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CSI Building Knowledge, Improving Project Delivery

APRIL 9, 2015 MEETING Integrated Project Delivery Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is one of the big buzz words currently in the construction industry. Come to the April meeting and see what the hubbub is about. Do you need a special contract, a team of lawyers, special documents? How does it work? What are the pros and cons? Hear about the process first hand from an Architect, Contractor, and Owner and see a real project completed by this team. Continue to page two to read the guest speaker bios. Cost Members: Free Non-Members: $25

Table of Contents Guest Speaker Bios . . . . . . . 2 President’s Message . . . . . . . 3 March Meeting Recap . . . . . . 4 Let’s Get Dirty . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Sheldon Wolfe . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Tri-Region Conference . . . . . 7

Location DoubleTree Suites 320 North 44th St. Phoenix, AZ

Golf Tournament . . . . . . . . 8-9 Technical Article . . . . . . .10-12

Time 11:00 AM Registration/Networking 11:30 AM Introductions/Chapter Business 12:00 PM Presentation 12:50 PM Closing Remarks

Low Slope Roofing Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-14 AIA Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Charter Member Roster . . . .16 Quality Paint Institute . . . . . 18 The Reference Library . . 19-21 Key Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Reservations can be made by online by clicking the image above OR Louise Rehse at 602-258-7499 or Louise@TheReferenceLibrary.com


INTEGRATED PROJECT DELIVERY OUR GUEST SPEAKERS Guest Speakers: HKS, Inc. Associate Principal/Senior Vice President, John Niziolek’s entire 22-year professional career has been devoted to every aspect of healthcare architecture, including project team management. He is responsible for the organization and delivery of projects, and developing the right project teams in response to client needs for the Phoenix office. He is also one of HKS’ foremost proponents in the use of the Integrated Project Delivery method to create cohesive teams working toward one common goal – ensuring the client’s vision for their project is achieved within the boundaries of the allotted budget and schedule. Steve Eiss is a member of the Banner Health Development and Construction team currently working as a Project Executive on the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center ED/OR Expansion project. His previous work has included the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center; which was Banner Health’s first fully integrated project delivery as well as our Enterprise Data Center and various other large scale healthcare projects. A graduate of Arizona State University’s Architecture program Steve is currently working towards his certification in Real Estate & Land Development through the WP Carey School of Business. In addition to his work through Banner Health; Steve is also active in his community as a graduate of the Town of Gilbert Leadership Program as well a partner to them on various fiscal and zoning committees. Charlie Thompson, Project Manager for DPR Construction, offers over 10 years of construction industry experience. Based in Arizona, Charlie has worked on various lab and healthcare projects with a focus on producing projects better, faster and smarter. His most recent projects include leading the preconstruction design assist / IPD integration and construction efforts for both Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center Phase I and II and he is currently leading the BUMCP ED Replacement design effort for DPR Construction. DPR Construction is one of the country’s top technical builders. Ranked in the top 50 general contractors in the country over the last 10 years, DPR has grown with our customers by delivering measurably more value and consistently building great things - great projects, great relationships, and a great community.


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE By: T.J. Valdez, CSI , The Twenty-One Tech Company, Inc.

Election Season Don’t panic. Your television is not yet going to be overrun with campaign ads full of empty promises and mudslinging. That said, it is CSI Election Season. In April we will be voting for next year’s board members. I’ve listed the ballot as it currently stands below. We have at least one person running for each office, and all of them have served on the board before. I want to thank those that have volunteered to continue their service to our chapter. I’d also like to encourage further nominations. Whether it is yourself, or someone else that you think may make a valuable addition to your leadership group, please feel free to get a hold of myself (tjv@twenty1tec.com) or any one of our current board members (http://csiphoenix.org/who-is-csi-phoenix/key-contacts/) and let us know. No experience necessary! Being on the board, especially as a director, is a great way to learn the inner workings of your chapter and to get involved. With CSI, like a great many other things in life, you’ll get out of it what you put into it. Here is the ballot as it currently stands: FY2016 Nominations of Officers President:

Ed Galindo*

Director (through ‘17):

Gary Campbell

President Elect:

Bobbi Jo Husky

Director (through ’17):

Jeff Cox

1st Vice President:

John Campbell

Director (through ’16):

Kelly Gray*

2nd Vice President:

Jim Daniels

Director (through ’16):

Dennis Keane*

Treasurer:

Teri Hand

Secretary:

Mark Yarish

I’m T.J. Valdez, and I approve this message.

TJ Valdez, CSI CSI Phoenix Chapter President

*In the second year of a two-year term. Not up for election.


MARCH MEETING RECAP By: Tim Garver, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, Dunn Edwards

The CSI Phoenix Chapter March Membership Meeting was held on Thursday, March 12th. Justin Watt presented the topic of Understanding Slip Resistance and SCOF. Understanding Static Coefficient of Friction (SCOF) and how to measure SCOF is extremely important topic in the industry right now.

After the presentation members had a better understanding of current standards and regulations applicable to the slip resistance or static co-efficient of friction for polymer flooring systems, and general knowledge of the terms and science of tribology. Discussed were the methods and materials used to create slip resistant floor coating systems and test methods, and how to quantify different surface profiles and determine their compliance with the standards. Attendees learned that tribology is the science and engineering of interacting surfaces in relative motion. It included the study and application of the principles of friction, lubrication and wear and that tribology is a branch of mechanical engineering and materials science.

www.CSIPhoenix.org


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SHELDON WOLFE Rules of Thumb A huge problem that continues to grow is that we have too much information. When American architects formed AIA, 150 years ago, construction was much simpler; mechanical systems hadn't changed much since the Romans used them 2,000 years ago. Since then, countless new materials and processes have been introduced. Life was simple for architects of those early years, much of their time being spent detailing ornamentation. In 1905, a local university building of 112,000 square feet was built using a steel frame, with brick, marble, granite, and terra cotta. The construction documents comprised 58 drawing sheets and a 51 page project manual. By today's standard practice, hundreds of pages of drawings and a project manual of at least two volumes. We all know that, at least in theory, today's designers must understand and comply with a growing collection of building codes, local regulations, and zoning requirements; they must keep abreast of the latest in building materials; and they must know what's in the standards published by many organizations. No easy task, this - in fact, it's impossible - so we focus on the big things and hope for the best. To keep things moving, we must carry in our heads the really important stuff, the rules of thumb. Following is a collection of such rules I have offered to young professionals for many years. What to draw. If it comes in a box, don’t waste time detailing it. Do spend time showing how it fits in. Example: Don’t draw detailed sections of windows, with all of the pieces that make up the sash and frame; do make sure to detail how the window fits in the opening and how it is flashed. Draw only what is needed; but draw everything that is needed. This takes a little thought, but helps the drawings get done right the first time. And, it helps the bidders, who don’t have to wade through a lot of information that isn’t necessary to find what it is we really want. Where does the information go? People who work at the site don’t even carry specs, let alone read them. Put the information they need on the drawings, and everything else in the specs. Defined terms. If defined in the contract documents, the terms furnish, install, and provide can have distinct meanings. While the difference between furnish and install is fairly obvious, the common definition of provide is not, so avoid problems by using furnish and install rather than provide. In a single-prime contract, there is only one contractor, but there may be many subcontractors. Drawing notes. General drawing notes often repeat, and often contradict, each other, as well as the project manual. Eliminate redundant notes. Use the same term for a given product throughout; use the same term that appears in the specifications. Used too often, "Unless noted otherwise" suggests you don't know what's in your own documents; how can the contractor be expected to know? Why preface some notes with the word “Note”? Ask yourself what each note means. Example: “Fill with concrete and paint.” Notes such as “fasten securely” and “see specs” are unnecessary. Don't use brand names. There is no need to say "Provide countertop" or "Install trim"; just indicate what the product is. Assignment of work. That's part of the contractor's job. Spelling. I have a spelling checker, it came with my PC. It plainly marks four my revue, mistakes I cannot sea. I've run this poem threw it, I'm sure your please two no; Its letter perfect in it's weigh, My checker tolled me sew. © 2015, Sheldon Wolfe, RA, FCSI, CCS, CCCA, CSC Agree? Disagree? Leave your comments at http://swspecificthoughts.blogspot.com/ Your slip is showing! http://bit.ly/1vYNZ0u


SOUTHWEST, NORTHWEST, AND WEST REGIONS

COMING TOGETHER TO BUILD BETTER TRI-REGION CONFERENCE MAY 13-16, 2015 @ MISSION BAY HILTON in SAN DIEGO, CA

3 Regions 20 Chapters 2700 Members 1 great conference! Conference registration and sponsorships are now open at the San Diego Chapter website http://www.sandiegocsi.org/tri-region-conference.html We are looking forward to joining with our CSI colleagues throughout the western U.S. for a great time of leadership training, professional education, team building, and just plain fun! Major activities include: •

Region board and annual meetings

Product Show with up to 70 booths

CSI leadership training, including a Tri-Region challenge

Education tracks on energy conservation, accessibility, and more

Welcome Reception

Local tours including the San Diego Zoo

AIA-CSI Golf tournament

Chapters: Plan for your leaders to be there! Diverse leadership training session for up and coming and current leaders. Opportunities to meet leaders from other chapters with similar challenges and great ideas. Leadership is in your future - join us! All CSI members: Meet people with the same concerns and issues. Enlarge your base of experts. Continuing Education: 8.5 hours of quality construction industry education with continuing education credits. Sponsor: Get your products seen at dedicated sponsor oriented activities. Some sponsor opportunities include presenting an education session of your choice. Some also include conference registrations, so you can spend time with key technically oriented architects and engineers during the entire event. There are so many ways to make connections and contacts with the people making product decisions every day.

http://www.sandiegocsi.org/tri-region-conference.html Reserve your hotel room and sign up today.


PHOENIX CHAPTER CSI 21ST ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT (Benefits the Phoenix CSI Chapter & Kenn Lockhardt Scholarship Fund)

DATE: TIME: PLACE:

Friday, May 8th Registration @ 6:45 AM. Shotgun @ 7:30 AM Vistal Golf Club www.vistalgolfclub.com 701 E. Thunderbird Trail Phoenix, AZ ENTRY FEE: $85.00 Per Player (Includes Green Fees, Cart, Range Balls & Prizes) FORMAT: 4 Player Scramble Format AWARDS: 1st & 2nd PLACE AWARDS Special Hole Prizes – $100.00/EACH RAFFLE PRIZES: Tickets Available at Registration Table – GREAT PRIZES FOOD: “RANCH COOKOUT” Hamburgers & Chicken

REGISTRATION FORM – (ENTRY DEADLINE – May1st) NAME: (Team Members): COMPANY: ADDRESS: SPONSORSHIP:

PH: CITY:

REGISTRATION:

BRONZE ($100) SILVER ($150) GOLD ($350) SINGLE ($85/PLAYER) TEAM

ENCLOSED:

$

**SEND TO:

ZIP:

PLATINUM ($600)

(Please Make Checks Payable To: PHOENIX CHAPTER CSI)

Jeremy Gustafson, CSI Arcadia Inc. 2510 W. Geneva Drive Tempe, AZ 85282 480-403-1903 (c) or Email Completed Form to jgustafson@arcadiainc.com


PHOENIX CHAPTER CSI ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

21ST 1.

BRONZE: $100 - Includes a hole sign, your Company Name in any advertising and recognition at the luncheon following golf.

2.

SILVER: $150 – Includes a hole sign, your Company Name in advertising and recognition at the luncheon following golf. BONUS: Round of golf for ONE (1) player at a later date!

3.

GOLD: $350 – Includes all of the BRONZE items PLUS two (2) rounds at no charge in the tournament. BONUS: Round of golf for TWO (2) players at a later date!

4.

PLATINUM: $600 – Includes all of the BRONZE items PLUS four (4) rounds of golf at no charge in the tournament. BONUS: Round of golf for FOUR (4) players at a later date!

Please review and complete the registration form noting whether you are a Sponsor or Player. Contact Jeremy Gustafson 480-403-1903 for any assistance.

HELP THE KENN LOCKHARDT SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION… BE A SPONSOR!!


The operation cost of a facility can also be reduced with less thermal bridges. With the average cost of a kWh of electricity in 2011 at nearly 12 cents (eia.gov), reducing heating and cooling HVAC workloads can translate to substantial cost savings over the life of a building. When an R-19 batt insulated steel framed wall, 4” deep vertical and horizontal Z-girt assemblies and a 4” deep thermally isolated intermittent bracket system are compared for kWh/SF used, the bracket system wins hands down. The intermittent bracket system uses ± 55% less kWh compared to batt and ± 38% and ± 28% less compared to vertical and horizontal Z-girts respectively. Being that a thermally isolated intermittent bracket system has less thermal bridging and performs much better than continuous furring strips, the overall thickness of insulation required for code compliance is reduced. As stated earlier, furring strips require more than 6” of exterior mineral fiber insulation whereas some intermittent bracket systems can require as little as 3.5”. This not only reduces the cost per square foot per R-value of insulation required, but with a reduction in overall wall thickness, the overall useable or leasable floor area for the owner can be increased.

3D F.E.A. THERMAL MODELING

Knight Wall Systems offers one of the building construction industry’s most efficient and versatile cladding attachment systems, called the MFI-SystemTM. The MFI-SystemTM outperforms the competition by only requiring the use of 3.5” of exterior mineral fiber insulation to meet the prescriptive path requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2007/2010 in all climate zones (U-value of 0.064). The system can be installed in a vertical or horizontal orientation, with no effect on thermal performance, is fully warranted, highly durable and one of the most budget conscious pre-engineered attachment systems on the market today.

ABOUT KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS Knight Wall Systems is one of several subsidiaries of Knight Construction and Supply Inc., in business since 1968 and primarily serving industrial customers throughout the US. The firm is family owned and has more than 115 employees at its eastern Washington headquarters and manufacturing facility.

www.ashrae.org (Std. 90.1 & RP-1365) www.eia.gov www.noaa.gov Morrison-Hershfield (report # 38123128.00 & 18123069.00)

WRITTEN BY: BRIAN NELSON, CDT, LEED GA ALL KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS COMPONENTS ARE MANUFACTURED IN THE USA. (PATENT PENDING)

NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES ARE GIVEN EXCEPT FOR ANY APPLICABLE WRITTEN WARRANTIES SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED BY KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED. No freedom from any patent owned by Knight Wall Systems or others is to be inferred. Because use conditions and applicable laws may differ from one location to another and may change with time, Customer is responsible for determining whether products and the information in this document are appropriate for Customer’s use.

Z-GIRT THERMAL BRIDGING

The emphasis on increased thermal performance for building envelopes has not only led to increased insulation thickness but, more importantly, how the insulation is effectively installed to maximize the investment. Design and construction professionals have struggled with how to achieve the requirements of the energy codes and have settled upon the use of ‘Z’ furring strips (aka “girts”) for a number of years. Now the industry’s designs, means and methods are changing, and where the once-beloved simple ‘Z-girt’ was acceptable, it is now no longer a viable option.

¤ Heat energy transfers from warm environments to cold environments, e.g. interior of a building to the exterior of a building and vice-versa in warm climate zones. ¤ Conduction heat transfer is the underlying cause of thermal bridging. The heat energy transfers through connected materials where one part of the connected materials, or assemblies, are in a warm environment and the other end of the connected materials, or assemblies, are in a cold environment – e.g. exterior wall assemblies where one side of the wall is a conditioned space and the other side is an unconditioned space, or outside.

KWS MFI-System

Horizontal Z-Girts

Vertical Z-Girts

R-19 Batt with Steel Studs

kWh/Square Foot

Window area not considered. Calculations based on average heating and cooling degree-day data published by NOAA and average kWh cost published by the US EIA. The calculations are based on opaque wall area with conductive heat loss only.

One specific and important part of the energy codes currently being implemented calls for an increased performance requirement on exterior wall assemblies, especially with steelframed walls. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 90.1, which is the basis of nearly all energy codes, has several paths to thermal compliance. However, it must be noted that the overall goal is to increase the wall assemblies’ performance by making it more effective at doing its job – resisting the transfer of thermal energy so the conditioned space requires less work by the HVAC system to maintain desirable conditions.

THE BASICS: THERMAL BRIDGING

COMPARISON OF ENERGY USAGE PER SQUARE FOOT

+

PANEL ATTACHMENT & THE ENERGY CODE: HOW TO MEET & EXCEED THE ENGERY CODE WITH EXTERIOR MINERAL FIBER INSULATION

This white paper explains why Z-girts and other traditional means of exterior wall construction no longer conform to code. The root cause along with some solutions and benefits will be presented.

REFERENCES

Since heat transfers through an assembly in three dimensions: outward (or inward) through the wall, up the wall and laterally across the wall all at the same time, the best and most accurate way to calculate the overall thermal resistance of a wall assembly is by use of 3D thermal modeling software. For the 3D thermal analysis, many manufactures have used the expert services provided by MorrisonHershfield. The CAD/FEA analysis software NX, from Siemens, was used. Using this software, MH had previously conducted a research project for ASHRAE in which a 3D thermal model was developed and calibrated to within 5% of measurements from over 30 different hotbox tests. Most all of the thermal data contained within this white paper come from either the ASHRAE research project 1365 or privately commissioned reports all using the same proven software.

KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS MINERAL FIBER SOLUTIONS

KNIGHT

WALL SYSTEMS 28308 N Cedar Road, Deer Park, WA 99006 www.knightwallsystems.com 1-855-597-9255 (KWS-WALL)

MFI-System, ThermaBracket, ThermaStop and PanelRail are trademarks of Knight Wall Systems, Inc. © Knight Wall Systems, Inc. 2013 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

¤ The rate at which the heat energy transfers is directly related to the property of thermal conductivity of the materials connecting, or bridging, the two environments – e.g. metal is highly conductive of heat, which is why it is used for activities

where conductive heat transfer is important such as cooking food on a stovetop, radiators, etc. ¤ The goal is to keep the overall thermal conductivity of the materials bridging the two environments together as low as possible, therefore increasing the assembly’s ability to resist heat transfer – e.g. adding insulation into an exterior wall assembly is primarily to help increase the resistance to heat transfer through the entire assembly (inwards or outwards). ¤ Bridged materials with a low resistance to heat transfer (therefore are very conductive like metal) which pass through highly resistant materials create a path for heat to follow and “go around”, also known as following the path of least resistance – e.g. metal framing members, such as steel studs, penetrating the insulation added to the assembly create a bridge and allow heat to transfer right through the insulation at 16” on center (stud spacing).

“Now the industry’s designs, means and methods are changing, AND where the once-beloved simple ‘Z-girt’ was acceptable, it is now no longer a viable option.”

JULY 2013

WHITE PAPER

KNIGHTWALLSYSTEMS.COM


WHY DOES THIS MATTER? Penetrations are pathways for heat to transfer and are known as thermal bridges. The greater the pathway, the greater the amount of heat energy lost creating higher operating costs amongst other risks. To help reduce this, the assembly design must reduce the amount of conductive material bypassing the insulation, use greater thermally resistant materials within the assembly and finally break the bridge, or connection, of materials transferring heat energy. When a wall assemblies R-value is considered, it is important to realize the assemblies R-value is not the rated R-value of the insulation. This is proven with batt-insulated steel stud wall assemblies by the ASHRAE Standard 90.1, where it states R-19 batt insulation in a steel framing application only has an effective, or real, R-value of 7.1 (less than 40% of its rated value). This is primarily due to the steel studs penetrating the insulation, creating a bridge for heat to transfer. The insulation on its own is R-19 – that is true, however once it’s made part of an assembly, the installation method will begin to affect it – creating an effective R-value. Effective R-value is the inverse of the U-value for the entire wall assembly (which is commonly referenced within the code).

WHAT ABOUT EXTERIOR INSULATION? The same challenge of deteriorating insulating values can be seen on exterior insulated wall assemblies as well, where only a fraction of the insulations stated R-value is actually delivered. Using a typical continuous furring channel for cladding attachment, such as a vertical Z-girt, will only allow the insulation to perform at ± 40% of its rated R-value. Rotate the cladding attachment Z-girt 90° to the horizontal and you will only increase the effectiveness of the insulation to ± 50% of its rated R-value. Therefore the building owner, or occupant, is only receiving half of what they have actually paid for.

WHAT AFFECTS THE THERMAL BRIDGING WITH EXTERIOR INSULATION? There are several characteristics of the cladding attachment methodology and configuration effecting overall thermal performance. In an effort to understand how to maximize the insulations thermal performance, it is important to review just a few of the culprits affecting the exterior insulations clear wall performance. These include the amount of material penetrating the insulation, the actual conductivity of the material penetrating the insulation and lastly what amount of contact area between all bridged/connected parts. PAGE 2 of 4 knightwallsystems.com

kind of girt, bracket or clip penetrating it, creating a thermal bridge. Now the real questions are: how big of a thermal bridge is it, what does it do to the wall and what does it mean for the owner?

“ONCE INSULATION IS MADE PART

OF AN ASSEMBLY, THE INSTALLATION METHOD WILL BEGIN TO AFFECT IT CREATING AN EFFECTIVE R-VALUE.”

Of course, allowing only screw fasteners to penetrate the insulation is the most preferred methodology to reduce and nearly eliminate thermal bridging, but not all projects, design loads, goals or insulations will effectively allow this to occur.

With a greater cross sectional area of material penetrating the insulation, the greater the amount of heat energy can be moved. The best way to think of this is an eight lane interstate versus a two-lane road with the cars analogous of the heat energy. Which one can move more cars (heat energy) from point A to point B per hour? With material penetrating the insulation, the actual thermal conductivity of the material used for the attachment system will allow for more heat energy to be transferred. It is important to note that every material in the world has the property of thermal conductivity, but some materials are very low in conductivity whereas others are very high. Aluminum has a far greater thermal conductivity versus steel. Therefore, more heat energy will be able to flow through a cross section of aluminum versus steel, decreasing overall performance even further. Looking at the road and car analogy, aluminum is a 75 MPH interstate whereas steel is a 35 MPH street. Which way moves cars (heat energy) from point A to point B fastest? How the material contacts the substrate and different pieces within the cladding attachment assembly also has an effect on how heat energy transfers. The greater the contact area between conductive materials, the more heat energy can transfer and move from point A to point B. If we limit contact area, we can “bottleneck” and limit the heat energy transfer. So looking at the road and car analogy one last time, reduction in

Aside from only allowing screw fasteners to penetrate the insulation, as per ASHRAE, there are a few other approaches to reduce the thermal bridging: ¤ Using intermittent brackets in lieu of a continuous rail or girt will cut down on the amount of material penetrating the insulation.

THERMALLY ISOLATED INTERMITTENT BRACKET WITH 57% REDUCTION IN CONTACT AREA - BY KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS contact area is like a traffic jam on a busy interstate. The cars (heat energy) are still moving from one point to another, but at a much slower rate.

THE BOTTOM LINE IMPACT OF INCREASED THERMALLY EFFICIENT WALL ASSEMBLIES It is overwhelmingly obvious that the simplest, most excepted and versatile way to increase a wall assembly’s thermal performance is by use of insulation applied to the exterior of the wall. Exterior insulation is typically marketed as “continuous insulation”. Though more than likely it will not be installed within the assembly without thermal bridges as specified by ASHRAE Standard 90.1 (definitions: ci). More than likely it will have some

¤ Specify the use of a lower conductivity material while strength and durability are not sacrificed. Steel’s thermal conductivity is much lower than aluminum and provides exceptional strength and durability. ¤ Pieces of the metal attachment system should not directly contact each other. This will reduce the thermal transfer from one piece of the system to another (known as a thermal break or thermal isolation). Cutting down on the contact area with the base wall will also reduce the amount of heat transfer occurring out-of or into the conditioned space. By reducing the thermal bridging, the overall performance of the wall is dramatically increased. Moreover, the amount of insulation (thickness) required to meet code can be reduced – including mineral fiber insulation. As a matter of fact – it is impossible to be at or below a maximum U-factor of 0.064 with steel stud assemblies and continuous vertical or horizontal Z-girts with 6” of mineral fiber insulation or less. PAGE 3 of 4 knightwallsystems.com


The operation cost of a facility can also be reduced with less thermal bridges. With the average cost of a kWh of electricity in 2011 at nearly 12 cents (eia.gov), reducing heating and cooling HVAC workloads can translate to substantial cost savings over the life of a building. When an R-19 batt insulated steel framed wall, 4” deep vertical and horizontal Z-girt assemblies and a 4” deep thermally isolated intermittent bracket system are compared for kWh/SF used, the bracket system wins hands down. The intermittent bracket system uses ± 55% less kWh compared to batt and ± 38% and ± 28% less compared to vertical and horizontal Z-girts respectively. Being that a thermally isolated intermittent bracket system has less thermal bridging and performs much better than continuous furring strips, the overall thickness of insulation required for code compliance is reduced. As stated earlier, furring strips require more than 6” of exterior mineral fiber insulation whereas some intermittent bracket systems can require as little as 3.5”. This not only reduces the cost per square foot per R-value of insulation required, but with a reduction in overall wall thickness, the overall useable or leasable floor area for the owner can be increased.

3D F.E.A. THERMAL MODELING

Knight Wall Systems offers one of the building construction industry’s most efficient and versatile cladding attachment systems, called the MFI-SystemTM. The MFI-SystemTM outperforms the competition by only requiring the use of 3.5” of exterior mineral fiber insulation to meet the prescriptive path requirements of ASHRAE 90.1-2007/2010 in all climate zones (U-value of 0.064). The system can be installed in a vertical or horizontal orientation, with no effect on thermal performance, is fully warranted, highly durable and one of the most budget conscious pre-engineered attachment systems on the market today.

ABOUT KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS Knight Wall Systems is one of several subsidiaries of Knight Construction and Supply Inc., in business since 1968 and primarily serving industrial customers throughout the US. The firm is family owned and has more than 115 employees at its eastern Washington headquarters and manufacturing facility.

www.ashrae.org (Std. 90.1 & RP-1365) www.eia.gov www.noaa.gov Morrison-Hershfield (report # 38123128.00 & 18123069.00)

WRITTEN BY: BRIAN NELSON, CDT, LEED GA ALL KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS COMPONENTS ARE MANUFACTURED IN THE USA. (PATENT PENDING)

NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES ARE GIVEN EXCEPT FOR ANY APPLICABLE WRITTEN WARRANTIES SPECIFICALLY PROVIDED BY KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS. ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES INCLUDING THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED. No freedom from any patent owned by Knight Wall Systems or others is to be inferred. Because use conditions and applicable laws may differ from one location to another and may change with time, Customer is responsible for determining whether products and the information in this document are appropriate for Customer’s use.

Z-GIRT THERMAL BRIDGING

The emphasis on increased thermal performance for building envelopes has not only led to increased insulation thickness but, more importantly, how the insulation is effectively installed to maximize the investment. Design and construction professionals have struggled with how to achieve the requirements of the energy codes and have settled upon the use of ‘Z’ furring strips (aka “girts”) for a number of years. Now the industry’s designs, means and methods are changing, and where the once-beloved simple ‘Z-girt’ was acceptable, it is now no longer a viable option.

¤ Heat energy transfers from warm environments to cold environments, e.g. interior of a building to the exterior of a building and vice-versa in warm climate zones. ¤ Conduction heat transfer is the underlying cause of thermal bridging. The heat energy transfers through connected materials where one part of the connected materials, or assemblies, are in a warm environment and the other end of the connected materials, or assemblies, are in a cold environment – e.g. exterior wall assemblies where one side of the wall is a conditioned space and the other side is an unconditioned space, or outside.

KWS MFI-System

Horizontal Z-Girts

Vertical Z-Girts

R-19 Batt with Steel Studs

kWh/Square Foot

Window area not considered. Calculations based on average heating and cooling degree-day data published by NOAA and average kWh cost published by the US EIA. The calculations are based on opaque wall area with conductive heat loss only.

One specific and important part of the energy codes currently being implemented calls for an increased performance requirement on exterior wall assemblies, especially with steelframed walls. ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 90.1, which is the basis of nearly all energy codes, has several paths to thermal compliance. However, it must be noted that the overall goal is to increase the wall assemblies’ performance by making it more effective at doing its job – resisting the transfer of thermal energy so the conditioned space requires less work by the HVAC system to maintain desirable conditions.

THE BASICS: THERMAL BRIDGING

COMPARISON OF ENERGY USAGE PER SQUARE FOOT

+

PANEL ATTACHMENT & THE ENERGY CODE: HOW TO MEET & EXCEED THE ENGERY CODE WITH EXTERIOR MINERAL FIBER INSULATION

This white paper explains why Z-girts and other traditional means of exterior wall construction no longer conform to code. The root cause along with some solutions and benefits will be presented.

REFERENCES

Since heat transfers through an assembly in three dimensions: outward (or inward) through the wall, up the wall and laterally across the wall all at the same time, the best and most accurate way to calculate the overall thermal resistance of a wall assembly is by use of 3D thermal modeling software. For the 3D thermal analysis, many manufactures have used the expert services provided by MorrisonHershfield. The CAD/FEA analysis software NX, from Siemens, was used. Using this software, MH had previously conducted a research project for ASHRAE in which a 3D thermal model was developed and calibrated to within 5% of measurements from over 30 different hotbox tests. Most all of the thermal data contained within this white paper come from either the ASHRAE research project 1365 or privately commissioned reports all using the same proven software.

KNIGHT WALL SYSTEMS MINERAL FIBER SOLUTIONS

KNIGHT

WALL SYSTEMS 28308 N Cedar Road, Deer Park, WA 99006 www.knightwallsystems.com 1-855-597-9255 (KWS-WALL)

MFI-System, ThermaBracket, ThermaStop and PanelRail are trademarks of Knight Wall Systems, Inc. © Knight Wall Systems, Inc. 2013 - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

¤ The rate at which the heat energy transfers is directly related to the property of thermal conductivity of the materials connecting, or bridging, the two environments – e.g. metal is highly conductive of heat, which is why it is used for activities

where conductive heat transfer is important such as cooking food on a stovetop, radiators, etc. ¤ The goal is to keep the overall thermal conductivity of the materials bridging the two environments together as low as possible, therefore increasing the assembly’s ability to resist heat transfer – e.g. adding insulation into an exterior wall assembly is primarily to help increase the resistance to heat transfer through the entire assembly (inwards or outwards). ¤ Bridged materials with a low resistance to heat transfer (therefore are very conductive like metal) which pass through highly resistant materials create a path for heat to follow and “go around”, also known as following the path of least resistance – e.g. metal framing members, such as steel studs, penetrating the insulation added to the assembly create a bridge and allow heat to transfer right through the insulation at 16” on center (stud spacing).

“Now the industry’s designs, means and methods are changing, AND where the once-beloved simple ‘Z-girt’ was acceptable, it is now no longer a viable option.”

JULY 2013

WHITE PAPER

KNIGHTWALLSYSTEMS.COM


Press Releases (Newsletter and Announcements page only) 1-2 page announcements re personal changes, project awards or completions, industry recognition, etc. No product announcements. Provided in PDF or Word format. Help Wanted (Newsletter and Announcements page only) Up to 75 word description, can be run anonymously.

AIA ARIZONA APRIL CALENDAR April 2nd—Educational Outreach Committee April 9th—Phoenix Metro Board of Directors April 10th—Scottsdale Section April 15th—Slide Slam April 22nd—Advocacy Committee April 23rd—Chapter Meeting

www.AIA-Arizona.org

Monthly Member Meeting April 9, 2015 Integrated Project Delivery


LOW SLOPE ROOFING IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

This 2015 one day educational seminar serving Continental Breakfast and Lunch is being held

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015 From 9:00am to 1:30pm Talking Stick Resort Scottsdale, AZ 3.0 HSW Hours of Continuing Education

SEMINAR TOPICS Presented Locally By:

FBE Products 623-516-8186

Our presentations cover a wide spectrum of important building envelope related issues — Roof Membrane Choices, Insulation Optimization, Wind and Weather Resistance, Regional Design Considerations, Warranty Implications! — these are just a few of the topics we will actively engage. Because interaction is a big part of our program, you’re assured your project needs will get the personal attention they deserve.

This presentation is developed for you, Architects, Specifiers, and Owners who play a critical role when selecting the appropriate products and systems for a building. You will find this program to be an invaluable educational opportunity. This will be your source for comprehensive knowledge on the latest trends and solutions available. From metal wall panel systems, materials and components, to elements of environmental design and more, we will help keep you on pace with all your metal wall panel projects.

Talking Stick Resort – Road Runner Room - C 9800 E Indian Bend Rd Scottsdale, AZ 85256 This one day seminar is FREE. However, you must be registered to attend. The Firestone Building Products mission for continuing education is to produce original, high quality programs we can offer regularly throughout the year. Topics are selected and developed by subject matter experts in order to address timely issues and to meet the diverse requirements of today’s design professional.

FREE PARKING Please Register NOW for

TUESDAY, March 31st , 2015 You must be registered by

Thursday, March 26th, 2015 to attend and receive CEU’s Class size is limited.


Low Slope Roofing in Architectural Design TUESDAY, March 31st , 2015 From 9:00am to 1:30pm

Use this Enrollment Form to Register for this Informative Event Email (reply) / Fax / Phone

SEMINAR AGENDA 9:00a 9:30a 11:00a 12:00p 12:30p 1:30p

Arrival & Continental Breakfast Single Ply Roof Covers Introduction to Daylighting Systems Lunch & Learn; FSBP Optimized Insulation Adjourn

Enrollment Form

LOW SLOPE ROOFING IN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN Tuesday, March 31st, 2015 9:00am to 1:30pm NAME:

*Register by Thursday, March 26, at joe@fbeproducts.com

THIS PROGRAM WILL AWARD

3.0 HSW, AIA APPROVED LEARNING UNITS

AIA #: FIRM: STREET:

Instructor

Howard Hall, Building Envelope Solutions manager, Firestone Building Products, is a graduate of Arizona State University with more than twenty years experience in the low sloped roofing industry. Mr. hall has now brought this vast experience to focus on topics concerning the building envelope. In his present role, has worked side by side with architects to identify the best choice in building materials for their design needs. With a degree in Environmental Management, Howard is passionate about incorporating environmentally conscious decisions in the design phase whenever feasible. He has written specifications and delivered presentations nationwide assisting the design community with buildings that demonstrate the highest levels of performance and integrity.

CITY/ST/ZIP: PHONE: EMAIL:

Talking Stick Resort Room - Road Runner C 9800 E Indian Bend RD Scottsdale, AZ 85256 COST: FREE. However, you must be registered to attend. PARKING: FREE Please Register NOW You must be registered by Thursday, March 26th Class size is limited.

RSVP to: Joe Volinsky at FBE Products representing Firestone Building Products FAX: 623-516-0846 EMAIL: joe@fbeproducts.com QUESTIONS: 623-516-8186


CHAPTER MEMBER ROSTER By: Pamela Bir, Your Computer Lady

Our website has a Member Roster that is maintained by the Chapter and separate from the Institute roster. We have some added features!

The Featured Members listing is a special expanded listing that you can purchase from Tim Garver to really spotlight your company.

In addition, you can look up members by specific pieces of information. (TIP: Do your search with the smallest possible option to get the widest range of search results. EX: Use “Tim” instead of “Timothy.” Use “Orcutt” instead of “The Orcutt-Winslow Partnership.” Not all members have provided CSI Division # or Keywords for their listing. Your Computer Lady will be available at the March and April meetings to gather that information from you. The Member Roster gets a lot of use by members and non-members. It is typically the 3rd or 4th most visited page of the website. Make sure your listing is up to date! (The Institute database is totally separate from the chapter database. You have to update the Institute database yourself. They are experiencing problems with the database currently but it should be available soon.)


www.atas.com

2015 Menu Friday, February 13: Lunch Catered by Joe’s Real BBQ

Fridays with ATAS What:

Friday, March 13: Lunch Catered by Buca Di Beppo Friday, April 10: Lunch Catered by Moki’s Hawaiian Grill Friday, May 8: Lunch Catered by Macayo’s Mexican Restaurant Friday, June 12: Lunch Catered by Thai Chili Friday, September 11: Lunch Catered by Joe’s Real BBQ Friday, October 9: Lunch Catered by Macayo’s Mexican Grill Friday, November 13: Lunch Catered by Lo Lo’s Chicken and Waffles

.. . L u n c h o n u s !

Where:

Time:

About:

Join us for our FREE monthly Architectural Factory Tour and Luncheon

ATAS International’s Manufacturing Plant/ Building Envelope Design Center 419 E Juanita Drive Mesa, AZ 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM

Factory Tour of Architectural Metal Roll Form, Brake Form, and Crimp Curving Manufacturing process of products for the Sustainable Building Envelope (eligible for a 1.5 LU/HSW Credit, AIA/ CES #ATA007) Architectural Metal Product Knowledge Overview FREE catered lunch in the Building Envelope Design Center

Please RSVP to Terrie Pickett via email: tpickett@atas.com or phone: (480) 558-7210


6 QUICK QUESTIONS TO HELP YOU PICK THE RIGHT INTERIOR PAINT Originally published by Paint Quality Institute Submitted by Tim Garver, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, Dunn Edwards

If you’ve ever been confused at the paint counter, you’re not alone. Most home centers and paint stores sell a dizzying array of coatings in every conceivable color and sheen. That can make it difficult for anyone to pick the right paint.

To help simplify things, we suggest that you ask yourself six questions about your personal preferences and lifestyle. The answers will help guide you through the maze of interior paints available today and make your purchasing decision a snap.

   

How sensitive am I to “paint smell”? If you abhor paint odor, you should favor water-based latex paints, which have little or no odor compared to oil-based or alkyd coatings. Latex paints also simplify cleanup and perform exceptionally well on all interior surfaces. These advantages help explain why latex paints have become the overwhelming choice of both do-it-yourselfers and professional painters. How much activity will take place in the space I am painting? If the room you are painting will see a lot of activity, the painted surface could get soiled. In that case, it’s best to use a glossier product (a high gloss or semi-gloss paint), which will tend to resist stains and are much easier to clean. If the room will see little activity, you could use any level of sheen – from a flat paint to a high gloss finish. What atmosphere do I want to create in the room? If your goal is to make the space cozy, consider using a “warm” color from the red, yellow or orange family; if you want it to seem cool, apply blues or greens. Do I wish the room were bigger (or smaller)? If you feel the space seems cramped (or, at the other extreme, cavernous), you can do something about it by selecting the right color of paint. Lighter colors make a room seem larger, while darker colors make it feel more intimate. How often do I typically repaint? If you paint only every so often, you’ll want to apply a durable, colorfast paint that will hold up well and continue to look good for a very long time. The best option in this regard is a top quality 100% acrylic latex interior paint. How much time do I want to devote to this painting project? If your time is limited, or you just want to complete the project quickly, then consider applying a “paint and primer” product that works like two coatings in one. You’ll likely need to apply fewer coats, which will save a lot of time -- and you’ll still get superior results.

Considering these questions takes just a few moments, but saves a lot of consternation when you are at your paint retailer’s. More importantly, the answers will help you quickly identify the very best type of paint for your next home beautification project! For more information about interior painting and interior color selection, visit blog.paintquality.com or www.paintquality.com.


April 2015

APRIL 01 ProSoCo, Jake Boyer, 254-432-2305 1 AIA LU with HSW

APRIL 08 Philips, Robin Goetz, 480-242-5355 I AIA LU

“Managing Condensation, Water Intrusion & energy in the Real World”

“LED 102 – Responsible Lighting Design” This multimedia presentation demonstrates how lighting can positively or negatively affect people in the built environment. Additionally, the presentation includes a comparison between traditional light sources and LEDs including advantages and disadvantages of each technology. Case studies include examples of successful projects, highlighting the best applications and opportunities with intelligent LED lighting systems. LEED ratings also will be reviewed.

Window opening air & water leakage has been a difficult problem for the construction industry. This course evaluates building failures, conventional construction approaches, and new developments in waterproofing techniques to show a path forward for designers seeking higher-performing wall assemblies.

APRIL 15 Fellert North America, Kurt Peterson, 630-618-9775, Tony Evans, Lanton Associates, 480-303-9182 1 AIA LU with HSW

APRIL 22 Halfen, Georges Loheac, 415-264-9666 1 AIA LU with HSW

“Architectural Anchoring Systems” “Acoustical Plaster” We will: analyze sound principals that are used to understand how acoustics affects the design & construction environment; familiarization of the various components of an acoustical plaster system and how proper implementation of these materials affects client safety; review of the various applicable codes, regulations and possible contribution to LEED points regarding acoustical plaster systems; and determine the proper application of acoustical plaster systems in Universal Design to provide a healthy environment that promotes physical, mental and social well-being. APRIL 29 Ashford, Germaine Head, 480-204-3521 1 AIA LU with HSW, IIDA, GBCI

This program is a general overview of architectural anchoring systems for diverse applications, common in commercial and institutional construction. There are six sections, each one devoted to the following anchoring specialties: glazed curtain wall; architectural exposed structural steel; wall cladding with dimension stone, brick veneer; concealed lintel systems for masonry; and insulated balcony connectors. Most of the material is covered graphically for a quick grasp of the fundamental principles.

“Drafting an Understanding of Densified & Polished Concrete” This course will provide an understanding of the benefits & limitations of both chemically densified & mechanically refined polished concrete. You will learn how to recognize how specifications influence the final outcome. We will conclude by discussing environments & industries conducive to densified & polished concrete. PLEASE MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMINARS:

o o o o o

04/01 ProSoCo 04/08 Philips 04/15 Fellert North America 04/22 Halfen 04/29 Ashford

o o o o o

Phoenix

Call and remind me at Call and remind me at Call and remind me at Call and remind me at Call and remind me at

NAME(S) (limit 3 from one company)

COMPANY

PHONE

RSVP TO THE REFERENCE LIBRARY – Fax 602-297-6613 Phone 602-258-7499 Email jill@thereferencelibrary.com or louise@thereferencelibrary.com

1 ©1988 The Reference Library, LLC. All rights reserved.


APRIL 2015

APRIL 23 Coreslab Structures (Arizona) Inc., Dawn Rogers, 602-399-3558 (Phil Richardson is the presenter) 1 AIA LU w/ HSW “High Performance Precast Concrete Envelope Systems Using a Sustainable Design” This presentation addresses what high performance building envelopes are, as well as key elements to their performance. It will discuss how to use precast concrete wall systems to meet the latest code requirements such as continuous insulation and air barriers and include topics such as moisture management, thermal mass effect and how to calculate effective Rvalues, integration with other building systems and more. This session will also touch on the idea of resilience. A structure must be able to resist environmental forces, such as high winds and earthquakes in order to protect life and fulfill its intended purpose. Case studies are used to highlight information presented.

PLEASE MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMINARS: o o

04/23 Coreslab

o o

Tempe

Call and remind me at Call and remind me at

NAME(S) (limit 3 from one company) ___________________________

COMPANY

PHONE

RSVP TO THE REFERENCE LIBRARY – Fax 602-297-6613 Phone 602-258-7499 Email jill@thereferencelibrary.com or louise@thereferencelibrary.com

APRIL 2015 2 ©1988 The Reference Library, LLC. All rights reserved.


April 16 Andreu World, Daniel Grinan, 312-339-0007 and The Material Collective, Mary Blanchard, 602-515-2736 1 AIA and ASID/IDC/IIDA LU “Wooden Technology & Furniture Design” We will discuss: What are the types of technology used in making wood furniture? What other materials can be used in constructing furniture and what are the advantages and disadvantages? 3. What finishes can be used? What fabrics can be used inside and outside? 4. What are the warranties available? 1. 2.

PLEASE MAKE RESERVATIONS FOR THE FOLLOWING SEMINARS: o

04/16 Andreu World/The Material Collective

o

Call and remind me at

NAME(S) (limit 3 from one company)

COMPANY

PHONE

RSVP TO THE REFERENCE LIBRARY – Fax 602-297-6613 Phone 602-258-7499 Email jill@thereferencelibrary.com or louise@thereferencelibrary.com

3 ©1988 The Reference Library, LLC. All rights reserved.

Scottsdale


OFFICERS 2014-2015 President T.J. Valdez The Twenty-One Tech Company, Inc. 480-226-5809 TJV@Twenty1Tec.com

Secretary Mark Yarish The Orcutt Winslow Partnership 602-257-1764 Yarish.M@OWP.com

President Elect Eduardo Galindo Ed Galindo Architect 480-751-8780 GalindoEd@outlook.com

Treasurer Teri Hand Tnemec/Southwest Coating Consultants 602-418-1268 THand@Tnemec.com

1st Vice President Bobbi Jo Huskey 480-421-8186 BobbiJoHuskey@msn.com

Director (through 2015) Jim Daniels ATAS International, Inc. 480-558-7210 JDaniels@Atas.com

Gary Campbell ASSA ABLOY . 480-688-7919 GCampbell@assaabloydss.com

Director (through 2016) Kelly Gray DLR Group 602-381-.8580 KGray@DLRGroup.com

Dennis Keane Stego Industries 480-459-5749 DennisKeane@StegoIndustries.com

2nd Vice President John Campbell Marlene Imirzian & Associates Architects 480-399-1805 JohnRCampbell@cox.net

Past President Brian McClure Stantec 602-707-4799 Brian.McClure@Stantec.com

COMMITTEE CHAIRS 2014-2015 Certification John Campbell Marlene Imirzian & Associates Arch. 480-399-1805 JohnRCampbell@cox.net

Awards Mark Yarish The Orcutt Winslow Partnership 602-257-1764 Yarish.M@OWP.com

Media Communications Tim Garver Dunn-Edwards 602-714-7280 Tim.Garver@DunnEdwards.com

Professional Development Richard Vullo Hafele America 800-423-3531 ext. 5310 RVullo@hafeleamericas.com

Programs Jeff Cox HKS, Inc. 480-688-7919 JCox@HKSInc.com

Fundraising Jeremy Gustafson Arcadia Inc. 602-734-5330 JGustafson@ArcadiaInc.com

Technical Jim Daniels ATAS International, Inc. 480-558-7210 JDaniels@Atas.com

Kenn Lockhart Scholarship Foundation Brian McClure Stantec 602-707-4799 Brian.McClure@Stantec.com

Membership Merrilou Peek PPG Architectural Coatings 602-377-4002 Merrilou.peek@PPGcom

Academic Programs Vacant

April 2015 newsletter  
April 2015 newsletter  
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