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Across the Threshold Annual Report 2008


Contents

Letter from the Chair and the President

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Project Highlights:

Iraq Virtual Science Library

6

Infectious Disease Surveillance in Central Asia

8

Newborn Screening Initiative in the Middle East

10

Event Highlights

12

CRDF Services

18

Financial Statement

20

Where We Work

22

Board of Directors

23

Advisory Council

24

Executive Staff and Office Locations

25

Funders and Partners

26


Letter from the Chair and the President

John Moore

Chair, Board of Directors

Cathleen A. Campbell President & CEO

Dear Friends and Colleagues, In this 2008 annual report, we have much good news to share about CRDF’s programs and activities and their transformative impact on international science collaboration. Our theme— “Across the Threshold”—reflects the path of this transformation into a new realm of shared knowledge, economic development and enduring relationships between nations. 2008 was a very exciting time for CRDF. Working together with our partners, we took important steps toward strengthening international scientific collaboration. We supported this goal through awarding research grants, conducting training activities and providing technical services. Our outreach now has extended globally to more than 30 countries. In the Middle East and North Africa, we supported the establishment of programs that facilitate and build collaborative relationships between the region’s scientists and engineers with their U.S. counterparts. One example addressed the



development of improved screening methods for genetic diseases in newborns. Through a workshop and a related funding competition, CRDF helped Middle Eastern researchers in this field to begin to develop regional networks and form international teams with U.S. and other scientists around the world to identify and address research opportunities. The outcome will be truly transformative—helping babies stay healthy as well as creating lasting connections between scientists. As part of our mission, CRDF promotes positive change by introducing international best practices and proven institutional models in science, higher education and technology commercialization. In 2008, CRDF worked to strengthen university research and education in science and engineering in places like Iraq through such projects as the Web-based project to reintegrate the nation’s scientific and higher education communities into the global community of science. In 2008,


CRDF also expanded its higher education program to include a new research and education center in Ukraine that will address energy efficiency research, a key economic priority area for Ukraine. Our programs and services in innovation continued to address urgent issues of global entrepreneurship and technology commercialization. In 2008, we drew upon our strong record of bringing together local scientists and business people to help build strong local science/business partnerships, while establishing links with U.S. companies, associations and technical experts. We also hosted workshops and training seminars for hundreds of scientists in Eurasia to impart valuable lessons on such topics as proposal writing, business plans and intellectual property concerns. CRDF continues to be a key partner in implementing government and private programs to halt proliferation. Our programs give priority to former weapons researchers and engage them in productive civilian research and development. In Kyrgyzstan, public health scientists—including those who once worked in the bioweapons field—are increasingly

using mapping tools like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to track infectious diseases such as anthrax and use the resulting data to develop ways to control outbreaks. They are obtaining much-needed help to use this technology through a consortium that CRDF helped to establish with support from the U.S. Department of State. Not only will raising the level of GIS expertise in Kyrgyzstan help address infectious disease outbreaks, it will also help stimulate research, education and business cooperation using these technologies. Taken individually, these changes are impressive. However, their real strength lies in the powerful momentum created by their collective impact, leading us into a better future. The world we live in tomorrow depends tremendously on the support given to science and scientists today. We are delighted to continue our effort to raise awareness about the importance of engaging scientists internationally to address global challenges. As you will see, “Across the Threshold” is more than a concept. It accurately describes how we view the impact of international science collaboration on creating an enduring transformation. We hope you will join us on this journey.

John Moore

Chair, CRDF Board of Directors

Cathleen A. Campbell President & CEO

CRDF Annual Report 2008




Project Highlight: Iraq Virtual Science Library

Through the IVSL, Iraqi scientists and engineers participated in several CRDF training workshops and conferences to increase knowledge of their fields and learn about new research approaches.

Opening the Gateway to Change Iraqi scientists and engineers faced decades of isolation from the international scientific community. Today, in an oftendangerous environment, they are willing to risk their lives to continue their work. Through a Web-based project—called the Iraq Virtual Science Library (IVSL)—they can access up-todate scientific data and expand their research horizons as well as their contributions to their nation’s reconstruction. The IVSL—for which CRDF serves as secretariat and manager—is an online database that provides free, full-text access to more than a million peer-reviewed articles and a large collection of educational materials. It was formed through a partnership among several U.S. government agencies, companies and NGOs. Since inception of the IVSL, more than 7,000 Iraqis have registered to use the database, which serves all public universities in Iraq (80 percent of the Iraqi university population) as well as nine government ministries. As of May 2009, approximately 30,000 articles are downloaded each month, with more than 1,000,000 articles downloaded since the start of the program in 2006. Access to current research has prompted a three-fold increase in the



number of publications made by Iraqi scientists in the world’s leading journals—from approximately 80 publications in 2005 (before the IVSL began) to almost 240 in 2008. The IVSL is playing a significant part in facilitating this rise in publication output. Several Iraqi researchers—speaking anonymously in order to protect their safety—stress that they cannot imagine conducting research without the IVSL. They had previously undertaken tedious and inefficient publication searches without access to scientific databases. Now, thanks to the IVSL, they are able to increase their knowledge of their fields and learn about new research approaches very easily. Students also use the IVSL to interact with researchers around the world to learn the latest methods and technologies and prepare to contribute their own findings to international journals and conferences. “I’d like to express my gratitude to everyone working on the ISVL, and my gratitude is extended to all the world scientific organizations and presses to validate it, and we look for more scientific cooperation and exchange between Iraq and the world countries,” says one of the researchers.


“Having your heart in the right place is not enough, you need people who have the type of experience, energy and motivation that CRDF talent brings to the table. Without CRDF, this would have been a far less successful effort.” ­—William McCluskey International Technology Programs Office Office of the Secretary of Defense

In 2009 CRDF will build on its success managing the IVSL project and the newly launched Research and Education Portal in Iraq (REPI) to develop digital library and information-technology based projects in other countries. Already plans are underway for a pilot virtual science library program in Afghanistan.

Project Perspective A “true partnership” is how William McCluskey, the director of the International Technology Programs Office with the Office of the Secretary of Defense, describes the Iraq Virtual Science Library (IVSL). McCluskey, as the Department of Defense lead, helped to develop the IVSL in 2005 with several public and private sector partners. Over the last four years, the tremendous impact of the IVSL has made McCluskey and his partners feel they have made a positive difference in the lives of Iraqi scientists and students who chose to stay in Iraq and help their fellow citizens. According to McCluskey, the IVSL advances science and technology and contributes to the stabilization and democratization of Iraq.

CRDF has played a critical role in facilitating the IVSL, says McCluskey. He emphasized that CRDF’s successful experience in improving the conditions for conducting scientific research and education can be a strong asset to other countries wanting to create positive change in their people. McCluskey has continued to work with CRDF on reconstruction and stabilization efforts in Iraq, including the development of an exchange program for Iraqi engineers. “The IVSL has proven to be the foundation that enables such followon efforts,” says McCluskey.

CRDF Annual Report 2008




Project Highlight: Infectious Disease Surveillance in Central Asia

Instructors from the local research community, the United States and Europe have provided GIS training to the public health community in Kyrgyzstan.

Breaking New Ground in Public Health Safety Central Asia has a long history of infectious diseases that circulate in domestic and wild animal populations and are transmitted to humans. Over the last decade, new independent countries like Kyrgyzstan have been grappling with infectious disease outbreaks with minimal resources. Public health scientists in Kyrgyzstan–including those who once worked in the bioweapons field—are increasingly needing to use mapping tools like Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to track infectious diseases such as anthrax and utilizing the resulting data to develop ways to control outbreaks. CRDF has helped to establish a consortium to enable these scientists to have access and training to use this important technology. Since its inception in 2006, the Kyrgyz Consortium for GIS Excellence (KCGE) has played an important role in helping scientists across Central Asia strengthen their mapping skills to more quickly map and track diseases. Its primary goal is to raise the level of GIS expertise in Kyrgyzstan and to stimulate research, education and business cooperation using these technologies. The KCGE has resulted in the establishment of a GIS



facility located at the Kyrgyz State University of Construction, Transportation and Architecture (KSUCTA) in Bishkek. The KCGE is managed by Project Director Dr. Akylbek Chymyrov, head of the KSUCTA Department of Geodesy, appointed by the KSUCTA and CRDF. The KCGE project is funded by a grant from the U.S. State Department to CRDF. Initial steering guidance came from U.S. consortium members, but the Kyrgyz members—led by Dr. Chymyrov—assumed management of the Kyrgyz component of the consortium, as planned. A GIS computer laboratory equipped with modern hardware and GIS software was established at KSUCTA. Instructors from the local research community, the United States and Europe provide GIS training in spatial analysis, spatial epidemiology, ecological modeling and integration of GIS into biological, ecological and disease surveillance studies. The KCGE has brought together U.S. scientists with their Kyrgyz counterparts, as well as enabled public health researchers in Kyrgyzstan to improve their understanding of infectious disease and help implement preventative strategies.


“With the KCGE, we now have a centralized place in Kyrgyzstan to provide standardized GIS training to the public health community.” ­—Dr. Jason Blackburn Director/Spatial Epidemiology and Ecology Research Laboratory California State University, Fullerton

Project Perspective The KCGE grew out of a long-standing relationship with CRDF and Dr. Jason Blackburn—director of the Spatial Epidemiology and Ecology Research Laboratory at California State University, Fullerton—when he was consulting on the development of new GIS laboratories in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan that were funded by the U.S. Department of Defense. The KCGE project in Kyrgyzstan benefited from these earlier GIS experiences in Central Asia, and will allow for the three countries to share their GIS data regionally.

According to Dr. Blackburn, the KCGE has flourished under the leadership shown by its head, Dr. Akylbek Chymyrov, head of the KSUCTA Department of Geodesy, and his staff. Dr. Blackburn says they have worked hard to engage scientists from Kyrgyzstan and other nations in the Central Asia and Caucasus regions through membership, training and meetings. They have also established strong academic and research cooperation with the European GIS community.

CRDF Annual Report 2008




Project Highlight: Newborn Screening Initiative in the Middle East

In 2008, CRDF—in connection with the NIH—furthered research collaboration on newborn screening in the Middle East and North Africa region by holding a proposal development workshop and grant competition as part of a conference held in Cairo, Egypt.

Exchanging Knowledge, Saving Lives The screening of newborns for a variety of genetic and metabolic disorders is required by every state in the United States. In the Middle East and North Africa—a region in which inherited disorders occur at a higher frequency—testing has become one of the top health priorities. Several countries are now working together to develop and expand national newborn screening programs through the Middle East and North Africa Newborn Screening (NBS) Initiative, which brings health professionals, policymakers and researchers together through conferences and other activities to discuss common issues and establish shared research activities. In 2008, CRDF helped to advance these collaborations by holding a proposal development workshop and grant competition to allow new research collaborators to work together. Both the workshop and competition were organized as part of the Second Conference of the MENA NBS Initiative held April 12-14, 2008 in Cairo, Egypt. The primary organizers for this conference were the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and other agencies at

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the NIH. NICHD has led the MENA initiative and provided support to CRDF for both activities. The conference provided participants with the opportunity to discuss recent advances in research and technology that have led to the development of more effective detection and treatment of genetic disorders. Researchers from the Middle East and North Africa region and Asia shared ideas and mechanisms for developing a national newborn screening system, related challenges and other management issues. From this conference and the integrated workshops, new networks began to develop and opportunities for collaborative projects began to evolve. CRDF—in connection with the NIH—helped to further these partnerships and expand these regional collaborative projects through the proposal development workshop and grant competition. The workshop focused on establishing a framework for potential newborn screening networks and forming international teams to identify and address research priorities. The grant competition then provided seed money to support the development of comprehensive research proposals that qualify for submission to local, regional or international


“We’ve had a very good collaboration with CRDF in this newborn screening initiative. CRDF has had a very important role in stimulating research activities. You have the flexibility that is different from the NICHD’s—and I think we need to build on that.”

­—Dr. Danuta Krotoski, Ph.D.

Center for Developmental Biology and Perinatal Medicine National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH

Project Perspective funders that support newborn screening research initiatives or activities in the region. CRDF awarded one grant to a team from Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt. This funding will enable the researchers to travel to a central location to collaborate on the development of their research projects and draft a full proposal that will be submitted to sources of funding other than CRDF. CRDF’s grant competition resulting from the Cairo proposal development workshop is an important first step for future collaborations, says Dr. Danuta Krotoski, Ph.D., the senior advisor to the director of the Center for Developmental Biology and Perinatal Medicine and special assistant to the deputy director of the NICHD at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Krotoski has worked closely with CRDF in activities that promote collaborative research for the Middle East and North Africa Newborn Screening Initiative.

Dr. Danuta Krotoski, Ph.D., is the senior advisor to the director of the Center for Developmental Biology and Perinatal Medicine and special assistant to the deputy director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Krotoski says that bringing countries together to exchange knowledge on the genetic screening of newborns is saving children’s lives in the Middle East and North Africa region. “One of the most important things we can do is involve researchers in the region,” she adds. “The workshop and follow-on grant competition with CRDF are wonderful because they’re bringing the region’s countries together. I personally feel there are a lot of opportunities in the future to identify priority areas and work together in a collaborative fashion.”

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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2008 Events: George Brown Award

Dr. Edwin Daniel Hirleman, the recipient of CRDF’s 2008 George Brown Award for International Scientific Collaboration, celebrates the uniting power of scientific and educational cooperation through many active international projects. (Pictured above and opposite page, bottom)

A Commitment to Global Education In 2008 CRDF presented Dr. Edwin Daniel Hirleman, professor and head of the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University, with the CRDF George Brown Award for International Scientific Collaboration in recognition of his outstanding commitment to international education and cooperative research. Throughout his career, Dr. Hirleman has been active in encouraging cultural and scientific exchanges with engineers and researchers around the globe. The George Brown Award is CRDF’s highest honor, recognizing outstanding individuals for their efforts to promote international science collaboration in the spirit of the late U.S. Congressman George Brown. According to Dr. Hirleman, solving today’s grand challenges—from clean water to energy to healthcare—requires collaborations between engineers and scientists from all over the world. “For today’s engineers, every job is a global engineering job,” says Dr. Hirleman. “When we get students together face to face and struggling together, that’s when we create global engineers. My goal is to deliver that opportunity to as many students as we can.”

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As the founder of Purdue University’s Global Engineering Program (GEP), Dr. Hirleman has designed international opportunities specifically for engineering students and professionals, and has established programs to help integrate global concepts into their work. Through GEP, he established the Global Engineering Alliance for Research and Education (GEARE), which combines international study with opportunities for internships and collaborative research. Dr. Hirleman is also working to develop GlobalHUB, an NSF-funded Engineering Virtual Organization that enables students, faculty and researchers to use a wide array of open-source software to collaborate on international team design projects, facilitate exchange programs and advance engineering education research. In his acceptance speech at CRDF’s award event in October 2008, Dr. Hirleman celebrated the uniting power of scientific and educational cooperation: “Purdue, CRDF and I have the same vision, and that’s peace and prosperity. We’re convinced that when our students build these global networks of peers and friends—with China, India, Africa—that is the best we can do to ensuring peace for future generations.”


“Purdue, CRDF and I have the same vision, and that’s peace and prosperity.”

—Dr. Edwin Daniel Hirleman

William E. and Florence E. Perry Head and Professor of Mechanical Engineering Purdue University

CRDF President and CEO Cathy Campbell and CRDF Board Chair Dr. John Moore honored Dr. Edwin Daniel Hirleman, the 2008 recipient of the George Brown Award, for his dedication to global education. (Top left)

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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2008 Events: Promoting the Value of International Science Cooperation on Capitol Hill

CRDF Board Director Dr. William Wulf, second from far-right, testified on behalf of CRDF at a July 2008 Congressional hearing on the role of U.S. non-governmental organizations and universities in fostering international science and technology cooperation. (Photograph by the House Committee on Science and Technology)

CRDF Testifies Before House Committee on Science and Technology The United States needs to do more to engage U.S. scientists and engineers in international science collaboration—that was the message of Dr. William Wulf, a member of CRDF’s Board of Directors, as he testified on behalf of CRDF at a July 15, 2008 hearing before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Research and Science Education. Dr. Wulf’s testimony focused on the role of nongovernmental organizations and universities in international science and technology cooperation. The hearing, entitled “The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations and Universities in International Science and Technology Cooperation,” highlighted the importance of expanding international collaborative activities for U.S. scientists and engineers to help find global solutions to global challenges. In his testimony, Dr. Wulf explained why the United States must do more to engage our scientists and engineers in international collaboration. He also shared the experience that CRDF has accumulated over 13 years as an effective and efficient implementer of global science and technology collaborations and a solid partner with the U.S. government, private sector and foreign governments and institutions.

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“We are delighted that CRDF was invited to testify before the House Science Committee,” noted Dr. Wulf. “It was this Committee, under the leadership of its former Chairman the late Congressman George Brown, which spawned the creation of CRDF in 1992. Chairman Brown felt strongly about international science cooperation and the value that NGOs could contribute to implementing global collaborations to address a myriad of challenges.” Dr. Wulf also called for the U.S. government to launch a strategic, new global initiative to catalyze, broker, amplify and scale up science and technology cooperation for the benefit of the United States and its partners around the world. Patterned after other public-private partnerships, this new global science initiative would engage scientists internationally to encourage critical scientific and technical advances that address global challenges including infectious disease, food security, energy alternatives and vanishing ecosystems; to reach young scientists and support a robust research and educational infrastructure; and to build mutually beneficial economic partnerships. “It would facilitate greatly expanded international science and technology cooperation as well as enhance institutional


“Scientists and engineers share a set of values that transcend culture. Those shared values facilitate developing the trust that is essential to achieving foreign policy and national security objectives.” —Dr. William Wulf

President Emeritus National Academy of Engineering

capacity in the developing world,” said Dr. Wulf. “Nations with a strong, stable science and technology base are better participants in the global economy, develop indigenous solutions to national problems and contribute to ongoing international collaborative efforts.” In addition to Dr. Wulf, other witnesses were invited to present testimony, including: • • •

Dr. Alan Leshner, the chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the executive publisher of the journal Science Dr. Michael Clegg, the foreign secretary of the National Academy of Sciences and the Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Irvine Dr. James Calvin, the interim vice president for research and a professor of statistics at Texas A&M University

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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2008 Events: CRDF Convenes Panel on International Higher Education Reforms

CRDF Senior Program Manager and Senior Technical Advisor Dr. Marilyn Pifer led an international panel on research in higher education at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Report from the 2008 AAAS Annual Meeting CRDF showcased its work at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston, February 13-18. At CRDF’s symposium, entitled “Changing Models of Research in Higher Education: International Perspectives,” CRDF Senior Program Manager and Senior Technical Adviser Dr. Marilyn Pifer led an international panel that presented three stages of higher education reforms aimed at improving economic growth. The panelists included Professor Brendan Goldsmith, the president emeritus of the Dublin Institute of Technology; Rector Mikhail Strikhanov of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute; and Dr. Wajih Owais, the president of the Jordan University of Science and Technology.

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The panelists discussed preferred models of successful and sustainable university research. They also highlighted important social, cultural, and economic factors that influence university research structures from one country to another. Specific attention was also paid to the U.S. university research model, widely viewed as being successful, and the lessons that can be gleaned from, and added to, that model. Later that evening, CRDF welcomed nearly 300 attendees to an International Science for Diplomacy Reception, at which CRDF President and CEO Cathy Campbell and Board member Dr. David Kay impressed upon attendees the real impact of CRDF’s work creating solutions to global challenges such as disease, climate change and economic growth.


Members of the U.S.−DPRK Scientific Engagement Consortium, for which CRDF serves as the secretariat, met at the AAAS Annual Meeting to discuss future consortium activities.

At her plenary address, Dr. Nina Fedoroff, the science and technology adviser to the U.S. Secretary of State, told the AAAS audience that science and technology has an important role to play in strengthening links with poorer countries, particularly at a time when the United States faces “a rising tide of resentment” around the world. She cited the January 2008 signing of a new science and technology agreement with Libya as evidence of growing acceptance of the role science can play in U.S. diplomacy.

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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CRDF Services: GAP in 2008

CRDF’s GAP program simplifies the management of international projects by offering crucial project support, streamlining bureaucratic processes and overcoming barriers to research collaboration.

Providing Crucial Project Support CRDF’s GAP services draw upon expertise refined in nearly 15 years of global operations to aid other organizations in successfully moving forward their objectives. GAP offers a host of services that cater specifically to diverse clients and provides the project support services that organizations need to manage international research collaborations. New clients in 2008 included: Washington University, St. Louis Chevron Corporation Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Yellowstone Park Foundation BHP Billiton Ltd. ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) The U.S. Russia Center for Entrepreneurship

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In addition to services in Eurasian countries, GAP has broadened its geographic scope to provide services for activities in the Middle East, North Africa, Southeast Asia and beyond. In 2008 GAP provided its services in such countries as Iraq, Libya, Brazil, Estonia, Pakistan and Indonesia. GAP has consistently provided tailor-made solutions that allow clients to succeed in even the most complex projects. Services include coordinating international collaboration, ensuring financial accountability, support and facilitating project management. In 2008 GAP expanded its travel and event support services and its ability to receive and make payments in Euros.


CRDF Services: Building a Knowledge-based Economy in Qatar

CRDF and the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) signed a contract in 2008 in which CRDF is providing technical services to help QNRF in its work as a science-based foundation.

Promoting International Cooperation CRDF has been contracted by the Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF) to provide the benefit of its nearly 15 years of experience as a science funding agency across a number of tasks including information and award management, professional development and public relations. QNRF was established by the Qatar Foundation in 2006 as part of its ongoing commitment to establish Qatar as a knowledge-based economy. Through its National Priorities Research Program and the Undergraduate Research Experience Program, QNRF aims to fund original, competitively selected research in natural science, industry and engineering, health and medical sciences, agricultural science, and social science and the humanities. During the summer and fall of 2008, CRDF conducted a series of seminars for the QNRF executive, program, financial and administrative staff. CRDF provided opportunities for QNRF executives to meet with members of the U.S. science policy and funding community such as the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the

Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the U.S. Department of State to explore opportunities for international cooperation. The QNRF leaders also met with CRDF’s executive team to discuss mutual challenges and approaches to managing a science-based foundation. QNRF program staff seminars focused on grant programs design and implementation including operating peer-reviewed competitions using modern database and Web-interface technologies, methods of selecting and qualifying peer reviewers, the administration of science panels, applicant and awardee relations and variations in review processes. QNRF financial and grant administration staff participated in a seminar covering internal controls and best practices, audit and compliance; due diligence, preparing and negotiating grant agreements, intellectual property, bioethics, financial management, procurement, data management and record keeping.

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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Financial Statement

Stephen S. Wolk, CPA Chief Financial Officer

Letter from the CFO CRDF’s budget and fiscal policies are carefully designed to advance our mission and to promote sound stewardship of our financial resources. Those policies ensure that we comply with all Federal and State requirements as we promote international scientific and technical collaboration through grants, technical resources and training. Over the past fiscal year CRDF maintained our past practices of excellence in financial terms as well as in the positive impact of its mission and program activities. We appreciate the many funders from whom we receive grants and financial support, including the U.S. government, private foundations and corporations.

Despite 2008’s unusual economic patterns, we maintained a balanced funding portfolio through a prudent, responsible fiscal policy. As we begin the new fiscal year, we remain committed to a diversified investment portfolio and a balance between existing and new funding sources. The financial information presented here is drawn from CRDF’s 2008 audited financial statements, prepared by McGladrey & Pullen, LLP, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and presented to the CRDF Board of Directors in June 2009.

Sincerely,

Stephen S. Wolk, CPA Chief Financial Officer

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Financial Statement Consolidated statement of activities for the year ended December 31, 2008 Temporarily Restricted

Unrestricted Revenues: Grants and Contracts Interest and Investment Income GAP program Net Assets Released

$

Total Revenues

Expenses: Program Expenses: Centers, Institution Building & Innovation Cooperative Research Grants Nonproliferation Middle East & North Africa GAP program Total Program Expenses Management Expenes

Total Expenses

Change In Net Assets

Net Assets At Beginning of Year Net Assets At End of Year

$

10,601,426 356,197 1,688,425 10,869,243 23,515,291

$

1,777,795 178,929 (10,869,243) (8,912,519)

Total

$

12,379,221 535,126 1,688,425 14,602,772

5,355,187 4,242,321 7,301,139 1,051,128 17,949,775 1,414,948 19,364,723 5,093,776 24,458,499

-

5,355,187 4,242,321 7,301,139 1,051,128 17,949,775 1,414,948 19,364,723 5,093,776 24,458,499

(943,208)

(8,912,519)

(9,855,727)

12,065,829

27,501,468

39,567,297

11,122,621

$

18,588,949

$

29,711,570

*The information presented here is drawn from the 2008 consolidated financial statements of CRDF and Subsidiary, which were audited by McGladrey & Pullen, LLP in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards and presented to the CRDF Board of Directors at its June 2009 meeting.

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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Where We Work CRDF is committed to working in countries where international science and technology cooperation can have a critical impact. Our international offices and partners throughout Eurasia, Middle East, North Africa and South Asia facilitate our programs and services

Where we make a difference

in more than 30 countries.

Russia

Estonia Ukraine Poland Hungary Macedonia Albania

Latvia

Georgia

Azerbaijan Kazakhstan

Tajikistan Kyrgyzstan

Uzbekistan Turkmenistan

Lithuania Moldova

Slovenia

Bulgaria

Pakistan India

USA Jordan Qatar

Philippines Indonesia

U.A.E. Libya

Iraq Armenia

Egypt

Thailand

Saudi Arabia

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Eurasia/Eastern Europe

South & Central Asia

Middle East & North Africa

South East Asia

Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Bulgaria Estonia Georgia Hungary Latvia

Afghanistan Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Pakistan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Uzbekistan

Egypt Iraq Jordan Libya Qatar Saudi Arabia

Indonesia Philippines Thailand

Lithuania Macedonia Moldova Poland Russia Slovenia Ukraine


Board of Directors (as of Dec 31, 2008)

Dr. John H. Moore Chair President Emeritus Grove City College

Ms. Rose Gottemoeller Vice Chair Director Carnegie Moscow Center

Mr. Fred L. Johnson Treasurer Chairman Santa Fe Technologies, Inc.

Ms. Dona L. Crawford Secretary Associate Director Computation Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Dr. Gloria Duffy

Dr. Rodney Nichols

Dr. Irma Gigli

Dr. Victor Rabinowitch

President and CEO The Commonwealth Club of California Director Center for Immunology & Autoimmune Diseases University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Dr. David Kay

Senior Fellow Potomac Institute for Policy Studies

Dr. Marjorie Senechal

President Emeritus New York Academy of Sciences

Senior Vice President (Retired) The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Dr. Kenneth W. Rind Senior Advisor Investment Banking Caris & Company

Louise Wolff Kahn Professor Emeritus in Mathematics History of Science and Technology Smith College

Dr. Albert R.C. Westwood Vice President Emeritus Sandia National Laboratories

Dr. William Wulf President Emeritus National Academy of Engineering

Dr. Jaleh Daie

Managing Partner Aurora Equity

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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Advisory Council (as of Dec 31, 2008)

Ambassador Thomas A. Pickering Chair Vice Chairman, Hills & Co.

Dr. Zhores L. Alferov

Nobel Prize in Physics (2000) Science Director A.F. Ioffe Physico–Technical Institute

Ambassador James F. Collins Director and Senior Associate Diplomat in Residence Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Dr. Sidney D. Drell Senior Fellow Hoover Institute Stanford University

Dr. Farouk El-Baz

Research Professor and Director Center for Remote Sensing Boston University

Dr. Loren R. Graham

Professor of History and Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Dr. Siegfried S. Hecker

Co-Director Center for International Security & Cooperation Stanford University

Dr. John Holdren

Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy Harvard University

Dr. Leon Lederman

Nobel Prize in Physics (1998) Former Director Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Illinois Institute of Technology

Mr. Charles T. Owens President Emeritus CRDF

Dr. Frank Press

Principal The Washington Advisory Group Former President U.S. National Academy of Sciences

Dr. Peter H. Raven

Director Missouri Botanical Garden Former President American Association for the Advancement of Science

Ms. Kim K. Savit

International Business Manager Science Applications International Corporation Adjunct Professor GSIS University of Denver

Dr. Robert M. White

Principal The Washington Advisory Group Former President National Academy of Engineering


Executive Staff

Ms. Cathleen A. Campbell President & CEO

Dr. Eric Novotny

Senior Vice President

Mr. Shawn Wheeler

Vice President for Global Operations and Program Support Services

Mr. Stephen S. Wolk Chief Financial Officer

Locations

CRDF Offices Headquarters

1530 Wilson Boulevard, 3rd Floor Arlington, Virginia 22209 Tel.: 703-526-9720 Fax: 703-526-9721 info@crdf.org | www.crdf.org

Russia/Eurasia

Ulitsa Miklukho-Maklaya 16/10 Room 204 Moscow 117997, Russia Tel.: 7-495-777-6560 Fax: 7-495-777-6559 www.crdf.ru

Ukraine/Eastern Europe 4 Bogomoltsa Street Room 133 01024 Kyiv, Ukraine Tel.: 380-44-253-7223 Fax: 380-44-253-4577 www.crdf.org.ua

Central Asia

151/115 Corner Radostovets Str. Abay Ave. Almaty District, Almaty Republic of Kazakhstan Tel./Fax.: 7-7172-50-24-05

Baku, Azerbaijan (Opening 2009)

Amman, Jordan (Opening 2009)

CRDF Subsidiary LLC

CRDF TechInnovation ulitsa Kirovogradskaya, d. 9 korp. 1, office 245 Moscow, Russia Tel.: 7 (495) 741-05-37 info@crdf-techin.ru www.crdf-techin.ru

CRDF Annual Report 2008

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Funders and Partners 2008 CRDF Funders

Azerbaijan National Science Foundation

CRDF wishes to thank the following U.S. government

Estonian Science Foundation

agencies, private foundations and corporations for their

Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative

grants and financial contributions to CRDF in 2008.

Enterprises (FASIE), Russia Georgian National Science Foundation

U.S. State Department

Georgian Research and Development Foundation

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

Lithuanian State Science and Studies Foundation

Carnegie Corporation of New York

Ministry of Education and Science, Armenia

U.S. Department of Defense

Ministry of Education, Azerbaijan

U.S. Department of Energy

Ministry of Education and Science, Georgia

U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Ministry of Education and Science, Moldova

U.S. National Institutes of Health

Ministry of Education and Science, Russia

U.S. National Science Foundation

Ministry of Education and Science, Ukraine

U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency

Moldovan Research and Development Association

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

National Academy of Sciences of Armenia

Defense Science and Technology Laboratory

National Foundation of Science and Advanced

King Abdullah University for Science and Technology

Technologies, Armenia

Qatar National Research Fund

National Mining University, Ukraine

Richard Lounsbery Foundation

Organisation for Economic

Ploughshares Fund

Co-operation and Development

Bechtel National, Inc.

Royal Scientific Society, Jordan

SRI International

Russian Academy of Sciences

U.S.-Russia Center for Entrepreneurship

Russian Foundation for Basic Research Yerevan State University

CRDF Partners CRDF wishes to thank the following organizations that

U.S. Non-Governmental Organizations

partnered with CRDF to carry out a program activity or

Armenian Engineers and Scientists of America

event in 2008.

American Association for the

Foreign Government Partners:

Syracuse University

Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan

The Korea Society

Advancement of Science

Academy of Sciences of Moldova Arab Science and Technology Foundation, UAE

26


Congressional Partners

The Hon. Brian N. Baird, House of Representatives

CRDF wishes to thank the following Congressional

The Hon. Janice D. Schakowsky, House of Representatives

partners for serving as co-sponsors and/or honorary

The Hon. Adam Schiff, House of Representatives

chairs of CRDF events in 2008:

The Hon. Tim Ryan, House of Representatives The Hon. Russ Carnahan, House of Representatives

The Hon. Joseph R. Biden, Jr., United States Senate

The Hon. Brian Bilbray, House of Representatives

The Hon. Richard G. Luger, United States Senate The Hon. John F. Kerry, United States Senate

Embassy Partners

The Hon. Dianne G. B. Feinstein, United States Senate

Embassy of the Republic of Armenia

The Hon. Richard J. Durbin, United States Senate

Embassy of Azerbaijan

The Hon. Evan Bayh, United States Senate

Embassy of Georgia

The Hon. Hillary R. Clinton, United States Senate

Embassy of the Republic of Iraq

The Hon. Barack H. Obama, United States Senate

Embassy of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

The Hon. Robert P. Casey, Jr., United States Senate

Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan

The Hon. Charles J. “Jerry� Lewis,

Embassy of the State of Kuwait

House of Representatives

Embassy of Kyrgyz Republic

The Hon. Ralph M. Hall, House of Representatives

Embassy of Latvia

The Hon. Frank R. Wolf, House of Representatives

Libyan Liaison Office

The Hon. Thomas P. Lantos, House of Representatives

Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania

The Hon. Gary L. Ackerman, House of Representatives

Embassy of the Republic of Moldova

The Hon. Howard L. Berman, House of Representatives

Embassy of Pakistan

The Hon. Bart Gordon, House of Representatives

Embassy of Poland

The Hon. Nita Lowey, House of Representatives

Embassy of the State of Qatar

The Hon. Wayne T. Gilchrest, House of Representatives

Embassy of the Russian Federation

The Hon. David L. Hobson, House of Representatives

The Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia

The Hon. James P. Moran, House of Representatives

Embassy of Tajikistan

The Hon. Anna G. Eshoo, House of Representatives

Embassy of Ukraine

The Hon. Sam Farr, House of Representatives

Embassy of the United Arab Emirates

The Hon. Roscoe G. Bartlett, House of Representatives

Embassy of the Republic of Uzbekistan

The Hon. Donald A. Manzullo, House of Representatives The Hon. Vernon Ehlers, House of Representatives

CRDF would also like to gratefully acknowledge each of the

The Hon. Zoe Lofgren, House of Representatives

U.S. Embassies in the countries in which we work for their

The Hon. Danny K. Davis, House of Representatives

continued support. CRDF would also like to thank the many

The Hon. Dennis J. Kucinich, House of Representatives

individual scientists and engineers who volunteer their time

The Hon. Rush D. Holt, Jr., House of Representatives

and expertise for our merit-based review programs to ensure

The Hon. Judith B. Biggert, House of Representatives

the quality of the work that CRDF supports.

CRDF Annual Report 2008

27


2008 Annual Report  

In this 2008 annual report, we have much good news to share about CRDF’s programs and activities and their transformative impact on internat...

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