speak Up — Interns are expected to have tons of questions. Keep in mind that your boss chose to hire you which means your boss wants to hear what you have to say.

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Be Proactive — If you are sitting around twiddling your thumbs, stop. It is difficult but essential to be able to ask your boss for new work if you find yourself empty-handed.

6

Meet Your Coworkers — Make an effort to get to know them, ask questions about the work they do. Not only will this make your internship more enjoyable, but your coworkers will also be more willing to help you out when you run into any snags. Don’t forget about the networking opportunities.

7

Find a Mentor — One of the best ways to really learn your trade is to have a mentor to show you the ropes. A good mentor is typically either someone you are working with directly or someone in the same department you are in.

8

Work Hard — This may seem obvious, but it is much easier said than done. Working hard generates a cycle of positive benefits, beginning with the fact that it will impress your boss. This will encourage your boss to give you more responsibilities and bigger projects. And this will be incredibly beneficial, for not only will you feel more accomplished, but when you finish your internship and ask your boss for a reference letter you will likely get great results.

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Remember why you are there — It is increasingly difficult to get an internship and if you are one of the lucky few to get hired, make the most of it. Try to learn as much as you possibly can, not only about the department you are working in but about the entire company and even the industry as a whole. Make an effort to truly understand what you are doing and how it affects the entire company.

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Stay in Touch — Once you finish your internship, there is still work to do. Make a genuine effort to keep contact with your site. Don’t be hesitant to provide an update on your whereabouts. The people you worked with provide an incredible opportunity for references, networking and job leads. CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


TIPS FOR COMMUNICATING AT YOUR INTERNSHIP EMAIL ETIQUETTE • Do not use your employer’s e-mail address for anything other than work-related correspondence. Be careful about using company computers for non-work related activity. Your employer has a right to monitor your use of their devices. • Do not send confidential material by e-mail. • Use a subject line that reflects what your message is about. • Do not use abbreviations or text-message jargon (BTW, LOL, or smiley faces, and so forth) in your e-mail. • Use spell check and reread your message before sending. • Respond to e-mail promptly. Within 24 hours. • Use typefaces and colors that are appropriate to your workplace. Ask if your office has a style that you should follow. • Do not share other people’s e-mail addresses. • Do not forward other people’s messages without permission. • Watch the tone of your e-mail. Remember, the person receiving the e-mail cannot see your body language.

PHONE ETIQUETTE 1 2 3

Give the caller your complete attention. Multitasking is more apparent to the caller than you think. As the caller does not have the benefit of seeing your facial expression or body language, you must use your words, tone and vocal projection to convey professionalism. Be warm and polite. If you do not know how to answer a caller’s question, or there is a situation you do not feel comfortable continuing to discuss, ask the caller if you can put them on hold for a brief moment.

RU L E S O F P O L I T E D I S C O U R S E 1

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Treat other interns and employees with respect Refrain from profanity and vulgar or abusive language Do not use threats of physical or bodily harm Sensitive information (for example, information that could compromise public safety) Do not use offensive terms that target specific ethnic or racial groups CSUCI Internship Toolkit for Students & Faculty

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5 T H I N G S N O T TO D O D U R I N G YO U R I N T E R N S H I P Internships allow students to explore a career while providing the opportunity to network, develop mentor-mentee relationships and gain valuable work experience. Internship coordinators often let their interns sit in on meetings, send company e-mails and try their hand at working on projects. If interns shine, it’s possible bigger assignments will come their way and higher-ups in the company will notice their work. Therefore, it’s common for internships to turn into jobs. With the job market being so competitive, internships are a direct way for students to showcase their skills and demonstrate their professionalism. With so much weighing on the internship experience, here are five things to avoid doing: 1 Showing up late and missing deadlines. An internship is the time to transition from being a student to a professional, which means that showing up on time and making deadlines is important. Doing these things also signals that you are responsible, dependable and care about your work, which are qualities needed to secure a job. 2 Don’t Gossip. There are liability issues when pervasive gossip is deemed “malicious harassment”. You may increase the company’s legal liability, which could lead to termination from your internship. 3 Declining an invitation to a company function. It’s understandable that after working a 40-hour week that an intern would rather skip out on the company picnic. Don’t. By going to company functions, interns can show they are part of the team and meet up per-level managers they normally wouldn’t interact with on a daily basis. 4 Never asking for feedback. If an intern cares about securing a job after graduation, it may be intimidating to ask questions or seek ways to improve. Internship supervisors don’t expect perfection. Instead, they want to see someone who is willing to grow and improve. 5 Overuse of Media Don’t use your cell phone regularly or text. This is considered rude or unprofessional by some managers. While you are at work if you are in doubt about whether an incoming call is important, let voice mail pick it up. Browsing social media can also be interpreted as unprofessional.

I M P O R TA N T C A M P U S R E S O U R C E S

Title IX & Inclusion Office Located in Lindero Hall; Hours: 8am – 5pm, Monday – Friday E: titleix@csuci.edu P: 805-437-3608 Dean of Students Located in Bell Tower, Room 2565 E: deanofstudents@csuci.edu P: 805-437-8512 Academic Advising Located in Bell Tower, Room 1595 E: advisement@csuci.edu P: 805-437-8571 Procurement & Contract Services Questions regarding the required insurance coverage may be directed to this department. E: purchasing@csuci.edu P: 805-437-8592

C A R E E R D E V E L O P M E N T & A LU M N I E N G AG E M E N T Danielle Quillan Internship Program Analyst (805) 437-2665 Danielle.Quillan@csuci.edu Amanda Carpenter, Ed.D. Director of Career Development & Alumni Engagement (805) 437-3565 Amanda.Carpenter@csuci.edu 18

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty

Amanda Asquith-Caya, M.S., M.A. Coordinator of Employer Relations (805) 437-8493 Amanda.Asquith-Caya@csuci.edu


O U R C O M M I TM E N T TO I N T E R N S H I P S We understand this informational guide can be a useful resource but may not answer all of your questions pertaining to internships. The Career Development & Alumni Engagement team is committed to supporting your internship interests and we are available to assist students, faculty, and staff with any internship-related questions or concerns.We believe internships are an excellent way to begin building important connections that are invaluable in developing and maintaining a strong professional network between local employers and our CSUCI students. For further assistance, please contact us regarding your internship-related questions and needs.

F R E Q U E N T LY A S K E D Q U E S T I O N S 1

What are the academic components of an internship course? Academic work varies based on the course, but you can likely expect to keep a daily or weekly journal of your internship experience, write reflective papers, complete a final research paper, and deliver a final presentation on your internship experience.

2

Will I be required to undergo a background check? Possibly. A criminal background check, fingerprinting, drug screening, required testing, vaccinations, proof of insurance, or other risk management processes may be required by the internship site. This is particularly true for health care organizations.

3

Are there deadlines for internship enrollment? Yes. Please see page 7.

4

I would rather fill my forms out electronically. Where can I get them? Microsoft Word versions of all internship forms can be found at the end of this guide. PDF versions can be located at https://www.csuci.edu/careerdevelopment/services/internship-guidelines.htm ** Please then email completed forms to your Academic Advisor.

5

How will my internship experience be evaluated? What if I disagree with my course grade? You will receive an evaluation of your performance during the internship from your site supervisor as well as be evaluated on your academic performance in the internship course by your assigned faculty member. A copy of the evaluation can be obtained from your faculty member. Occasionally, students may misunderstand or disagree with the grade they receive in their internship course. The grade is calculated based on the academic assignments in the internship course and the evaluation of the internship site supervisor. All questions about internship course grades must first be addressed with the faculty member assigned to the course. The student should not contact the internship site supervisor to discuss the course grade. The faculty member will work with the student and the site supervisor to discuss the course and evaluation grades.

6 I want to intern for my family, what is the policy around this? Students cannot intern for immediate family members, in a family business. Alternate supervisors are required. 7 I am interning in a health care organization. Is there anything special that I need to do because of this? Yes. Students who accept an internship role in a health care environment may be required to enroll in academic internship course and/or pay ($125.00) for any site requirements prior to beginning an internship role. These may include drug screening, criminal background checks and an introduction to laws such as HIPAA or other specialized trainings. Students may expect to devote approximately 5 hours to completing these requirements no later than the first day of the semester in order to assure timely completion of all requirements. 8 How many hours will I be working? The number of credits varies by degree program offerings, usually 120 hours (at least 8 hours per week) for 3 credits, over the course of the full semester (15 weeks). Students and their internship site supervisor set the actual schedule of hours per week. Internships have specific requirements based on your program and the individual course syllabus. Many students work beyond the minimum number of hours required to receive credit to meet the needs of the employer.

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9

I am an international student, is there anything special that I need to do? No. Most likely you will be completing an unpaid internship. We highly encourage you to disclose your international status to your employer prior to accepting your position.

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Am I placed into an internship? No. Please see page 6.

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Are internships paid? Varies. The rate of pay for internships will be set by the employers. However, please note that many internships do not offer wages. Please look at your household budget and decide if you are able to apply for both paid and unpaid positions. If you can only accept a paid position, know that you need to plan ahead to search, apply, and compete for the opportunity you want. Also, internship work assignments do not qualify you for unemployment benefits, and you cannot file for such benefits upon completion or termination of your internship assignments for any reason.

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My internship site would like me to start before the semester begins. Can I do this? Only with permission. Please let your faculty member know about early start date requests as soon as possible to ensure that the role and internship site can be approved before you begin. There is no guarantee that you will be eligible and approved after you start, so make sure that you would be willing to stay on and honor your commitment in a not for credit capacity, if you begin before approval. Please note that “minimum hour” accumulation must occur during the semester time frame.

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Do I pay tuition for an internship course? Yes. Credit-bearing internships are an academic course, so tuition is treated the same as any other course you are enrolled in at the university. For all other inquiries about your academic credit internship, contact your program chair.

I found my own internship, how do I propose this? The process is the same, just turn in a position description to your faculty member so the role can be reviewed, and all necessary employer forms can be completed and submitted on your behalf. Employer sites for academic credit internships must be cleared through our Procurement & Contract Services department prior to your first day working on site.

CSUCI Internship Guide for Students & Faculty


DEFINITIONS OF EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING TERMS Apprenticeship (registered) Registered apprenticeships are innovative Work-Based Learning and post-secondary earn-and-learn models that meet national standards for registration with the U.S. Department of Labor (or federally recognized State Apprenticeship Agencies. https://www.apprenticeship.gov/help Experiential learning/education A systematic approach to applied learning whereby a student engages in professional, productive learning activities. Experiential education refers to learning activities that involve the learner in the process of active engagement with, and critical reflection about, phenomena being studied. National Society for Experiential Education (NSEE). Internship The purpose of an internship is to give students planned, practical, educationally intentional experiences in professional, work-related settings that relate to or complement students’ academic and career goals. Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (CAS). Job Shadow The opportunity for a student to observe or “shadow” someone at your organization for a set period of time. Giving the student a chance to see someone completing their daily routine on the job which allows the student to experience the company culture, type of work associated with that role, and other areas of interest related to their individual career goals. Mentor/mentee relationships A mentor is an individual with expertise who can help develop the career of a mentee. A mentor often has two primary functions for the mentee. The career-related function establishes the mentor as a coach who provides advice to enhance the mentee’s professional performance and development. The psychosocial function establishes the mentor as a role model and support system for the mentee. Both functions provide explicit and implicit lessons related to professional development as well as general work–life balance. The term mentee refers to the broad range of individuals who may be in the role of “learner” in mentoring relationships, regardless of the age or position of the mentor and mentee. Service Learning Service-learning is a way of teaching and learning that links course content to “real-life” experiences that center on a community need or issue. Through reflection activities students are given the opportunity to understand what was learned and experienced, and how the community was benefited. Service-learning is a direct expression of the CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) mission and a critical component of the curriculum. Service-learning courses equip students with the knowledge and experience necessary to transform them into future leaders and socially-conscious citizens. https://www.csuci.edu/servicelearning/

APPENDIX These resources and additional forms can be found on the Internship Hub web pages. 1

STUDENT SELF-SELECTED INTERNSHIP PLACEMENT SITE AGREEMENT

2

CURRENT INTERNSHIPS POSTED ON DOLPHIN CAREERLINK

Questions? Contact internships@csuci.edu

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