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Australia Business Arts Foundation Gold Book 2012


Australia Business Arts Foundation

12 years of connecting the arts, business and donors

Gold Book 2012


About AbaF What do we do? AbaF connects the arts, business and donors. Every day we bring together the worlds of business and the arts around Australia. Through information, expert advice and networking events we are the catalyst for giving business a creative edge and help arts and cultural organisations achieve their creative visions. For 12 years AbaF has helped to change the culture of private sector support for the arts in Australia and built the capacity of the arts, business and donors to connect. Private support for the arts has more than doubled from $108M in 2000 to $221M in 2010. By partnering with business, arts organisations discover new ways to become more sustainable, enhance their work and expand their reach. Business benefits too, through brand alignment, employee engagement and community contribution. Partners commit more than just money. They both have a stake in the other’s success and they work towards building a relationship that enhances the profile and success of both partners.

AbaF over 12 years… Through workshops, advice and networking, AbaF is the catalyst for connecting arts organisations and businesses and provides ongoing support to help partnerships grow. Donations are an important part of the income mix for the arts. AbaF works with donors, artists and cultural organisations to help them make the most of their relationships. We do this by providing information and advice through AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund.

How are we structured? Established in 2000, AbaF is a company of the Commonwealth and is supported by the Australian Government through the Cultural Development Program of the Office for the Arts, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport.

Find out more. Visit the AbaF website where you can find out more about all our offerings including adviceBank and boardBank, which match business volunteers with arts projects or arts boards. Donors can browse through artists and arts organisations eligible to receive donations through AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund. AbaF regularly runs workshops to provide practical advice for arts organisations and businesses and we host networking events around the country to help bring arts organisations, artists, business professionals and donors together. The details for these events and much more are all online.

Total private sector support for the arts has more than doubled:

$108M in 2000

$221M in 2010

Visit abaf.org.au

AbaF is governed by a board appointed by the Minister for the Arts, chaired by Terry Campbell AO. AbaF has a national council of senior business leaders who are champions and advocates for business support for the arts. See the full list of AbaF councillors on page 70. AbaF receives financial support from our councillors and corporate partners to deliver our programs and services in response to the needs and opportunities in each state and territory.

AbaF numbers... 24,102 business & arts guests brought together at AbaF events 5,500 donations made to artists through AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund $10M in donations to AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund 3,490 artists used AbaF services to improve their business

$9.4M total value of business volunteering for the arts 13,065 attendees at AbaF workshops 182 companies and 237 individuals have led through the AbaF Council 236 SME arts partnerships through PAPF $2.26M to the arts through PAPF

1,273 business volunteers through adviceBank & boardBank 2

AbaF Gold Book 2012

3,408 arts organisations have worked with AbaF 3


Foreword

Julia Gillard Australian creativity touches all of our lives. The arts are an essential expression of our identity and culture. Importantly, our creative industries also make a vital contribution to the Australian economy worth more than $30 billion annually to Australia’s GDP, employing some 285,000 people and supported by over 200,000 volunteers. Strong partnerships between the arts, government and private supporters are essential for a thriving cultural sector and are a key element of the National Cultural Policy. Through this landmark policy, the first of its kind in almost 20 years, the Australian Government is working to support the arts in the 21st century and to strengthen their contribution to a dynamic and diverse Australia. A cornerstone of this policy is our commitment to encouraging philanthropic, sponsorship and business support for the arts. The Australia Business Arts Foundation (AbaF) Awards and the case studies in this year’s Gold Book showcase the best in partnerships between the arts, business and private supporters and are a powerful tool for championing the value of private support for the arts. On behalf of the Australia Government I congratulate the nominees and winners of the AbaF Awards and wish you all the very best for your ongoing work in supporting Australia’s rich cultural life.

The Honourable Julia Gillard Prime Minister of Australia

Terry Campbell Welcome to the 2012 AbaF Gold Book.

Contents About AbaF............................................................................................................. 2 AbaF Partnership of the Year................................................................................. 6

The annual AbaF Awards and AbaF Gold Books have acknowledged the very best relationships between the arts, business and donors since 2001. Over 12 years the AbaF Awards have become a driving force in connecting the arts with the private sector and setting the standards for best practice. They have grown and expanded, responding to a more sophisticated environment for private support and encompassing awards for cultural giving, environmental sustainability, health and community wellbeing and accessibility. They have also recognised impressive leaders in business, philanthropy and the arts. Looking to the future we are working to expedite the amalgamation of AbaF with the Artsupport program of the Australia Council to create a new organisation which will soon become Australia’s pre-eminent one-stop shop for connecting the arts, business, donors and philanthropists. On behalf of the Board and staff I offer sincere thanks to the 2012 AbaF Awards judges and those who’ve done such a wonderful job for the last 12 years. I also appreciate and thank the business, arts and community leaders who have contributed to the AbaF Awards over their rich history. I am proud to acknowledge AbaF’s government and corporate partners and AbaF councillors; we would not achieve the success we do without your commitment and support. I thank the AbaF Board members for their loyalty and contribution and the AbaF team that delivers impressive results.

Toyota Community Award ...................................................................................... 8 AbaF Partnering Award........................................................................................ 14 City of Melbourne SME Award.............................................................................. 21 AbaF Regional Award........................................................................................... 28 AbaF Arts Access Award...................................................................................... 33 AbaF Giving Award............................................................................................... 39 JBWere Philanthropy Leadership Award.............................................................. 46 Dame Elisabeth Murdoch Arts Business Leadership Award ................................ 48 Richard Pratt Business Arts Leadership Award.................................................... 49 Visy Environmental Sustainability Award.............................................................. 50 Australia Council Young and Emerging Artists Award.......................................... 53 Arts & Health Foundation Award.......................................................................... 58 Woodside Better Business Award ....................................................................... 63 AbaF Awards 2012 Judges................................................................................... 68 Good Practice Recognition................................................................................... 69 AbaF Board and Councillors ............................................................................... 70 Index..................................................................................................................... 75 Partners and acknowledgements......................................................................... 76 Contact AbaF........................................................................................................ 77

The stories of the 2012 Gold Book are evidence of the collaboration of many passionate individuals and AbaF and the AbaF Awards are a credit to the companies and individuals who partner with, volunteer for and give to the arts. I hope you enjoy and are inspired by the terrific outcomes that can be achieved when connections are made between arts, business and donors.

Terry Campbell AO Chairman of AbaF

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

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AbaF Partnership of the Year

Winner

Darwin Symphony Orchestra and Sitzler

National and Northern Territory & South Australia

Benefits for the arts organisation

Outcomes for the community

• Performance opportunities in front of large crowds

• Concerts with free admission

• Support to tour new works • Media exposure in both advertising and reporting of the event • New fundraising contacts and an increase in overall support Benefits for the business • Strong brand presence at the event with banners and branded t-shirts for the orchestra

• A sense of ownership in the unique programming • Collaboration between the orchestra and local Indigenous pop and country and western singers • A live stream of Big Sky Country by radio to 149 remote communities

While the DSO is Darwin-based, it really belongs to the whole of the Territory. The performing members are all volunteers and give an enormous amount of their personal time to practise and perform with the orchestra for their communities. The Red Desert Tour to Alice Springs was our way of sharing the enjoyment produced by the fine musical outfit that the Darwin Symphony Orchestra has become. Michael Sitzler, Sitzler

• Media coverage leading up to and including the performance • Brand alignment with values of accessibility, vibrancy and volunteering • Engagement with staff and other event stakeholders

The Darwin Symphony Orchestra (DSO) is made up of 60 volunteer musicians who live and work in the community. Sitzler, one of the largest construction companies in the Northern Territory, has grown alongside the DSO. Together Sitzler and the DSO work to reach more and more people across the region with regular touring and inventive venue choices and their 20 year partnership has played a central role in tours to Alice Springs. In 2011 the Sitzler Red Desert Tour entertained the Alice Springs community over a period of five days with local collaborations and the exciting new works, Songs from Big Sky Country and Symphony Under The Stars. The performances featured the collaborative efforts of the DSO, Red Hot Arts Central Australia and local Alice Springs artists Warren H. Williams, Catherine Satour and Jacinta Price as well as Northern Territory composer Cathy Applegate and His Honour Mr Tom Pauling, AO QC, Administrator of the Northern Territory.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

By collaborating with local musicians and performing popular rock songs as well as well-known classical works, the DSO challenged audience perceptions of an orchestra and in doing so attracted new members of the community. Songs from Big Sky Country was streamed live by Central Australia Aboriginal Media Association radio to 149 remote communities. The involvement of local artists and performers in the concerts, such as the Larapinta Primary School choir, gave Alice Springs ownership of the event and further encouraged the community’s interest. Sitzler is an Alice Springs-founded business and the enthusiastic response of local audiences has reinforced the importance of their partnership with the DSO. The business employs people from all over Australia and these concerts have provided an opportunity to introduce employees to the unique aspects of their new home and demonstrate the benefits of a Northern Territory lifestyle. Ties with the Alice Springs arts community have also been strengthened through connections with local Indigenous artists.

For last year’s concert, DSO and Sitzler wanted maximum community engagement. The generous support of Sitzler made this possible with the tour events all free to attend. DSO was also able to work on a larger scale, increasing its legitimacy as a key cultural organisation in the eyes of audiences, potential sponsors and donors. By opening up these avenues of awareness and support, Sitzler is ensuring that future performance, learning and development opportunities for Alice Springs and Territory-wide musicians remain available. Everyone involved in the partnership took pride in a unique and enjoyable event that received widespread media coverage. The enthusiastic response to the Sitzler Red Desert Tour has encouraged the partners to grow the event into a biannual event. Both Darwin Symphony Orchestra and Sitzler are proud to have been involved in an event that was embraced by such a broad audience and has created such strong links within the community.

Image credit: Songs from Big Sky Country with Warren H Williams. Photo: Eleanor Eilks Image credit (opposite): Symphony Under The Stars, Darwin Symphony Orchestra. Photo: Eleanor Wilks

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Toyota Community Award

Toyota Community Award

Winner

Big hART and Woodside Energy

Western Australia This is a project that takes seriously the Indigenous ways of doing business, particularly the importance of country, family, story, dance and music. It makes the vital link between children, transmission of knowledge and respect for senior people.

For partnerships between businesses and arts and cultural organisations that enhance the life of communities.

Dr David Palmer, independent evaluator

Toyota values the diverse community groups that contribute to Australia’s identity and social fabric. Through the Toyota Community Spirit program, Toyota promotes issues and activities that are important to the Australian community. AbaF and Toyota have established a successful partnership to present the Toyota Community Award to recognise business partnerships with the arts that enhance the cultural, social and economic life of local communities.

Benefits for the arts organisation • The capacity to employ a large, professional team to create content, a touring theatre work and more A partnership between Woodside, the country’s largest independent oil and gas company and Big hART, a national organisation that delivers participatory arts-based community projects, has produced the inspiring Yijala Yala Project. In 2007, Woodside entered into a $34 million conservation agreement with the Commonwealth Government to identify, manage and transmit knowledge regarding the heritage of the Dampier Archipelago and Burrup Peninsula. This area has the most dense concentration of Aboriginal rock engravings in Australia and is also rich in ceremonial standing stones, stone pits and circular stone arrangements. In 2010, Big hART was invited to work in conjunction with members of the local Aboriginal community on an inter-generational, multi-platform arts project that was focused on conserving and promoting the area’s cultural heritage in innovative ways. Now known as the Yijala Yala Project, this collaboration uses arts and digital media to engage young people while also increasing literacy levels, education and employment opportunities. Ultimately, the project is developing a group of young leaders

that will guide the social, economic and cultural future for their community beyond the current resources boom. As well as engaging young people in Roebourne, the Yijala Yala Project has produced content that helps communicate cultural heritage through theatre pieces, films, music, photographs, artwork and digital storybooks. The quality of this content and the innovative use of new technologies has resulted in great interest and support from both within and outside the community. Each time a new product is created, interest in the project increases and more community members participate in the skill-building, mentoring and creation of cultural content. Through this partnership between Woodside and Big hART, opportunities are being created that will help diversify the area’s economy and provide a greater range of employment options while also preserving its cultural heritage.

Image credit: Shooting Burrup Story; Stuart Thorne, Stu Campbell,Tyson Mowarin, Eric Wedge and James. Photo: Debra Myers.

• The capacity to work with more community members for a longer period of time • Business model mentoring Benefits for the business • Increased opportunities to engage with the community through performances and participation in cultural activities • Opportunities to promote a clearer understanding of Woodside’s role in conserving the Burrup Peninsula and Dampier Archipelago • The ability to educate Woodside employees and contractors about the Indigenous culture of the region Outcomes for the community • Skills development in arts administration, production, storytelling, performance, digital media, song and dance • Community involvement through school workshops, cultural mentoring, artist collaboration and guides for project workers • Content creation including a touring theatre work, short films and iPad storybooks • Preservation of cultural heritage

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Toyota Community Award

Winner

Toyota Community Award

Winner

Queensland

Geelong Performing Arts Centre and Bendigo Community Banks (Geelong Region)

Victoria

Museum of Brisbane and Sunnybank Plaza

my own private neon oasis has contributed to a sense of belonging, fostered cultural awareness and been a source of cultural pride for the artists, arts workers, visitors to and residents of Sunnybank, as well as the broader Queensland arts sector.

This program has been an excellent example of what can be achieved by these smaller community companies working together to achieve what could not have happened if acting alone. We are looking to promote this collaborative model in other programs outside of the arts arena.

Robyn Daw, A/Director Visual Arts, Craft and Design, Arts Queensland

The Museum of Brisbane (MoB) celebrates the many facets of Brisbane’s identity and culture through social history and visual arts projects. For the contemporary art project, my own private neon oasis, MoB partnered with a shopping centre, Sunnybank Plaza, to help deliver this unique exploration of identity and community. The project has brought about a series of opportunities, challenges and firsts for both partners. Hosting a contemporary art project was definitely not usual business for Sunnybank Plaza. The project meant expanding the reach of the shopping centre to the broader Brisbane community and the arts sector as well as to the general public through social media. For MoB, the project meant expanding its Brisbane interest to the rich cultural experiences of the suburb of Sunnybank. The central idea behind my own private neon oasis was that at Sunnybank it is easy to be a tourist in one’s own backyard. The project explored how identity can be expressed and articulated in a place such as Sunnybank, regardless of cultural background.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

my own private neon oasis presented nine projects by seven international, national and local artists and designers, each transforming ordinary spaces around the shopping centre into extraordinary encounters. One popular project was Thea Baumann’s Hologram Holiday inside a nail salon, in which participants, while having their nails painted, could be transported in their minds to exotic destinations while listening to dreamy soundtracks. The project received a great deal of public interest and media exposure, with increased visitation for the shopping centre. MoB benefitted too, as it was able to present its first major offsite project and gain experience working across contemporary, public and community art. The community of Sunnybank also benefitted greatly from this project. my own private neon oasis helped to create a sense of belonging, fostered deeper cultural awareness and was a source of much pride for the community.

Image credit: Choi Jeong Hwa. Photo: R. Shakespeare.

Pat Murnane, Regional Manager, Bendigo Community Banks (Geelong Region)

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• First major offsite project

• Support for the gpac:ed program

• Experience delivering multiple complex projects

• Enhanced quality and variety of activities in the program

• Opportunity to reinforce vision of a vibrant, creative city Benefits for the business • Positive media attention • Cross marketing with a reputable city-based cultural organisation • City-wide interest with new customers introduced to the area Outcomes for the community • New, engaging and enriching experiences for the community • Alternative, non-commercial reasons to visit Sunnybank • Increased local spending by converting audiences to customers

A partnership between the Bendigo Community Banks in the Geelong Region and the Geelong Performing Arts Centre (GPAC) was born out of a need for both partners to reach further into their shared communities. The result has been an expansion of the gpac:ed creative education program which now inspires young minds across the region. GPAC has been providing educational programs since it opened in 1981. With the support of its partner, Bendigo Community Banks, it has been able to grow the gpac:ed program and reach a bigger range of schools. Over 9000 students and more than 80 schools from the wider Geelong region currently attend educational activities at GPAC. In the past, Bendigo Bank was part of the GPAC community as the naming rights sponsor of their Family Magic program. In 2009, the Geelong region’s Community Banks joined the partnership as education program sponsors for an initial three-year term. They have since reconfirmed their commitment with a further three-year agreement.

Bendigo Community Banks’ support for gpac:ed enables GPAC to provide high quality, low or no cost programs for students of all ages across the region, including students with disabilities, students from nonEnglish speaking backgrounds and students from areas considered disadvantaged. Community banks often support local organisations, but through this program they are enabling young people in their communities to enjoy the same opportunities as their peers in a major city. The partnership also allows GPAC to build its profile among teachers who may be considering similar services in Melbourne.

• Increased profile, reach and scope of gpac:ed Benefits for the business • Raised profile in target communities and across the region • Positive marketing and publicity opportunities • Directors and managers of banks invited to present awards to students Outcomes for the community • More schools and more students reached across the region • Through gpac:ed, students gain skills for life

There is considerable evidence supporting the power of performing arts to build confidence, improve learning and contribute to positive mental health in young people. Through this partnership, the Geelong Performing Arts Centre and Bendigo Community Banks have been able to demonstrate their commitment to their communities by providing opportunities to high quality performing arts and education.

Image credit: Primary school students with Poppykettle drums at the Poppykettle Festival. Photo: Ferne Millen.

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Toyota Community Award

Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) & Popperbox/Symple Creative and The Lot & SBS

Winner

Toyota Community Award

Winner

New South Wales

Junction Arts Festival and Effective Naturally

Tasmania

Facilitating storytelling is a major aspect of ICE’s everyday work and One Day in Cabramatta allowed us to work with the Vietnamese community to encourage them to share their thoughts and feelings about Cabramatta. This was a richly rewarding project to partner on.

Junction Arts Festival is a brand activation playground offering opportunities for business and the clients we have introduced to this festival to interact with their audiences in ways they’ve never been able to before. Rick Marton, Effective Naturally

Lisa Torrance, Executive Director, ICE

A unique storytelling project has been created through a partnership between national broadcaster, SBS, Western Sydney arts organisation, Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE) and arts collectives Popperbox/ Symple Creative and The Lot. The project was designed to facilitate discussion in Cabramatta around issues raised by the SBS documentary series, Once Upon a Time in Cabramatta. Local community members were asked to share their experiences of Cabramatta through the One Day in Cabramatta Mobile Story Exchange, a custom-built roving tea cart. Community members received a cup of chilled chrysanthemum tea in exchange for story cards that were then compiled to form a commemorative book. The book was later handed back as a time capsule for future generations to better understand the journey that shaped their suburb. All four partners embraced this opportunity to build on the popular documentary. The multicultural focus and core values of SBS and ICE led them to explore what could happen if they pooled their resources to create

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

a community engagement project. SBS initiated the conversations with ICE which, in turn, engaged local artist collectives The Lot and Popperbox/Symple Creative. The Lot drew from an experience in architecture to create the mobile exchange tea cart and Popperbox/ Symple Creative worked on design elements and the 230 page commemorative book. Both collectives benefitted from connecting with the communities and working with SBS and ICE has opened up several future opportunities. Through this unique collaboration, SBS has been able to build even deeper connections with the communities that inspire their documentaries. At the same time, ICE was able to connect the cultural life of Western Sydney with people beyond its boundaries as well as offer traineeships with SBS to their staff.

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• ICE staff granted SBS traineeships

• Support and consultation

• Relationship building with the community in Western Sydney

• A growing network of supporters

• Brand exposure, especially through social media Benefits for the business • Engagement with the Cabramatta communities • Stories collected for multiplatform storytelling Outcomes for the community • A greater sense of identity and belonging • Empowerment through storytelling • A ‘time capsule’ containing the people of Cabramatta’s stories

Working together, the partners proved the power of storytelling for bringing communities together. For all partners, the evidence of the project’s success lies in the breadth of stories collected in the One Day Commemorative Book.

Image credit: Mum and daughter with Mobile Story Exchange by Mike Chin. Photo: Mike Chin.

• Ongoing access to short run print facilities Junction Arts Festival (JAF) is an annual multi-arts event in Launceston that encourages collaboration and participation. The partnership facilitation, financial and in-kind support provided by brand engagement specialists, Effective Naturally has helped to expand the Festival and showcase community involvement.

Working in collaboration with JAF, he identified potential strategic partners that would benefit by aligning their brand with JAF. Proposals were then distributed which outlined the benefits to potential partners from both a social and economic viewpoint. This was also an opportunity to introduce Effective Naturally and JAF to a new audience.

JAF features five days and nights of interactive and ambitious contemporary art, with a focus on works that invite audiences to become active participants and collaborators. The Festival aims to help the community be the best it can be, while Effective Naturally seeks to do the same for individuals and business. As such, these two partners are a natural fit.

Effective Naturally facilitated partnerships with a significant number of organisations, resulting in an expanded and improved offering for the Festival. From 47 events in 2010, the inaugural JAF, 60 events were offered in 2011, 57 of which were free.

Both partners felt it was important that the Festival offered a broad range of events with free entry so that a large cross-section of the community could participate. In order to offer such a program, additional corporate support was required.

Together, Junction Arts Festival and Effective Naturally have created mutually beneficial business arts relationships throughout Tasmania. With this additional support, the Festival has evolved and with strategic brand exposure, the supporting businesses have shared in its success.

Benefits for the business • Logo inclusion on marketing material • Networking opportunities with Festival partners • Free tickets, invitations to VIP events Outcomes for the community • An expanded interactive Festival with more free events • Engagement of arts and a broad range of businesses strengthening their community connection

Tasked with leveraging networks and developing the growth of the Festival as a whole, Effective Naturally’s Rick Marton was engaged as JAF’s Corporate Partnerships Manager to develop strategic partnerships.

Image credit: 2011 Project by Search Party, Search Party on Day 1. Photo: Kate Kirby.

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AbaF Partnering Award

AbaF Partnering Award

Winner

Art Gallery of South Australia and Santos

National and South Australia Santos’ business in remote parts of Australia has made it an important contributor to the communities where it works over many years and through our partnership and in particular the Desert Country exhibition, it is adding to the broader community’s understanding and appreciation of the stunning art of remote Australia.

For partnerships between businesses employing 200 or more people (globally) and arts and cultural organisations.

Nick Mitzevich, Director, Art Gallery of South Australia

Business partnerships with the arts are about more than monetary value; making the right connections brings benefits for all kinds of businesses and cultural organisations. The arts profit from access to the resources that business can provide to support their growth and sustainability and the businesses value partnerships that are creative and deliver on their corporate objectives. AbaF is proud to acknowledge and showcase successful partnerships that demonstrate a strategic alignment and mutually beneficial outcomes.

Benefits for the arts organisation • Financial resources to increase exposure of its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection The Desert Country exhibition is the pinnacle of a significant five year partnership (2009–2013) between Santos and the Art Gallery of South Australia. Behind the many achievements of this long-lasting relationship is the objective to bring benefits to Indigenous people and the broader community.

For the exhibition opening, the Gallery created a deeper experience than the typical private viewing with traditional cultural performances by Kaurna people, local Indigenous hip hop bands and DJs, children’s activities, bush tucker and curator’s tours. Twenty artists and their families from remote communities were present.

The partnership between Santos and the Gallery has evolved through an understanding of each other’s needs. For Santos, one of the country’s largest gas producers, this is to pay tribute to the regional landscape and to demonstrate its growing commitment to Indigenous communities. For the Gallery, it is to develop its Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection. Under a new agreement, Santos is now principal partner of the Gallery’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection.

This partnership has created a valuable legacy. With Santos’ support, the Gallery was not only able to tour Desert Country to almost 40,000 people, it has been able to continue to build its culturally rich collection. At the same time, Santos has been able to demonstrate its commitment to Indigenous people and communities in a meaningful way.

The collaboration has supported the successful Desert Country exhibition and national tour, the appointment and travel fellowship for a curator of Indigenous art, four high-quality publications, tour promotion, the acquisition of a significant work and substantial expansion of the Gallery’s online collection.

The Santos and Art Gallery of South Australia partnership continues to be a positive alignment of energy and interests that has delivered tangible benefits to the partners and the community.

Image credit: Partnership Desert Country. Photo: Art Gallery of South Australia.

• Alignment with an ASX Top 20 company, enhancing its credentials to
 potential sponsors • Appointment of an Indigenous curator and funding artists’ travel to and from remote communities, bringing curatorial authenticity and engagement with 54 Aboriginal groups Benefits for the business • Added cultural credibility in business negotiations with Indigenous communities • Significant exposure to a culturally respectful brand • Enhanced reputation with stakeholders and staff by bringing a high quality cultural event to communities where Santos operates How they made it work • The principal partner role of the Gallery’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collection is based on a five-year funding arrangement for 2009–2013 • Santos’ Manager Community and Corporate Responsibility and the Gallery’s Manager Development are the lead relationship custodians, with interaction between the partners also occurring at CEO, senior executive and employee levels

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AbaF Partnering Award

Poetry In Action and Gadens Lawyers

Winner

AbaF Partnering Award

Winner

New South Wales

Melbourne Recital Centre and Audi Australia

Victoria

The Gadens and PIA partnership has been, and continues to be, a great adventure for Poetry In Action. While we’ve certainly been supported, we’ve also been pushed artistically in ways that would simply not be possible without this kind of engagement.

Through our partnership with Melbourne Recital Centre, Audi has been able to thank Victorians for their support, by enabling this excellent institution to provide the very best musical program for the community to experience. Audi representative

Bryce Youngman, Artistic Director, Poetry In Action

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Opportunity to become a larger presence in business

• Support for increased selfpresented programs and educational programs

• Ability to invest in new projects both in and out of education The pairing of one of Australia’s leading law firms and a small not-forprofit theatre in education organisation may seem unusual. However this is a partnership born out of a shared passion for language and it has proven to be a resounding success. The partnership began at an AbaF Awards ceremony where Bryce Youngman from Poetry In Action (PIA) was seated next to Campbell Hudson, a partner at Gadens Lawyers. The actor/poet and lawyer found they shared an appreciation for the importance of language in the workplace. Following this encounter, Campbell invited Bryce to consider how it might be possible to fuel a passion for language within the Gadens’ office. After much discussion, PIA proposed Hero’s Journey. This was a bespoke, 22-week program that would involve 75 Gadens’ staff taking part in 10 poetry classes and a series of workplace activities and installations.

but in busy professionals. With open communication and a shared willingness to try something new, the Hero’s Journey began. The key objectives of the partnership for Gadens included stimulating the use of concise and compelling language among staff, supporting emerging talent and discovering bold and creative solutions to workplace challenges. Those objectives were well and truly met, engaging staff and inspiring a more creative place to work. The partnership also greatly benefited PIA by opening up the possibilities of pursuing its mission out of theatre in education into the professional world. Indeed, due to the success of the Hero’s Journey, Poetry In Action is implementing two new programs for Gadens Lawyers in 2012 as the partnership continues.

AbaF Gold Book 2012

Benefits for the business • Staff encouraged to use and enjoy expressive, compelling language • Factor to encourage staff retention in a workplace of choice • Continued and deepened engagement with the arts community How they made it work • A high level of engagement and attention to detail in both the management of the program and the partnership • Frequent management sessions to discuss the program, the partnership and the impact on the staff involved • A professional undertaking with both parties entering into a contractual agreement.

As a pilot program, it was risky. Gadens was investing significant resources in a program that had never been run. PIA had the challenge of trying to instil their passion for language not in high school students

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• Increased promotion and networking opportunities

Image credit: Team Gadens. Photo: Bryce Youngman.

Audi Australia is the principal partner of Melbourne Recital Centre (MRC). This collaborative partnership was established in 2009 with the opening of MRC and is now in its fourth year of delivering business benefits to both organisations as well as positive outcomes for the wider Victorian community. As a German business, Audi enjoys this partnership as it reinforces its position as a progressive, sophisticated, lifestyle brand that is deeply embedded in and committed to enriching the cultural fabric of the Australian community. For MRC, Audi’s principal partnership has been seminal to fulfilling its potential as one of Australia’s best places to hear great music. The partnership shares a principle of active engagement of its stakeholders, which has resulted in exclusive meet-the-artist events and behind-the-scenes talks for Audi dealers and their customers. Just as MRC has facilitated networking opportunities between Audi and its other corporate partners, Audi client events have helped build new audiences for MRC.

Knowledge sharing and capacity building have been integral to the relationship as both brands have gone about establishing themselves in Victoria. A specific impact of the partnership for Audi has been successfully building brand recognition with MRC audiences. Audi dealers have reported that access to MRC via the partnership enables them to provide a better experience for their customers. For MRC, the sustained investment represented by Audi’s principal partnership has enabled it to build a viable business model and fully leverage marketing and audience development opportunities. This in turn has greatly benefitted the Victorian community and the Australian music sector. Specifically, Audi’s support has enabled MRC to substantially increase self-presented and educational programs. Audi and the MRC share brand values of technical excellence brought to life with vigour, quality and passion. Their partnership has taken that alignment and imaginative leveraging to maximise benefits for each partner and for the Australian music sector.

Image credit: Audi 2010 National Dealers Conference at Melbourne Recital Centre. Photo: Andrew Hobbs.

• Increased awareness of MRC among Audi customers • Staff engagement including invitations to other Audi corporate events Benefits for the business • Reinforced core brand values in the Victorian market • Principal partnership rights and naming rights to the Audi foyer, signage, advertising and logo recognition on collateral How they made it work • Organisation-wide engagement has demonstrated the value placed on the partnership by each partner and the shared commitment to maximising benefits • Quarterly meetings establish and monitor progress on objectives • A work-in-progress grid enables day-to-day monitoring of partnership activations and is facilitated by monthly conference calls

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AbaF Partnering Award

West Australian Symphony Orchestra and Chevron Australia

Winner

AbaF Partnering Award

Winner

Western Australia

Ten Days on the Island and Southern Cross

Tasmania The professionalism which the Ten Days staff applies to all aspects of our partnership ensures that I can easily pick up the phone with ideas or suggestions that will improve the delivery of our partnership.

Supporting culture and the arts in Western Australia is aligned with our commitment to contribute to the liveability of the communities in which we operate. We are proud to be able to give back to the Western Australian community through our partnership with the West Australian Symphony Orchestra.

Craig Davies, Regional General Manager, Tasmania & Northern Territory, Southern Cross Austereo

Roy Krzywosinski, Managing Director, Chevron Australia

Chevron Australia is one of the world’s leading integrated energy companies and is currently developing the Gorgon and Wheatstone natural gas projects in the Pilbara. As the state’s largest performing arts organisation, the West Australian Symphony Orchestra (WASO) reaches the community through concerts, touring, education programs and other initiatives. Together these two organisations have delivered on social investment, audience engagement and education. Chevron initially partnered with WASO in 2005 as their Composer in Residence Community Development Partner. The partnership grew to support the Orchestra’s Community Development program and its Symphony of Smiles series before Chevron’s contribution increased again to support the Master Series from 2009 to 2010. With WASO’s growing commitment to communities across Western Australia, the partners recognised they had a shared vision. This led to Chevron’s sponsorship of the WASO on the Road metro tour and WASO on the Road Pilbara tour. Both Chevron and WASO believe that programs such as these are integral to the sustainable growth of the arts

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

across the state. It is their shared commitment to develop capability in communities through education and access to the arts that has made the partnership such a success. The Chevron-WASO partnership supports both the flagship concert series and grassroots programs that benefit communities, in particular disadvantaged youth. The WASO on the Road program takes small ensembles to visit schools and with Chevron’s support the program toured the Pilbara towns of Karratha, Roebourne and Onslow. This tour also brought the talents of the Orchestra to students with limited access to music education in Perth. WASO’s experience in delivering music education provides the perfect channel for Chevron to achieve its social investment goals. Audience engagement with both performances and education has demonstrated the success of the partnership and there is a strong commitment to the future development of programs throughout the Pilbara and beyond.

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Education, community activities and tour expenses covered

• Delivery of the festival program to a broader community

• Increased capability to deliver programs in regional areas and to engage with communities

• Five times the value of the advertising spend

• In 2011, 21,887 people were exposed to outstanding classical performances, world artists and new music through the Master Series Benefits for the business • Improved long-term wellbeing of residents in Chevron’s areas of operation • Recognition and acknowledgement in all sponsored programs and regional media • Tickets for key stakeholder engagement How they made it work • Clear plans, timelines and monthly progress meetings as well as midyear and end of year reports • A clear dialogue that fosters trust and openness • Evaluation through feedback surveys

Image credit: WASO on the road in Pilbara: Roebourne DHS Artists; Prue Ashurst (Education Manager), Rebecca White (Violin), Cerys Tooby (Violin), Nik Babic (Viola), Oliver McAslan (Cello). Photo: Claire Stokes

Southern Cross is a television network committed to delivering engaging and relevant programming across Tasmania. Ten Days on the Island is a multi arts festival that takes place every two years across the entire state. Since the first festival in 2001, a relationship between the two organisations has evolved to a mutually beneficial and strategic partnership that delivers on each other’s corporate objectives. The relationship began as a media partnership with Southern Cross delivering non-exclusive media services on behalf of Ten Days at a rate negotiated below market value. That arrangement continued until 2009 when the partners explored a larger corporate partnership, after which a new era began with Southern Cross signing as a full corporate partner of Ten Days. A common objective of this partnership has been to enhance the festival profile state wide and ultimately increase access to events across Tasmania. This has been achieved through television advertisements and campaigns across multiple platforms.

One of the significant characteristics of this partnership has been growth and the impact of that growth extending this partnership beyond a commercial agreement to include state wide programming, improved community awareness and the promotion of arts and cultural activities. Another reason the partnership has been such a success is a consideration of how each partner works within their own business. Each acknowledges the opportunities the other has to bring to the partnership and how these can add value and develop the scope of the partnership. At the successful conclusion of the 2011 festival, the 2013 partnership was entered into without hesitation. Ten Days on the Island and Southern Cross continue to ensure the partnership brings benefits to each other and as a result they continue to deliver even greater benefits to the entire Tasmanian community.

Image credit: Dinosaur Petting Zoo, Erth Visual and Physical Inc. Photo: Al Bett.

• Strategic business and stakeholder introductions with opportunities for new business and partnerships Benefits for the business • VIP tickets and invitations to key events • Branding and marketing benefits • Raised market share and profile How they made it work • The partnership is delivered within the framework of a preagreement MOU highlighting the core objectives and values that both parties are working towards • Regular communication focuses on the partnership’s progress as well as new opportunities that may be presented • The structured, yet fluid, working agreement ensures both partners are able to share and drive the achievement of objectives defined in the MOU

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AbaF Partnering Award

Winner

Queensland Music Industry Network and Virgin Australia

Queensland

City of Melbourne SME Award

Ours is a brand that has a long and historic association with music. It has been a pleasure to work (with QMusic) to develop a solution that will deliver real tangible benefits to Australian artists on a daily basis.

For partnerships between businesses employing fewer than 200 people (globally) and arts and cultural organisations.

Richard Tanner, Group Executive - People, Virgin Australia Benefits for the arts organisation • Greater capacity to grow the BIGSOUND event, through support, flights and marketing opportunities All year round, Melburnians and visitors can enjoy arts, film and festivals – a lively calendar of performances, installations and exhibitions and stimulating public art.

• Establishing the Virgin Australia National Music Industry Partnership to achieve outcomes for the entire national music industry Both the Queensland Music Industry Network (QMusic) and Virgin Australia share a commitment to servicing and supporting the growth of Australia’s contemporary music industry.

to touring artists with a special excess baggage offering so musicians are able to plan tours around Australia that are more profitable and financially sustainable.

Virgin Australia has recently undertaken a rebrand and has re-focused on becoming a full-service airline, committed to meeting the needs of its customers including the music industry. To that end they have continued their partnership with QMusic, a not-forprofit organisation that promotes the artistic value, cultural worth and commercial potential of music from around the state.

Another side to the partnership is Virgin’s investment in a compilation CD of contemporary Indigenous artists called HOME. As well giving support, Virgin stages a launch event during BIGSOUND for the album, promotes the release to staff members and guests and has developed an inflight Indigenous music channel featuring the compilation’s artists.

Initially this partnership was focused on a traditional sponsorship model where Virgin Australia provided QMusic with a package of free flights for their key industry event, BIGSOUND. Over four years the partnership has evolved and grown significantly with more shared objectives being delivered across a range of platforms. As well as expanding their financial and in-kind support (through flights) of BIGSOUND, QMusic and Virgin have implemented initiatives to assist contemporary musicians. One example is Virgin providing assistance

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

This supports Virgin’s commitment to its Aboriginal Employment Strategy and cultural awareness strategies within the organisation; for QMusic the project means bringing Indigenous artists to wider audiences. Thanks to this partnership with Virgin, QMusic has been able to grow its operational capacity and ability to deliver significant projects. In return, Virgin has been able to use QMusic’s skills and networks to strengthen ties with the music industry. More broadly, the partnership continues to make a positive impact on the Australian music community.

• Support, promotion and distribution of the compilation album HOME, showcasing over 40 Indigenous artists and exposure through an inflight Indigenous music channel

The City of Melbourne is proud to foster an environment in which the arts and business can flourish. Annually our arts and culture budget supports a wide range of arts grants programs and arts related activities.

Benefits for the business

The mutual benefits of arts and business partnerships enables arts organisations to better address important issues – these include leadership models for business planning, examining sustainability practices, as well as improving their marketing and communication skills.

• As a direct result of this partnership, Virgin Australia is acknowledged as the ‘preferred airline’ for almost 20 music industry bodies • A better understanding of, and connection with the music industry • Demonstration of Virgin Australia’s Aboriginal Employment strategy and cultural awareness initiatives for staff

The City of Melbourne is supporting AbaF to host their national Awards in 2012 to promote the collaboration of arts organisations and businesses around Australia. The City of Melbourne acknowledges and encourages the creative contribution that these partnerships harness and in particular the value of the City of Melbourne SME Award.

How they made it work • This partnership has been set up with room to evolve. While the commitment and underlying principles remain solid, strategies to build that partnership are responsive to the needs of both partners • QMusic’s principal role focuses on project delivery and leadership within the Music Industry Taskforce • An ongoing meeting schedule allows for discussion of ways in which Virgin Australia can support contemporary music

Image credit: Sue-Ray at the BIGSOUND 2011 launch of the HOME 3 compilation. Photo: Elleni Toumpas

Image Credit:


City of Melbourne SME Award

Winner

City of Melbourne SME Award

Winner

Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and Ports North

National and Queensland

The HELIX Project and HARTAC Sales and Distribution

Western Australia

The relationship forged between CIAF and Ports North has given people living in regional Far North Queensland the opportunity to access a world-class art and cultural event and embrace the rich and vibrant art and culture from Indigenous Queensland artists.

When opening night came, I have to say I was overwhelmed by the beauty of it all. I was more than a little teary. I attended every performance, bringing HARTAC clients, staff, family and friends. And when, each night, I saw people stand and applaud, along with all the rave reviews, I really felt so enormously proud that HARTAC had contributed to making something very special happen.

Alison Copley, General Manager, CIAF

Rhoda Harris, Co-Director, HARTAC

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• A venue for the Art Fair

• Support to stage The HELIX Project

• Support for opening party

• Large format posters, programs and presentation folders

• Exposure to Ports North business networks The successful partnership between the Cairns Indigenous Art Fair (CIAF) and Ports North has enabled the Art Fair to move into the prestigious Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal. This has helped to cement CIAF’s place as one of the country’s leading Indigenous art fairs with increased attendance and wide-ranging benefits for the partners, the regional community and Indigenous artists. Ports North is a Queensland Government owned corporation that has been undertaking a waterfront revitalisation project since 2004 to transform the Cairns waterfront area with attractive open spaces and public art. CIAF is a three-day event that works to build a stronger and more sustainable Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander arts industry in Queensland. In 2008 Arts Queensland approached Ports North to be part of a steering committee for the inaugural CIAF. At the core of this partnership has been the desire to support Indigenous communities in which a number of Ports North regional ports are based.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

A formal partnership commenced between CIAF and Ports North in 2010 and in 2011 Ports North became the official venue partner, offering generous support with in-kind venues so the event could move to the Cairns Cruise Liner Terminal. Ports North also assisted CIAF’s public events as coprincipal partner of the opening party. Thanks in part to Ports North providing a prestigious waterfront venue in a central location, attendance for CIAF increased by 24 per cent to 13,000 in 2011. Ports North and CIAF came together through a common interest – an appreciation of Indigenous art and the desire to make it accessible to the public. Their commitment has extended to a two-year partnership for 2012-2013. Together they have lifted each other’s profiles while at the same time delivering cultural and economic benefits to the community.

• Knowledge sharing to plan the event Benefits for the business • An improved waterfront area and showcasing the Terminal as a venue • Better understanding of Indigenous cultures • VIP events for staff to attend • Demonstration of commitment to the community

• Graphic design HARTAC is a family-owned business employing 36 people. It is dedicated to providing safety signage and other safety products, primarily to the WA resources sector. The co-founder and co-director of HARTAC, Rhoda Harris, has always been a great admirer of Helpmann Award-winning dancer Daryl Brandwood, having seen him dance with the Western Australian Ballet. When Rhoda heard about The HELIX Project, a new solo dance work for Brandwood, she decided it was the perfect opportunity for HARTAC’s entry into the world of arts support.

How they made it work • A contract with clear objectives and responsibilities • Interaction between the partners at CEO, senior executive and employee levels throughout the year • An open, organic relationship based on goodwill to ensure CIAF is successful

Image credit: 10 metre crocodile made in the Ghost Nets Australia workshop by traditional Aurukun weavers and CIAF visitors. Photo: Kerry Trapnell.

When the Project went into full production, HARTAC was able to provide additional services beyond its original financial investment. These included printing very large format, high-resolution display posters and providing graphic design for the souvenir program. HARTAC’s contribution as a first-time arts partner meant The HELIX Project also benefitted from support from the WA Premier’s Arts Partnership Fund. The partnership has evolved and continued beyond the premiere of The HELIX Project with HARTAC supporting marketing efforts for potential national and international presenters.

The key principles underlying the partnership are a shared commitment to creating products of excellence, an understanding that true collaboration is based on a vision with mutual benefits and an acknowledgment that success stems from having a talented team of contributors. These principles have driven the partnership and delivered both tangible and intangible benefits to both partners. The partnership has allowed HARTAC to lift its profile within its target demographic, the key players in the resource sector in WA who have a strong alignment with the arts. For The HELIX Project, the support of HARTAC proved that attracting partners from non-traditional sources provides benefits beyond those of more traditional sources such as funding bodies. This partnership ultimately meant that The HELIX Project could produce its acclaimed, award-winning season and look ahead to more successful performances.

Image credit: Daryl Brandwood in underwater film sequence for HELIX. Photo: Ian Batt (cinematographer).

Benefits for the business • Positive media coverage • Opportunity to demonstrate printing and design capabilities • Increased corporate and community profile • Pride in the partnership from all staff members How they made it work • As HARTAC is a family-owned business without board members or shareholders, decisions could be made immediately • A direct relationship between the partners meant needs and opportunities could be addressed very quickly. This was especially important leading up to opening night

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City of Melbourne SME Award

Arts Project Australia and Leonard Joel

A first-time partnership has delivered financial and in-kind support for the work of Arts Project Australia, at the same time as it has engaged the staff and clientele of Leonard Joel. Both partners are part of the Victorian art world. Arts Project Australia supports artists with an intellectual disability, promoting their work and advocating for their inclusion in contemporary art practice, while Leonard Joel provides auction management services with a focus on art. A recent business overhaul at Leonard Joel included a focus on developing meaningful alignments with community partners. Upon discovering this, Arts Project invited key Leonard Joel staff for a visit and a partnership began to develop. Arts Project Australia was seeking a partner to help produce an individual artist catalogue each year for 4 years to accompany a series of planned retrospective exhibitions of work by established Arts Project artists. Leonard Joel was able to successfully arrange for the publication of Viewfinder, a comprehensive survey of the work of artist Alan Constable over 20 years in the Arts Project studio.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

Leonard Joel also hosted the Outisder Art Fundraising Auction for Arts Project Australia, the largest fundraising event in the history of Arts Project. They also worked closely together to secure high quality contemporary artworks through galleries, collectors and personal contacts. The fundraising event provided publicity opportunities and Arts Project and Leonard Joel have also promoted each other and the partnership in their e-news and other communications. For Leonard Joel, this has been a positive step into engagement with the community. At the same time, Arts Project enjoys being part of a true partnership, rather than simply the recipient of a charitable gift. This partnership between Arts Project and Leonard Joel has been a close one and with a four-year horizon, there is a promising future ahead for both partners.

Winner

City of Melbourne SME Award

Winner

Victoria

IHOS Music Theatre & Opera and Liminal Spaces

Tasmania

When I began at Leonard Joel in the role of valuations and assistant to the Managing Director I would never have imagined that I’d be involved in a community project of such importance. Playing my part in bringing the Leonard Joel Series catalogue for Arts Project Australia together and coordinating the Leonard Joel side of the fundraising event has not just been fun, it has been immensely rewarding.

The relationship between IHOS and Liminal Spaces commenced on the basis of a shared creative vision, underpinned by an enthusiasm to contribute to Hobart’s status as a significant place on the national and international cultural map. This vision coupled with a desire to contribute to cultural experience through the sharing of knowledge and expertise has elevated IHOS and Liminal Spaces to a new creative space.

Monique Le Grand, Leonard Joel

IHOS

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• 1000 copies of Viewfinder and funds raised through its sale

• Professional design and implementation processes

• Support to print a catalogue every year for four years

• Access to new networks

• Staff development – Arts Project gallery staff spent time at Leonard Joel to learn about auction processes • Resources for the fundraising event – catering and space provided, artworks sourced and buyers fees waived by Leonard Joel Benefits for the business • New networking and promotional opportunities • Introduction to David Bromley led to Leonard Joel being given a large selection of Bromley artworks to auction • A partner with strong community credibility How they made it work • A formalised agreement in writing • Regular meetings to discuss the partnership and new ideas

Image credit: The auction crowd builds. Photo: Kerstine Elliott.

• Critical acclaim for productions IHOS is a performing arts company based in Tasmania with a reputation for creating original music-theatre and opera. Liminal Spaces is a small Hobart architecture practice that believes strongly in supporting the arts. So far they have collaborated on two successful productions for MONA FOMA (Museum of Old and New Art Festival of Music and Art) – Kimisis in 2009 and The Barbarians in 2012 – and are currently preparing a third opera for Ten Days on the Island in 2013.

The results have been successful designs that can be disassembled and transported easily, allowing the production to tour to other festivals. The designs by Liminal were not only beautiful and appropriate for the productions, they were also cost effective for IHOS’s purposes. An additional advantage was gained through Liminal’s networks with other businesses donating valuable resources and labour towards set construction.

The relationship between Liminal Spaces and IHOS began with a shared creative vision, underpinned by an enthusiasm to contribute to Hobart’s status as a significant cultural location. Liminal deeply valued the opportunity to contribute design hours, expertise in managing an evolving set design, refined project management, set fabrication skills and installation strategies.

The collaboration has led to critical acclaim for IHOS that has lifted the company’s profile to a new level. The profile of Liminal Spaces has also grown as a result of this partnership, with coverage in design magazines and recognition at the Australian Interior Design Awards.

Added to the complexity of staging opera were the constraints of constructing a demountable set to facilitate touring, so the partnership needed transparent communication, well documented project management and collaborative principles to succeed.

Benefits for the business • Increased profile • Media exposure • Added skills How they made it work • An initial three day workshop retreat • Monthly meetings to review budgets within the context of artistic vision • Efficient communication through documentation of outcomes and delegation of tasks

This highly creative partnership is based on open communication and creative challenges and is continuing with the third collaboration currently in development.

Image credit: The Barbarian, Mona Foma 2012, performed by Grace Ovens, Christos Linou, Nicholas Dinopoulos. Photo: Lucia Rossi.

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City of Melbourne SME Award

aMBUSH Gallery and The Galeries

Winner

City of Melbourne SME Award

Winner

New South Wales

Adelaide Youth Orchestra and Fisher Jeffries

South Australia

Lane Four has been a successful art project for The Galeries, which has allowed the centre to generate positive publicity and increase its presence within the art and design space. The project has also presented The Galeries with the opportunity to provide a platform for local and emerging artists to showcase their talent.

Until I attended an AdYO performance I had never seen an orchestra perform. I thoroughly enjoyed it and so did my husband. I am keen to go again! Jo-Anne Severin, Fisher Jeffries, staff member

Taryn McGurk, Marketing Manager, Ipoh Group (The Galeries is owned by Ipoh Pty Ltd)

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Dedicated marketing, promotions and media campaigns

• Increased, diverse audiences • Legal work including contracts and policies

• A satellite site in the CBD reaching broader audiences Lane Four is a new laneway public art project in the heart of Sydney’s CBD at The Galeries shopping centre. Produced and curated by aMBUSH Gallery, Lane Four launched in October 2011, attracting wide audiences to the work of established and emerging artists. The Galeries approached aMBUSH to develop an exhibition infrastructure for one of its spaces and to curate a program of art exhibitions. Both partners share a commitment to supporting the arts, to innovative cultural programming and to achieving commercial outcomes. With these goals in mind, The Galeries and aMBUSH combined their resources, including marketing, public relations and networks, to make the project work. aMBUSH provided a solution to the various heritage restrictions on The Galeries and transformed a static laneway into a gallery space. Lane Four, has encouraged visitation, generated positive publicity and reinforced The Galeries’ brand as a cultural and lifestyle destination.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

At the same time, aMBUSH has been able to provide a commercial platform for artists to reach a broader audience. The creation of Lane Four has enabled more artists to produce site-specific, commissioned public art on a commercial level.

• Increased profile and professional networks

As well as establishing Lane Four, aMBUSH has coordinated four exhibitions per year, curated through their strong connections within the art and design industry. So far they have successfully managed installations featuring high profile artists working across street art, design and photography.

• Solution to the heritage restriction associated with the building

Within a very short timeframe, Lane Four has managed to cement itself as a fresh and engaging public art project. The fact that the partnership is continuing past its initial lifespan is testament to the success of Lane Four and the strength of the relationship between The Galeries and aMBUSH.

Benefits for the business • Rich content through artist relationships

• New connections in the creative industries How they made it work • The Galeries manages the venue and marketing campaigns while aMBUSH curates each project and manages the artists. • Both partners work together to ensure the outcomes of each exhibition are on track to meet the requirements of the centre, its audience and the artists. • Regular goals are set and met and the partners adhere to a regular meeting schedule.

Image credit: Rainbow City Gaze by Anthony Lister. Photo: Enzo Amato.

The partnership between the commercial law firm Fisher Jeffries and the Adelaide Youth Orchestra (AdYO) was established in 2008. This harmonious partnership has evolved from the provision of one-off legal advice to a mutually valuable relationship. As AdYO’s legal partner, Fisher Jeffries provides advice for a wide range of legal issues. These have included preparing employment and sponsorship contracts, undertaking reviews of AdYO’s constitution, reviewing child-safe policies and providing advice regarding operational and governance issues. Both AdYO and Fisher Jeffries consider the arts to be a fundamental part of any vibrant community. Fisher Jeffries regularly promotes AdYO’s performances and staff members regularly attend concerts. As well as introducing new audiences to AdYO, Fisher Jeffries has opened doors in the arts and business community for the Orchestra. The partnership has also given AdYO the chance to network with Fisher Jeffries’ clients, which has increased fundraising opportunities.

Throughout the partnership, AdYO has been able to approach Fisher Jeffries for legal advice, whether the result is a five-minute phone call or hours spent on complex sponsorship agreements. These services have helped AdYO implement professional documents and processes that play a key day-to-day role in minimising the company’s risk and creating an effective and safe environment.

• Increased profile in the business and not-for-profit sectors Benefits for the business • Enhanced reputation as a good corporate citizen • Increased staff engagement • Opportunity to network with clients How they made it work

In return, Fisher Jeffries has benefitted from the opportunity to network, to engage with the community and to build upon its reputation as a good corporate citizen. Perhaps most importantly, however, Fisher Jeffries’ staff members have enjoyed being associated with a youth arts group and seeing such talented young and emerging artists reach their potential.

• The partnership is managed by Fisher Jeffries’ Senior Partner, Nicholas Linke and AdYO’s General Manager, Christopher Wainwright • The partnership is assessed on an annual basis to ensure key objectives are being met

Each year the AdYO performs to over 30,000 people with inspiring orchestral performances by South Australia’s most gifted young musicians. The success of AdYO is due in no small part to the successful relationship with Fisher Jeffries.

Image credit: AdYO 2012 season launch. Photo: David Cann.

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AbaF Regional Award

AbaF Regional Award

Winner

KULCHA Multicultural Arts of Western Australia and CITIC Pacific Mining

National and Western Australia The real value of the CITIC Pacific Mining and KULCHA partnership is that by celebrating Western Australia’s cultural diversity, we encourage greater social cohesion in the community. This creates a stronger economic environment and a socially prosperous society for all people and future generations.

For partnerships between businesses and arts and cultural organisations that provide people in regional and rural areas with access to high quality arts and culture.

Jon Cope, KULCHA General Manager

The AbaF Regional Award celebrates outstanding partnerships that provide Australians in rural and regional areas with access to quality arts and cultural activity. With one third of all Australians living in regional, rural and remote areas, the arts present great opportunities to engage and strengthen communities as participants and audience members. Success in regional arts programs is enhanced through partnership and this Award recognises the business-arts relationships that contribute to the strength of cultural life in regional areas.

Benefits for the arts organisation • A series of performances and workshops

In 2011, a partnership between CITIC Pacific Mining and KULCHA Multicultural Arts of Western Australia was launched to support multicultural community arts programs. KULCHA’s regional strategy had identified a demand for its services in Karratha, a key regional community with a diverse workforce at the epicentre of Australia’s resources industry. A major challenge in the Pilbara is the transient nature of the population due to impact of the FIFO workforce, 24-hour shift work schedules and short-term contracts which can create barriers to building a strong sense of community. KULCHA had been liaising with the Pilbara Multicultural Association (PMA), a group of multicultural families that had recently migrated to Karratha. Together they had been discussing ways in which the two organisations could work together to build community capacity through engaging, culturally inclusive projects.

to bring together the many African, European, Middle Eastern, Asian and South American cultures represented in the Karratha region. KULCHA coordinated the purchase of samba drums from Brazil and CITIC Pacific Mining transported them to Karratha where the PMA took responsibility for local transportation to workshops and performances. The activity was launched at Karratha’s FeNaClNG Festival in July 2011 with a weekend of instrument-making workshops for children and adults as well as vibrant samba parades. Since then the band has continued to grow, with further workshops and performances planned for the coming year. It is anticipated that the Pilbara Samba Band will flourish independently as a popular community activity well beyond the life of the partnership that made it possible.

• Flights, accommodation, travel, freight and launch events for KULCHA • Membership of the Pilbara Multicultural Association more than doubled Benefits for the business • An opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to enhancing the Western Australian community Outcomes for the region • Development of the social prosperity of Karratha and its surrounding communities • Greater inclusivity, respect, harmony and participation in the community • Stronger cultural appreciation in the region

Following consultation, KULCHA recommended creating the Pilbara Samba Band, a large-group multicultural arts activity that could accommodate the transient nature of the participants. It was designed to be a fun, energetic and engaging way

Image credit: Pilbara Samba Band FeNaClNG Festival Workshop shakers.

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AbaF Regional Award

Winner

AbaF Regional Award

Winner

Darwin Symphony Orchestra and ConocoPhillps

South Australia & Northern Territory

Lake Bolac Eel Festival and Deakin University

Victoria

A Rock Symphony for Everyone was the most accessible community event the Darwin Symphony Orchestra has ever staged in Darwin, with a winning formula of exciting programming and free entry. At one stage, it was just a few ideas floating around in meetings – our partnership with ConocoPhillips made this ambitious project a reality.

The partnership with Deakin University introduced both fresh ideas and different ways of seeing our small regional community. This exploration of place was beautifully reflected through stories and images of the community, which were developed for the Festival and will remain as part of the community’s cultural capital.

Guy Ross, General Manager Darwin Symphony Orchestra

The partnership between Darwin Symphony Orchestra (DSO) and ConocoPhillips (CoP) has developed steadily since it began in 2006, leading to increased audiences and increased involvement from each partner. In 2011 the relationship enjoyed its biggest success when the partners staged a free, largescale community event called A Rock Symphony for Everyone. At first glance, a volunteer community orchestra and a global energy company might seem an unlikely pair. However they share a strong commitment to inspiring and engaging with Northern Territory communities. CoP had been supporting the DSO’s annual concerts since 2006 and, after a particularly successful season in 2010, the partners could see the series’ potential to attract even greater crowds and engage new audiences. DSO proposed a bold concept – a rock symphony, featuring the orchestra as a rock band with electric violin and cello, popular songs arranged for the orchestra and even a choir of Harley-Davidsons. This concert would challenge preconceived ideas about orchestras and appeal to new audiences.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

The partners decided that the project’s impact could be extended if the concert was free. CoP doubled its contribution and DSO provided funds to supplement the cost of producing a free, large-scale community event. The memorable concert was held on the eve of the Darwin Cup weekend and was a huge success with approximately 4500 people attending – a significant increase on 2010’s figure of 1800. Families, friends and staff from both organisations enjoyed a night of quality entertainment that also contributed to a boost in profile and media exposure for the partners. A Rock Symphony for Everyone embraced the outdoor lifestyle particular to the region’s dry season and met the partnership’s objective of contributing to a sense of identity and belonging in the Top End.

Lake Bolac Eel Festival

Benefits for the cultural partners

Benefits for the cultural partners

• Support for a series of performances including A Rock Symphony for Everyone

• Documentation of the festival as well as workshops, photography and presentations by Deakin

• Musicians challenged by new music and non-orchestral instruments

• Festival poster design

• Morale boost from playing for a large audience including family and friends Benefits for the business • Increased exposure and profile • Networking opportunities among industry and government stakeholders • Employee engagement with many CoP staff members involved in the event preparation Outcomes for the region • A free concert, engaging a widecross section of the community • Greater inclusivity, respect, harmony and participation in the community • Stronger cultural appreciation in the region

The partnership between Lake Bolac Eel Festival and Deakin University has greatly enhanced this annual art and music festival, while enabling Deakin to expand its regional program. Deakin projects formed a significant part of the Festival program and contributed to the intellectual and cultural capital of the region. The Eel Festival uses music and art as drawcards to involve people in a range of cultural and environmental activities. Although the Festival is based in a small rural community, its influence has spread throughout the region and it has become known nationally for its focus on Indigenous and environmental issues. Deakin University is strengthening its commitment to connect with regional communities. In response to this, Deakin’s Centre for Memory, Imagination and Invention (CMII) approached the Eel Festival as part of their research and a creative partnership was formed to document and promote the 2012 Festival.

will remain as part of the community’s cultural capital and will be translated into place-based learning programs for the University. As a university with regional campuses, Deakin embraced the Festival’s commitment to providing a significant, inclusive, low-cost event that fosters reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities and promotes ecologically sustainable rural practice. Deakin CMII’s research theme, Flows and Catchment, led to Festival contributions that included workshops, documentaries and photography projects as well as poster design and Festival promotion. The exciting and creative ideas that the partners explored together have helped to strengthen the Festival’s outreach, influence and network. Both Deakin University and the Festival look forward to continuing this partnership to the benefit of both partners and the Lake Bolac region.

• Indigenous dancer Rheannan Port led dance workshops in five regional schools • Assistance with costs including travel and accommodation Benefits for the business • Researchers given privileged access to regional communities • Material for place-based learning programs that can be funded and trialed at Lake Bolac College • New student research projects Outcomes for the region • Greater inclusivity, respect, harmony and participation in the community • Engagement and communication between Indigenous owners, farmers, local and national experts, cultural figures and other stakeholders in the environmental sustainability debate

The partnership introduced fresh ideas and different ways of seeing this small regional community. Deakin’s exploration of ‘place’ was beautifully reflected through stories and images of the community. Their contribution

Image credit: Darwin Symphony Orchestra and Wade Finnegan Band. Photo: Eleanor Wilks.

Image credit: Volcano Dreaming, students from district schools participating in the dancing. Photo: Peter Taylor.

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AbaF Regional Award

Winner

Queensland Youth Orchestras and Peabody Energy

Queensland The visit from QYO wind symphony was just brilliant! My band has found another gear since they visited and are going from strength to strength. I think it was wonderful for them to interact and perform with such talented musicians. Judith Hodge, Music Coordinator, Mercy College Mackay

Benefits for the cultural partners • Opportunities for musicians to improve their skills through exposure to diverse performance and workshop situations The sounds of Queensland Youth Orchestras (QYO) are heard all across Queensland thanks to Peabody Energy’s support for the state’s major orchestra training and performance organisation. With the partnership now in its seventh year, the Peabody QYO Regional Concert Series allows top Queensland talent to delight audiences from Dalby to Moranbah.

located. A regional concert series was developed in 2010 that sees QYO students’ tour regional communities as well as performing and participating in workshops with local school students. The joint concerts have proven to be a huge success and have enriched regional music education for students, teachers and communities alike.

Both partners are impressive in size. Peabody Energy is the world’s largest private-sector coal company and QYO is a world-class orchestra organisation with up to 500 members in orchestras and ensembles. In 2006, QYO approached Peabody, initiating what has become an enduring partnership that promotes cultural enrichment and celebrates Queensland’s creative young people.

In 2011, school musicians from Mackay toured to Brisbane and performed alongside QYO’s wind symphony musicians in the Concerts at Twilight series. In 2012 the partnership continues to grow, with an international symphony orchestra tour to Singapore.

Initially for Peabody the partnership was about building and cementing ties with Queensland youth. As the partnership developed, Peabody and QYO began to engage with regional Queensland and with communities where Peabody’s mines were

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

From a modest beginning in 2006, the partnership has gone from strength to strength. As a result, through the Peabody Regional Concert Series and beyond, audiences have enjoyed accomplished performances of Queensland’s top musical talent. The two organisations look forward to continuing and further developing this relationship into the future.

• Capacity to tour locally and overseas Benefits for the business • Profile building and brand exposure to new, regional and corporate audiences • Enhancing the lifestyle in areas where Peabody operates • A demonstration of commitment to Queensland Outcomes for the region • Over 20,000 people attending QYO performances in 2011 • Entertainment and music education throughout regional communities • Long-lasting friendships as young musicians are billeted with families, enhancing their experience and understanding of regional communities

Image credit: QYO Musicians before a concert, Stephen Wimberger; French Horn, India Ghariss; Cello. Photo: Erika Fish.

AbaF Arts Access Award For arts and cultural organisations which have implemented projects or strategies to improve access for people with disability to their venues, programs and/ or services. Developed in collaboration with Arts Access Australia.

People with disability make up 20% of Australia’s population yet experience significantly lower levels of cultural participation when compared with other Australians. Through this Award, AbaF and Arts Access Australia are delighted to recognise those working to deliver accessible and inclusive programs and service for people with disability and encourage other organisations to work to this remit.


AbaF Arts Access Award

Winner

AbaF Arts Access Award

Winner

Adelaide Festival

National and South Australia

St Martins Youth Arts Centre

Victoria

This partnership illustrates the capacity and responsibility of arts organisations nationally to lead and implement access initiatives, cultivating inclusive approaches to programming and setting aspirational benchmarks for theatre-makers, presenters and producers.

St Martins is a friendly place to be because everyone there is very friendly. The Access Officer has helped me in a lot of ways to be included in the company. Thomas Banks, Catapult participant

Kate Gould, 2012 Chief Executive and Associate Artistic Director, Adelaide Festival

Outcomes for access

Outcomes for access

• Significant improvement in physical access to venues

• Inclusive projects and programs that lead to performances

• Wheelchairs for loan

• Promotion of a better understanding and the benefits of including young people of all abilities

• Auslan volunteers on site The Adelaide Festival’s Accessibility Initiative focuses on improving access for people with specific access requirements to performances, events, venues and services. In 2012, the organisation implemented a range of initiatives to ensure its events were inclusive of the broadest possible audience and in the process established an Australian benchmark for best practice.

Some of Adelaide Festival’s initiatives included regular access updates, large text programs, Auslan consultants, the inclusion of Auslan volunteers and wheelchairs. All Adelaide Writers’ Week sessions were broadcast on ABC Radio National so they could be enjoyed online by blind and vision impaired patrons or patrons with limited mobility.

Partnered by the Disability and Arts Transition Team (DATT), Adelaide Festival committed significant financial and human resources to deliver a comprehensive suite of access initiatives. A longer-term commitment to accessibility was developed and implemented by the Festival after a successful pilot program in 2010. In 2011 an Accessibility Coordinator was appointed to identify connections between presented works and patrons’ specific access needs.

The website, app and Auslan video content were all created in consultation with people with disabilities, carers and interpreters. The 2012 Festival program was available in multiple formats, including hard copy, interactive PDF, large print text only and audio formats.

Adelaide Festival worked extensively with access expert Gaelle Mellis from DATT to ensure ongoing consultation throughout planning and delivery. The Festival also invited other key people within leading access groups to act as advocates. Together they worked to improve access to programs, services and venues.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

• Large print and audio format programs

All of the improved access services have generated enthusiastic feedback from new and otherwise excluded audiences. Adelaide Festival is committed to further developing its leadership position as an arts organisation in identifying and facilitating the delivery of access and inclusion practices.

Image credit: Auslan interpreter at Writers Week. Photo: Shane Reid.

St Martins Youth Arts Theatre has built a creative environment that genuinely promotes the inclusion of children and young people with disabilities. The addition of an Access Officer has led to a comprehensive Disability Action Plan and a shift in core thinking behind new access initiatives. The initiatives the Access Officer has helped develop include offering one or two Auslan shows per season, consulting with the vision-impaired community and purchasing audio description equipment. Through its targeted programs and projects, St Martins is also building relationships with children with disabilities and their carers by creating meaningful and relevant performances.

There is a focus throughout St Martins on mentorship to help build the capacity of young adults with disabilities through consultation and ongoing support. St Martins employs people with disabilities in many ways, including advertising on websites used by people with disability and developing an access intern role. The Access Officer headhunts individuals with disabilities when vacancies come up and also sits on the interview panel.

• Staff training • St Martins funded and supported two young people with a disability to attend the Australia Council forum on engaging young audiences to speak about their experiences

Over the last two years, the vision of St Martins has undergone a dramatic shift. With the engagement of an Access Officer, the concept of an inclusive environment has been embraced and firmly embedded into the guiding philosophy, staff action, programs and projects of St Martins Youth Arts Centre.

The popular Catapult 18+ program has attracted young theatre makers, including a small group with a range of disabilities who are continually consulted in order to best support them. Another inclusive project has been Accidentally Ugly for which children aged 5 to 12 who are deaf or hearing impaired work alongside hearing children.

Image credit: Production of Lost Girl. Performer Samuel Rockman. Photo: Sarah Walker.

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AbaF Arts Access Award

Winner

AbaF Arts Access Award

Winner

Riverside Theatre

New South Wales

Kickstart Arts

Tasmania

Being part of Beyond the Square’s ruckus ensemble means everything to (my son) Gerard as he loves acting so much and he is most happy when he gets to perform and make others laugh.

Social inclusion is our raison d’etre! We make art with people from all over Tasmania to build bridges of understanding across the community. We believe this will help to make the world a kinder and more creative place.

Beyond the Square is essential for people with a disability to gain access to a creative outlet. They richly deserve this as does anyone else. They touch people’s hearts with their endearing performances and remind us all about the power of inclusive and creative pursuits.

Jami Bladel, Artistic Director, Kickstart Arts

Ann O’Dwyer, mother of ensemble member, Gerard

Outcomes for access • Employment of a Creative Director to guide access programs

Beyond the Square is Riverside Theatre’s inclusive arts program for people with disabilities. The program creatively explores ideas, embraces difference and challenges preconceptions through workshops, performances and events. Riverside Theatre is the only mainstream theatre company in Australia to have both an extensive creative arts program for people with disabilities and a Creative Director assigned to the development of this program. Riverside’s Workshops in the Arts for People with a Disability (WAPD) program had been running successfully for 15 years. It serves the need for creative outlets, social interaction, self-expression and confidence building for people with a disability across Western Sydney through weekly drama workshops. As the program has grown, a need was identified for someone to give the program direction and a new level of sophistication. Riverside and Alison Richardson (from Accessible Arts) successfully applied for a Strategic Industries grant from ArtsNSW. This, coupled with funding from Parramatta Council, enabled Alison to work as a Creative Director alongside Gerard

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

O’Dwyer, a young, talented person with a disability, to further develop the WAPD program.

Outcomes for access

In 2011 the new rebranded program, Beyond the Square, was realised. Currently in its second year it is already creating increased performing and visual arts opportunities for people with disabilities.

• Workshop programs that encourage participation in the arts for people with disabilities

Beyond the Square encourages the development of performers, filmmakers and artists through an extensive workshop program. The program has a renewed focus on developing a sense of community through performances such as Beyond ABBA (engaging over 60 people with moderate to high intellectual needs), social functions and fundraisers.

• Performances and fundraisers to further develop programs

• Employment of a Creative Director to guide access programs

• Employment of people with disabilities to work directly with Beyond The Square

• Hearing loops, wheelchair accessible performance spaces and dedicated parking spaces at venues

Through performances, programs and employment opportunities, Riverside Theatre’s commitment to access continues to go beyond compliance, enabling everyone to reach their full potential in the arts world.

Image credit: Film making workshops, Les Powell School Blue Grotto Project. Photo: Alison Richardson.

Kickstart Arts is enjoying its 20th year as a successful contemporary community arts production company with a focus on social inclusion. It is a place where people with disabilities can feel safe to explore and develop their creative potential by participating in social and cultural activities. Three program areas highlight Kickstart Arts’ recent achievements in the area of disability access and social inclusion. The first program, Kickstart’s partnership with Headway, began in 2009. Together they have produced three contemporary art projects that have engaged people with acquired brain injury. The artworks have not only been emotionally challenging, they have also successfully raised awareness of acquired brain injury in the community. Kickstart’s second program, The Happiness Project, is an outreach arts space that provides access to contemporary arts and cultural experiences for people with disabilities in regional Tasmania. The project also exists online, the most accessible space, through the creation of linked interactive digital artworks.

The third program area is the Teaching Artist in Residence Program (TARP), which is linked to the Kickstart Arts Centre, a thriving hub for socially inclusive community arts and cultural development programs. TARP was the first initiative to engage people with disabilities at Kickstart. Selected professional artists provide arts workshops for community participants through an in-studio teaching program across exciting visual, digital and performing arts.

• Workshop programs that encourage participation in the arts for people with disabilities • Employment of people with disabilities to work directly with Beyond The Square • Performances and fundraisers to further develop programs • Hearing loops, wheelchair accessible performance spaces and dedicated parking spaces at venues

The work Kickstart Arts does in advocating for improved access to cultural experiences, both as consumers and creators of arts for people with disabilities, is central to the organisation’s ethos. Through its Disability Action Plan and policies, they have provided for the needs of people with disabilities in all of its programs and projects. As a result, Kickstart Arts projects continue to challenge stereotypes and help build bridges of better understanding across the community.

Image credit: Craig “Esky” Escott with his artworks. Photo: Lucia Rossi.

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AbaF Arts Access Award

Winner

Contact Inc

Queensland

AbaF Giving Award

There was great energy, a lovely truthful nature and genuine interactions with each other and the audience. I loved the types of audience interaction we worked with.

For individual artists and arts and cultural organisations’ giving (donations) programs: annual campaigns, capital campaigns, patron programs, bequest programs, projects supported by foundations.

Liesel, support worker, performer

Philanthropic giving is an important source of income generation for the arts. AbaF’s survey of private sector support for the arts shows that giving continues to increase (more than 150% 2001 to 2010). Through AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund $10M in donations have been granted to artists and arts organisations. The effort of artists and arts companies to build relationships with donors is delivering results and AbaF commends the individuals and organisations that have established effective giving programs to reach out to their community and connect with donors.

Outcomes for access • Promoting understanding within the community of people with disabilities Contact Inc presents The Best workshop series that encourages young Brisbane people with disabilities to explore their experiences of love, dating, romance and sexuality. It addresses important issues around access to venues, meeting other young people, friendship, relationships and the perception of people with disabilities in Brisbane. The aim of the workshop series is to engage young people (18 to 35) who identify as having a disability as well as professional artists and disability support workers. The weekly workshops are focused on sharing experiences, sharing anecdotes and offering insight into thoughts on popular culture and social trends. Over the six to ten week workshop period, a facilitator curates ideas and possible scenes to be shared in the performance. The Best performance is part party and part social action. Participants create a utopia for themselves and the audience – an accessible, safe and caring space where people of all abilities are welcomed. It is an intimate and engaging experience where the participants deliver scenes or moments of sharing with the audience. The final performance of

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

The Best is filmed and posted in an accessible format online for young people who are unable to attend due to limited mobility or poor health. The Best workshop series is the result of a mentoring relationship between Lenine Bourke (CEO and Artistic Director of Contact Inc), the Canadian organisation Mammalian Diving Reflex and Thomas Banks, a young artist with a disability. Contact Inc has also partnered with a local access organisation, Access Arts to ensure all access needs are met.

• Empowerment of participants through storytelling • Engagement of audiences and a sense of belonging for those at the performance and those viewing online • Improvements in physical access to the venue

Through devising, developing and delivering The Best, Contact Inc has learned a great deal about engaging and working with people with disabilities and this has helped with the development of their Disability Action Plan. The project has also provided a powerful way for young people to be able to share their stories and step up into leadership roles within their community.

Image credit: The Best participants on performance night; Thom, Kiera, Alison, Tiara, Dale. Photo: Melly Niotakis.

Image Credit:


AbaF Giving Award

Winner

AbaF Giving Award

Winner

Queensland Symphony Orchestra

National and Queensland

Perth International Arts Festival

Western Australia

There is an undoubted artistic renaissance in Queensland. Cultural precincts are important. We need buildings. Build them and the people will come. This building will ensure that the QSO can make the great leap forward. It will become a centre for excellence in music. It will inspire a wealth of musical talent in Queensland and attract the finest musicians from around the world.

I believe that the arts have an important contribution to make to our society, as a source of enjoyment and social communication as well as a source of the creative energy Australia must have to develop into a successful and innovative economy which can prosper in the years ahead. David Griffiths, board member and donor

Harold Mitchell, AC, leading donor to Building for the Future campaign

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Solidified relationships with current donors and identified new donors

• The funding received through the Annual Giving Program helps keep Festival tickets affordable for audiences

• Increased confidence in fundraising Queensland Symphony Orchestra’s (QSO) Building for the Future campaign aims to raise substantial funds towards a new home. The success of the campaign will mean a sustainable future for the state’s flagship performing arts company. The new home will represent a coming-of-age both for the QSO and the arts in Queensland. The building will be situated in the heart of the South Bank cultural precinct and will offer excellent access for all visitors. A purpose built, state-of-the-art rehearsal and performance studio will accommodate up to 450 audience members and orchestra musicians. Additionally, the ground floor has been designed to be a hub of creative activity with guest artists’ suites, four practice rooms, a recording studio and administration suites.

The excitement generated by a new home, the ambience of the cultural precinct, the novel programs in the performance studio and the opportunity to name a space within the building encouraged prospective donors to contribute and raise the level of their giving. The Building for the Future campaign provided an opportunity to develop new relationships and demonstrate that support for the QSO was good for the community and provide a worthy place to invest philanthropic dollars. The QSO has a reputation for the highest quality performances that attract high quality donors. The many generous contributors to the Building for the Future campaign have created a sustainable future for a Queensland performing arts icon.

• Funds for a home for the QSO in the South Bank cultural precinct How they made it work • A detailed communication strategy developed early in the campaign • A high profile launch with portable electronic funds transfer units in the concert hall foyer for guests to make donations to the campaign on the night • A double page feature on the campaign in the QSO newsletter that acknowledged all donors and included a donation form

AbaF Gold Book 2012

As well as an income stream, the Annual Giving Program has developed deeper relationships with Festival audiences and has engaged them throughout the year. This ongoing communication (through a series of launches, donor events, personal conversations and mail-outs) has shown donors that they are truly valued at all times and not just when the Festival requires their support. The Festival believes that the key to the success of its Annual Giving Program is nurturing strong and mutually beneficial relationships. Donors’ contributions are aligned to either the Festival’s international works or the Vital Stages programs. Both of these areas contribute significantly to the positive impact the Festival has in the community.

QSO’s Building for the Future campaign began with a detailed strategy. The first step was a brochure that clearly set out the urgency and need behind the initiative, the dollars required and the outcomes that success could achieve. A high profile launch created interest in the campaign.

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The Perth International Arts Festival not only has significant ambition, it operates in a market in which competition for funds is intense. In order to diversify and develop its funding base (which includes box office sales, corporate partnerships and government support) the Festival established its Annual Giving Program.

Image credit: QSO musicians at work and at play (campaign launch). Photo: Christian Aas.

In addition to their financial assistance, donors have proven to be the Festival’s best ticket buyers and source of word-of-mouth support. They often share their expectations for the Festival as well as their criticisms. In this way alone, they are invaluable. In return, top-level Festival staff are always made available to donors at events. This ensures that donors feel connected to the people and the content of the Festival. It also demonstrates to donors that staff members care about the Annual Giving Program and this in turn creates confidence their donation will be used well.

• With more personal contact between staff and donors, the Festival has a deeper connection to its audiences How they made it work • Events are held where donors can meet Festival staff • Donors are engaged throughout the year, not just leading up to the Festival • Donor contributions are aligned to the Festival’s international works or the Vital Stages programs • There are five levels of donation offered, from $500 to $10,000

Broad staff engagement and a full calendar of donor events have made private giving central to the Festival’s long-term vision and have ensured the Perth Festival can continue to offer courageous work of the highest international standard to the people of its city.

Image credit: Festival opening audience of Place des Anges by Les Studio de Cirque. Photo: Jarrad Seng.

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AbaF Giving Award

Winner

AbaF Giving Award

Winner

The Adelaide Hills International Sculpture Symposium

South Australia

Ten Days on the Island

Tasmania

The generosity of Adelaide Hills businesses, individuals and community organisations has been outstanding and provided the impetus for the organisers to persevere and be successful.

The structure of recruitment to the program has meant that I am helping Ten Days every time I talk to friends, family and clients about my involvement. It also enables me to invite them to come along to a monthly networking night to experience it themselves. No other business networking group allows this flexibility for its members. It also means I can demonstrate effectively my passion for the program.

Chris Steele Scott, Marketing Manager, Adelaide Hills Sculpture Symposium

Brock Gardner, Storm Hairdressing, inaugural CBD² member

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Opportunity to deliver a cultural legacy in the community

• Support for the festival • Relationship building with businesses and a new tier of support

• Exposure for local and international artists The 2012 Adelaide Hills International Sculpture Symposium brought together eight internationally acclaimed sculptors to create stone sculptures for permanent placement in the Adelaide Hills. The artworks became the start of a significant sculpture trail and visitors were invited to watch the works evolve. This initiative was the work of Adelaide Hills International Sculpture Symposium (AHISS), a not-for-profit community organisation formed in 2010 to develop an art initiative for both Adelaide Hills and South Australia. It began with internationally recognised sculptor and Adelaide Hills resident Silvio Apponyi’s dream to ‘enrich the Hills with sculpture’. Silvio gathered local residents and friends together to form an Executive Committee for the Symposium to make his dream a reality. The Committee knew it was essential that they secure financial support, engagement and involvement from the community in the project. Successful presentations were made to both the Adelaide Hills Council and the District Council of Mt Barker which resulted in seed funding. This gave AHISS some financial credibility before seeking private sector funding.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

The broader community was invited to show support by becoming a member of AHISS and make a tax-deductible donation, become a supporter or commission a sculpture. Ultimately the organisation’s giving program was critical in making the dream a reality.

• Momentum for similar projects in the area

The 20-day Sculpture Symposium was held in April 2012 in the magnificent setting of The Cedars at Hahndorf, the estate of iconic Australian artist Hans Heysen. Entry was by gold coin donation which made the event accessible to everyone.

• Connecting with local businesses, government and community for support

How they made it work • The establishment of a giving program

• Registration with AbaF’s Australia Cultural Fund for tax deductibility

The Symposium exceeded the organisers’ expectations and was embraced by South Australians with over 12,000 people visiting and engaging in the creation process. Thanks to the success of the giving program and the generosity of local businesses and individuals the Hills are now home to eight incredible new works of art.

Image credit: Happy Dreamer by Silvio Apponyi. Photo: Peter Hoare.

Ten Days on the Island is Tasmania’s state wide arts festival. In 2010 CBD² was established, an informal networking group connecting small to medium businesses in Hobart to build contacts and exchange valuable knowledge and skills with the festival. CBD² members are invited to join and contribute to the funding of a specific festival event. Prior to CBD², Ten Days already had well-established donor programs in place which included Philos Patrons, a high level support program, Ten Days Islanders, a program with a lower minimum donation level and the recently added Young Islanders program which connects with people aged under 26. In August 2010 a Hobart-based small business owner and operator (Pete Dillon from Poolquip) approached Ten Days to discuss how small to medium sized enterprises could become involved and financially support the festival. His interest revealed a similar desire for other small businesses to support the arts. After conversations between Ten Days and local businesses, CBD² was formed.

The founding members and Ten Days agreed that the program would grow its membership base through word of mouth advertising. Each member is encouraged to nominate other business people to become involved, thereby ‘squaring’ the membership. Using a direct approach and peer-topeer advocacy has added an element of exclusivity, which in turn generates interest in the program. Two levels of giving are offered in the program and each CBD² member is paired with a specific show in the festival, which has generated a strong connection between each business and their event. While individual donations might seem small in the scale of the festival, collectively the CBD² members make significant difference and are helping make the 2013 festival a success.

Image credit: Powerplant by Mark Anderson, Anne Bean, Jony Eastery, Kirsten Reynolds, Ulf Mark Pederson. Photo: Al Bett.

• Exposure for the festival through business networks How they made it work • Peer-to-peer asking between businesses • Fundraising functions and monthly networking events • Display material for business people acknowledging their membership

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AbaF Giving Award

Winner

AbaF Giving Award

Winner

Heide Museum of Modern Art

Victoria

Four Winds Festival

New South Wales

Our partnership acknowledges the essential role of philanthropy and private benefaction in the history and evolution of Heide and the ongoing work of ANZ Trustees in inspiring and growing philanthropy as a means of bringing the wishes and charitable interests of private individuals into the life of great social and cultural organisations.

We wanted to be more than just an outstanding music festival. When we articulated our aspiration to create a cultural hub for our region, the financial support started to flow. Governments and supporters have invested in our vision to transform this temporary site into Nature’s Concert Hall for music lovers and performers. Sheena Boughen, Chair, Four Winds Festival

Jason Smith, Heide Director & CEO

Heide Museum of Modern Art and ANZ Trustees have initiated a philanthropic partnership that enhances the Museum’s capacity to conserve and display its core collection. They have developed a three-year program – Preserving, Presenting and Growing – which will assist the Museum to work toward operational and financial sustainability.

Trust had previously made during the construction and subsequent redevelopment of Heide.

The program aims to improve the Museum’s capacity through conservation of the collection and through a robust exhibition schedule that enables public and scholarly access to its works. The program also aims to grow the collection through the strategic acquisition of new works.

The Preserving, Presenting, and Growing program also drew new audiences and supporters to Heide by enabling the display of many works that had rarely been seen or not seen at all due to their condition. In terms of value, it contributed a substantial 19% to the organisation’s annual total private sector income.

Heide was built on the philanthropic gestures of John and Sunday Reed. Both Heide and ANZ Trustees work on the philosophy that philanthropy generates philanthropy. Together they work to grow philanthropy as a means of bringing the charitable interests of private individuals into the life of cultural organisations.

The partnership between Heide and ANZ Trustees acknowledges the essential role of philanthropy and private benefaction in the history and evolution of Heide, its commitment to artists and the development of audiences for art.

With the Preserving, Presenting, and Growing grant, ANZ Trustees made a significant contribution that helped Heide increase its reach, inspire people and improve its ability to leverage additional support from individuals and other organisations.

As trustee of the Truby and Florence Williams Charitable Trust, ANZ Trustees is building on three gifts the

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

Image credit: Documentation. Photo: Fred Kroh.

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• A strengthened relationship with the Museum’s primary conservator

• A demonstration of Four Winds’ ability to successfully manage and deliver a major project

• An increased capacity to conserve a significant proportion of the collection • Increased visitation to Heide due to an expanded and marketed collection How they made it work • Private events and engagement with ANZ Trustees’ directors, major stakeholders, executives and staff to broaden exposure

For 21 years, Four Winds has presented world-class performances and commissioned Australian music and world premieres, all from temporary facilities. A successful fundraising drive led to the construction of Nature’s Concert Hall, an open-air venue which incorporates a sound shell (opened in 2012) as well as a performance pavilion and supporting infrastructure to be completed in 2013. Nature’s Concert Hall will not only support future Four Winds classical festivals, it will give the region a high quality venue for a range of artistic endeavours. Cinema, dance, residencies, community events and world-renowned performers can now be hosted in a space that celebrates nature and music alike.

successful completion of the sound shell in 2012. Planning for the second stage of Nature’s Concert Hall is also already well advanced. The giving project gave Four Winds the opportunity to communicate its vision for the future and invite its audience to cement their strong emotional connection to the organisation in a practical way through contributions. The clear vision of Four Winds encouraged new relationships and a constant source of donations. The Sound Shell Infrastructure project and the giving project which supported and stimulated its formation has been critical to the expansion of Four Winds. It was a manifestation of a dream that the local community had held for many years and will be enjoyed for many years to come.

Four Winds engaged Philanthropy Squared, a professional fundraising company to guide them through the fundraising process. Fundraising started at the 2010 biennial Easter festival. The combination of 220 individual donors, an anonymous dollar for dollar challenge grant as well as contributions from Arts NSW and the federal government led to the

Image credit: Sound Shell launch. Photo: Richard Green.

• Credibility with granting bodies and potential individual donors • Increased number of individual donors • Added appeal for national and international performers to play in a new open-air venue • Training opportunities for young people in stage management and technical operations • Confidence to launch another opportunity for individual donor giving – The Symphony of Supporters campaign How they made it work • The engagement of a professional fundraising company (Philanthropy Squared) to provide advice and guidance • The establishment of professional teams for communications, legal, fundraising, building and construction, acoustic and technical requirements • 220 donors plus government support • Cox Richardson Architects and KPMG pro bono support

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JBWere Philanthropy Leadership Award

JBWere Philanthropy Leadership Award

Patrick Corrigan AM

For an individual, family, group, foundation or other entity that through their leadership, advocacy, practice and example has encouraged increased philanthropic giving to Australia’s cultural life.

JBWere has shared a long relationship with AbaF to honour individuals who provide their tireless dedication and commitment to the arts. Through this dedication and commitment, Australian arts and culture have a profound and lasting impact on the communities we live in. As a leader in delivering first class investment advice and philanthropic services, JBWere is proud to recognise the leaders in philanthropy to the arts for the difference they make within the arts community.

For over 40 years, Patrick Corrigan has developed and managed successful businesses within the freight industry and at the same time has been contributing to the arts and inspiring others to do likewise.

through one of the country’s richest art prizes. His passion is not limited to the visual arts, however, with the Patrick Corrigan Foundation also supporting emerging jazz musicians through scholarships for the past five years.

Patrick’s leadership in the field of philanthropy has been by example, donating considerable funds and works of art to institutions around the country. In just one example, during his time as Chairman of the Gold Coast City Gallery he convinced other collectors and artists to donate double the amount of his own significant contributions.

Patrick’s love of collecting began in his childhood and has never ceased. His many generous gifts to institutions have included the most significant collection of pictorial bookplates ever assembled in Australia, given to the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 1995 and a collection of 81 valuable Australian indigenous artworks donated to Bond University in 2007. He also actively supports the University of Queensland Art Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Gallery of Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria.

As well as financial support, Patrick has given his time and business skills to develop sponsorship and fundraising programs that have greatly benefitted the Arts Centre Gold Coast. He was instrumental in establishing their development office and benefactor program, becoming the first silver level benefactor whilst encouraging many friends and colleagues to also join. Since 2008, in his role as chairman of the judging panel and key advisor for the Qantas Foundation Encouragement of Australian Contemporary Art Award, Patrick has helped to support talented artists

acknowledged in 2000 when he was made a Member of the Order of Australia. Patrick’s support for the arts has been demonstrated through his resources and tireless commitment – and through his leadership that has led so many others to follow his example.

Philanthropy, for me, is not ‘hard work’ – it is a pleasure. Knowing the satisfaction it is finally going to bring to so many people in the arts. Patrick Corrigan

As well as collecting, Patrick is an enthusiastic supporter of young and emerging artists. This has been demonstrated through the various grants he has set in motion, his generosity to artists seeking assistance and his willingness to acquire new works. Patrick Corrigan’s invaluable contribution to our national cultural landscape was formally

Image credit: My Country (detail) by Sally Gabori. Photo: Stephen Baxter.

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Dame Elisabeth Murdoch Arts Business Leadership Award

Richard Pratt Business Arts Leadership Award

Dr Gerard Vaughan AM

Kim Williams AM The arts in all their forms, and in my case the visual arts, play a crucial role in Australia’s cultural infrastructure. We are fortunate that so many committed, interesting people work together with creativity and vision to forge an alliance between the public and private sectors - just look at what suddenly becomes possible! Gerard Vaughan

The National Gallery of Victoria is not only Australia’s longest established and largest public art gallery; in 2011 it was again the most attended gallery in the country. Gerard Vaughan’s drive and talent for building successful relationships with government, donors and the business community, as well as the support he has won in the broader community, were key factors behind the NGV’s success. From his appointment as Director in 1999, Gerard provided dynamic leadership in the face of extraordinary challenges. The first was overseeing the redevelopment of the NGV on two separate sites (The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia at Federation Square and NGV International on St Kida Road) and raising the significant funds needed for this through a corporate and donors program. This was achieved through launching the Gallery Campaign in 2000, which not only exceeded its target but also identified a new group of important Gallery supporters. This campaign was the most successful of its kind in the history of Australian visual arts. Masterpieces for Melbourne, launched in 2008, was the NGV’s next major campaign to raise money for the acquisition of works of art, which led to the engagement of a

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

new, wider group of major donors. In addition, significant partnerships with leading companies including the Foster’s Group, Qantas, Macquarie Bank, Ernst & Young and MercedesBenz, have been transforming.

While greatly improving the NGV’s financial position, Gerard built enormous community enthusiasm and diversified the gallery’s reach through blockbuster exhibitions, night openings and family spaces.

In 2004, the NGV launched its blockbuster Melbourne Winter Masterpieces series, supported by the Government of Victoria through the Victorian Major Events Company. This immensely popular series has brought many exhibitions to Australia for the first time and attracted more than 2 million local, interstate and international visitors, bringing an independently assessed economic benefit to Victoria in excess of $150 million. The success of the series is a credit to Gerard’s passion and his capacity for building partnerships with international institutions.

Gerard was awarded a Centenary Medal in 2001 for outstanding service to museum and arts management and in 2011 he was made a Member of the Order of Australia. The NGV prospered under his devoted stewardship and is acknowledged as Australia’s premier public visual arts institution.

Having trained as a musician, Kim Williams has acknowledged the importance of the arts in his long and proud history of leadership with Australian business and cultural organisations. In his many and varied roles, he has championed the arts through public and private advocacy. Since returning from Italy in the 1970s where he worked with Luciano Berio, Italy’s leading composer, Kim has held many influential positions in Australia’s arts sector, including Chief Executive of the Australian Film Commission, and Southern Star Entertainment and as foundation chairman of the Australian Film Corporation – the principal funding body for original film and television for 20 years from 1988. Since 2005 he has has been Chairman of the Sydney Opera House Trust.

increased audiences. After leaving Musica Viva he was a board member and eventually chairman.

services to the arts, culture and policy advocacy in Australia and internationally.

Kim’s 10 year leadership at Foxtel has created an enduring legacy. To this day, Foxtel commissions and promotes a very wide offering of Australian film, drama and music. Foxtel’s STUDIO, Australia’s subscription service dedicated to the arts, would not have been possible without Kim’s firm belief and commitment to the idea that Australia’s creative arts deserve wide exposure. STUDIO was realised through relationships that Kim built with business and arts organisations across Australia.

While inspiring others to support the arts, Kim is also a major donor in his own right, having regularly made large gifts to many of Australia’s cultural institutions as well as commissioning new works by Australian composers and playrights.

Through Kim, Foxtel has been a strong supporter of arts events and organisations and has established significant scholarships that recognise the importance of new voices in the cultural landscape.

As well as overseeing these initiatives, Gerard worked tirelessly to consolidate relationships with existing benefactors and reach out to the wider community. This involved a highly strategic approach including focused asking, naming rights, special events, preview evenings, private functions and special exhibitions for corporate entertainment.

Kim has been a cultural beacon for business through his chairmanship of boards, including the Sydney Symphony Orchestra and the Sydney Opera House. He regards Musica Viva as his most enduring relationship with the performing arts and, as its General Manager, Kim worked tirelessly to improve music education in schools. At the same time he created a wealth of opportunities for performing artists and composers and substantially

Image credit: Gerard Vaughan - Director NGV in front of Howard Hodgkin’s Night and day 1997-99 Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Image credit: Kim Williams AM. Picture courtesy of News Limited. Image credit: The Takacs String Quartet. Supplied by Musica Viva. Photo: Angus Wilkinson

Kim was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 2006 for his service to arts administration through executive roles with a number of cultural organisations, his contribution to music education and arts-related public policy. In 2009 he was awarded a Doctorate of Letters honoris causa by Macquarie University for

As a lifelong champion of the arts, Kim Williams has led by example – through his distinguished career in the arts and entertainment industry, his generosity and his advocacy to governments and the corporate sector. His unique history as both artist and corporate leader has enabled him to demonstrate harmonious opportunities that the arts and business worlds present to each other.

Much of what I know about life and management I learnt from music… It was in the arts that I learnt to never ever give up – to keep on trying and to come at a problem from a variety of angles until a solution is found. Kim Williams

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Visy Environmental Sustainability Award

Visy Environmental Sustainability Award

Winner

Sydney Theatre Company and Greening the Wharf partners

National and New South Wales Climate change is the most pressing challenge facing the human race today. One of the roles of art is to imagine the future. To do this effectively it must be both visionary and practical. We believe Greening the Wharf not only delivers enormous practical outcomes for Sydney Theatre Company but offers a vision of how we might all creatively embrace the challenge and opportunities that climate change presents.

For partnerships between businesses and the arts that contribute to environmental sustainability. Developed in collaboration with the Banksia Environmental Foundation.

Andrew Upton and Cate Blanchett, Co-Artistic Directors, STC AbaF is honoured to be supported by Visy, a leader in environmental and sustainability initiatives. Through the Visy Environmental Sustainability Award, AbaF and Visy work together to encourage and acknowledge business and arts partnerships that demonstrate the role arts can play in achieving positive outcomes for the environment.

Sydney Theatre Company (STC) has transformed the Wharf into an excellent example of environmental practice, supported by a unique private and public partnership. The Greening the Wharf project has established STC as a world leader in the arts in this crucial area.

waste handling and recycling systems, wide-ranging water usage reduction and rainwater harvesting systems and a ‘Reduce, Reuse, Recycle’ ethos in theatre design. There has also been a significant shift to include a focus on programming that deals with the impact of climate change.

• Sinclair Knight Merz • Veolia • KPMG • Bug Switch Projects • Tropman and Tropman • Landis & Gyr

When STC Artistic Directors Andrew Upton and Cate Blanchett were appointed, they came with a strong commitment to improve environmental sustainability. After extensive research, STC committed to ‘Green the Wharf’ through one of the most comprehensive environmental programs of any performing arts company internationally.

Through Greening the Wharf, sustainability principles are now integrated into business planning and decision making at all levels within STC. These principles have not only delivered practical outcomes internally, they offer an example to other arts organisations of how to creatively embrace the challenges of climate change.

• Shi’s Family Foundation in partnership with The University of NSW • Cameron and Illse O’Reilly • Peter Hall and Laura Smith • David and Claire Paradice

STC’s Greening the Wharf project was funded by unique private and public partnerships involving philanthropy, corporate, university support and Federal and State government funding, supplemented by significant in-kind corporate and support for various services and items. The success of the project was reliant on the shared vision and cooperation of 25 stakeholders, which made the implementation both inspiring and challenging.

The Greening the Wharf partners include:

STC put in place extensive companywide energy efficiency measures including Australia’s second-largest rooftop solar array, best practice

Corporate partners: • Ausgrid • Caroma

Government partners: • Australian Government – Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and • Communities • NSW Government – Communities Arts NSW • NSW Government – Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water

Image credit: John Nolan, Lisa Nolan, Elizabeth Rogers, Andrew Upton, Cate Blanchett at an event to formally launch the new rainwater harvesting and reticulation system at the Wharf, 2011. Photo: Grant Sparkes-Carroll.

Philanthropic partners

Benefits for the arts organisation • A demonstration of active arts leadership on climate change Benefits for the business • High profile publicity and leveraging with high profile Artistic Directors Outcomes for the environment • Creation of a green arts precinct with a reduction in energy and water use as well as carbon emissions • A demonstration of the measures taken and encouragement for others to do the same

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Visy Environmental Sustainability Award

Winner

Queensland Museum and ENERGEX

Queensland

Australia Council Young and Emerging Artists Award

ENERGEX and the Queensland Museum have worked together to create ENERGEX Playasaurus Place as an inviting community exhibit which demonstrates in practical ways how the community can make smart energy choices for their lifestyles. Initiatives such as the ENERGEX Energy Action Wall empower the community to have a positive and sustainable impact by making a written commitment to use electricity wisely in their daily routine.

For partnerships between businesses and arts and cultural organisations that help to build skills, experience and opportunities for young and emerging artists.

Terry Effeney, CEO, ENERGEX The Australia Council for the Arts supports Australia’s arts by funding, strengthening and developing the arts sector. Through the Australia Council Young and Emerging Artists Award and a program of residencies, commissions, mentoring and online programs, the Australia Council is working to build the next generation of Australian artists. The AbaF Awards recognise business partnerships with the arts that share this commitment.

Benefits for the arts organisation

The ENERGEX and Queensland Museum (QM) partnership is underpinned by a mutual desire to instil an understanding that the choices we make about energy use now have an impact far into our future. The physical expression of this partnership is the iconic exhibition ENERGEX Playasaurus Place (EPP) at Queensland Museum and Sciencentre (QM&S). Currently in the fifth and final year of a five-year agreement, the ENERGEX and QM partnership is one that has been continuously built upon. Initially focused on developing and promoting an energy themed exhibition, the partners have shifted their focus to achieving positive, long-term environmental outcomes, through object based learning and play. In its original form, EPP educated Queenslanders about the challenges of a clean energy future by exploring climate change, ancient animals and plants. In January 2011, areas of the Museum, including EPP, were damaged by floods and temporarily closed to the public.

including Megawatt, an exploration of electricity in everyday life and Bouncing Back from Disaster, an exhibition that used content from firsthand accounts and objects collected during the recent natural disasters. ENERGEX and QM also worked together to increase interactivity in EPP through the incorporation of the Energy Action Wall which provides visitors with a hands on approach to learning about energy. Since re-opening on 20 January 2012, over 500,000 people have visited QM&S, including EPP and Bouncing Back. QM has acknowledged the support of ENERGEX through marketing, exhibition signage, program promotion and the QM honour board. Together, ENERGEX and Queensland Museum have created an engaging, dynamic exhibition space. Through the ENERGEX Playasaurus Place and associated education resources, visitors continue to gain an appreciation of energy, sustainability and the importance of conserving our natural environment.

During this time, the partners worked together to plan improvements to EPP. A new program of museum experiences was also developed

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

Image credit: Bouncing Back - Exhibition panels. Photo: Gary Cranitch.

• Support for EPP redevelopment, Megawatt and Bouncing Back experiences • A collaborative partner to improve and rework the exhibits while the Museum was closed due to flooding Benefits for the business • Extensive marketing, exhibition signage, program promotion and the QM&S honour board • Recognition as a good corporate citizen Outcomes for the community • Visitors have gained a better understanding of the importance of making choices about how people use energy • The exhibition content is aligned to the Australian school curriculum and teachers and families are supported with a range of learning materials • Through Energy Action Wall, visitors are asked to commit to behaviour in their homes that reduces energy consumption and promotes sustainable energy practices

Image Credit:


Australia Council Young & Emerging Artist Award

Winner

Australia Council Young & Emerging Artist Award

Winner

West Australian Opera and Wesfarmers

National and Western Australia

Sculpture and Spatial Practice, School of Art, VCA, The University of Melbourne and Lend Lease

Victoria

During my time as a young artist at West Australian Opera I was lucky enough to be a recipient of the Wesfarmers Arts Scholarship. This scholarship gave me the chance to properly focus on the program, as well as on my role of Pistola in their production of Falstaff.

It introduced me to the possibility of using alternate platforms – outside of the gallery space – to exhibit work. This project revealed that working collaboratively greatly enriches the creative process and enhances the outcome. Ben Taranto, student

Ryan Sharp, 2011 Wesfarmers Arts Young Artist

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• Improved education programs

• Experience for students in delivering public art

• Young artist development • Increased community engagement and audiences This year marks 15 continuous years of successful partnership between the West Australian Opera (WAO), the state’s flagship professional opera company and Wesfarmers, one of Australia’s largest public companies. Wesfarmers has been the principal partner of WAO since 1996. Since it began, the relationship has expanded to encompass the commissioning of a new operatic work, the development of an extensive education program and the reciprocal exchange of expertise between Wesfarmers and WAO staff. The partnership has also led to the establishment of the Wesfarmers Arts Young Artist Scholarship within the Young Artist program. This scholarship manifests Wesfarmers and WAO’s shared focus on ensuring the long term sustainability of the arts in Western Australia through supporting local talent. The scholarship allows the recipient to work full time in an intensive program for one year with WAO. It is the only program of its kind in Australia to provide young artists with a stipend to undertake professional development unique to opera.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

This is a partnership of common values and vision with both partners committed to strong education and development programs that help individuals as well as their local communities. Wesfarmers invests in community engagement and internal staff development to attract and retain quality people across the many professions relevant to their business. Likewise, WAO’s mission is to develop new artists to ensure the vitality and relevance of opera. Both partners believe in the importance of investing in young people and fostering community pride. Together they have developed a long and successful partnership with both Wesfarmers and WAO earning a reputation as industry leaders in young artist support.

Benefits for the business • Employee engagement, corporate hospitality and networking • Visibility in the community • Positive brand alignment How they made it work • High levels of communication, honesty and transparency • Shared objectives and clearly aligned expectations • Progress meetings throughout the year

Rising: the Victoria Harbour Young Artist Initiative is the result of a five-year partnership between the property business, Lend Lease and the Sculpture and Spatial Practice (S&SP) discipline stream of the School of Art at the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). The project gives students at a formative stage of their career the opportunity to experience a real world assignment, with all the challenges and rewards of creating art for public space. Between five and eight second and third year students are awarded a commission for a four-week temporary public art exhibition at Victoria Harbour. Students work directly with Lend Lease and City of Melbourne representatives to ensure their artworks comply with technical and safety standards.

is committed to offering ambitious practical experience for students to develop their art practice. The project has made a significant contribution to the students’ academic and professional artistic success. As well as receiving top marks and prizes, many students have continued to exhibit in artist run or public galleries. This project is a model example of the VCA’s goal to create dynamic links with industry partners. For Lend Lease, the project has generated excellent feedback from residents and visitors to Docklands.

• Skill building for students including negotiation, managing budgets and meeting deadlines • Engagement with industry partners Benefits for the business • Positive feedback from residents and visitors • Opportunity to demonstrate support for emerging artists How they made it work • Designing the project structure to align with an academic semester made it easy to roll out and maintain • All stakeholders are included early in the process • An analysis of real time-based costs and required actions has allowed the budget to be realistically managed throughout the project

Both partners share a vision for the role of temporary and ephemeral art in a public context and specifically the contribution of art to Victoria Harbour’s sense of community. Lend Lease has a policy of supporting emerging artists considering a career in public art, while the S&SP stream

Image credit: Sitiveni Talei and Ryan Sharp in Falstaff (2011). Photo: James Rogers.

Image credit: Incorporation by Ben Taranto. Photo: Simone Slee.

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Australia Council Young & Emerging Artist Award

artisan and BCM

Winner

Australia Council Young & Emerging Artist Award

Winner

Queensland

Sydney Dance Company and The Works

New South Wales

Partnering with artisan to create the Emerging Curator Mentorship program has surpassed our expectations by a country mile. BCM is very proud to be part of developing curatorial talent and contributing to the arts community in such a powerful way.

“I’m an elite rugby league player, and the toughest person I know is a dancer. From the age of eleven my brother knew he wanted to dance. Which is fine. But when you grow up in a small town like Cootamundra, population 5000 give or take, there are smoother paths and indeed more popular dreams to chase. When I was heading off on tours training with teammates Tom was at home practising alone. And when we’d come back, he’d be practising still.”

Paul Cornwell, Managing Partner, BCM

Joe Bradley, Canberra Raiders (excerpt from letter)

Benefits for the arts organisation • The opportunity to mentor, develop and promote a talented curator

The BCM Emerging Curator Mentorship supports the professional development of an emerging curator in the fields of craft and design. The mentorship is the result of a partnership between BCM, one of Australia’s largest advertising agencies and artisan, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes quality craftsmanship and design. The partnership was created in 2011 on the strength of BCM’s interest in the arts and the value it places on creative thinking. The Emerging Curator Mentorship arose from discussions between the two partners regarding the development of future arts leaders with a focus on curating. Thanks to this partnership, artisan is able to provide mentorship for three years for an emerging currator. Over that time the curator works with experienced mentors and acquires skills, knowledge and experience through the development of exhibition programs for BCM’s in-house Crucible Gallery. The curator also has the opportunity to present curator talks to large audiences at each exhibition opening.

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

BCM is a business that depends on generating new ideas; having an evolving exhibition program within its workplace has provided a stimulating work environment for its staff. BCM receives three high quality exhibitions each year for its gallery, which it is able to show to staff, clients and other partners. An additional benefit of this partnership is that new audiences have been generated for the craft and design sector as well as an additional outlet in which craft and design practitioners can exhibit. As a result, the partnership has also garnered media attention and a positive workplace environment for both BCM and artisan staff. The BCM Emerging Curator Mentorship program has given artisan and BCM the opportunity to explore a new arts business model that not only develops future arts leaders and curators, but also provides exhibition opportunities for Queensland’s artists.

• The opportunity to partner with a leading creative business to support and grow the craft and design sector • An additional avenue for craft and design practitioners to exhibit work Benefits for the business • A dedicated Gallery Curator to schedule, develop and coordinate exhibitions for the BCM Crucible Gallery • An innovative approach to incorporating craft and design exhibitions into the work environment How they made it work • artisan undertakes a thorough candidate selection process with final candidates presented to BCM for review. • Evaluation metrics have been developed to monitor the success of the partnership and mentoring program on an ongoing basis

Image credit: Artist at work, Mapping Sensation by Rebecca Ross. Photo: BCM.

Benefits for the arts organisation • Advice on how to structure an effective direct marketing campaign Thanks to a partnership between The Works, a Sydney based advertising agency and Sydney Dance Company (SDC), young dance graduates now have a chance to gain experience at the highest level. In 2011, the director of The Works witnessed the amazing young talent on display in the SDC rehearsal studio. When he learned that SDC was hoping to create more opportunities for emerging dancers, he offered The Works’ assistance through a new direct marketing campaign. SDC had an immediate need for such a campaign. Tom Bradley, a young dance graduate who grew up in Cootamundra in rural New South Wales, had been the recipient of a three-month scholarship funded by FOXTEL. SDC wanted to offer him ongoing employment but did not have the funds. As part of their campaign preparation, The Works discovered that Tom had a brother who was in the Canberra Raiders Rugby League elite sports program. The brothers’ talent and promising future highlighted a contrast between the opportunities that exist for young people in sport compared to dance.

The Works engaged the support of the Canberra Raiders which was pleased to assist SDC by distributing a letter on their letterhead from Tom’s brother Joe stating how he was lucky enough to have a chance to follow his dream into professional rugby, but that it was much harder for his brother to have the same opportunities in dance. The heartfelt letter also contained an honest request for people to support his brother’s dream and donate to a fund allowing him to continue on his path towards becoming a professional dancer. An innovative social media campaign was also developed and implemented – the first time SDC had used social media as a fundraising tool.

• Intellectual property from a copywriter, marketing creatives and a social media expert

The campaign target was raised and Tom Bradley is now employed full time by SDC. A longer-term goal of growing a program to give other talented, young emerging dancers the same opportunity is now in place.

• An emphasis on collaboration

Image credit: 2 One Another, Sydney Dance Company dancers including Tom Bradley. Photo: Wendell Teodoro.

• Printing of direct marketing collateral • Support for new talent Benefits for the business • The opportunity to collaborate with other creative thinkers • Tickets to openings and performances • A corporate dance class for 40 people How they made it work • Regular contact between the Director of The Works and SDC Development Manager • Regular meetings with teams from both groups

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Arts and Health Foundation Award

Arts and Health Foundation Award

Winner

Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) and The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

National and New South Wales This project has paved the way for future collaboration and has helped to break down some of the barriers to interdisciplinary collaboration in the health setting. Most importantly we have already produced a wonderful interactive artwork which can be experienced by children in the hospital setting. This has the potential to significantly improve their hospital experience and self-efficacy.

For partnerships between healthcare and arts organisations that improve health and wellbeing.

Dr Angie Morrow, Staff Specialist, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead

The Arts and Health Foundation is a charitable organisation established to improve individual and community health and wellbeing by promoting the expansion of knowledge, evidence, capacity and investment in arts and health practices in Australia. In particular the Foundation supports and promotes: • arts programs aiming to improve patient and staff health and wellbeing in health settings; • arts programs to improve health and wellbeing in the wider community; • research to provide evidence and enhance understanding of the benefits of the arts to individual and community health and wellbeing. In addition, the Foundation has successfully advocated for national policy recognition of the role of the arts in the health and wellbeing of all Australians. The Arts and Health Foundation Award honours successful, sustainable partnerships between healthcare and arts and cultural organisations working to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals and communities.

Benefits for the arts organisation • Developing a best practice methodology for collaboration between arts and science An evolving partnership has been facilitated by the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) with artist Dr George Khut and The Children’s Hospital at Westmead paediatrician Dr Angie Morrow to research ways in which the adaptation of biofeedback-based artworks can help manage the pain and anxiety experienced by children undergoing medical procedures. ANAT is a not-for-profit organisation that provided leadership and support to individuals and organisations pursuing collaborative and creative research projects in Australia and beyond. Dr Morrow was curious to explore how art and technology could be used in health care and Dr Khut was looking for health sector partners to extend his research into bodyfocused (biofeedback) interactive art experiences. A research project was suggested to explore how Dr Khut’s biofeedback interactions could be used to help children undergoing recurrent medical procedures. An arts-science residency grant from ANAT supported the preliminary work at the hospital.

concepts evolved through a process of observation and listening to the experiences of children, their carers and health professionals. Together the partners explored the efficacy of multimedia interaction as a tool for managing painful procedure related anxiety. This three-way partnership is based on the shared commitment to enhance children’s health and the belief that collaboration between the arts and sciences has the potential to create new knowledge, ideas and processes which are beneficial to both fields. Enabling such collaborations is a core element of ANAT’s mission. Partnerships such as these increase recognition amongst artists, scientists, researchers and government agencies of the value of collaborative art and science research. The partnership between ANAT, Dr Khut and the Children’s Hospital at Westmead’s Dr Angie Morrow has provided a platform to develop creative arts practice in health care settings and ultimately to improve the experiences of children in hospital.

• Increasing recognition amongst scientists, researchers, government agencies and science organisations as to the value of collaborative art/ science research • Strengthening of strategic partnerships across the science and technology sectors Benefits for the health organisation • In-kind donation of research, creativity and administration • Research partnerships with university partners in the Schools of Design and Software at University of Technology Sydney • Generation of a body of experiential and evaluative data to inform future research Outcomes for health • The potential to radically improve children’s experience in hospital • A focus on the personal as well as the medical experience of children in hospital

The project, BrightHearts, provided the artist with insights into the workings of a hospital. Initial design

arts health

foundation

Image credit: Henry on floor with interactive artwork by George Khut. Photo: Julia Charles.

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Arts and Health Foundation Award

Media Resource Centre and Mental Health Coalition of SA

Winner

Arts and Health Foundation Award

Winner

South Australia

Junction Arts Festival and Kids Paradise, Pregnant and Young Parents Support Service & cu@home

Tasmania

Mental illness can be a long and lonely journey and the pathway to recovery is different for each individual. Mindshare is a place for people to talk about their lives, issues and experiences while enriching others with knowledge of their personal experience. Each of us is special, we all have a personal story to tell and Mindshare allows us all to shine.

Many of the mothers engaged in cu@home do not come from a background where play is considered important and therefore do not naturally encourage their own children to play creatively. This will be a new step forward in encouraging young vulnerable parents to engage in this kind of activity. Extra care has been taken to devise a project that encourages the families to feel safe and supported in entering into a new venture.

Steve Clark, mindshare uploader

Libby Dawson, cu@home

A partnership between Media Resource Centre (MRC), Messenger Press and the Mental Health Coalition of SA (MHCSA) and its members, the Mindshare website and programs aim to reduce the stigma of mental health by creating opportunities to share stories through filmmaking, blogs, creative writing, photography, music and art. This worthwhile partnership began when the South Australian Government approached the MRC, a not-for-profit filmmaking organisation to develop a project with the MHCSA. Messenger Press joined the collaboration as media partner. The initial scope of the project was for the MRC to provide people living with a mental illness with filmmaking skills. To ensure the project would have ongoing impact, the reduction of mental health stigma became a central objective. The project was expanded to include art forms that could be presented digitally, including creative writing, photography and music. Reaching and building an audience was critical and building a website to broadcast the stories became a strategy for the project. The

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

Messenger Press ensured the outcomes were well promoted through interviewing and sharing the stories of 44 mental health consumers in the lead up to the launch of the website. Mindshare has enabled each of the project’s partners to achieve much more than they could alone. MRC has been able to develop and showcase its capacity to deliver a large-scale community social media program. At the same time, the small health body of MHCSA has been able to create a media rich website that allows people living with a mental illness to share their stories and challenges. The MHCSA believes that greater understanding leads to greater empathy. Thanks to their partnership with the MRC, a reduction in stigma of mental health is now a reality.

Benefits for the arts organisation

Benefits for the arts organisation

• The opportunity to work on a large-scale media partnership with long term strategies

• Financial support for How High the Sky

• Filmmakers were educated on how to work with mental health consumers and guides were produced for Messenger Press journalists (including guides on defamation) as part of the media partnership • The opportunity to work with new communities Benefits for the health organisation • A one stop portal for mental health consumers to exhibit their creative work • Improved availability to present issues to government • Training in filmmaking and social media Outcomes for health • An online tool that works to reduce stigma and break down negative stereotypes surrounding mental health • Increased understanding of mental illness and its prevention by the Mindshare audience • National and international exposure of the need to reduce the stigma mental health

Image credit: Artwork (detail) by Damien Phillips, Mindshare participant.

Research has shown that families that engage in regular creative play with their children enjoy improved outcomes in overall wellbeing. Thanks to the support of Kids Paradise, an interactive play centre in Launceston, Junction Arts Festival (JAF) was able to deliver a community focused performance series to educate the public on infant health and interaction. The workshop development process for the performance included the Pregnant and Young Parents Support Service (PYPS) and cu@home, a program offered to young first time parents. As organisations that focus on the emotional and physical health of young parents and their babies, PYPS and cu@home were ideal collaborators for a project to promote social inclusion and education in a marginalised segment of the community.

was very popular and feedback following the Festival placed it as one of the top three audience ‘favourites’ of JAF 2011.

• Sharing of information to client networks, in particular young and at-risk parents • A popular event that engaged the young parent community

The partnership was a success on many fronts. It allowed Junction Arts Festival to provide an experiential, accessible event that engaged with young parents. At the same time, the partnership provided Kids Paradise with a new channel to communicate with their key target market and expand their networks with organisations such as PYPS and cu@home.

Benefits for the health organisation

The knowledge, support and networks gained throughout the first year of the partnership have been extremely valuable and will continue to assist young parents and the wider community of Tasmania.

Outcomes for health

JAF worked with PYPS, cu@ home and the theatre company, Polyglot, to develop a creative show as an interactive experience for babies and their carers. The result of these collaborations was How High the Sky, that encouraged a greater understanding of the thought processes of children. The project

Image credit: How High the Sky by Polyglot Theatre. Photo: Kate Kirby.

• Kids Paradise, PYPS and cu@ home logos were featured on a wide variety of marketing collateral as well as the Junction Arts Festival website and program • Clients were able to participate in the workshops and performances and meet artists

• An experiential, accessible program that engages young parents • Learning experiences for young parents about the importance of play • Raised awareness of infant health and the local organisations available to support young parents

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Arts and Health Foundation Award

Winner

Moonshine Movies and Palliative Care Australia

Victoria

Woodside Better Business Award

Whilst death is something that everyone in the world will experience, the limitations around language and communication prevent us from having the conversations that would help make a difference to how people live at the end of their lives. What LIFE Before Death gives us is something that needs no language to explain; the visuals say everything and unite everyone around the same actions.

For business volunteers or board members who have helped achieve significant business outcomes for arts and cultural organisations or individual artists. Open to all business volunteers who work with the arts.

Dr Yvonne Luxford, Chief Executive Officer, Palliative Care Australia At Woodside, volunteering activities are a hallmark of our culture, so much so that we are a benchmark leader in employee volunteering and participation within the resources sector. With this in mind Woodside is pleased to present AbaF’s Woodside Better Business program, including adviceBank and boardBank volunteering services, for artists, arts organisations and business people across Australia. Through the Woodside Better Business Award, Woodside and AbaF are pleased to recognise and honour the significant contribution of business volunteers for the arts.

Benefits for the arts organisation • A launch partner to build audiences for LIFE Before Death Palliative Care Australia and Moonshine Movies joined forces to launch the advocacy project, LIFE Before Death. The project explores untreated pain and the dramatic lifechanging effect that palliative care can deliver to patients and families facing life-limiting illnesses. The project comprises of a feature film, a 55 minute television documentary and 50 short films, each addressing a specific issue relating to pain and palliative care. LIFE Before Death has reached over 100,000 health professionals, policy-makers, patients and other stakeholders with its mission to improve pain management and end of life care. Palliative Care Australia is a national organisation that represents the interests of people who share the idea of quality care at the end of life for everyone. Moonshine Movies is the independent film production company with a focus on the development and production of innovative film and transmedia experiences. Moonshine Movie’s founder, Mike Hill, met Dr Yvonne Luxford, the CEO of Palliative Care Australia, at an initiative run by the Institute for Palliative Medicine at San Diego Hospice in 2011. Dr Luxford realised

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

that the arguments presented in LIFE Before Death closely aligned with the interests of Palliative Care Australia in promoting access to palliative care and essential medicines.

• Expert advice and source material on the subject of palliative care • Access to new audiences Benefits for the health organisation

This was the beginning of a mutually beneficial and strategic partnership. Together, through the promotion of LIFE Before Death, Moonshine Movies and Palliative Care Australia have raised awareness of palliative and end of life care. They have improved understanding and the availability of services across Australia and encouraged discussion to support better knowledge networks.

• Raising public awareness of palliative care and the life-changing benefits it can deliver

The engaging material of LIFE Before Death and the discussions it has raised have brought the issues surrounding end of life care to a broader audience, including government bodies, in Australia and abroad.

Outcomes for health

• A creative channel to address issues surrounding palliative care • Accessible and visual media to inform and advocate to target groups including government and medical professionals

• The collection of films has reached over 100,000 health professionals, policy-makers, patients and other stakeholders to advocate for improved pain management and end of life care • Raised public awareness via media and social media • Assisted health professionals through screenings at health facilities and educational institutions • Informed Senate Enquiry into palliative care via a screening at Parliament House Australia

Image credit: Screening of film at Parliament House. Photo: Claire Maskell.

Image Credit:


Woodside Better Business Award

Winner

Woodside Better Business Award

Winner

Renew Adelaide and Steve Maras

National and South Australia

Art Gallery of Western Australia and Adrian Fini

Western Australia

With Steve Maras’ networks in the property industry, his business and management skills and his sheer enthusiasm, our organisation has effectively doubled in size … allowing us to assist over 100 individual exhibits, events and performances in the Adelaide area during the last year.

The arts and the creative industries define who we are. They build community spirit and soul; they are the backdrop for community aspiration. I am personally very proud to have been part of a project in which business and government are forging new bonds to help the Art Gallery of Western Australia Foundation build a cultural asset for all of us today and for our children and generations to come.

Dr Ianto Ware, CEO, Renew Adelaide

Adrian Fini

Benefits for Renew Adelaide

Benefits for the Art Gallery of Western Australia

• Spaces for cultural groups including Adelaide Festival • Mentorship and professional development for staff Renew Adelaide is the South Australian version of the successful Renew Newcastle project, a notfor-profit enterprise which allows cultural and community organisations to occupy empty buildings. When it began, the volunteer group behind Renew Adelaide was highly skilled in the arts; however they needed someone who knew the local property industry to really succeed. Steve Maras, the Managing Director of Maras Group, joined the Renew Adelaide board in 2011 and filled this crucial gap. Through Steve’s connections, Renew Adelaide was introduced to a number of high profile commercial property owners who were able to provide empty spaces. These included 199 and 200 North Terrace – buildings which had stood vacant for almost 10 years and were successfully transformed into key venues for the Adelaide Fringe Festival in 2012 with a bar, a café and six theatres.

As well as his own properties and professional networks, as a board member Steve Maras has generously shared his detailed understanding of the property industry, governance and regulatory issues. Thanks to his mentorship, Steve has helped Renew Adelaide shift from a volunteer board of five young people with limited experience to an incorporated organisation with an eight-person board consisting of highly skilled professionals.

• Legal, accounting and insurance services via professional networks Benefits for Steve Maras • A better understanding of the nature of alternate uses for empty spaces • A positive impact on the Maras Group business and its public image • A better position to lease spaces to commercial tenants

Both the Maras Group and Renew Adelaide share a belief that nobody benefits from empty shops, unused buildings or vacant streets. The passion Steve Maras shares with Renew Adelaide for urban renewal has made him not only an invaluable member of the board but also an ideal advocate for the organisation as it continues to grow.

AbaF Gold Book 2012

Adrian was appointed to the AGWA Board in 2006, where he assists with governance, strategic oversight and specialist working groups. In 2008 he was the driving force behind a national forum of architects and planners that explored visions of regeneration for the Gallery, its surrounds and how the arts fit into a sustainable community. As a highly respected businessman and community leader, Adrian has also opened doors to several valuable individuals and organisations for the Gallery.

the very best art in the areas of Indigenous, Western Australian, Australian and international contemporary art. Under Adrian Fini, the TomorrowFund is also making a significant impact on the state’s arts scene. Local artists who are showcased by AGWA receive exposure, an enormous profile boost and the honour of sharing space with timeless classics. The relationship between Adrian Fini and AGWA has evolved over its thirteen years with Adrian providing advice and expertise in many areas as well as financial support. He has changed the Gallery’s vision, direction and capacity to acquire works of art, ensuring its place as the premier public art collection in the state.

• Encouraging private sector support which has demonstrated to the Government that the community values the State Art Collection • New donors and increased visibility for the Gallery Benefits for Adrian Fini • Further development of business skills through Board involvement • Personal satisfaction from transforming the cultural life of Western Australia

In 2008, Adrian was appointed Chair of the AGWA Foundation TomorrowFund, a major new initiative conceived to transform the State Art Collection with an ambitious goal of raising $25 million for the acquisition of contemporary art. The objective of the TomorrowFund is to take the State Collection to a new level by acquiring

Since Steve joined the board, Renew Adelaide has more than doubled the amount of vacant spaces it has been able to activate, including spaces from Steve’s own Maras Group. As a result, the business benefits for Steve Maras have included greater interest from potential commercial tenants.

64

Adrian Fini and the Art Gallery of Western Australia have enjoyed a fruitful partnership for thirteen years. It began in 1999 when Adrian made a gift to the Gallery and became a life member. A subsequent donation in 2007 enabled the acquisition of a significant group of contemporary artworks. This was followed by a major financial commitment to the Gallery’s TomorrowFund in 2009.

• The establishment of the TomorrowFund to purchase significant local and international pieces for the State Collection

Image credit: The Elective Wedding Expo at The Tuxedo Cat. Photo: Anna Maclean.

Image credit: Adrian Fini and The Hon John Day, Minister for Culture and the Arts at TomorrowFund event. Photo: Bo Wong.

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Woodside Better Business Award

Stompin and Darren Alexander

Winner

Woodside Better Business Award

Winner

Tasmania

The Living Room Theatre and Ray Parslow

New South Wales

Darren’s commitment, enthusiasm and generosity are a factor of Stompin’s success to date. We are extremely grateful to Darren for his involvement as the Chair of the Stompin Board and a sponsor with Autech Software and Design. Darren has an incredible drive and passion for Stompin and fits us into his rigorous business schedule at times when we need him most.

I get great pleasure seeing the connection people make between the graphic design and the performance – everything working holistically … Helping do this small thing can make a huge difference to the way the company is viewed and its level of professionalism. Ray Parslow

Sarah McCormack, Executive Producer, Stompin

Benefits for Stompin

Benefits for The Living Room Theatre

• Increased awareness in the business community

• A new logo

• Greater access for the public through the website and iPhone app In 2010, the board of the Launceston based dance organisation, Stompin decided the time was right to become more sustainable and to no longer rely so heavily on government funding. At the same time, Stompin was introduced to Darren Alexander from the design house, Autech, through AbaF’s boardBank. It was perfect timing, as the board soon discovered that in Darren they had found someone who could assist them in the crucial tasks of improving the Stompin brand and securing new avenues of income. In 2011, Darren accepted the role of Chair. Through his design business, Autech, Darren created a new, more corporate website for Stompin which has improved the company’s promotion and improved its chances of finding further business support. Darren also supported the development of a Stompin iPhone app with features including upcoming performances, videos and social media integration.

celebrate Stompin’s long history, with all profits going back into the company.

• Professional development for staff

Darren Alexander’s business, Autech, has benefitted greatly from his involvement. Stompin is a Launceston icon, with more than one generation of dancers among its population. Autech is to be part of the Stompin story – some staff members are proud former dancers – and morale at the business has grown since the partnership began.

Benefits for Darren Alexander • Personal satisfaction of helping the community • Brand acknowledgement for his business on all marketing material • Tickets to shows

Darren has been able to increase his love of the arts and his dedication to the community. Stompin initially sought a new board member who was business minded and connected. Darren Alexander has greatly exceeded those expectations. His invaluable influence as a benefactor, a mentor and a business manager has brought a more confident future to Stompin.

Outside of these technological innovations, Darren has opened Stompin up to more networks through opportunities to perform at festivals and fundraising events. He has also supported a 21st birthday book to

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

• A theatre catalogue • A new website A chance meeting on a bus between a graphic designer, Ray Parslow and an actor and one half of the Living Room Theatre, Michelle St Anne has led to an enduring and valuable partnership.

invaluable skills and the company has started a relationship with the Sydney Festival. These networks have all been made with the assistance of Ray’s rebranding and the skill he has brought to the company’s collateral.

When they met, the Living Room Theatre website and logo were bright pink – which in no way conveyed the dark material being presented by the company. Ray was able to successfully translate the tone and the feeling of the theatre company into a new visual brand and apply that to a new website and brochure.

For Ray Parslow, his countless hours as a volunteer have delivered creative satisfaction working alongside other artists, as well as valuable professional development.

Ray sees his role as helping to provide a stronger visual presence and to create a visual language for the Living Room Theatre. In doing so, he has made a huge difference to the way the company is seen in the professional world, which in turn has helped with corporate support. As well as the new brand, Ray has produced pitch documents, posters, flyers, postcards, invitations, signage and much more.

Ultimately the contribution of Ray Parslow has been to help The Living Room Theatre understand the role of branding and marketing more clearly, which in turn has led to a better understanding of its demographic. With more and more success, the dreams of a small arts organisation to tour to Berlin and Toronto now seem achievable.

• A marketing campaign and collateral Benefits Ray Parslow • Creative satisfaction • Collaborating with other creative people • Professional development and board experience • Networking connections

The relationship has continued for six years, with Ray serving for part of that time as a chairperson on the board. Over that period, the board has attracted other talented individuals who each contribute

Image credit: Tales from a Small City, Kate Mitchell. Photo: Patrick Ronald and Shannon McDonnell.

Image credit: A Little Room Melbourne performance by Gabrielle Quin. Photo: Living Room Theatre.

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AbaF Awards 2012 Judges National Lesley Alway, Director, Arts Program, Asialink Tim Biggs, Managing Partner, Queensland, Deloitte Peter Bridgman, Director, Decisive Consultants Terry Campbell AO, Senior Chairman, Goldman Sachs Sue Donnelly, Executive Director, Queensland Theatre Company Stephen Found, Managing Director & Owner, Capitol Theatre & Lyric Theatre, Sydney Lisa Harris, Manager, Philanthropy and Special Events, Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra Tania Hudson, Director, Words Communications Consultancy John Irving, Director, Dundee Bay Patria Jafferies Hugo Leschen, Executive Director Arts and Culture, Northern Territory Government Donna Lewis, Executive Director Corporate Sponsorships and Events, Goldman Sachs Nicholas Linke, Partner, Fisher Jeffries Norm McIlfatrick, Chief Executive/ Secretary, Department of Infrastructure, Energy & Resources Anne-Marie Schwirtlich, Director-General, National Library of Australia Clive Scott, General Manager, Sofitel Melbourne on Collins Carol Whish-Wilson

Australian Capital Territory and New South Wales Jackie Appleyard, Marketing Manager, ACT, Ernst & Young Malcolm Moir, Head of External Relations & Philanthropy, Sydney Festival Tristan Landers, Executive General Manager Corporate Sustainability, Commonwealth Bank of Australia

AbaF Gold Book 2012

Victoria

SA & NT

Robert Bazzani, Victorian Chairman, KPMG

Artback NT: Development and Touring Adelaide Airport Brighton Jetty Classic Sculptures and Adelaide Airport Adelaide Festival Adelaide Festival and Bendigo and Adelaide Bank Adelaide Festival Centre Foundation and Michael Luchich Adelaide Fringe and Alinta Energy Adelaide Fringe and Flinders Medical Centre and Port Augusta Hospital and Women’s & Children’s Hospital and SA Lotteries Adelaide Fringe and Minter Ellison Adelaide Fringe and PwC Adelaide Hills International Sculpture Symposium Adelaide Youth Orchestra and Fisher Jeffries Art Gallery of South Australia and Santos Brink Productions Brink Productions and Slipperyfish Darwin Symphony Orchestra and ConocoPhillips Darwin Symphony Orchestra and Sitzler Media Resource Centre and Mental Health Coalition of SA and Messenger Press Renew Adelaide and Steve Maras South Australian Living Artists Festival and ABC Local Radio South Australian Museum and Beach Energy Windmill Theatre and Community CPS Australia

Jill Gregory, Manager, Corporate Communications, BlueScope Steel Warwick Tiernan, Head Radio Marketing, ABC Radio Lisa Watts, Chair, Midsumma Festival Western Australia

Northern Territory and South Australia Steve Grieve, Director, Grieve Gillett Winnie Pelz Carolyn Mitchell, Consultant, Cowell Clarke Chris Russell, Business Editor, The Advertiser Queensland Alison de Groot, Partner, Assurance & Advisory Business Services, Ernst & Young Anna Marsden, Chief Executive Officer, Queensland Ballet Kate Eltham, Chief Executive Officer, Queensland Writers Centre Association Michael Rayner AM, Principal Director, Cox Rayner Architects Tasmania Lou Clark, Community Relations Specialist, Bell Bay Aluminium Robert Wallace Peter Althaus, Proprietor, Domaine A / Stoney Vineyard Rebecca Fitzgibbon

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Good Practice Recognition Recipients

Melissa Callanan, Director of Development and Communications, Methodist Ladies’ College Tania Hudson, Director, Words Communications Consultancy Natalie Jenkins John Palmer

NSW & ACT aMBUSH Gallery and Sydney Harbour Federation Trust aMBUSH Gallery and The Galeries Australian Network for Art and Technology and The Childrens Hospital at Westmead Australian Theatre for Young People and Freya Lombardo

Australian Youth Orchestra and King & Wood Mallesons Bell Shakespeare and Optus Centenary of Canberra Unit, Chief Minister & Cabinet Directorate, ACT Government and You Are Here and Canberra CBD Limited Four Winds Festival Griffin Theatre Company and Interbrand Information & Cultural Exchange (ICE) and Nepean Intensive Care Unit and The GroundSwell Project Information & Cultural Exchange (ICE) and Popperbox/Symple Creative and The Lot and Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) Mixed Media and Qantas Airways National Gallery of Australia and San Remo Object: Australian Design Centre and Canvas Group Poetry in Action and Gadens Lawyers Riverside Theatres Sculpture by the Sea and Allens South East Arts (NSW) and Corrective Services NSW Sydney Dance Company and Bendon Sydney Dance Company and The Works Sydney Harbour Federation Trust and Microsoft Sydney Symphony and Credit Suisse Sydney Theatre Company and Greening the Wharf partners The Living Room Theatre and Ray Parslow The Song Company and Principals The Song Room and Coal & Allied Community Development Fund WA Art Gallery of Western Australia and Adrian Fini AWESOME Arts Australia and 303Lowe & Zac Creative Big hART and Woodside Energy Black Swan State Theatre Company and Dessein

Film & Television Institute WA and Madfish Wines The HELIX Project and HARTAC Sales and Distribution KULCHA Multicultural Arts of Western Australia and CITIC Pacific Mining Perth International Arts Festival Perth International Arts Festival and Griffiths Architects Shakespeare WA and Santos Tura New Music and Total E&P Australia West Australian Opera and Hollywood Private Hospital West Australian Opera and Wesfarmers West Australian Symphony Orchestra and Chevron Australia Western Australian Museum and Woodside Energy and Society for Underwater Technology VIC Abbotsford Convent Foundation and ACE Alliance (Melbourne Water / Thiess Services) Arts Project Australia and Leonard Joel City of Greater Bendigo and Bendigo Advertiser Creativity Australia and Royal Children’s Hospital Creativity Australia and Sofitel Frankston Arts Centre Geelong Performing Arts Centre and Bendigo Community Banks (Geelong Region) Heide Museum of Modern Art Lake Bolac Eel Festival and Deakin University Melbourne Recital Centre and Audi Australia Melbourne Theatre Company Melbourne Writers Festival Moonshine Movies and Palliative Care Australia Museum Victoria National Gallery of Victoria and Ernst & Young Polyglot Theatre Sally McLean Sculpture and Spatial Practice, School of Art, VCA, The University of Melbourne and Lend Lease

St Martins Youth Arts Centre Victorian Opera and John Holland Group TAS Burnie Arts & Function Centre and Wellers Inn Encore Theatre Company and Heritage Isle Credit Union IHOS Music Theatre & Opera and Liminal Spaces Junction Arts Festival and Effective Naturally Junction Arts Festival and Kids Paradise and Pregnant Young Parents Support Service (PYPS) and cu@home Junction Arts Festival and Optomeyes Kickstart Arts Stompin and Darren Alexander Ten Days on the Island Ten Days on the Island and Southern Cross QLD artisan and BCM Australian Age of Dinosaurs and Cox Rayner Architects Cairns Indigenous Art Fair and Ports North Contact Inc Museum of Brisbane and Sunnybank Plaza Noosa Longweekend and Macquarie Perc Tucker Regional Gallery and Xstrata Copper Queensland Museum and ENERGEX Queensland Music Festival and Rio Tinto Alcan Queensland Music Network (Q Music) and Virgin Australia Queensland Symphony Orchestra Queensland Symphony Orchestra and RSL (Queensland Branch) Queensland Youth Orchestras and Peabody Energy State Library of Queensland and Magabala Books

69


AbaF Board & Council Board Directors Mr Terry Campbell AO

Senior Chairman

Goldman Sachs

Mr Stephen Found

Managing Director & Owner

Capitol Theatre & Lyric Theatre, Sydney

Ms Patria Jafferies

Non-Executive Director

VIC

Mr Graham Kraehe AO

Chairman

BlueScope Steel

VIC

Mr Peter Lamell

CEO

Silcar

VIC

NSW

Mr Mark Lelliott

Managing Partner

EWK International

VIC

WA

Mr Robin Levison

Managing Director & CEO

Industrea Limited

QLD

Chapter Chairs

Mr Nicholas Linke

Partner

Fisher Jeffries

SA

Mr Rob McLeod

Oceania CEO & Managing Partner

Ernst & Young

NSW

Ms Julieanne Alroe

Managing Director & CEO

Brisbane Airport Corporation

QLD

Mr Rohan Mead

Chief Executive Officer

Australian Unity

VIC

Mr Peter Althaus

Proprietor

Domaine A / Stoney Vineyard

TAS

Mr Peter Nash

Australian Chairman

KPMG

VIC

Mr Robert Bazzani

Victorian Chairman

KPMG

VIC

Mr Bruce Neill

Chair

Peppermint Bay Group

TAS

Mr John Irving

Director

Dundee Bay

SA

Mr Ross Nielson

Executive Director

Nielson Properties

QLD

Mr Ian Kew

CEO

Northern Territory Airports

NT

Mr Paul O'Sullivan

Chief Executive

Optus

NSW

Mr Mark Sullivan AO

Managing Director

ACTEW Corporation

ACT

Ms Mary Padbury

Chairman

Ashurst Australia

VIC

Mr Sam Walsh AO

Chief Executive, Iron Ore and Australia

Rio Tinto

WA

Mr Harley Paroulakis

CEO

Paspalis Property Trust

NT

Mr Peter Young AM

Director

RBS Morgans

NSW

Mr David Raffen

Managing Director

DrPC

SA

National Councillors

Mr Michael Rayner AM

Principal Director

Cox Rayner Architects

QLD

Ms Vivienne Ritchie

Vigneron

DELATITE Winery

VIC

Mr Terry Agnew

Group Chief Executive

RAC WA

WA

Mr Robert Rockefeller

Director

Nekon

TAS

Ms Julieanne Alroe

Managing Director & CEO

Brisbane Airport Corporation

QLD

Mr Simon Rothery

Chief Executive Officer & Managing Director

Goldman Sachs

NSW

Mr Peter Althaus

Proprietor

Domaine A / Stoney Vineyard

TAS

Mr Lloyd Smith

Group Chief Executive

Gerard Daniels

WA

Mr Russell Anstey

Managing Director, Western Australia

Hatch Associates

WA

Mr Michael Smith OBE

Chief Executive Officer

ANZ Banking Group

VIC

Mr Philip Bacon AM**

Director

Philip Bacon Galleries

QLD

The Hon Warwick Smith AM

Chairman Advisory Board

Australian Capital Equity

NSW

Ms Malu Barrios

General Manager

Darwin Convention Centre

NT

Mr Paul Spiro

Brisbane Chairman

Gadens Lawyers

QLD

Mr Luca Belgiorno-Nettis AM**

Joint Managing Director

Transfield Holdings

NSW

Dr Michael Stanford

Group Chief Executive Officer

St John of God Health Care

WA

Mr Gavin Bell

CEO & Chief Managing Partner

Freehills

NSW

Mr Kerry Stokes AC*

Executive Chairman

Seven Network

NSW

Ms Helen Besly

Managing Director

Rowland

QLD

Mr Mark Sullivan AO

Managing Director

ACTEW Corporation

ACT

Mr John Clayton

Pacific Region Head/CEO Australia

Marsh

NSW

Mr Giam Swiegers

Chief Executive Officer

Deloitte

NSW

Mr Peter Cleary

Vice President Strategy & Corporate Development

Santos

SA

Mr Alan Taylor

Managing Director, Perth

303LOWE

WA

Mr Peter Coleman

Managing Director & CEO

Woodside Energy

WA

Mr Sam Walsh AO*

Chief Executive, Iron Ore and Australia

Rio Tinto

WA

Mr Nick Collishaw

Managing Director

Mirvac

NSW

Mr Greg Ward

Deputy Managing Director

Macquarie Group

NSW

Mr Alan Cransberg

Managing Director

Alcoa of Australia

WA

Mr Ian Wilkinson

Managing Director, Australia West

WorleyParsons

WA

Mr Peter Young AM

Director

RBS Morgans

NSW

Mr Michael Crouch AO

Chairman & Chief Executive

Zip Industries

NSW

Mr Doug Dean AM

Managing Director

Veolia Environmental Services Australia

NSW

Commonwealth Bank of Australia

NSW

Mr Rob De Luca

Managing Director

Bankwest

WA

Visy Industries

VIC

Miss Julia Farrell

Executive Director

Federal Group

TAS

Mr Barry Felstead

Chief Executive Officer

Burswood Entertainment Complex

WA

State & Territory Councillors

Mr Stephen Found

Chairman

Production Resource Group

VIC

Mr John Georgiou

Chief Executive Officer

Georgiou Group

WA

Centre for People Development (SA), Cowell Clarke (SA), Cre8ive (ACT), FJM Property (WA), Grieve Gillett (SA), Hydro Tasmania (TAS), Manteena (ACT), Mermaid Marine (WA), Square Holes (SA), RACT (TAS), RMC Pty Ltd and SpectrumWriters (ACT)

Mr Russell Gibbs

Chief Executive Officer

Hawaiian Management Group

WA

Prof Barney Glover

Vice-Chancellor

Charles Darwin University

NT

Honorary Councillors

Mr Richard Goyder

Managing Director & CEO

Wesfarmers

WA

Recipients of AbaF Leadership Awards who have elected to join the AbaF Council

Mr James Graham

Managing Director

Gresham Partners

NSW

Prof Jeanette Hacket AM

Vice-Chancellor

Curtin University of Technology

WA

Dame Elisabeth Murdoch Arts Business Leadership Award Winners

Mr Andrew Hagger

Group Executive, Corporate Affairs & Marketing

National Australia Bank

VIC

Mr Paul Heath

Executive Director, CEO & Managing Director

JBWere

NSW

Ms Robyn Archer AO, Mr John Bell AM OBE, Mr Carrillo Gantner AO, Ms Elizabeth Ann Macgregor OBE, Mr Greg Mackie OAM, Mr Ian McRae AO, Mr Graeme Murphy AM, Ms Sue Nattrass AO, Mr Lyndon Terracini, Ms Mary Vallentine AO

Mr Hans Henkell

Managing Director

Henkell Brothers Investment Managers

VIC

Dr Dongyi Hua

Executive Chairman

CITIC Pacific Mining

WA

Mr Scott Hutchinson

Chairman

Hutchinson Builders

QLD

Richard Pratt Business Arts Leadership Award Winners Mr Rick Allert AO, Mr Anthony Berg AM, Mr Michael Chaney AO, Mr Ian Darling, Mr David Gonski AC, Ms Janet Holmes Ă  Court AC, Mr Harold Mitchell AC, Mr James Strong AO

Mr Peter Iancov

Group Chief Executive Officer

DORIC Group

WA

Mr John Irving

Director

Dundee Bay

SA

Philanthropy Leadership Award Winners

Mr Malcolm Jackman

CEO & Managing Director

Elders

SA

Mr Robert Albert AO, Mr Tim Fairfax AM, Mr Simon Mordant AM & Mrs Catriona Mordant, Mr John B Reid AO, Mr Peter Weiss AM

Mr Rod Jones

CEO & Managing Director

Navitas Group

WA

Mr Colin Jordan

CEO & Managing Director

Royal Automobile Club of Victoria

VIC

Mr Alan Joyce

CEO

Qantas Airways

NSW

Mr Ian Kew

CEO

Northern Territory Airports

NT

Ms Jane Kittel

Managing Director

BankSA

SA

70

AbaF Gold Book 2012

* AbaF Councillors Mr Kerry Stokes AC and Mr Sam Walsh AO are also recipients of the Richard Pratt Business Arts Leadership Award **The Belgiorno-Nettis Family and Mr Philip Bacon AM are also recipients of the Goldman Sachs JBWere Philanthropy Leadership Award

71


Production Resource Group (PRG)

Production Resource Group (PRG) is the world’s leading supplier of entertainment and event technology to a wide range of markets, including performing arts, concerts, special events, theatre, televisions and film, corporate and automotive events, trade shows, and installations, such as theme parks, museums, retail stores as well as performing arts centres. PRG has a long history of working in the arts, from Broadway or London’s West End to the Capitol Theatre or local productions including School Spectacular, the redevelopment of Melbourne’s Hamer Hall or fitting out school performing arts centres. PRG understands the needs and vision of the arts and entertainment sector and offers the most advanced, innovative solutions to implement creative visions across all cultural disciplines. PRG Australia recently re-affirmed its 30 year strong partnership with Arts Centre Melbourne for the re-opening and development of Hamer Hall, working on the specific lighting control needs for the project as well as coordinating a spectacular light show held nightly in July 2012.

72

AbaF Gold Book 2012

Leeuwin Estate The Art Of Fine Wine

With highly skilled teams of technicians and craftsmen, PRG can evaluate and address the myriad of considerations for permanent and touring productions, concerts, filming, special events and more, regardless of scale.

A family operated boutique vineyard and winery, Leeuwin Estate, one of the founding wineries of Western Australia’s renowned Margaret River district, is particularly proud to be consistently recognised amongst the great icon wines of the world.

Described as the most extraordinary concerts ever held in Australia, these sellout events now enjoy a 28-year history and have featured an eclectic mix of the world’s finest musicians and entertainers, becoming a highlight in Australia’s social and cultural calendar.

Special events with PRG are just that, unique productions that can take place in any venue, for any audience with any creative vision.

Leeuwin’s premium wines are known as the “Art Series”. The labels are adorned with the artworks of leading contemporary Australian artists. The collection now comprises over one hundred works from artists including John Olsen, Arthur Boyd, Sir Sidney Nolan, Lloyd Rees, Albert Tucker, Fred Williams, Robert Juniper, Clifton Pugh and Immants Tiller. Each painting forms part of the private collection owned by the Estate and displayed in the Leeuwin Art gallery.

A benchmark producer with an outstanding international reputation, Leeuwin attracts thousands of discerning wine connoisseurs each year. Visitors to the picturesque Estate can indulge in gourmet cuisine from the awardwinning restaurant, enjoy spectacular alfresco summertime concerts, inspect Leeuwin’s unique collection of contemporary Australian art, experience a behind the scenes tour of the winemaking process, utilise the private boardroom facilities and of course, savour Leeuwin’s outstanding premium wines. A scenic charter flight service from Perth to the Estate’s private airstrip is available.

The world’s leading supplier of entertainment and event technology, PRG provides integrated services and equipment, including audio, video, lighting, rigging, staging, and scenery and automation systems, from more than 40 offices in North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia. PRG Australia (and formerly Bytecraft) has been proud to partner with AbaF for more than ten years. www.prg.com

Continuing the Estate’s association with the arts, the tradition of the Leeuwin Concerts began in 1985 when the Estate provided financial support for the London Philharmonic Orchestra’s tour to Australia. As part of the visit the Orchestra performed in this unique vineyard setting, thereby launching what was to become an institution - the annual “Leeuwin Concert Series”.

The wines of Leeuwin Estate can be found in fine establishments in 30 markets. www.leeuwinestate.com.au tel: (08) 9759 0000 email: info@leeuwinestate.com.au

73


The Australian Financial Review and BOSS Magazine

Index A Adelaide Festival ........................ 34 Adelaide Hills International Sculpture Symposium................. 42 Adelaide Youth Orchestra............ 27 Adrian Fini................................... 65 aMBUSH Gallery......................... 26 Art Gallery of South Australia...... 15 Art Gallery of Western Australia...................................... 65 artisan.......................................... 56 Arts Project Australia................... 24 Audi Australia.............................. 17 Australian Network for Art and Technology........................... 57 B BCM............................................. 56 Bendigo Community Banks (Geelong Region).........................11 Big hART....................................... 9 C Cairns Indigenous Art Fair .......... 22 Chevron Australia ....................... 18 CITIC Pacific Mining.................... 29 ConocoPhillips............................. 30 Contact Inc.................................. 38 cu@home.................................... 61

The Australian Financial Review has been the leading authority on business and finance for the past 60 years. Although our readers are business leaders and senior executives or professionals they are also avid lovers of culture and the arts. The Australian Financial Review features highly respected arts coverage in Arts & Salesroom and Arts & Review in the Weekend Edition. The Australian Financial Review, AbaF’s 2012 National Media Partner, is delighted to support the AbaF Awards. that have long celebrated a successful marriage between business and the arts, a vital ingredient to the sustainability and growth of the cultural economy, in Australia. AFR is invested in engaging with our readers at a deeper level, not just in their business lives but by being connected with and supporting their cultural interests and endeavours.

74

AbaF Gold Book 2012

Whether it is through the generation of debate around philanthropy and the arts, or through our upcoming cultural alliances as part of the launch of a new subscriber loyalty program later in 2012, the Financial Review will continue to set the agenda through quality journalism on the most important issues facing the sector. www.afr.com.au

D Darren Alexander ....................... 66 Darwin Symphony Orchestra... 6,30 Deakin University........................ 31 E Effective Naturally........................ 13 ENERGEX................................... 52 F Fisher Jeffries.............................. 27 Four Winds Festival..................... 45 G Gadens Lawyers ........................ 16 Geelong Performing Arts Centre...................................11 Gerard Vaughan AM.................... 48 Greening the Wharf partners ...... 51

H HARTAC Sales and Distribution .23 Heide Museum of Modern Art...... 44 I IHOS Music Theatre & Opera...... 25 Information and Cultural Exchange (ICE)........................... 12 J Junction Arts Festival............ 13, 61 K Kickstart Arts............................... 37 Kids Paradise ............................. 61 Kim Williams AM.......................... 49 KULCHA Multicultural Arts of Western Australia.................... 29 L Lake Bolac Eel Festival............... 31 Lend Lease.................................. 55 Leonard Joel ............................... 24 Liminal Spaces ........................... 25 M Media Resource Centre.............. 60 Melbourne Recital Centre............ 17 Mental Health Coalition of SA...... 60 Moonshine Movies...................... 62 Museum of Brisbane................... 10 P Palliative Care Australia ............. 62 Patrick Corrigan AM ................... 47 Peabody Energy.......................... 32 Perth International Arts Festival.. 41 Poetry In Action........................... 16 Popperbox/Symple Creative........ 12 Ports North ................................. 22 Pregnant and Young Parents Support Service .......................... 61

R Ray Parslow................................ 67 Renew Adelaide.......................... 64 Riverside Theatres...................... 36 S Santos......................................... 15 Sculpture and Spatial Practice, School of Art, VCA, The University of Melbourne....... 55 Sitzler............................................ 6 Southern Cross........................... 19 Special Broadcasting Service (SBS) ............................. 12 St Martins Youth Arts Centre....... 35 Steve Maras................................ 64 Stompin....................................... 66 Sunnybank Plaza........................ 10 Sydney Dance Company............. 57 Sydney Theatre Company........... 51 T Ten Days on the Island.......... 19, 43 The Children’s Hospital at Westmead............................... 59 The Galeries................................ 26 The HELIX Project....................... 23 The Living Room Theatre............ 67 The Lot........................................ 12 The Works................................... 57 V Virgin Australia............................. 20 W Wesfarmers ................................ 54 West Australian Opera................. 54 West Australian Symphony Orchestra................... 18 Woodside Energy.......................... 9

Q Queensland Museum.................. 52 Queensland Music Industry Network ........................ 20 Queensland Symphony Orchestra..................................... 40 Queensland Youth Orchestras.... 32

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2012 AbaF Awards National Partners & Supporters

Contact AbaF

Jane Haley CEO

Australia Capital Territory

Jill Berry Executive Director National Business Development

Director ACT: Bea Brickhill Coordinator ACT: Jenny Norris T: 02 6247 4199 E: act@abaf.org.au New South Wales

Award Category Partners

arts health

foundation

Awards Supporter

Media Partner

Damien Hodgkinson Executive Director Operations Trudi Sheppard Manager Communications and Marketing

Manager NSW: Marie-Louise Carroll Coordinator NSW: Grace Archibald Administrative Assistant NSW: Jessica Thornton T: 02 9215 9313 E: nsw@abaf.org.au

Denise Damianos Manager Australia Cultural Fund

Queensland

Alicia Stafford Manager Professional Development

Director Queensland: Sue Fisher Coordinator Queensland: Melanie Pitt T: 07 3211 5051 E:qld@abaf.org.au

Joanne Simon Manager Finance

South Australia

Kate Steele Administration Officer

Director SA: Jane MacFarlane Coordinator SA: Will McRostie T: 08 8233 0676 E: sa@abaf.org.au

Kathryn Austin Manager Business Development Stuart Westbury Manager IT

Jane Allsop Finance and HR Officer

Cherie Schweitzer Communications Officer Sally Wilson National Events Officer

Acknowledgements The Gold Book 2012 was prepared by the Australia Business Arts Foundation based on the nominations submitted for the AbaF Awards 2012. The nominations and judges’ comments are the source of the information and quotes published in this book. AbaF thanks all the organisations featured in this book for their nominations and the accompanying images. All images are used by permission of the artists and organisations. Disclaimer Every effort has been made to ensure that this publication is free from error and/or omission at the time of printing. The authors, the publisher and any person involved in the preparation of the Gold Book 2012 take no responsibility for loss occasioned to any person or organisation acting or refraining from action as a result of information contained in this publication. ISBN: 978-0-9804540-6-2 The Gold Book 2012 is published by the Australia Business Arts Foundation (AbaF).

Northern Territory Event Partner

Wine Partner

Sparkling Wine Partner

Director NT: Meriel Corbett-Weir T: 08 8943 0657 E: nt@abaf.org.au Tasmania

Beer Partner

Hotel Partner

Victoria

This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior permission from the Australia Business Arts Foundation. Requests and enquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed by email to info@abaf.org.au

Nominations Partner

Western Australia Major Event Partner Macquarie Event Supporter Gadens Lawyers Queensland Major Event Partner Brisbane Airport Corporation

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AbaF Gold Book 2012

SA & NT Print Partner Hyde Park Press

Tasmania Major Event Partners The Federal Group The Henry Jones Art Hotel Arts Tasmania Event Partners Little Creatures Brewing Luke Wagner Monotone Art Printers

Wine Partners Domaine A / Stoney Vineyard Kreglinger Wine Estate Pipers Brook Vineyard

Western Australia Major Event Partner Bankwest Event Partners Leeuwin Estate Little Creatures Brewing

Director WA: Henry Boston Coordinator WA: Toban Harris T: 08 9366 8005 E: wa@abaf.org

Victoria Event Partner Arts Victoria Venue Partner Arts Centre Melbourne

The Australia Business Arts Foundation is supported by the Commonwealth Government through the Cultural Development Program of the Office for the Arts, Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport.

Trudi Sheppard Editor Sweet Creative Graphic design

2012 AbaF Awards State and Territory Partners & Supporters

Event Partner State Library of Queensland Catering Partner Caxton St Catering Media Partner Seven Network

Big Words Writer

Director Tasmania: Magdalena Lane Coordinator Tasmania: Essie Kruckemeyer T: 03 6237 6311 E:tas@abaf.org.au

Director Victoria: Stefani Adams Coordinator Victoria: Clementine Walker Administrative Assistant Victoria: Edward Sainsbery T: 03 9616 0326 E: vic@abaf.org.au

NSW & ACT

Contributors

National Office T: 03 9616 0300 E: info@abaf.org.au

Š Australia Business Arts Foundation 2012

Printed on elemental chlorine-free stock with pulp sourced from plantations and managed forests, bio degradable laminate finish with soy based inks free of hydrocarbons.



Gold Book