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CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS

Stage 3 ACTIONS AND OUTCOMES

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Stage 3 CONTENTS INTRODUCTIONS COURSE LEADER STAGE LEADER DESIGN STUDIOS STUDIO 1 Interface STUDIO 2 Caledonian Road, High Street of the Future? STUDIO 3 Urban Society - Local Community STUDIO 4 Imagining the Commons STUDIO 5 Mediating Urbanism CONTEXTUAL STUDIES TECHNICAL STUDIES PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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GEOFFREY MAKSTUTIS - COURSE LEADER

The final year of an undergraduate architecture degree, for the students, is not simply the end of their course, or the achievement of Part 1. It is the beginning of a further journey - one that may take them in many different directions. Certainly, many will continue toward professional qualification as architects, but some will move toward other destinations. Whatever direction our graduates follow, it is our hope that in the time they have spent with BA (Honours) Architecture: Spaces and Objects (A:SO) that they have found their architecture.

grated awareness of how an architect might choose to practice in ways that see building as enabler.

A:SO is a course that challenges students, particularly in the final year, to define their own agendas through selfinitiated work. The five studios, working on a range of different sites across London, have each sought to articulate a

As a course that provides graduates with RIBA/ARB Part 1, A:SO also seeks to inform and support students to develop a critical awareness of practice. Now in its third year, the CSM/RIBA London Mentoring Scheme continues to offer

field of research, in which students may respond to a challenging brief with their own approach.

our students with a unique opportunity to engage with leading practitioners from across London. With 27 architects from 23 practices, students are provided with a series of opportunities to understand different aspects of practice, from the individuals who are at the forefront of their profession. Increasingly, mentors become partners with A:SO in providing continued opportunities for placements, internships and employment.

From Dalston to Bankside, Peckham to Islington, the studios have encouraged students to deal with real issues and real people. This, above all, is one of the key aspects of A:SO - that architecture is about people. Buildings are but one of the myriad of potential solutions that may result from an architectural process. In this final year of their undergraduate studies, A:SO brings together the knowledge, skills, theories and methodologies, that have informed the students’ development, toward an inte-

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While the students’ projects still result in the design of buildings, it is our hope that they have arrived at solutions that do more than provide built form. Whether through critical analysis of context, public engagement, activism or material exploration, the journey that a student has taken; through the project, is one which is intended to encourage them to consider what agency they may deploy as future architects.

Not every student who studies architecture must become an architect. And, At CSM we hope that students see A:SO as a course that opens up possibilities.

The profession is changing rapidly, but this also creates further opportunities for students who are prepared to operate outside of traditional practice roles. For students who have begun to explore the agency, that their approach to architecture may provide, there is much to be found beyond buildings.


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O S C A R B R I TO - S TAG E L E A D E R

Stage 3 of BA (Honours) Architecture is the most intense part of our students’ journey through the course. The explorations from previous stages are now consolidated and enhanced with a critical perspective based on extensive research, rigorous analysis and reflective experimentation on the relation between architecture and its cultural and physical context and how these may reciprocally influence each other. Through the integration of spatial, theoretical and technical investigations, the aim of stage 3 is to promote the development of conceptual, contextual and methodological approaches to construct the students’ individual position as strategic designers, empowering them as active and critical agents in an increasingly complex social, economical, political, and professional scenario.

social, economic and cultural conditions that compose and characterise the complexity of the urban phenomena. 

Stage 3 emphasises the development of a critical understanding of the strategic role that architecture may have in the development and implementation of site-specific conceptual, programmatic, spatial and material agencies. We promote a direct engagement with the context of investigation and the different situations, narratives and processes therein that would inform specific conceptual and material approaches and outcomes beyond easy preconceptions. Thorough the year, our students are engaged exploring the potential effect that architecture, as an expanded practice, may have in articulating and enabling exchanges between different spatial,

rized as follows:

This year’s general theme for the design subject is focused on exploring how architecture may have an agency, a role, in contributing to the generation and development of social and cultural resilience in urban contexts subjected to processes of urban stagnation, regeneration and gentrification that are often conflicting, as is currently happening in many areas of London. From this premise, each one of the five design studios has defined a specific brief, context and focus that has underpinned the definition of the self-initiated project in which each students develop their own approach. The studio briefs may be summa-

Studio 1: Interface Exploring the role of spatial and programmatic juxtapositions and in-betweens to negotiate interactions between different and even conflictive/ exclusive urban and social situations. The context for this investigation is the area between Bemerton Estates, Caledonian Road and Barnsbury in Islington, London. Studio 2: The High Street of the Future? A critical exploration of how the contemporary and emerging scenarios may shape the roles and qualities of

the British local high streets, beyond and beside the current trends towards an increasingly generic landscape. The context for this investigation is Caledonian Road in Islington, London. Studio 3: Urban Society – Local Community An investigation on the role of art and creative industries as one of the agents behind spatial transformations of the city in the current processes of regeneration and gentrification, focusing on culture and cultural identity as social catalysts. The context for this investigation is Peckham, London.   Studio 4: Imagining the Commons The purpose of this studio is to imagine the future of the commons in highly diverse urban situations defined by strong boundaries, exploring how material and social relations may connect, empower and avoid the segregation often related to process of gentrification. The context of this investigation is Dalston, London.   Studio 5: Mediating Urbanism In a context where developers and community appear to be often at odds, this studio aims to investigate the role of design in supporting and enabling all stakeholder groups to develop a sense of individual and collective agency through space. The context of this investigation is Bankside, London.

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Studio 1 Interface

Tutor Oscar Brito Students Adeeb Badenjki (10) Gabriel George (1) Isadora Graham (9) Neil Patrick Healy Lorenzo Iandelli (6) Marianna Janowicz (8) Burhan Limani Rocco Manetti Paleaz Alice Meyer (2) Sherief Mohamed (3) Abigail Park Emanuelis Stasaitis (5) Lina Viluma (7) Carlotta Weller (4) Chen Zhixiang (11) 1) Lina Viluma - Site plan, 2) Action research at Cally Market.

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Lefebvre and others advocate for an idea of the city as an intrinsically heterogeneous body, a juxtaposition of differences that continuously activate a range of possibilities and even tensions that keeps our cities alive and relevant. Our general approach is based on an understanding of the public space, as a consequence of complex interactions

Each student’s proposal is an investigation on how architectural interfaces that would mediate different situations by the strategic juxtaposition of different programs, spaces and users. Our aim is to propose interactions would have an effect on perception and understanding of the original conditions as well as enabling new, inclusive and

and superposition of between multiple agents, systems, networks and processes related to a context (material/immaterial) and the situations it contains. The public space as a condition created by the constant negotiation of the relation between material and immaterial actors and the networks created by their, mainly contingent, interactions. The projects of our studio are a reflection on the urban condition, its complexity and intensity, developed through a local approach. The definition of the design proposals have been informed by a proactive contextual engagement in order to reveal its specific issues and potentials.

potentially unexpected situations, challenging preconceptions and requiring a constant negotiation of the sense of ownership, allowing the different users to establish multiple and open relations with the context and with the others through an active use of public space. Our area of investigation is within and around Bemerton Estates in Islington, London; a spatial and social cluster that has been subjected to simultaneous processes of stagnation, regeneration and gentrification. Our scope has been to devise strategies to promote social and cultural resilience of the local communities and identities by developing strategic approaches to this situation.


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BEMERTON ESTATE

CALEDONIAN ROAD

THORNHILL SQUARE

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2. Counselling Rooms 3. Homeless Market Stall

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Gabriel George HOMELE SS WA L K I N C EN T R E My investigation started with a encounter with a homeless man, this (his story) lead me to explore how members of the homeless community in Islington inhabit space. The proposal attempts to give homeless individuals a place to help improve their way of life in a self directed way. With phases of investment

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and interaction, ranging from food, counselling, and an introduction to employment program utilising a relocated Caledonian Market.

1) top: Surplus food market; middle: counselling rooms; bottom: surplus food dining. 2) East elevation. 3) internal view. 4) Short section of homeless market stall and counselling room, 4,5) Views/Perspective plan of homeless market 6

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Alice Meyer 4x 1 _ C AR NOUSTI E COM MUNI TY C E NTE R The project aims to provide a strategy to generate a dynamic resilience through the interface between different social

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groups. The main focus of the proposal is to empower the women in Caledonian now

in 5 years

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Road area creating programs of exchange of skills, time and local production. The project is conceived as a process that aims to gradually infiltrate in the existing social and architectural tissue of the site.

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Through the concept of infiltration the AFTER 15 YEARS

building extends and retrofit existing programs on the High Street and consolidates them at the back of it, on Carnoustie Drive, creating an inclusive community center where 4 different programs collide creating a symbiosis between the existing and the new and reactivating the area. 1) axonometric of the building elements, East/West section 2) views, 3) infiltration process in Iceland and context

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Sherief Mohamed T HE C AL LY F I L M S CHOOL The Cally film school invites local communities who resort socialising within their own concealed social settings to engage in film production - documenting the everyday scenes on Caledonian road while placing the communities in a more active and thoughtful relationship. The project investigates ways in which reclusive communities may be exposed to other communities without sacrificing the qualities of enclosure that form the basis

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of their existence. This drives the concept through the project – elusive exposure. The design translate filmmaking techniques into architectural elements and through visual interactions and physical meetings in spaces of multiplicity, social boundaries are expanded fusing ‘performers’ and ‘spectators’.

1) Exploded Spatial Model, 2) Conceptual Programmatic Storyboard, 3) Carnoustie Drive Elevation from Cally Youth POV, 4) Interactions within the Film School, 5) Rendered North Wing Section. 5

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Carlotta Weller PAR ASI TE SPE C TAC LE Teenagers on Tilloch Street operate the area in a choreographed sequence, which locals have studied and now live by. This project aims to provide a place for apprenticeship and secondary education for the youth of Bemerton Estate right at their doorstep. The proposal intends to emphasis the occurrence of performances - formal and informal of the local daily life 2

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on Tilloch Street. The project investigates different degrees of interactions, which alter the spectator- spectacle relationship. The building plays with the idea of performance as formal and informal interactions, which trigger a dialectic of revealing and concealing within the spaces as well as around the site. Users, customers and locals become part of an interlocking performance.

1) Long section Tilloch Street, 2) Perspective section: formal spectacle, 3) Interior interlocking screens, 4) Iteration of performance components, 5) Sectional perspective of formal and informal spectacles. 4

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Emanuelis Stasaitis A FRAME WO RK F O R SO C IAL R E PAIR Situated in the heart of the high street, the intent is to intersect the community life so to encourage interactions between the many unique communities living on Caledonian Road. The project responds to a very particular sensitive and disjointed social and urban situation. The restaurant becomes an expansion of the Euro Cafe, providing an aprenticeship scheme for the local youths, whilst continuing to attract local communities through the story of food. The ground floor allows the Cally market to continue to grow and expand, helping to reactivate the area and dissolve the barrier between Bemerton and Thornhill.

1) Section showing exposure to programmes, 2) Collage of current situation on site: A history of fear, 3) Main issues on site, 4) Programme concept model, 3

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Lorenzo Iandelli UNI TI NG BAR R I E R Programmatic response to the social marginalisation created by the different areas surrounding Caledonian Road. The design interaction, positioned in the dividing threshold between Barnsbury and Bemerton Estate, aims to mimic and replace the existing facilities offered by the estate. The new facilities will be condensed around a new public plaza in a series of multilayered open and enclosed

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spaces, requalifiying and enhancing the public realm with the ambition of mixing communities, making them benefit of lecture halls and Public accessible workshops. The Old and previously unused facilities, scattered over the estate premises will be converted in affordable hosing, satisfying the London housing request.

1) Building in context, 2) Interior court yard with staircase, 3) Interior workshop, 4) Atrium, 5) Interior lecture room. 4

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Lina Viluma THE FRAM E WO R K F O R LIFE By enhancing the apparent layered and multi-faceted qualities of the existing site, the project celebrates ideas of change and future adaptability for an improved built environment. The Framework For Life a is temporary-permanent, a selflearning workshop in continuous renewal and transformation. Local kids are the main users of The Framework of Life, which would continue to grow according to their needs and demands, through the engagement with external actors such as designers and young architects. To create a new connection of the community, the proposal would be built in stages and continue to expand. In each phase a new element is added to the existing structure. Each element has its own structure and can work by themselves. 1) Exploded isometric of the components, 2) Ground floor plan, 3) Long section.

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Marianna Janowicz G ROWI NG BE M E RTON The project seeks to establish a base at the forefront of Bemerton Estate, challenging its homogeneity, stagnation and the reputation of “no-go area�. The programme brings together two user groups: CSM students and Bemerton Youth. The youth take part in cookery apprenticeship to gain employment 2

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skills and the students are being served good and affordable food in an informal environment. The processes surrounding food production are on display and perceived through various senses to raise awareness and educate about food and its value.

1) Long section, 2) Detail section, 3) Elevation fragment, 4) 5) 1:50 model with materials study. 4

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Isadora Graham B E - BE M E RTO N This project attempts to address some of the negative characteristics that dominate the Bemerton Estate on Caledonian Road, offering the possibility of unthreatening, productive and empowering human interactions. This intervention emphasises the development of a sense of pride and a growing communal sense of responsible ownership. The scheme proposes to create a link between the apparent dis-connections in the area; re-qualifying the residual spaces at the top of Bemerton and creating a new communal facility. By creating a new and physically improved link the project aims to break down invisible barriers and to fill the gap, with a functionally versatile, inclusive and engaging structure.

1) Interior moment 1 - socialise, 2) Longitudinal Section, 3) ‘New Opportunities’.

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Adeeb Badenjki BE M E RTON SC H E M E The intervention builds up on the plans of the Bemerton Tenant Organisation to improve their public areas by introducing a scheme that tries to push the existing social boundaries on the Cally and regenerate the neutral public carpet, through increasing the permeability of the Estate in four main steps: 1

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Permeating an existing urban block, allowing Cally Market to expand into Bemerton.

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Meeting Point: proposing a new social space for a broader comunity.

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Activating the area by providing a new Learning zone for the students from CSM,

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Exposing the internal activities of the proposed public spaces.

1) Proposal in action, 2) East elevation.

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Zhixiang Chen C a lly So c ia l Mo n u men t In order to adapt to the ongoing urban processes and to regain civic pride, Bemerton and the surrounding areas currently affected by stagnation needs to have an effective way of developing a stronger identity. This project pushes the boundaries proposing the implementation of a new super-structure, a horizontal 3

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social monument on top of Bemerton Estates dedicated to a social interaction through a direct engagement in urban agriculture aimed to the production of two distinctive products: the Cally beer and the Cally bread

3) View on Bemerton fields, 4) urban model, 5) Axonometric. 5

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Studio 2 Caledonian Road - High Street of The Future?

Tutor David Chambers Students Isabelle Lindsay Castro Ahla Cho Thomas Deacon Jessica Jacoba Denyer Nicole Mary Edwards Rahim Farias Hassam Maria Fernanda Gutierrez Hannah Victoria Jackson Shintaro Kanegae Dominik Antoni Olszewski Tatiana Frances Owen Luiz Andre Conceicao Manh Cuong Ta Stella Tavella

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This year, using Caledonian Road as our case study, we have investigated possible futures for London’s High Streets. Islington’s Caledonian Road is a major transport, commercial and cultural axis; affectionately nicknamed ‘The Cally’, this high street boasts a complex network of people, buildings, spaces, interactions and stories.

Collectively, the projects explore and re-imagine ‘The Cally’ as more than somewhere to simply buy stuff, suggesting a wider spectrum of activities. To name a few among many imaginative proposals, Maria Espindola rethinks the traditional shop-house typology – with adaptable dwellings above a commercial property – to

Connecting north and west London, it has maintained a largely working-class population since it was built in 1826. However, an unprecedented level of local regeneration – especially driven by the redevelopment of Kings Cross, one of the largest urban renewal plans in Europe – has affected the appeal and value of the area. Concentrating on the fringes of Caledonian Road and the communities who live there, we have used our research to make projects which pose simple but vital questions: What is the role of a high street? Who are we designing our high streets for? What are their needs, wants and desires?

support the emergence of alternative models of living, working and playing on the high street. Thomas Deacon’s investigation of Housmans, the radical independent bookshop, explores the resilience of physical retail spaces through the staging of events. Hannah Jackson proposes to pedestrianise the high street – often isolated from the communities that it serves – to support more public facilities. Jessica Denyer’s Cally Mill looks to bring manufacturing back to the city centre, and Luiz Conceicao’s update of the corner shop supports the exchange of skills, providing a new network of human interactions.


DESIGN THINKING conceptual strategy PEDESTRIAN EXPERIENCES S TAG E 3

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MAXIMIZATION OF THE SITE

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concept exploration

B A ( H O N O U R S ) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S MAIXMIZATION OF THE SITE

QUESTIONING THE AREA OF THE SITE AND EXPLORING THE MAXIMIZATION OF THE SPACE IN ORDER TO HOUSE MORE UNITS IN THE SAME PLACE. FLIPPING THE MACHIYA UNIT = FIRST STEP TO MAXIMIZATION.

INTRODUCING CONCEPTUAL STRATEGY INTO THE SITE

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S1 PRIVATE UNIT PRODUCTION / LIVING

CIRCULATION POINT

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ACCESS

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COMMERCIAL UNIT

MAKING THE NORTHERN FACADE MORE INTERESTING. BY ROTATING THE TYPOLOGY 3 M1 TO CHANGE THE SHOPFRONT ORIENTATION. THIS ACTIVATES THE STREET BY HAVING ACCESS NOT ONLY TO THE RESIDENTIAL AREA BUT ALSO TO THE COMMERCIAL AREA. THE DOUBLE FACADE IS INTRODUCED BRINGING MATERIAL RICHNESS INTO THE FACADE.

ACCESS

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2. TESTING ON SITE BY FLIPING THE MACHIYA MODULES TO EXPLORE THE DENSIFICATION OF THE SITE in order to generate A HIGHER NUMBER OF LIVE/WORK UNITS

Maria Fernanda Gutierrez ‘M ACHI YA’ The Machiya is a rethink of the

PRIVATE UNIT PRODUCTION / LIVING

traditional shop-house typology, featuring adaptable dwellings above

CIRCULATION POINT

a commercial property, to support the emergence of alternative models of COMMERCIAL UNIT

living, working and playing on the high street. A redevelopment of an existing supermarket on Caledonian Road, the proposal is inspired by the architectural

NEW ACCESS PROP

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typology of the historical ‘machiya’ merchant house in Japan, where courtyards play a central importance in the connection of spaces. The project increases the potential for individuals and families of all sizes to live and work on the high street.

3. ACCESS DEFINITION AND LIVE/WORK UNIT TYPOLOGIES DEFINED. 4 TYPOLOGIES DEFINED AND 8 UNITS ON SITE

1. COURTYARD = BREAKING POINT

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DIFFERENT LAYERS OF VOLUME EXTRUSION INTRODUCED INTO THE STREET. DIFFERENTIATING THE CORNER BAKERY SHOP FROM ITS RESIDENTIAL VOLUME, CREATING A MARKED VOLUME FOR THE RESIDENTIAL ACCESS, AND HAVING A SECOND CORNER POPING-OUT ON THE PEDESTRIAN STREET COVERED BY IT’S CANTILEVERED RESIDEN2. ACCESS = TIAL VOLUME VERTICAL DIFFERENTIATION

3. MACHIYA WITHIN A MACHIYA

1) Street Elevation, 2) Site Strategy Sketch, 3) Facade Development Model , 4) Development Model, 5) Ground Floor Plan, 6) Level 1 Plan.

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Hannah Jackson OCCU PY CA L LY Based on a careful, close-looking analysis of existing patterns of loitering on the Caledonian Road, and a detailed study of successfully occupied public spaces elsewhere in London, this radical proposal creates a community living room right on the high street. The newly pedestrianised street is organised into a series of ‘rooms’, each encouraging various intensities of occupation. At its heart, a split level amphitheatre creates a centre for activity and performance spread over numerous levels. An elevated structure provides a home for the community organisation and a market hall creates a platform for local trade and exchange.

1) Loitering & Occupation Study Drawing, 2) Market Hall Drawing, 3) The Central Stage Drawing 4) Strategy Plan. 2

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Thomas Deacon A NE W HOME F O R HAU S M AN S Hausmans is a small, radical independent bookshop which has been at the centre point of the political scene in Kings Cross since the 1970’s. It is a non profit organisation, ran by a team of volunteers, whose focus is on establishing a place for debate and the distribution of radical thought. The ‘New Home for Hausmans’ explores the resilience of physical retail spaces through the staging of events, providing a series of flexible

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spaces, of varying size, that promote opportunities for talks, lectures, booksignings, and debates as well as providing an incubator space for activist start-up organisations.

1) Long Section, 2) Ground Floor Plan, 3) Program Drawing, 4) Research Drawing, 5) Site Strategy Drawing, 6) Research Drawing, 7) Research Drawing.

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Nicole Edwards CA LLY DA N CE STUD I OS The Cally is a high street for everyday life, a place to work, live and play. Inspired by an understanding of the lifestyles found in the area, and a study of the leisure spaces established by the Huguenots in Spitalfields, the Cally Dance Studios provide a new opportunity for residents and workers to participate in various music- and dance-based leisure activities. Different types of space allow for both performance and practice of contrasting intensities. Through play with materials and visual permeability, activities can be seen and heard internally through the building and externally throughout the community.

1) Internal Views, 2) Internal Views, 3) Cross Section, 4) Building Axo Drawing 5) Live-Work-Play Research Drawing 6) Huguenots Research Drawing. 5

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Jessica Denyer TH E CA L LY M I L L The Cally Mill is a flour mill, powered by an overshot water wheel that draws water from London’s rising underground water table. Working as an extension to the existing Sunflower Bakery on the Caledonian Road, the mill provides both the raw material – in the form of flour – and the knowledge, training local people to become bakers. The Kings Cross area has a rich history of manufacturing; in keeping with this tradition ‘The Cally

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Mill’, offers an alternative model for the area’s ongoing regeneration, employing and training locals whilst further developing the high street as a place of production as well as consumption.

1) External View, 2) External View, 3) Short Section, 4) Long Section, 5) Street Elevation, 6) Internal View, 7) Internal View, 8) Masterplan & Strategy Drawing. 6

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Tatiana Owen THE G A M ER ’S HAVEN Capitalising on the increasing popularity of E-Sports, which are organized multiplayer video game competitions, and the recent establishment of London’s first E-Sports stadium, the Gamer’s Haven proposes to create a live-work-play space specifically for professional E-sports gamers. The proposal extends the existing Meltdown

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E-sports Bar on Caledonian Road, providing a series of spaces for gamers to intensively train and also to gain the vital tournament experience so that they can climb up the ranks of the gaming world.

1) Long Section, 2) Interior View, 3) Location Drawing.

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Luiz Rocha Pereira Queiroz Conceicao COLLA BO R ATI VE ‘CA L LY ’ How can local economies readjust to take advantage of under-utilised locations and the skills of local people along the Caledonian Road? ‘Collaborative Cally’ develops a framework for a new sharing network based around the redevelopment of a series of currently vacant corner shops along the Highstreet. Each new contemporary corner shop acts as a centre for a different specialism – technology, education, daily-services, homeware and wellness – a network of different skills and exchange that is based on a detailed survey and understanding of the talents of various people in the local area.

1) Research Drawing, 2) Research Model, 3) External View, 4) Short Section, 5) Internal View, 6) Internal View. 3

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THE HIGH STREET OF THE FUTURE

| CALEDONIAN ROAD

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Stella Tavella TH E LIVI NG KI TCHE N Caledonian Road has recently seen the growth of a new type of ‘studio apartment’ – residences as small as three metres square, crammed with a shower, kitchenette and WC as well as a bed. Most residents spend all day outside; the accommodation is used simply for sleep, as there is not enough room in which to live. In response, the Living Kitchen, a parasitic extension to the Euro Cafe,

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provides generous public kitchens for people to cook and eat together, as well as other spaces to work, study, dine and entertain. It acts as a collective second home for all the residents of the Cally.

1) Axo Drawing, 2) Ground Floor Plan, 3) Model.

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Shintaro Kanegae CA LEDO NI A N M A R KE T STRU CTU R E The Caledonian Road acts as a boundary that separates the Bemerton Estate from the more affluent Barnsbury area. The Caledonian Market structure crosses this boundary, building upon and exacerbating the existing linear visual connection to physically connect the public spaces of Bemerton with the Barnsbury’s Thornhill Square. The timber framework of the structure encourages

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local trade and exchange by providing a series of spaces and platforms, spread over a number of levels and connected by a ramp, that allow for both temporary market stalls and more permanent shops.

1) Development Site Model, 2) Development Site Model.

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Isabelle Lindsay Castro THE G A M I N G ACA D EMY Building on the presence of the UK’s first e-sports bar ‘Meltdown’, halfway up the Cally, the Gaming Academy aims to provide a series of offline spaces for gamers to both learn how to design and play e-sports games. Capitalising on the accessibility and inclusiveness of video game platforms, the proposal aims to reach out to, and build connections

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between the contrasting socio-economic groups that live on both sides of Caledonian Road, potentially exposing them to previously unexplored career paths and opportunities.

1) Research Drawing, 2) Long Section.

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Manh Cuong Ta 2 4 HOUR L AUN D R ETTE This new laundrette is designed to serve the increasingly 24/7 Caledonian Road economy. Based around a study of the traditional London shopping arcade, the proposal aims to create a new centre for the community by offering a series of spaces, spread over a number of floors, that will promote unexpected 2

opportunities for interaction between distinct local communities and enable people to carry out a variety of different activities while their clothes are washed and dried.

1) Research Drawing, 2) Model, 3) Internal View.

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Studio 3 Urban Society Local Community

Tutor Ruth Cuenca Students Mita Amani Xin Guot Hanyue Hu Karolina Krawczuk Isabel Lanzoni Dimitrios Mentes Carl J. Munyuthe Polina Olizko Birute Petkute Milly Helen Reid Maxim Sas Xavier Ulibarri Maria Vorobyeva Yingxin Wen

1) Group model - by Birute, Carl and Polina with collage by Birute, 2) Photo of graffiti in Peckham -by Carl, 3) View from Peckham´s car pak rooftop - from Bold Tendencies

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“Urban society – local community” looked at the notion of resilience in Peckham, a district of south-east London. The studio project sought to identify ways of developing human potential by focusing on culture and cultural identity as a social catalyst. The key question was how architects can support communities in dealing with the reality of social and spatial regeneration and gentrification.

in the interwoven world of Peckham’s different cultures and communities. Students identified issues of social disconnection, segregation, lack of public space, etc., that informed their agendas, concepts and strategies. The sites chosen had strategic locations and the potential to connect different users and programmes. The architectural proposals strove to act as agents that might generate opportuni-

Peckham is an area with a multicultural background and complex urban, social and economic issues that has undergone vast transformations in recent years. The studio engaged with community organizations and ongoing design processes in the area. Students were encouraged to connect with existing networks in order to discover potential ways to work with local resources to develop human potential through bottom-up proposals. Drawing from models of inclusive citizenship, the studio considered how architectural interventions and social engagement might be used to create resilient communities. The area of study stretched from Peckham Library to the south end of Rye Lane. Through research and analysis, students explored the various layers that form the complex urban society

ties for alternative social interactions connecting people, spaces and programmes in this specific urban context. Public space was always considered in the designs as a locus for facilitating strategic social engagement. Resilience was explored by thinking creatively about the potential of both existing and new communities, public spaces and buildings to adapt to the present and prepare for the future with an aim to trigger spatial and social transformation. While the proposals vary in scale, ambitions were large, aiming to make a positive contribution in a culturally-conscious and socially responsible way.


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Birute Petkute PECKH E ME I T P L ACE Peckhemeit Place is seeking to unite segregated communities living in Peckham. The project bridges the gap between different communities by introducing music and crafts. It focuses on West African traditions and culture promoting activities like African drumming and dance, textile and jewellery, where all Peckhemeits can connect, gain new skills and learn about other cultures. In addition, the building provides activities such as recording studio, wood workshop and a cafĂŠ facing the square. The activities are articulated around a central multi- purpose foyer allowing visual and physical connection between users. It is open to all and aiming to be a place of connection between communities.

1) Long elevation of Rye Lane 2) Programme collage -spatial arrangement 3) Axonometric 4) Section in context 5) Materiality 6) Internal view 7) Internal view 3

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Carl J. Munyuthe TH E SILO The silo aims to re-ignite past traditions by importing the customs and habits of African communities through traditional African theatre. It aims to challenge the identity of a migrant by creating a balance between preservation and assimilation, integration and resilience. In doing so it also proposes a brewery that sources it’s ingredients from African stores on Rye Lane and is operated by local entrepreneurs.

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The building is situated on top of the Bussey building and used by the communities on Rye lane. It’s use is informed by the way African businesses re-appropriated the high street and turned them into cultural silos (places where they stored and practised their native culture and passed it on to future generations). 1) Urban strategy, 2) Aerial view of proposal, 3) Initial model ‘graft’, 4) Parasite & retrofic strategy, 5&6) Views of theatre & brewery, 7) Long section-part 8) Sectional model 9) Interior foyer view 10) Model in context 11) View of north access 4

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Xin Guo F OOD E XCHA NGE CE N T E R The proposal is a food exchange center including restaurants from various ethnic backgrounds, a food market, cooking school and exhibition area. The idea came from observing the large amounts of wasted food from the numerous grocery shops along Rye Lane. The aim was to reduce food waste through a new food cycle. Shops could bring the food which is about to expire but still good to eat and exchange it for a

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meal. People from the local community will be involved in cooking and preparing the food. The culinary school will be managed by locals with an emphasis in sharing the recipes from their own cultures. The ground floor is open providing public space and food market for the locals.

1) Contextual analysis, 2) Site strategy, 3) Digital model in section, 4) Space organisation, 5) Restaurant view, 6) Exhibition view, 7) External view, 8-10) Site model and sectional model photos. 3

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B A ( H O N S ) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S

venture villagventure vi llage ham ad ham ad peck peck

tuke school

tuke school

hay

hay

MORNINGMORNING

MIDMIDDAY DAY

m e r l e s c h ool

m e r l e s c h ool

libra ry peckham pulse

libra ry peckham pulse

shore school high m adventure peckha park

h a rris a c a d e m y

shore school high

m adventure peckha park

h a rris a c a d e m y

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Maxim Sas PE CKH A M A DVE NTU R E V I L L AG E The proposal intends to resolve social differences by focusing on a polarised and underrepresented community within Peckham, that of the disabled children. My theory is that early integration is key to getting rid of preconceptions and prejudices which should result in a more open and cohesive community. The proposal balances on the border of therapy and non-therapy, direct and indirect development. Providing disabled

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children with the everyday experiences healthy children are exposed to, in the meantime introducing healthy children to life styles different from their own. It aims to free families with disabled children from a social stigma and the general shyness that burdens their social interactions.

1) Programmatic strategy, 2) Ground floor sketch, 3) Working model, 4) Exploded axo, 5) Site elevation 6) First floor plan 7) View from top floor 8) Sectional model 9) View from Jocelyn Street 10) Cross section. 3

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AFTERNOON

AFTERNOON


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DESIGN PROCESS Structural development

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DESIGN PROCESS Structural development

PROCESS B A ( H O NDESIGN S) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S Structural development

study and experimentation with a roof beam system

study and experimentation with a roof beam system

study and experimentation with a roof beam system

study and experimentation with a roof beam system

testing the concept ‘a building inside a building’ testing the concept ‘a building inside a building’

testing the concept ‘a building inside a building’

testing the concept ‘a building inside a building’

further development of the roof according to a building space organisation

further development of the roof according to a building space organisation

further development of the roof according to a building space organisation

further developm according to a bu organisation

as the roof and the building itself were designed separately, they perform as two different independent elements

centrality

connectivity

transparency

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as the roof and the building itself were designed separately, they perform as two different independent elements as the roof and the building itself were designed separately, they perform as two different independent elements

as the roof and the b designed separately two different indepe

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Polina Olizko D OG COMMU NI TY CE N T R E Parks and green pockets make Peckham a pet friendly area, for dogs in particular. These days more young people and single adults have a dog. As animals have a positive psychological effect on people, interaction with dogs was chosen

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as an instrument to link different social and ethnic groups of people in Peckham, encourage interaction between them and contribute to their wellbeing. The Centre will provide dog owners with free facilities to take care of their pets and a great place to meet others. The building is intended to address a large public space near the station and park. Provides a dog grooming station, a garden for training and leisure, and a cafe encouraging people from various backgrounds to join in.

1) Site and spatial strategies, 2) Design development, 3) Development through models, 4) Final model, 5) Cross section. Structural development 5

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Milly Reid TH E GO L D E N THR EAD The Golden Thread project re-clusters the African fabric and fashion industry of Rye Lane. Cultural disconnects found on the highstreet, meant there was opportunity for Peckham to resist foreign infiltration and reactivate its framework of self-production. I propose implementing a network of sites that integrate existing fabric actors (tailors, dressmakers, textile merchants etc) with the operating social systems of Rye Lane. The ‘Fashion Workhouse’, is designed

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to host facilities dedicated to the creative professionals of the fashion industry. As well as private studios, the building also holds space for the future generation of designers and craftsmen, in order to connect with the neighbouring artist workshops and create a new cultural production quarter for Peckham. 1) Site analysis, 2) Cluster strategy, 3) Exploded axo and spatial moments, 4) Proposal collage

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Studio 4 Imagining the commons /Connectempowerevolve

Tutor Ursula Dimitriou Students Hanan Abdulamir Myyen Dang Siqi Huang Judith Jones Charnjeev Kang Kleanthis Kyriakou Vittoria Lenzi Beau Mc Carthy Rohit Nanda Jaala Priscilla Cristiana Sarla Serhan Tekbas Emma Twine Cici Yang

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Once a rough area of London, Dalston is now synonymous with hipster culture. Yet, although heavily gentrified, the area is still home to financially lower classes and is still one of the most ethnically and culturally diverse areas of London. An area where boutique cafes, cocktail bars and disco pizza coexist with pawn shops,

imagine a space for empowered users without the need for a boss, or a charity, or the state?

afrocaribean hair parlours, car repair workshops, hamams and mosques; an area connected with three relatively new public spaces but also segregated by infrastructure lines.

train line) aiming to connect, empower and eventually fight back. We have approached design as a creative and critical tool that aims to connect the material with social practices imagining a future of social relationships, build on communication, connection and common goals that can empower local communities and resist their erosion and expulsion.

Is gentrification really unavoidable? Based on fact that almost two thirds of “Dalstonites� live in council flats is it fair to imagine a future only for the newcomers? Does Dalston need another expensive housing complex, another chain supermarket, another bank? How to connect instead of segregate? Can we imagine self-managed, non hierarchical common spaces, on the threshold between the market and the state? Can we

The purpose of this studio is to imagine the future of the commons, in highly dense urban plots defined by strong boundaries (the street, the highrise, the market, the public space, the


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Charnjeev Kang TH E F I E L D - CU LTUR AL C E N T E R OF TE CHNO LO GY Dalston has developed an unrelenting ability to adapt to its ever changing social climate. My project aims to engage with these realities by providing spaces and routes that allow them to interact with the cultural district. 1) North facing elevation 2) Internal views showing expected agencies 3) South west Isometric view showing totality of scheme

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Emma Twine BUTTE RM E R E WA L K H IGH STR E E T Buttermere Walk High Street is a new square in Dalston, reclaiming underused, open urban space on the Rhodes Estate and recreating it into a public place for locals. The project questions the decisionmaking process for regeneration in our cities. How do we decide how urban space should be used? Who should get to decide? The High Street is a toolkit

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for reclaiming open space in the city, making locals the decision-makers for the future of their neighbourhoods. The project gives the local community agency over Dalston’s future, giving locals the opportunity to decide for themselves, an opportunity denied them by the rest of the area: “Dalston, who asked you?”.

1) A series of elevations showing the process of occupation 2)/3) moments from the square 4) An exploded isometric plan and storyboard 3

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Rohit Nandha DALSTO N CU L I NA RY AC AD E MY/ CH IL L I GA R DE NS Over the last few centuries, Dalston has undergone transitional changes; from its former agriculture and rural landscape towards a rather urbanised space, attracting people from a spectrum of different cultures. Dalston’s new culinary academy aims to unite the generations of groups of people from different cultures that are slowly gentrifying its societies. With

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unemployment rates for the youth of London being at its lowest point ever,. The extraordinarily diverse culinary tradition along one market is something that needs to be celebrated. Chillies are a significant spice used throughout most of the communities, a unifying ingredient in Dalston.

5) Atmospheric axo on site 6) Second/Third floor plans, 7) short section cutting through the restaurant/small greenhouse and the first floor glass room. 7

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Hanan Abdulamir THE DA LSTON FA B R I C The Dalston Fabric is envisioned as a response to the growing differences between the cultural and community groups in the Dalston area, due in part to increasing gentrification and increasing right wing rhetoric that threatens the vibrant multi-ethnic community. The Fabric created in the weaving studios is a symbol of Dalston itself. Worn to 2

unify the people, it is a bridge between communities and a contributor to a stronger Daslton identity.

1) External view from Dalston Lane 2) Sectional Axonometric 3) External view of main entrance space 3

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Kleanthis Kyriakou TH E TOW NS HI P O F PERF OR M ATI VE PAVI L I ON S The ‘Township of performative pavilions for Dalston’ deals with the problematic conditions of urban decay and gentrification, evident in the upand-coming area of Dalston. The project imagines a parallel reality that aspires to save what is common and bridge the gap that exists between the Hackney council and residents by injecting theatre into everyday life. . ‘Theatre is the rehearsal for revolution’ director Augusto Boal once said. During the 70s Boal developed a new form of theatre the “Theatre of the Oppressed” where spectators become spect-actors. Social sustainability arises when non-actors take initiatives in a performance. Holding a banner is not the way to go. The people of Dalston have lost their voice. They need to be trained how to take action! Revolution is on its way.

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4) The complete network of theatrical devices 5) Isometric of the three main pavilions 6) The crown pavillion 7) The street promenade

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Cristina Sarla TH E DA L STO N CR A F T CO-OPER ATI VE The aim of the Dalston Crafts Cooperative is to evoke Dalston’s creative heritage. The agenda of the proposal is to help the community learn creative skills through making. The purpose of the co-op is for the community, by the community. The design implements and displays the creative processes within. There are portions of the proposal that

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are merely exposed structure. In these areas, the users are able to construct upon the structure as they see fit. This allows them to exercise their learnt skills from the workshop. These areas are temporary and can be altered when required. Therefore, giving the users a sense of ownership and control.

1) Section through market containers, steel frame and communal space, 2) View into the communal space, 3) Exterior view from Ridley Road market, 4) Design proposal on site 4

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Myyen Dang CRE ATI VE COM MO N S As privatising spaces becomes increasingly the standard pathway of redevelopment, the loss of public spaces has been seen as a corporate model that favours ornament despite the risk of erasing community spirit. The Creative Commons is a de-capitalised public spaces accessible to everybody in hope of fostering strong community pride and involvement. A space that provides a shared sense of ownership and the qualities of these spaces influence how the communities operate and evolve. It’s a self managed, non hierarchal common art co -operative which offers young people the opportunity to transform themselves through the arts, to learn freely and intuitively whilst connecting to their surrounding community.

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5) Creative Common Garden View, 6) Axo 7) Long Section, 8) Key Moments/ Internal View, 9) Layering Function Model

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Vittoria Lenzi SH ADOW E X P R E SS Shadow Express acts as a storytelling community space in which elderly and kids benefit each other through learning, making and performing in a shadow puppet theatre. Their interaction activates the neighbouring overground station by converting this pause space into an entertaining auditorium for the commuters standing on the platforms. At the wider scale, the theatre acts as a catalyst for social interaction between

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Dalston’s local primary schools, Saz music school, Turkish community centre, Elderly community centre and its Arcola theatre by inviting their different users together into one unique spatial experience.

1) Night view from Platforms , 2) 1:50 Sectional Model, 3) Design Concept Model 4) Programme Drawing - Shadow express for making, playing and performing 3

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Serhan Ahmet Tekbas Weavers S qu a re A Project dedicated to Ahmet Hassan

The Weavers Square is a new public place for gathering and belonging that aims to reignite the ideals of the commons between the ‘new’ and ‘old’ Dalstonite communities. The proposal superimposes a public square with spaces for weaving and drinking tea. The tectonics of the architecture, offers an urban porosity that reconfigures the linearity of the high-street and exposes the raw flesh and

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heritage of Dalston hidden behind. The proposal is an opportunity for locals to reclaim Dalston, and bridge the gap between the divided Dalstonites, providing a place where local communities may exist, belong and flourish in the spirit of the commons. 5) Dalston site intersection and proposal model (Material: Paper & Thread), 6) Dalstonites DIY tea ceremony at the car wash, 7)Dalston Junction site analysis, 8) Dalston Square Manifesto, 9) Contextual analysis and urban strategy (Materials: timber, steel, paper, and thread)

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B A ( H O N S ) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S

Jaala Kenchington DA LSTON P R I NTI NG PR E SS The Dalston Printing Press brings together original Dalstoners, youth and artists by enabling them to publicise their opinion on Dalston’s ever changing landscape through a process of creative collaboration. The project offers them three distinct ways in which their voice can become a visual one. Printing press, woodcut printing and inkjet printing mirror the intersecting paces of the building’s neighbouring streets, namely

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Dalston Lane, Kingsland road and Ashwin road. As a result, the passers-by are slowed down, speed up and invited into the building where they will meet with other Dalstoners and join voices.

1) Spatial Collage, 2) Printing Press Model, 3) Concept Model

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Qinyun Yang A NE W DAW N F O R THE CH ILDREN O F DA L STO N The project is about offering a children`s daycare center in ridley road market and in dalston. Dalston is experiencing changing and developing at the moment, as a major shopping area of north part of london, dalston invites people to come, whereas without considering the public facility that could provide for new comers and also local residents.

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Mothers are the majority group of user in kingsland high street and ridley market. They have difficulties in taking their chidrlen with them to the market. Base on these, to provide a childrencare nursury for children they do not want to shop with their mothers.

4) Short section from Ridley road market, 5) plan 6) Long sectional drawing

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Siqi Huang MUS I C S CHOOL My design project is a small-scaled music school. The site locates at Dalston lane and covers a total area of 288 m2. The building comprises of four and half floors including a split-level platform in between ground and first floor. It has a typical white concrete structure and has been designed to have high level of flexibility, mingling and openness just like NA house of Fujimoto.This music school has four parts of large windows on the top of the roof to provide enough natural light for the building, each part composed by four long doubleglasses.

7) Exploded Axo

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Beau McCarthy M A K E O R BA K E CO - O P E R AT I V E Dalston has a rich and diverse culture with an ageing population and a higher dependency on social support, whereas the newcomers may be predominantly a younger community with a higher degree of expendable wealth. As people enjoy the physical task of working the different materials in their hands, they see the social differences 8

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between them vaporise. Through a collaborative effort they bring the different ingredients together to form a product of delight. Discussions arise on the topic of “the benefits of bringing together existing and new communities in the neighborhood�. Only by bringing together complementary ingredients in constructive collaboration may they achieve more for all.

8) Plan 9) sectional model 10) longitudinal section from Dalston lane

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B A ( H O N S ) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S

Studio 5 Mediating Urbanism

Tutor Geoffrey Makstutis Students Nabil Abdullah Manuela Coco Moetaz Osman Nina Handley Nelson Koe Simon Kwan Hwa Yeong Lee Alessandra Melchiorri Katrina Papet Siqi Song Yang Song Hanaa Taouzri Clara Iglesias Zeynap Tumertekin Junyan Wang 1,2) Nabil Abdullah, Simon Kwan, Alessandra Melchiorri - Research Documentation. 3,4,5) Katrina Papet, Nelson Koe, Manuela Cocco, - ‘Coexisting, Not Interacting’

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In the complex and dynamic urban environment of the modern city there are diverse and challenging situations that arise with any new development. Where existing residents and communities may have developed particular attachment or patterns of use, new insertions may be seen as disruptive. Against this there may be demand for development in order to drive economic growth within the local, regional and national economy. Where these divergent views meet there can be difficulty, on all sides, to see the needs of different stakeholders and to empathise with the needs of the other. On one side of the argument, architecture is often seen as the face of change - the outward representation of a larger system; separate and distant from the local community. The developer may be seen as the instigator of change - representing the overt power of a financial imperative, at odds with the needs of the average person. On the other side, there is a ten-dency to see local residents as the underdog - fighting for their rights against a system that denies them their voice. Can we say, with any certainty, who is right? The aim of the Mediating Urbanism

is to explore the potential of architecture as a form of local agency. Through the process of enacting architecture, via participation and collaboration, the studio has sought to develop an understanding of the way in which the architectural design process may directly involve a broad constituency of residents, users and developers. In developing the brief, we reflected on the pattern of engagement within local communities. When issues of importance are present, diverse groups may mobilise and define a shared sense of community. However, too often, when the issue is resolved (for better or worse) the sense of community dissolves. Thus, the Urban Mediator asks the question of whether architecture be the basis for ongo-ing community engagement? The outcomes of Studio 5 are buildings only in the sense that they present themselves as such. The more important focus of the Studio has been to explore strategies for public en-gagement as forms of research; to inform the direction of a built proposition. The buildings are not proposed as solutions in themselves, but as facilitators for the continued engagement of stakeholders within the community.


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B A ( H O N O U R S ) A R C H I T E C T U R E : S PA C E S A N D O B J E C T S

Ph a se 1 - Ga t he r Research, when working in a community, cannot be done through data, mapping and observation, alone. To truly understand a place, requires that a closer relationship is devel-oped; one which can engage with a place and the people to better understand the situation. In ‘Gather’, students were set the challenge of exploring the research area, through direct engagement. By combining primary research (site visits, interviews, etc.), with historical research, the students sought to develop an initial position about Bankside; reflecting their experience as well as their discoveries. The added challenge, was that their research must be delivered as interactive ‘documents’ that did not require them to present the work.

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1-4) Hwa Yeong Lee, Zeynap Tumertekin, Hanaa Taouzri ‘Pop-up Bankside’. 5) Nina Handley, Siqi Song, Yang Song - ‘Hidden Bankside’6)Moetaz Fathalla, Clara Iglesias, Junyan Wang - ‘An Area Disconnected’. 7-9) Presentations at the Bankside Residents Forum Annual General Meeting, December 2014 6

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The work developed in ‘Gather’ ranges from more traditional research material; presented as models, documents and files, to the more fun and engaging; such as, pop-up books, flip-books and games. In each case, the method of presenting the research has sought to allow the viewer to engage with the work in ways that reveal both the content and the process of discovery. This work was presented at the Annual General Meeting of the Bankside Residents Forum, in December 2014. Following an initial presentation of the overall project, discussions re-vealed that local residents were strongly of the opinion that developers, local government and architecture students had ‘let them down’ in the past; promising but not delivering. However, when given the opportunity to engage with the research documents, it became clear that CSM students were doing something different. The fact that the issues revealed by the students reflected, very directly, the feelings of the community gave us confidence that the research approach was beginning to offer opportunities.

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Phase 2 - Q u est i on The issues discovered in Phase 1, were reviewed and discussed; to determine where there were shared areas of interest across the 5 groups in ‘Gather.’ Through this discussion, it was determined that there were two main areas of investigation - ‘identity’ and ‘participation.’ Thus, from five groups the studio re-formed into two groups for Phase 2 - ‘Question.’ The aim of ‘Question’ was for students to develop a series of direct engagements with the local community, in order to gain further insight into the issues/topics that were discovered in Phase 1. As a part of this, the students were tasked to design live interventions that would encourage members of the Bankside community to discover aspects of their own experience in relation to the two areas of investigation. Students began the process of developing engagement activities, by exploring ways in which identity and participation might be considered. The ‘Identity’ team became interested in both the way that individuals define their identity, within a community, and how they define the community identity. Their engagement activities, using arts/crafts as well as a community ‘skills exchange’, sought to encourage participants to express their ideas of individual and community identity. In particular, the ‘skills exchange’ sought to find ways of developing shared identities that did not relate to social or economic groupings, but used the shared interests and skills of the community members.

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1) Studio 5 - ‘Discovering Bankside’. 2) Identity Team - ‘A Postcard to Bankside’. 3) Identity Team - ‘Bankside Skills Exchange’. 4,7) Participation Team - ‘Collaboration Game. 5,6) Participation Team - ‘Planning Game’. 8) David Matchett (Borough Market) in discussion with students following his pecha-kucha presentation

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The team exploring ‘Participation’ sought to develop methods of engagement that looked to get members of the community involved in activities that encouraged them to question the roles of different stakeholders (resident, developer, tourist) and how these groups might work together to promote community. A series of games; exploring collaboration, planning and community history, aimed to provide an environment for questioning and sharing. These engagement activities were deployed in a weekend event, dubbed “Discovering Bankside.” Engagement activities were held in Mint Street Park, while a round-table discussion (on participation) and ‘pecha-kucha’ presentations (on identity) were held in BetterBankside. With representatives from community groups, architecture practices, local government, arts organisation, academics and artists this weekend of events created opportu-nities for students, as well as the community, to explore the topics from a range of different viewpoints. The outcomes of ‘Question’ were both exciting and interesting. Each student discovered something from the events which has gone on to inform their final design proposals. For some, the public’s engagement with specific aspects of the events has given direct infor-mation to be integrated into a proposal. While, for others, the way in which people became active in the weekend’s events illuminated challenges to public engagement that they have sought to address.

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Phas e 3 - Po si t [ i o n ] The transition from public engagement, as a form of research and development, to architectural proposition is a challenging one. For students who have been deeply involved in seeking to understand a situation through close interaction with the people and the place, it may seem that no physical proposition can embody the complexity and richness that they have discovered. The projects, in the final phase of the Studio, fall into several categories. First, there are those that respond directly to public response to engagement activity. These projects seek to provide a place in which specific activities can be provided, in response to those ‘gaps’ revealed through research and engagement. Simon Kwan’s ‘Bankside Recreation Centre’ seeks to address the lack of community recreation facilities in the local community to provide fitness facilities. However, more importantly, through connecting to a series of existing fitness networks and clubs, he seeks to provide a social space where members of the community might come together - based on their interest in fitness and activity. Similarly, Siqi Song’s project; for a ‘Gardening Skills Exchange Centre,’ provides spaces of learning and sharing of gardening skills. Based on information derived from the engagement activities (The Bankside Skills Exchange), the project locates itself as a hub within the community; linking a series of existing greenspaces, and providing skills and training for interested local participants.

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1,2,3) Simon Kwan - Bankside Recreation Centre Longitudinal Section, Model, Transverse Section. 4,5) Siqi Song - Gardening Skills Exchange Centre Transverse Section, Longitudinal Section. 6) Junyan Wang - Skills Exchange Centre, Entrance. 7) Clara Iglesias - Bankside Arts Hub, Section. 8) Hanaa Taouzri - Culinary Food Bank, photomontage. 9) Alessandra Melchiorri - Borough Kitchen, section. 10) Nina Handley - ‘Made in Bankside’, section. 5

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Junyan Wang, Clara Iglesias and Nina Handley, share an interest in providing spaces for skills exchange and development. Where Siqi Song takes a targeted approach, these three have developed projects that provide facilities for a range of different skills. Again, from information discovered in the Skills Exchange engagement activity, their projects seek to develop shared identity through skills and interests; cutting across social and economic groupings. From early in their research, some students discovered that food was both a common interest and a contentious area. Many local residents felt that there was a lack of affordable shops. Others felt that the rise of ‘chains’ was making the area homogenous and corporate. The Skills Exchange engagement activity pointed to the fact that many local residents had a desire to learn more about cooking and healthy eating. So, for Hanna Taouzri and Alessandra Melchiorri, food became the vehicle for promoting engagement. Melchiorri’s project is a cooking school, that also creates opportunities for income generation. While Taouzri’s project integrates a cooking school with food bank. In both projects, the role of cooking and eating as common social activities, create the space in which shared experiences become the driver for social interaction.

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The second group of projects are those that have reflected upon the overall experience of participation and collaboration, to develop spaces where engagement may continue to take place. Each of these projects recognises the overall activity of the Studio as being the basis for an architectural programme. Nabil Abdullah’s ‘Bankside Creative Innovation Centre’, integrates a clear programme of workshops, facilities and resources in support of ongoing engagement activities for the area. Similarly, Katrina Papet’s ‘Bankside Initiative’ provides an environment in which individuals and local business startups may work together, in shared facilities, to continue to build collaborative approaches to community development.

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Moetaz Fathalla, in his project ‘The Skill Exchange’, explores the potential for learning new craft skills and the commercial opportunities that this provides. ‘BanksideDesignCollective,’ by Zeynap Tumertekin, provides spaces for shared development of collaborative approaches and a ‘forum’ in which these are debated. In all of these projects, there is the ambition to provide an architecture which supports the development of agency for the participants and to pro-mote the ongoing potential of collaborative practice in urban development.

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1,2) Nabil Abdullah - Bankside Creative Innovation Centre, axonometric, street view 3,4) Moetaz Fathalla - Bankside Craft Centre, programme view, ‘plugins’. 5,6) Katrina Papet - The Bankside Initiative, sectional model, programme study. 7,8) Zeynap Tumertekin - BanksideDesignCollective, street view, manifesto collage. 8

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There is also a group of students who have discovered the role that specific groups play in creating the environment for interaction. For Manuela Cocco, Yang Song and Nelson Koe, the ‘Discovering Bankside’ events pointed out the role that children play in bringing adults together. They found that when children get involved, in play and social activities, parents become involved; either through supporting their children or in discussing with other par-ents. Based on this, these projects create spaces for social engagement through shared experience with children. Cocco’s project, “Bankside Culinary School and Childcare Centre” combines the cross-overs of shared experience of being a parent with the potential of learning through food. Linked to Borough Market, and local garden spaces, the project (presented as two communicating buildings) is a new community presence on the Bankside Promenade. Yang Song’s ‘Peabody Daycare Centre,’ re-inhabits the centre of the Southwark Street Peabody Estate. Currently, an underused playground, Song’s project creates a partially submerged day care centre. Capitalising on the security offered by the limited access to the housing estate, the project seeks to provide space for the children of local residents as well as those working in the area. Nelson Koe’s ‘Playful Parasite’ provides spaces for children to play in support of ‘parental play’; in relation to public engagement activities.

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1,2) Manuela Cocco - Bankside Culinary School and Daycare Centre, section, community view. 3,4) Nelson Koe - Playful Parasite, axonometric, interior views. 5,6,7) Yang Song - Peabody Daycare Centre, play space, courtyard, section. 8,9,10) Hwa Yeong Lee - Bankside Story Archive, section, foyer, street view. 3

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Finally, Hwa Yeong Lee; in her project ‘The Bankside Story Archive’, has sought to create a living archive of Bankside. Affording spaces for researchers to ‘gather’ the stories of Bankside, and visitors to discover the area through engagement with both the people and the stories, the archive is aimed at making the life of Bankside visible to residents, visitors and those who work in the area. The work of Studio 5, ‘The Urban Mediator’, has been an experiment in how to support students to develop an understanding of architecture as a method as well as an object. Through this project, it is hoped that students have explored strategies in how architecture may provide more than building. Through their use of engagement, as a form of research, students have expanded their range of skills and have begun to consider how they might act as architects and agents. While the students have arrived at building proposals, they have also recognised that architecture can provide more than spaces to inhabit. Architecture can also provide space for communities to change, to grow and to become stronger.

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Studio 5 wishes to thank: Valerie Beirne, BetterBankside Joanna Cielecka, Bankside Residents Forum Daisy Froud Synthia Griffin, Tate Modern Verity-Jane Keefe David Matchett, Borough Market Adele Morris, Southwark Council Jon Tollit, Gensler Alex Wraight, Allies & Morrison Delancey Mint Street Park Bankside Residents, Businesses, and Visitors 9

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Contextual Studies S H U M I B O S E - CO N T E X T UA L ST U D I E S CO O R D I N ATO R

The final year of undergraduate studies sees each student crystallise an aspect of theoretical and critical research, in the form of a substantial dissertation. Self-selected by the individual students, topics vary across a huge range of spatial concerns, looking at various global, socio-economic, political, cultural and aesthetic contexts of architectural production. This year, students have looked at issues of immigration and civic justice; architectural expressions of post-colonial and emergent national identities; the history of architect-client relationships; architectural representation in films and much more. Key to the success of each dissertation is the identification of an astute and compelling question, which would lead to the production of useful research; these are neither exhaustive narratives nor indulgent polemics,

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rather they aspire to be academically rigorous contributions to contemporary and forward-looking architectural discourse. From largely intuitive and impassioned beginnings, students progress through the development of theoretical frameworks, historical studies, and the selection of visual and supporting materials, to articulate their arguments and present them in a properly formatted and academically rigorous piece of writing. As the end point in undergraduate studies in architecture, the most pleasing thing to see in the architectural dissertation is the emergence of highly individualised, confident new voices and position, across a future generation of spatial practitioners, makers and thinkers. The questions they raise and explore are, at their best, thoughtful, provocative, sincere and exciting contributions to architectural discourse.

Dissertation title for 2014/15 have included: Urban Theatricality Explore through the Commons - Dimitris Mentes Learning from Cube - Isabelle Castro Can Temporary Uses Change the Way We Plan Our Cities? - Lina Viluma The Concept of Beauty in Sustainable Architecture - Manuela Cocco Domestic Kitchen as Articulation of the Social - Marianna Janowicz Density through Connectivity - Nelson Koe Architecture as Healing Space - Qinyun Yang Garden Design and Architecture - Siqi Huang The Power of Gap: From an Abandoned Place to a Regenerated Identity of Urban Voids - Siqi Song From the Spoon to the City - Vanessa Lanzoni The Influence of Biomimetics on Architecture - Xin Guo The Stadium - A Stage for Sporting Spectacle - Simon Kwan Can the Body as a Metaphor Facilitate an Understanding of Architecture? - Cristina Sarla Defining Places in Video Games - Cuong Manh Ta Beyond Architecture: Study of Modern Day Prisons - Dominik Olszewski The Speculative Drawing: Visionary Potentials in Design Methodology - Hannah Jackson Shanghai: Transformation of Abandoned Industrial Buildings into ‘Creative Industry Clusters’ - Hanyue Hu [Social]Smart [Info]rmality - Luiz Conceicao The Digital Urban Interface - Nabil Abdullah Virtually Realised Rocco Manetti Skyscraper: Friend or Foe? - Stella Tavella Film Architecture - Tatiana Owen Concrete, Expression


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& Spirit - Zhixiang Chen Architecture, The Perceived Spacetime - Ahla Cho The Immigrant’s Right to the City Alice Meyer ‘Nice’ Neighbourhoods: Observing Architecture’s Effect on the Social Culture of the City - Emma Twine Flirtatious Consultation: Beyond Contemporary Modes of Consultation - Carl Munyuthe Architecture as an Expression of Power - Hanan Abdulamir Gwanghwamun Square and its Relationship to Political Changes in Korean History - Hwa Yeong Lee Destructive Typologies: Design and Behaviour of the Mental Hospital and the Night Club - Jaala Kenchington Iconic Architecture and the Identity of Globalisation - Karolina Krawczuk Contradictions in Parametricism: From Theory to Practice - Maxim Sas The Social Richness of the Unacknowledged Informal Settlement - Moetaz Fathalla

Space: Objects of Design in the Process of Production - Milly Reid Agonistic Democracy in Conflictual Public Spaces: Civil Conflicts and Reconciliation in the Middle East - Mohamed Adib Badinjki Architecture and Literature: The Founding Elements of Structure and Construction - Nicole Edwards The Architecture of Orphanages - Polina Olizko The Spatial Politics of Belonging in the Construction of Inner-city Migrant Communities - Sherief Mohamed Architect in Disaster - Shintaro Kanegae Architect/Client: A Changing Relationship - Alessandra Melchiorri How does the Aesthetics of Architecture Express National Identity? Birute Petkute Architectural Pedagogy: Shifts in Education - Gabriel George Attitudes Toward Land: How Land Use and Ownership Influence Architecture and Urbanism - Junyan Wang To Frame

Overcoming Liminality to Improve the Living Conditions of Refugee Camps - Abigail Park The Valley of Mexico - Xavier Ulibarri Meade How Governments Demonstrate Their Power Through Public Squares - Zeynep Tumertekin The High Street: Platform of Convergence - Carlotta Weller The Architectural Uncanny - Emanuelis Stasaitis Moroccan Assets: Architectural Mediation with Culture During the French Protectorate in Casablanca - Hanaa Taouzri Architecture and Inclusivity: The Power of Participation - Jessica Denyer The Perpetuation of Informality - Maria Gutierrez In Search of Genius Loci - Maria Vorobyeva Translation of

the View: Alfred Hitchcock’s Exposé on the Flaws of Modernism - Katrina Papet The Paraphernalia of the Fantastic: How Theme Environments Mediate Between Imagination and Reality Kleanthis Kyriakou Property > Architect > Value - Lorenzo Iandelli Gentrification in London and How it Threatens the Commons - Myyen Dang High-rise Social Housing in the United Kingdom: Triumph or Failure? - Nina Handley The Concept of Informal Settlements Holds the Key to Coping with Population Growth - Rahim Hassan Shopping Cities: An Investigation of How Consumer Environments Challenge the Role of the City - Serhan Ahmet Tekbas

Broadening Archtiectural Horizons on Skinny Houses - Vittoria Lenzi A Study of Urban Slums in Shanghai and its Future Strategy - Yang Song Chinese Traditional Typologies: Relating Residents to the Traditional Settlement - Yingxi Wen What is the Optimum Model of Sustainability in the Context of a Western Urban Area? - Mita Amani Learning from the Skateboarders of the Undercroft: Skateboarding, Space and Appropriation in the Wake of a Homogeneous City - Tom Deacon The Past, Present and Future of Parametric Architecture - Rohit Nandha

Dissertation Tutors: Shumi Bose Oscar Brito Gunter Gassner Geoffrey Makstutis Eva Sopeoglou

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Technical Studies A D R I A N RO B I N S O N - T E C H N I C A L ST U D I E S CO O R D I N ATO R

By the third year, students have acquired a confidence in technical studies that allows them to explore and experiment with concepts that are integrated with their programme. A lecture series during the first term provokes them to challenge accepted norms on technology and each student is asked in their third year to adopt a critical position on the role of technology in their main project proposals. As the detailed proposals take shape a dialogue between architectural brief and the technical design emerges. Adopting a more singular approach to the technical resolution of their projects, each student is encouraged to express the individuality of their proposals through the physical performance of the material and environmental qualities. The building form, the use of light, noise and air movement are synthesised with their spatial pro-

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posals to create an integrated building form that expresses the poetic qualities of the tectonic design. 1

1) Lorenzo Iandelli, exploded axonometric wall section 2) Nabil Abdullah, detail section. 3,6) Making Week, a cross-course full-scale making project. 4) Vittoria Lenzi, artificial lighting study model. 5) Sherief Mohamed, exploded axonometric model. 7) Luiz Conceicao, exploded axonometric - structural systems. 8) Simon Kwan, environmental section. 4

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Professional Practice G re g Ro s s - P RO F E SS I O N A L P R AC T I C E CO O R D I N ATO R

In the third year of the BA, the Professional Practice curriculum shifts emphasis towards the future of practice and our graduating students potential role in the profession and society as whole. We look at current projections in the future of practice and explore working practices which are currently blurring disciplinary boundaries, thus encouraging students to consider wider potential futures than those traditionally attributed to the architect’s professional role. At the same time, through workshops and lectures and the CSM/ RIBA London Mentoring Scheme, a key feature of their third year, we aim to assist and prepare students for a coming year out in an architectural and design related practice. The mentoring scheme provides students with the opportunity to ‘shadow’ a leading member of a practice; discovering the role of an architect in a variety of different contexts. Live projects such as Making Week are integrated into the professional practice curriculum enabling students to engage with, reflect upon, and develop collaborative working practices in the studio, the workshop or, in the case of our extra curricular live projects, outside of the College. It is our hope, that students who graduate, having studied architecture at Central Saint Martins, enter the profession prepared not only to work within it, but also to challenge and redefine it in the future.

Mentors 2014/15 Ben Masterton-Smith - Michaelis Boyd Associates Libby Makinson - Farrells Nick Edler - Conran and Partners Rory Pennant-Rea - Vine Architecture Studio Sanya Polescuk - Sanya Polescuk Architects David Appleton - Appleton Weiner Ltd Joanna Coleman - Mustard Architects Caspar Rodgers - Almanac Simon Astridge - Architecture Workshop Sophie Kirkwood - Kirkwood McCarthy Fiona McCarthy - Kirkwood McCarthy Sabine Hogenhout - Henley Halebrown Rorrison Mohieldin Gamal - HLM Brian Love - Love Architecture Ltd Isabelle Chatel de Brancion - SPIN architecture Ben Hopkins - Bennetts Associates Safia Qureshi - Studio DTALE Ayaka Takaki - Donald Insall Architects Heather Cerowski - Donald Insall Architects Jason Lai - Donald Insall Architects Joveria Baig - 3D Reid Andrew Partridge - Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Andy Bryce - Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Murray Kerr - Denizen Works Claire Dale-Lace - Haverstock Gordon McQuade - Aukett Swanke Meryl Townley - van Heyningen and Haward Architects Rui Carvalheiro - RTKL

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1) Site Visit - Haverstock 2) Consultants Meeting Shepherd Robson 3) Site Visit - Appleton Weiner 3

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Dean of Academic Programmes Anne Smith

Programme Director Spatial Practices Dr. Melanie Dodd Course Leader Geoffrey Makstutis Stage 3 Leader Oscar Brito Contextual Studies Coordinator Shumi Bose Technical Studies Coordinator Adrian Robinson Stage 2 Leader / Professional Practice Coordinator Gregory Ross Stage 1 Co-Leader Amanda Hopkins Stage 1 Co-Leader / Media Practice Coordinator Andrew Sides Stage 3 Tutors Oscar Britow David Chambers Rut Cuenca Ursula Dimitriou Geoffrey Makstutis Technical Studies Tutors Ed Sauven Ajay Shah Guest Reviewers Patricia Aelbrecht Katy Beinart Anne Bellamy Jorge Beroiz Method Blejec Clio Capeille Rui Carvalheiro Kleopatra Chelmi Alison Crawshaw Jordan Cottage Tom Coxon Elizabeth Dow Javier Estevez Michael Foros Ines Garcia Tom Gardner Gunter Gassner

Nasser Golzari

Grit hartung Nicolas Henninger Richard Henson Beth Hughes Platon Issaias Michael Kloihofer Martina Kousidi James Lai Andreas Lang Tom Lindblom Alejandro Martinez Federico Nassetti Robert Nisbet Hitaru Nissanke Joana Rafael Peter Sheard Scott Schwager Camila Sotomayor Sarah Sperber Manuel Stringer Paolo Zaide Fiona Zizch Stamatis Zografos Students Hanan Abdulamir Nabil Abdullah Mita Amani Adib Badjinjki Isabelle Castro Zhixiang Chen Ahla Cho Manuela Cocco My Yen Dang Thomas Deacon Hanaa Della Lama Taouzri Jessica Denyer Nicole Edwards Rahim Farias Hassam Gabriel George Isadora Graham Xin Guo Maria Gutierrez De Pineres Espindola Nina Handley Neil Healy Hanyue Hu Siqi Huang Lorenzo Iandelli Nancy Jackson Marianna Janowicz Shintaro Kanegae

Jaala Kenchington

Nelson Koe Karolina Krawczuk Yu Kwan Kwan Kleanthis Kyriakou Isabel Lanzoni Hwa Yeong Lee Vittoria Lenzi Burhan Limani Rocco Manetti Pelaez Beau McCarthy Alessandra Melchiorri Dimitrios Mentes Alice Meyer Sherief Mohamed Carl Munyuthe Rohit Nandha Polina Olizko Dominik Olszewski Tatiana Owen Katrina Papet Abigail Park Birute Petkute Mert Pozan Milly Reid Luiz Rocha Pereira Queiroz Conceicao Cristina Sarla Maxim Sas Yang Song Siqi Song Emanuelis Stasaitis Ameljeda Sufaz Cuong Manh Ta Stella Tavella Serhan Ahmet Tekbas Zeynep Tumertekin Emma Twine Xavier Ulibarri Meade Lina Viluma Maria Vorobeyeva Junyan Wang Carlotta Weller Yingxin Wen Qinyun Yang

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Applying to BA Architecture @ CSM

Entry to BA Architecture is highly competitive. Selection is determined by the quality of the application, indicated primarily in your portfolio of work and written statements. Applicants are normally expected to have achieved, or be expected to achieve, the course entry requirements: • Passes at GCSE level in 5 subjects (grade C or above) including English Language, Mathematics and a double award at science, or a separate science such as Physics or Chemistry, and one other subject (Art & Design or Design Technology are recommended). • In addition to the requirement above, applicants must have achieved 320 UCAS tariff points (or equivalent).

Student selection criteria

Portfolio and interview advice

We don’t just look for a passion for architecture. We’re also seeking people who are open to new ideas, informed risk taking and challenge, and who are willing to get involved in the different disciplines and practices of architectural design during their degree. We select degree applicants according to your potential and current ability to: • Work imaginatively and creatively in architecture and design • Engage with experimentation and invention • Show imagination and ambition in proposals for your work • Demonstrate a range of skills and technical abilities • Demonstrate an engagement with 3D and architecture/spatial design • Demonstrate a basic ability to draw

Your work should demonstrate creative development, whether for a college project or in your personal work. By creative development, we mean ideas that have originated in your own experience and research and progressed towards potential visualisation. Ideas, visual research and experimentation are more important than finished design solutions and can be shown in 2D work, or through 3D objects and maquettes. It’s important that the creative work you include reflects and demonstrates your thinking, initiative and personal commitment to a particular project, theme or idea. Both through your work and in talking to you at a portfolio review we’re interested in you as an individual. Our focus is on your personal interests, your creativity and your initiative in finding

and model objects and spaces Demonstrate a basic ability to discuss ideas verbally and through written work Demonstrate cultural awareness and/or contextual framework of your work Articulate and communicate intentions clearly

out about your proposed area of study. We’d like to know about your favourite designers and artists, where you’ve seen their work at first hand and how you’ve gathered more information about the work that interests you.

To find our more, read the full course description, get application forms and information, visit:

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with generous support from:

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Profile for Central Saint Martins

BA Architecture: Spaces and Objects  

Degree Show 2015 catalogue.

BA Architecture: Spaces and Objects  

Degree Show 2015 catalogue.

Profile for csmtime
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