Page 1

A Guide to Environmental Sustainability

For the

UNIFORMGROUP August 8th, 2008


Table of Contents Section 1.

INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………………..4

2.

2.1

OVERVIEW OF THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS………………………………………...6 The Stages………………………………………………………………………….............7

3.

STAGE ONE - ESTABLISHING YOUR BUSINESS DRIVERS………………………..8

3.1 4.

Why is Environmental Sustainability Good for Business?....................................8 STAGE TWO - SCOPING YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY……………………………………………………………………...9

5.

STAGE THREE - CURRENT ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE………………...10

5.1 5.2

Energy, Water and Waste ………………………………………………………… 11 Compliance with legislation…………………………………………………………….12

6.

STAGE FOUR - IDENTIFYING OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT IN YOUR USE OF RESOURCES……………………………………..14

6.1 6.1.1 6.1.2 6.1.3 6.1.4 6.1.5 6.1.6 6.2 6.2.1 6.2.2 6.2.3 6.2.4 6.2.5 6.3 6.3.1 6.3.2 6.3.3 6.3.4 6.3.5 6.3.6 6.3.7

Suggested opportunities for reducing energy use …………………………………14 Lighting……………………………………………………………………………………...14 HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning)……………………………………15 Hot Water……………………………………………………………………………………15 Kitchens……………………………………………………………………………………..15 Appliances and Office Equipment……………………………………………………...16 Transport……………………………………………………………………………………16 Water Use…………………………………………………………………………………...17 Basics………………………………………………………………………………………..17 Kitchen ………………………………………………………………………………………17 Taps…………………………………………………………………………………………..17 Shower heads………………………………………………………………………………18 Toilets………………………………………………………………………………………..18 Waste………………………………………………………………………………………..18 Paper and cardboard……………………………………………………………………..18 Packaging…………………………………………………………………………………..19 Electronic waste…………………………………………………………………………..20 Ablutions……………………………………………………………………………………21 Chemicals and cleaning products……………………………………………………..21 Furnishings………………………………………………………………………………...21 Construction and demolition waste……………………………………………………21


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

7.

STAGE FIVE - DEVELOPING YOUR ACTION PLANS AND ENVIROMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY……………………………………………23

7.1 7.2

Training……………………………………………………………………………..23 Your Environmental Sustainability Policy …………………………………..23

8.

STAGE SIX - IMPLEMENTATION OF YOUR ACTION PLANS AND INTEGRATION INTO YOUR DAY TO DAY WORK PROCESSES…………26

9.

STAGE SEVEN - MONITORING AND REPORTING……………………………….. 27

10.

STAGE EIGHT - REVIEW AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT…………………..27

11.

APPENDICES……………………………………………………………………………...28

2


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

1. INTRODUCTION

Environmental Sustainability can be defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

3


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

An environmentally sustainable organisation aims to balance society, economy and environment within its operations.

Environmental Sustainability is often described as a journey rather than a destination. The Sustainability Institute of NZ (SIONZ) has developed an Eight Stage Process to assist your organisation’s journey towards environmental sustainability. The Eight Stage Process provides a practical methodology for establishing your baseline data for energy, water and waste. It will assist you to identify opportunities for improvement, set targets and develop an action plan. Guidelines are provided for creating your Environmental Sustainability Policy and integrating the principles of environmental sustainability into your business practices within a framework of continuous improvement.

4


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

2

OVERVIEW OF THE EIGHT STAGE PROCESS

Introduction The Eight Stage process is illustrated below:

Stage One:

Stage Two:

Establishing Your Business Drivers

Scoping Your Environmental Sustainability Project

Stage Eight

Stage Three:

Review and Continuous Improvement

Eight Stage Cycle

Stage Seven:

Establishing your Baseline Data, Checking Compliance with Current Legislation

Monitoring, And Reporting

Stage Four: Opportunities for Improvement in Your Use of Resources.

Stage Six: Implementation of Your Action Plan

Stage Five: Environmental Sustainability Policy Creating Your Action Plan

5


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

2.2 The Stages

Stage One:

Establishing Your Business Drivers

Stage Two:

Scoping Your Environmental Sustainability Project

Stage Three

Establishing Your Baseline Data, Checking Compliance with Current Legislation Identifying Opportunities for Improvement in your Use of your Resources

Stage Four :

Stage Five:

Setting SMART targets and creating Your Action Plan Environmental Sustainability Policy

Stage Six:

Implementation of Your Action Plan

Stage Seven: Monitoring, and Reporting Stage Eight:

Review and Continuous Improvement

6


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

3. STAGE ONE - ESTABLISHING YOUR BUSINESS DRIVERS 3.1

Why is Environmental Sustainability Good for Business?

Environmental Sustainability provides significant benefits to businesses and their stakeholders, including shareholders.

Businesses that have adopted sustainable business practices have reported the following benefits:

Reduced operating costs.

Enhanced opportunity to win business that requires suppliers to prove they meet sustainability criteria.

Ensuring compliance with current health, safety and environment legislation.

Future proofing against legislative changes.

Improved status with stakeholders through demonstration of social responsibility.

Enhanced ability to attract and retain employees

Raised competitiveness through innovation.

7


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

4. STAGE TWO - SCOPING YOUR ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT The Scope for your project needs to address the following: Commitment: To maximise potential benefits, the environmental sustainability values and principles that you establish for your organisation must become embedded in your policies and practices. For this to happen, Senior Management must be committed to the project. Staffing: Management champion, Project Leader, Team member(s), Team leader(s), role of other staff As a consequence of the project staff may need to start doing things in different ways. They may need to do different things. We strongly encourage you to involve staff from all levels and areas of your business in the planning process and suggestions from staff should be encouraged. Time frames: Start and End Dates for the Project and for each stage. Involvement of Clients / Customers: Consider whether you want to involve your clients / customers in the process. Some organisations have found a questionnaire seeking feedback on current environmental practices and inviting suggestions from clients / customers has been very useful. Linkages to Other Projects: Are there projects already underway that link to the Environmental Sustainability project? For example, are you about to replace your vehicle fleet, are you re-vamping the staff kitchen or going to tender for new business? Resources required: Budget required: Reporting: Who, What, When and How? Communications: It is important that all members of the organisation have an understanding of the Environmental Sustainability project and how they fit in. Everyone should be kept informed of progress.

8


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

5. STAGE THREE - CURRENT ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE Establishing Baselines for Energy, Transport, Water and Waste. Checking Compliance with Legislation To establish your company’s current environmental performance and to provide levels to measure progress against, you need to measure baseline data for resources used, waste and emissions produced. As these measurements can be time consuming and complex, it is important to focus your efforts on the most significant areas for your company. We suggest that you start with overall figures, assess significance in terms of your business drivers and then consider more detailed measurements, if necessary, for particular areas. In this Guide a methodology for obtaining the overall data is described. Data at a more detailed level would generally require the services of a qualified expert in a specific area, e.g. air conditioning. SIONZ is able to assist you by sourcing this expertise, if required. It may be appropriate to have one person or team completing all the tasks required. Alternatively you may wish to have a different person or team completing each component. .

A spreadsheet is provided to calculate your baseline data.

9


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

5.1 Energy, Water and Waste The data used to establish your baseline values is historic. The spreadsheet supplied allows you to enter data on a monthly basis. You may wish to enter data for each of the 12 months previous, if it is available, or for a lesser period. Enter the kWh in the Electricity cell of the spreadsheet for each month you have chosen to record. If you use gas, enter the GJ used in the Gas cell. Enter the total consumption in litres of petrol and diesel used by your company vehicles in the Petrol and Diesel cells. Enter the distance in km travelled for Domestic, International Short Haul (<3700 km) and International Long Haul (>36900 km). If you don’t have a record of the actual kilometres travelled there is a Flight Calculator in the spreadsheet to assist you. If taxi travel is significant for your business, enter the distance in km travelled by taxi. On the summary sheet you will now see your baseline consumption values for electricity, gas, vehicle and air travel. The Energy Graph will now display your total energy consumption excluding flights. Water consumption in an office occurs in four principal areas: kitchens, amenities (i.e. toilets and showers), heating and cooling systems (i.e. cooling towers) and landscaping. In some cases leaks can also account for a large proportion of the apparent ‘consumption’. Where a business is the owner or sole tenant in a building using water supplied by a local authority water supply it is possible to monitor the water use from your water usage account. If you have a bore water supply, read your meter on a regular basis. Where a business is a tenant in an office block or another type of building one way to determine water consumption is to approach the landlord and request the total volume of water consumed by all tenants in the building. By also finding out the total number of people using the building (as full-time equivalent staff, or FTE) you can calculate the average volume of water consumed per FTE. This figure can be used to estimate the water consumed for each business in the building, based on a business’s number of FTE staff. If total water use and FTE data are not available, water usage can be estimated for a particular business based on the occupied floor area (m2). Often a business will pay its landlord a portion of the water bill based on the average water consumption (per m2) for the whole building. Although this is not based on the actual quantity of water consumed by an individual business, it is based on the building average and is a useful starting point. A solid waste audit is a tool to help find out what waste your organisation is producing, so that you can find ways to reduce the waste, to recycle or to reuse it.

10


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

Many organisations choose to employ an independent specialist to conduct the waste audit. SIONZ can arrange this for you. A Waste Audit Manual is supplied in Appendix One if you wish to carry out the waste audit yourself. Enter your waste figures into the spreadsheet. You now have baseline figures for both your energy usage, waste produced and your carbon emissions. 5.2

Compliance with legislation

Environmental Sustainability requires organisations to comply with relevant legislation. As part of establishing your baseline data, you should check your compliance with: 

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992 (and Prescribed Matters Regulations 1993)

Department of Labor http://www.dol.govt.nz/about/legislation.asp 

First Aid Equipment, Facilities and Training to meet HSE Act and Regulations. Department of Labor

http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/order/catalogue/252.shtml 

Injury Prevention, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2001 Accident compensation legislation (ACC)

http://www.acc.co.nz/about-acc/WCM001469 

Building Act 2004

The Department of Building and Housing http://www.tenancy.govt.nz/publications-about-the-building-act-2004 

Fire Service Act 1975/Fire Safety and Evacuation of Buildings Regulations 1992

The New Zealand Fire Service http://www3.fire.org.nz/cms.php?page=18066 Smoke-free Environments Act 1990

11


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

Health Education Resources - A Guide to the Smokefree Environments http://www.healthed.govt.nz/resources/aguidetothesmokefreeenvironmentsac.aspx 

Resource Management Act 1991

Ministry for the Environment http://www.mfe.govt.nz/rma/index.php 

Biosecurity Act 1993

MAF Biosecurity New Zealand http://www.biosecurity.govt.nz/what-is-biosecurity/the-biosecurity-act 

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 and related legislation

Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996 (HSNO) http://www.osh.dol.govt.nz/law/hsno.shtml 

Local Government Act 2002 / Trade Waste Bylaws

Specific to your Local Authority 

Water Supplies Protection Regulations 1961

Specific to your Local Authority 

Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996

About the Ozone Layer Protection Act 1996 http://www.mfe.govt.nz/laws/ozone.html

12


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

6. STAGE FOUR - IDENTIFYING OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT IN YOUR USE OF RESOURCES Talk to everyone involved to identify opportunities for improving your use of resources. The saying “Avoid, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Compost” can help focus thinking. It may be helpful to categorise suggestions into Quick Wins, Moderate Changes or Significant Changes. “Quick Wins” are free or low cost actions that will be easy to implement and give good returns. Quick Wins help to maintain the motivation of your project team, and grow the support from management and staff. Examples of Quick Wins would be keeping car tyres inflated correctly and providing fuel tips sheets to all staff that drive company vehicles or encouraging staff to report leaking taps immediately. Moderate Changes require minor cost and effort. For example, considering water and energy efficiency ratings when purchasing new appliances. Significant Actions require significant planning and investment and may take some time to implement, e.g. alternative fuel systems for fleet vehicles. 6.1 Suggested opportunities for reducing energy use The biggest energy consumers in offices are typically: • Lighting • HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) • Office equipment (computers, printers, photocopiers etc) • Domestic hot water (DHW) • Kitchen equipment General suggestions  Educate staff on energy efficiency and conservation techniques  Install signage and reminders for staff 6.1.1 Lighting Lighting uses approximately $3 to $10 per square metre of floor space per year. It has been found that many offices can save approximately 40% on lighting by making effective changes. Ideas for minimising lighting costs and increasing efficiency include:  Turning off lights when they are not needed e.g. at night or when the business is shut down (i.e. public holidays)  Checking that infrequently used areas are not lit continuously e.g. storage areas  Replacing fluorescent tubes that need replacing (as they dull off over time). This can save energy as staff are less likely to use additional lighting to supplement the lower light levels.  Cleaning or improving reflectors or removing diffusers (diffusers are plastic covers used to scatter light and were mostly installed to remove glare on CRT computer monitors which is less of an issue with newer flat screens and LCD displays)

13


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

     

Checking that maximum use is made of natural lighting Checking that lighting and lamps are of an energy efficient type Using efficient night lights (or on motion sensors) Not over-lighting night areas Installing a control switch to enable you to turn off all lighting when you leave Installing control switches in individual departments so individual areas can be lit while in use rather than lighting the whole floor

6.1.2 HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) Gains can be made by:  Programming time clocks to switch off when the office is not occupied (e.g. overnight, lunch breaks etc). Note that time clocks are often not reset when we switch to and from daylight savings.  Ensuring that air conditioning and heating is switched off when external temperatures are such that opening a window would be more effective.  Ensuring that the control of the air conditioning or heating system is assigned to one person and that staff agree on the temperature required.  Encouraging staff to dress appropriately for the time of year.  Ensuring that the cooling (air conditioning) and heating (heaters, heat pumps) do not fight each other by operating at the same time.  Not heating unoccupied areas  Closing doors and windows in the winter (except where needed for ventilation) 6.1.3 Hot Water Ways to minimise energy use with amenities include:  Setting the domestic hot water temperature to 60°C  Insulating hot water pipes so heat loss is minimized  Minimising the distance between the hot water cylinders and taps  Ensuring that you are using tempered water systems. Tempered water systems mix in cold water near the hot water source so losses of heat in the pipe work are minimised. This also means you are putting less cold water into your heating water unit  Investigating using instant water heaters rather than hot water cylinders  Investigating solar water heating or night rate water heating opportunities 6.1.4 Kitchens Ways to minimise energy use in the kitchen include:  Using the microwave to heat food rather than an oven  Fixing dripping hot water taps quickly  Only using the dishwasher when it is full  Using a jug rather than using large wall mounted water heaters or zips

14


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

6.1.5 Appliances and Office Equipment The table below provides examples of energy usage for office equipment. Equipment Laptop Computer and monitor Energy star rated monitors Photocopiers Microwave oven Dishwasher Ovens    

Energy use when in use 30 watts 90-150 watts 20 watts (LCD) 1,400-1,600 watts 200-900 watts 1200 watts 900-1500 watts

Energy in stand by mode 5 watts 10 watts (monitor off) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

If replacing appliances consider using energy efficiency (Refer Appendix Two for information on Energy Rating labels and Energy Star) Make a list of the equipment that can be switched off at night and circulate around the office Switch off computers and screens when not in use and activate E-Star (built into Windows operating system) Set printers and photocopiers to utilize a stand by mode.

6.1.6 Transport  Ensuring trips are well planned - combining trips and ensuring that deliveries are planned to minimise mileage.  Scheduling regular servicing of vehicles and ensuring engines are well tuned.  Checking that high mileage vehicles are run on CNG, LPG or are high efficiency diesels.  Ensuring that freight is transported by rail or coastal shipping wherever possible.  Rewarding staff for good practice.  Minimising the use of air conditioning systems in vehicles - they increase fuel consumption (up to 10% more fuel).  Avoiding short trips (up to 20% more fuel is used when a car is first started until it is warm).  Driving smoothly and avoiding over revving the engine (this will also mean your vehicle lasts longer.  Avoiding idling.  Encouraging alternative transport for staff by providing carpooling spaces, bike racks, showers and changing rooms and bus timetables.  Using public transport.  Using teleconferencing and videoconferencing.  Considering purchasing hybrid or alternative fuel vehicles.

15


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

6.2 Water Use

Appliance or Equipment

Water Used

Shower

10 - 30 litres per minute

Garden sprinkler

1000 litres per hour

Standard dishwasher

20 - 40 litres per wash

4 star rated dishwasher

127 litres per wash

Toilet Flush

11 litres per flush

6.2.1 Basics  Educating staff on water conservation methods.  Installing signs and reminders for staff.  Encouraging staff to report leaking taps and toilet cisterns - fix promptly.  Reviewing water use by cleaners to check if water use can be reduced. 6.2.2 Kitchen Dishwashers can use up to 40 litres of water per wash (Consult your appliance manual or supplier to determine the volume used)  Ensuring that you fill the unit before washing dishes.  If you are replacing the unit then choose a WELS 4 star water rated appliance (Using a dishwasher with a WELS four star rating or better will reduce water usage to less than 1 litre per place setting. For example, a four star, 12 place setting capacity dishwasher would have a water use less than 12 litres per wash. For more information on the WELS Water Efficiency Labelling Scheme, refer Appendix Two). 6.2.3 Taps  When rinsing items, fill the sink first and then rinse. Rinsing under a flowing tap wastes water.  Using taps that are rated for water efficiency (see http://search.waterrating.com.au/tap_srch.asp).  Fixing dripping taps promptly. A dripping tap can waste up to 2,000 litres per month. (Typical taps discharge 15 to 18 litres per minute) Low-flow and aerating models can use as little as 2 litres per minute WELS 6 star taps use less than 5 litres per minute (see http://search.waterrating.com.au/tap_srch.asp)

16


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

6.2.4 Shower heads  A standard showerhead uses about 15 to 25 litres of water per minute A (WELS) three star water efficient showerhead uses a maximum of 9 litres per minute (see http://search.waterrating.com.au/showers_srch.asp) 6.2.5 Toilets  A leaking toilet can waste up to 16,000 litres per year.  A standard flush unit uses 11 litres per flush. Water efficient dual flush units can use as little as 4 litres per flush (see http://search.waterrating.com.au/lavatory_srch.asp).  Install a toilet dam to reduce water consumption (e.g. fill a 1.5 litre plastic bottle with water and place inside the cistern if the toilet isn’t a dual flush).  An average urinal uses about 2.2 litres per flush The most efficient urinals reduce flush volumes to 1.5 litres per flush (see http://search.waterrating.com.au/urinal_srch.asp) Water less urinals use no water  Use gray water or rain water for flushing toilets. 6.3 Waste There are many different ways to go about reducing waste. In some cases, simple changes to purchasing or the way you go about your daily activities can have a significant impact on your waste. The following sections outline some common waste streams and provide practical opportunities for waste reduction. 6.3.1 Paper and cardboard Paper and cardboard usually make up a large proportion of office waste. The following information outlines how this paper (including stationery) and cardboard waste can be reduced, reused and recycled. Basics  Knowing how much paper and cardboard you are buying.  Knowing where paper and cardboard is going now and how much is going where.  Setting up a paper and cardboard recycling system.  Educating staff on recycling.  Putting up relevant signage to remind staff to recycle.  Organising a paper and cardboard recycling collection service. Quick Wins  Encouraging e-mailing and discourage printing of e-mails.  Proof reading documents electronically when possible.  Teaching staff to use print preview and spell-check on the computer to avoid unnecessary printing.  Setting photocopiers and printers to print double-sided and reduce copies to fit two pages into one, where possible.  When printing PowerPoint presentations as a handout, print 6 slides on each side of an A4 page.  Using your computer to send paperless faxes.

17


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

  

          

Not printing agendas for everyone at meetings. Post one agenda on the board or share copies. Using a data projector for meetings rather than paper handouts. Placing a reuse tray beside the printer/photocopier and on desks to collect and encourage reuse of paper used on one side only (lids from paper containers make good trays). Reusing envelopes for internal circulation and reuse envelopes for external mail by covering the address and markings with stickers. Purchasing reuse address labels for envelopes. Buying envelopes made out of recycled paper. If you must use window envelopes, then ask your supplier for envelopes that use glassine, a wood fibre product, as these can be recycled. Using 2-way envelopes. Reusing paper folders. Using paper recycling collection containers under people’s desks, beside photocopiers and printers and in the lunch room. Collecting paper, newspaper, magazines, and cardboard for recycling. Buying cardboard rather that plastic folders. Using durable cardboard folders and binders. Using distribution lists for magazines and other subscriptions rather than ordering copies for individual staff.

Medium  Eliminating unnecessary forms and redesign forms to use less paper.  Circulating memos, reports, and publications using distribution lists.  Removing duplicates from mailing lists, updating lists before mail-outs, and taking yourself off unnecessary mailing lists.  Making note pads with paper that has only been used on one side.  Shredding paper and use for packaging.  Giving your old magazines and journals to schools and libraries.  Using binders, file folders, containers, and report covers more than once.  Reusing computer paper ream containers for filing instead of buying filing containers  Buying recycled and recyclable paper products.  Talking to suppliers about minimising packaging.  Purchasing in bulk to reduce packaging.  Encouraging suppliers to use reusable and recyclable containers.  Transporting your products in containers you have received from suppliers.  Asking customers to return containers for reuse and recycling.  Giving away materials you cannot reuse yourself. 6.3.2 Packaging Products often have packaging that can be avoided. Look at your suppliers’ and your own products and identify ways packaging can be improved to minimise material use and increase its ability to be reused and recycled after purchase. Consider the following when reviewing opportunities to minimise packaging use:  Options to prevent excess packaging.  Talking to suppliers to take back packaging for reuse or recycling.  Considering reusing packaging. 18


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

         

Using packaging made from materials that can be reused or be recycled. Using materials already on hand for loose-fill packaging material e.g. use shredded office paper for loose fill packaging. Giving away what materials you cannot reuse. Using reusable containers and mailbags for shipping to branch offices, shops, and warehouses Shipping products to your customers in the containers that you receive from your suppliers. Setting up a place to store reusable containers Asking customers to return containers for reuse. Printing a message on products to encourage consumers to recycle the packaging. Returning, reusing and repairing wooden pallets and spools. Purchasing in bulk to reduce packaging.

Kitchen Some simple ideas for reducing waste in your kitchen facilities include:  Using reusable cups and cutlery.  Recycling glass, plastic, aluminium and steel recyclable containers.  Providing a labelled organics bin in the tearoom to collect food waste for composting or for a commercial organic collector. By weight, food scraps often make up to a third of the total weight of office waste. Remember that the organic waste that you compost or use a Bokashi system to process could be put on your office garden. Go to http://www.ccc.govt.nz/waste/composting/ to find out more. 6.3.3 Electronic waste Electronic waste can occur from a number of sources e.g. computers, photocopiers, printers, mobile phones and batteries. It is important to ensure that these wastes are dealt with in an appropriate manner. Consider:  Opportunities for others to use the unwanted equipment.  Returning equipment to suppliers for reuse or recycling.  Donating equipment to schools or charities.  Purchasing equipment that can be upgraded.  Purchasing equipment that can easily be repaired. Ways of minimising the impacts of electronic waste include:  Leasing items that are used occasionally or share them with other offices in your building.  Considering an upgrade or reconditioning of equipment before replacement.  Purchasing equipment that matches your requirements rather than using the ‘biggest is best’ mentality.  Ensuring equipment can be upgraded if needed in the future.  Considering the length of product life, warranty and availability of repair services when purchasing equipment.  Using re-chargeable batteries and recycle dead cell phone batteries and other batteries.

19


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

For more information on hazardous waste such as electronics, visit the Environment Canterbury website at www.ecan.govt.nz. Printers  Buying refillable toner cartridges and recycle old cartridges.  Getting printer ribbons re-inked.  Investing in photocopiers and printers that can default to double side printing.  Using draft mode when printing to save on toner. Fluorescent tubes Fluorescent tubes contain mercury and pose an environmental risk. These can be recycled through an appropriate commercial recycler. 6.3.4 Ablutions The key to reducing waste from the ablutions and shower areas is to purchase wisely. Consider the following:  Using hand dryers and/or cloth towel dispensers in bathrooms (ensure you meet your organisation’s Health and Safety requirements), or purchase recycled and unbleached paper towels.  Purchasing toilet paper in bulk and do not purchase individually wrapped rolls.  Purchasing hand soap in bulk and avoid individually wrapped items.  Purchasing cleaning liquids in bulk and decant into smaller refillable containers for daily use. 6.3.5 Chemicals and cleaning products  Considering the use of re-washable rags rather than disposables.  Dispensing cleaning solutions in refillable containers like pump-spray bottles and buy in bulk. Use products in non-aerosol containers where possible. 6.3.6 Furnishings When purchasing workplace furnishings, look for the following to support your waste reduction programme: Tips for choosing carpets  Products that contain recycled content.  New Zealand made products that can be repaired locally.  Products that contain natural additives like vegetable dyes.  Formaldehyde free natural latex, woollen or jute (plant) backings  A carpet that is recyclable at the end of its life.  Look for Environmental Choice labels for environmentally preferable carpets. (Environmental Choice Products: www.ianz.govt.nz/echoice) Tips for choosing paints  Choosing paints with low or no off-gassing (no volatile organic compounds, (VOCs).  Choosing paints that do not contain mercury or mercury compounds or tinted with pigments of lead, cadmium, chrome 6 or their oxides (look for Environmental Choice labels). Tips for choosing furniture  Buying furniture that is recycled or has recycled content.

20


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

   

Buying furniture that is modular and can be easily upgraded or disassembled for recycling at the end of its life. Buying durable furniture. When modernising your office consider recovering or painting existing furniture instead of buying new furniture. Buying furniture with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) logo to ensure it is from sustainably managed forests.

6.3.7 Construction and demolition waste If you are planning on building a new office or renovating an office view the REBRI Guidelines (Resource Efficiency in the Building and Related Industries) at www.rebri.org.nz to assist you in reducing waste going to landfill and clean fill. Other ideas to reduce waste in the office:  Recycling old computers or donate to charity groups or schools.  Donating old office furniture to charity groups, recycle at the transfer station recycling centre or repair and revamp existing furniture. For each resource area, use the worksheet in Appendix Four to:      

Document the opportunities for improvements that have been suggested. Categorise each opportunity – Quick Win, Medium or Significant. Where possible, implement Quick Win suggestions as soon as is practicable. Document all the costs / expenses associated with each Medium and Significant opportunity. Where appropriate complete an ROI analysis. Document any dependencies associated with the opportunity, e.g. can’t be implemented until kitchen renovations begin in January 2009. Prioritise the opportunities in each category (The priorities should reflect what’s important to decision-makers and the organisation. However, you also need to think about the interests of staff. If the majority of staff are really keen to focus on recycling cardboard, then you may have to have projects that focus on both, and use the one to lead to progress in the other).

21


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

7. STAGE FIVE - DEVELOPING YOUR ACTION PLAN Decide which opportunities you want to implement and set efficiency targets for each. Make sure each target is SMART:  SPECIFIC - you need to be clear about what is to be achieved  MEASURABLE - you should be able to measure your progress (i.e. quantitatively) and demonstrate if you are meeting the target or not  ACHIEVABLE - the objectives you set must be achievable within your business environment (i.e. time, money, labour)  REALISTIC - can you actually achieve the objectives with the resources you currently have, with the constraints imposed by other projects?  TIME LIMITED - what are the deadlines and when do you want to have achieved the target? Some examples of SMART targets are:  We will reduce our paper use per full time equivalent staff member by 10% over the next 12 months.  After October 1st 2008 we will no longer provide disposable cups in the cafeteria. Document your SMART targets in the Worksheet in Appendix Four. Develop an Action Plan for each target. The degree of implementation planning required will depend on the significance of the efficiency target. Quick Wins may require communication only. Medium targets may require limited consultation and resource to implement. Procedures may need to be updated or developed. Significant targets may require sign off at a high organisational level and require extensive planning. Be sure that all staff impacted by the changes are kept well informed. People are more receptive to change if they know why they should do it, exactly what they need to do and that their efforts will be acknowledged. 7.1 Training When developing your Action Plans consider staff training. You may need to have specific training for particular targets. Resource efficiency awareness and training should be conducted on a periodic basis so that all staff understand the commitment to resource efficiency. This training could be incorporated into your existing training programmes, (health and safety, processes, etc.), and should also be included in induction training for new staff. Staff newsletters and your intranet provide opportunities for keeping staff up to date. 7.2 Developing your Environmental Sustainability Policy An Environmental Sustainability Policy is a written statement outlining an organisation’s mission in relation to managing the environmental effects and aspects of its operations. Your Environmental Sustainability Policy should clearly state the aims and principles of your organisation with respect to its impact on the environment.

22


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

There is no standard format for writing an Environmental Sustainability Policy, but the style should reflect your organisation’s culture and your business drivers. A good starting point is to review examples of policies written by other organizations and select a format and style appropriate to your organisation. (Refer Appendix Six for Policy examples). There is no standard content for an Environmental Sustainability Policy, although policies normally contain similar themes, including those listed below. As a general rule, the policy should comment on the following criteria: 

A commitment to continuous improvement

Recognition of compliance with relevant environmental legislation as a minimum level of performance

The education and training of employees on the environmental impact of their activities and on environmental issues as they relate to the workplace

The monitoring of progress and review of environmental performance on a regular basis (usually annually)

Additional issues you may wish to address in your Environmental Policy could include: 

Efficient use of waste and energy

Minimising waste

Transport

Recycling of packaging materials

Use of biodegradable materials

Use of timber from sustainable (managed) forests

Minimising use of solvents and lead-based paints

Compliance with approved Codes of Practice

Expecting similar environmental standards from all suppliers and contractors

23


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

If your business is closely linked to key customers through the supply chain, obtain a copy of their Environmental Sustainability Policy and consider framing your statements to reflect their requirements and needs. Draft your policy using simple words and concepts that speak clearly to the people who will be reading, enforcing, and living by the policy. Select several employees, or even a small pilot group, to read the policy and ask any questions they might have about the policy. This review provides feedback that employees will be able to understand and follow the policy. Rewrite the policy based on the feedback. Review the policy with the managers who will have to lead and put the policy into effect. You will want to have their support and ownership of the policy. You will have started this process much earlier, even as early as when you identified the need for the policy, but management support as you implement the policy is crucial. Publish your Environmental Sustainability Policy on your Web Site and include it in company reports. To check that your organisation’s current activities comply with the Environmental Policy, a review needs to be undertaken regularly – usually on an annual basis. If your organisation’s business activities or operations change significantly, the policy may need to be amended.

24


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

8. STAGE SIX - IMPLEMENTATION OF YOUR ACTION PLANS AND INTEGRATION INTO YOUR DAY TO DAY WORK PROCESSES Conduct a resource efficiency awareness programme for all staff. Implement the action plans for your resource efficiency targets including identified training requirements. You can assist the integration of Environmental Sustainability initiatives into day to day business by:        

Documenting changes as part of policies, operational procedures and documentation Ensuring that resource efficiency gets on meeting agendas at all levels of the organisation Adding Environmental Sustainability projects into regular departmental and organisational reporting Creating a dedicated section for Environmental Sustainability projects on staff notice boards and in staff newsletters Having information on your intranet and internet pages Including training and information for staff in your induction programme Assigning accountability for projects to the areas Reviewing progress on a regular basis

25


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

9. STAGE SEVEN - MONITORING AND REPORTING Once you have implemented your resource efficiency action plans you need to monitor their effect and report on progress. When you report results you will need to decide:    

Who will receive the results – Senior management, Project team, staff, share holders, Clients / Customers, the general public What you will report? How you will report? Paper based, Intranet, Website When you will report? – Monthly, Quarterly, Annually

10. STAGE EIGHT - REVIEW AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT Continuous Improvement occurs when an organisation develops an Environmental Sustainability Policy, implements resource efficiency projects, reviews progress regularly and then continues to identify new projects to implement. You should decide how regularly you will review your Environmental status and document the process you will follow to maintain progress towards sustainability.

26


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

APPENDICES INDEX APPENDIX ONE:

WASTE AUDIT MANUAL

APPENDIX TWO:

ENERGY RATING LABELS AND ENERGY STAR WELS: WATER EFFICIENCY LABELLING SCHEME

APPENDIX THREE:

OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVING YOUR USE OF RESOURCES - WORK SHEETS

APPENDIX FOUR:

SMART EFFICIENCY TARGETS - WORK SHEETS

APPENDIX FIVE:

POLICY EXAMPLES:

EXAMPLE ONE:

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY FOR WIDGETS NZ LTD

EXAMPLE TWO:

MEDICARE AUSTRALIA ENVIROMENTAL POLICY

EXAMPLE THREE: COLLINGWOOD ENVIROMENTAL PLANNING SUSTAINABILITY POLICY EXAMPLE FOUR:

EXAMPLES OF INDUSTRY SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENT PHRASES AND TERMS YOU COULD USE IN YOUR POLICY

27


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

APPENDIX ONE: WASTE AUDIT MANUAL PDF

28


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

29


ADDENDIX TWO:

ENERGY RATING LABELS AND ENERGY STAR WELS: WATER EFFICIENCY LABELLING SCHEME


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Energy Star Energy Star is a global mark of energy efficiency. It's awarded to the most energy efficient appliances and electronic products. If you see the Energy Star mark on one of these products, you can be sure it is one of the most energy efficient available on the market at this time. The label was launched in New Zealand, with Government backing, in mid-2005. As at late 2006, you can find the Energy Star mark on heat pumps, televisions, DVD players and recorders, VCRs, audio equipment, computers and monitors, printers, fax machines, copiers and scanners. Upcoming products include dishwashers, clothes washers and refrigerators. New computer and office equipment specifications will also be introduced in July 2007. For more information, see the Energy Star website. Energy Rating Labels Home appliance Energy Rating Labels are designed to help you choose energy efficient appliances. The labels help you to work out how much energy an appliance will consume in a year of normal service, and provide a star rating to make comparisons easy. The more stars an appliance has, the more energy efficient it is (each extra star means an extra 10% or more saving in running costs). Note: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to look at annual energy use as well as the star rating, since an efficient large appliance might use more power than a less efficient smaller model does. For more information, see the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web page on Energy Rating Labels. You can find information about energy ratings of specific products at the Energy Ratings Australia website. ECCA

http://www.energywise.org.nz/

EMPROVE http://www.eecabusiness.govt.nz/emprove/ WELS Australia has Water Efficiency Labelling and Standards Scheme (WELS) for home appliance water use. Under the scheme, home appliances display labels showing their water use in litres per load, and a star rating for their water efficiency (the more stars the appliance has, the more water efficient it is). The Ministry for the Environment has considered submissions on extending the scheme to cover appliances sold in New Zealand. For more information about the Australian scheme, including a database of energy efficient appliances, see the Water Ratings Australia website. http://www.waterrating.gov.au/

2


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

APPENDIX THREE: OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVING YOUR USE OF RESOURCES- WORK SHEETS

3


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Lighting Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

4

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

HVAC Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

5

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Hot Water Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

6

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Kitchen Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

7

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Appliances and Office Equipment Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

8

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Transport Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

9

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Water Use Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

10

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Environmental Sustainability

Waste Suggested Opportunity

Category (Quick Win, Medium or Significant)

11

Projected Cost

Factors Affecting e.g. other projects

Priority


SIONZ – Environmental Sustainability

APPENDIX FOUR

SMART EFFICIENCY TARGETS

12


SMART TARGETS Lighting

13


SMART TARGETS HVAC

14


SMART TARGETS Hot Water

15


SMART TARGETS Kitchen

16


SMART TARGETS Appliances and Office Equipment

17


SMART TARGETS Transport

18


SMART TARGETS Water Use

19


SMART TARGETS Waste

20


APPENDIX FIVE: POLICY EXAMPLES: EXAMPLE ONE:

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY FOR WIDGETS NZ LTD

EXAMPLE TWO:

MEDICARE AUSTRALIA ENVIROMENTAL POLICY

EXAMPLE THREE: COLLINGWOOD ENVIROMENTAL PLANNING SUSTAINABILITY POLICY EXAMPLE FOUR:

EXAMPLES OF INDUSTRY SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENT PHRASES AND TERMS YOU COULD USE IN YOUR POLICY

21


Sample Environmental Sustainability Policies EXAMPLE ONE: ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY FOR WIDGETS NZ LTD.

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY POLICY Widgets NZ Ltd TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................... 1 2. STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION........................................... 1 3. PROTECTION OF THE BIOSPHERE..........................................1 4. SUSTAINABLE USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES.................. 1 5. REDUCTION AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE.............................. 5 6. WISE USE OF ENERGY.............................................................. 5 7. RISK REDUCTION....................................................................... 6 8. RESTORATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT...................................6 9. DISCLOSURE............................................................................... 6 10. COMMITMENT OF MANAGEMENT RESOURCES............... 6 11. REVIEW.......................................................................................6

22


1. INTRODUCTION Company Widgets NZ Ltd is a distributor of widgets in the local NZ market. Our policy is to work towards environmental sustainability in our operations. Our policy fits within our principal objective, which is to operate as a successful business and to be financially sustainable. The following principles guide us toward environmental sustainability.

2. LEGISLATION We will comply with all relevant environmental legislation. 3. SUSTAINABLE USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES In operating our business we will take all practicable steps to minimise harmful effects on the environment. We aim to use natural resources in a sustainable way. 4. REDUCTION AND DISPOSAL OF WASTE We aim to minimise waste, especially hazardous waste, and wherever practicable, recycle materials in our operations. We will dispose of our waste through safe and responsible methods. We will seek to purchase long-life assets and assets that can be re-used within our business. 5. WISE USE OF ENERGY We will take all practicable steps to use environmentally safe and sustainable energy sources to meet our needs. We will follow strategies that minimise energy consumption and maximise energy conservation in our operations. 6. WISE USE OF VEHICLES We will use vehicles in ways that minimise emissions to the air.

23


7. RISK REDUCTION We will seek to understand the risks to the environment that our operations pose and, based on those risks, prioritise our efforts to eliminate or minimise potential environmental hazards caused by our operations. We will take all practicable steps to employ safe technologies and operating procedures and we will proactively prepare for emergencies. We aim for continuous improvement in our environmental management performance. 8. COMMITMENT OF RESOURCES We will commit resources to maintain these principles. We will provide training to our staff to assist them to meet these principles. 9. REPORTING We will annually disclose to our shareholders and to the public our overall performance against environmental targets and any incidents that cause significant environmental harm. 10. REVIEW We will work toward the timely creation of sustainable management procedures that will be reviewed on a regular basis. The results of these audits will be made available to stakeholders.

24


1.1 1.1.1.1

ABC Uniform Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Environmental Sustainability Policy.

1.1.1.2 Environmental Principles: Promotion of environmental awareness among our employees and suppliers 1.1.1.3 Respect for nature: Caution in decision-making out of respect for nature 1.1.1.4 Sustainable use of resources: Resource conservation, recycling and reduction of waste 1.1.1.5 Healthy products: Products that are safe to use and harmless to the environment 1.1.1.6 Clean production chain: Sustainable production and production methods throughout the supply chain 1.1.1.7 Green transport: Clean and efficient transport with limited influence on the climate 1.1.1.8 Sustainability policy and vision 1.1.1.9 Sustainability vision ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's business operations shall be run in a way which is economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. 1.1.1.10 Sustainability policy ABC UNIFORM COMPANYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business concept is to offer fashion and quality at the best price. Quality also means that the products have to be manufactured in a way that is environmentally and socially sustainable. Like all ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's activity, our CSR work is based on a drive for continuous improvement.

25


We have a responsibility towards everyone who contributes to our success, including those who are not employees of ABC UNIFORM COMPANY. That is why we work closely with our suppliers to develop a long-term, sustainable social and environmental standard in the factories that manufacture ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's products. We have to ensure that our employees' human rights are not violated, and the same applies to employees of our suppliers and other cooperation partners, and to our customers. We apply the precautionary principle in our environmental work and have adopted a preventative approach with the substitution of hazardous chemicals. We strive to use resources as efficiently as possible and to minimise waste. By adopting new technologies and methods, we can work preventatively to minimise our environmental footprint through improved production processes and our choice of materials. We must continuously review the company's goals and strategies to reduce the company's climate impact. Our decisions are based on careful consideration, where shorter or longer-term environmental benefits are weighed up in order to ensure that we choose solutions which are sustainable in the long term. We want to be a good global citizen and act responsibly in our business relations. We take a clear stand against all forms of corruption. We engage in dialogue with all our various stakeholders to build trust in our operations within the environment we rely on for our long-term success. 1.1.2 Environmental requirements for suppliers 1.1.2.1 Our Code of Conduct sets environmental requirements The environmental requirements in ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's Code of Conduct demand that our suppliers comply with the relevant legislation in the countries where they operate. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY also encourages suppliers to assume greater responsibility for the environment than is strictly required by the law. When we audit facilities to verify compliance with local environmental law and our Code of Conduct, we focus on four main areas: environmental law and governmental permits, chemicals, wastewater treatment and waste management. We begin by reviewing factories' permits. We also examine how chemicals are handled. The focus is on workers' safety and on chemical emissions to water and into the ground. To evaluate this, we check whether and how chemical containers are labelled, and if there are material safety data sheets (MSDS). We also check whether the MSDSs have been implemented, i.e. if workers have been trained in safe chemical handling, and if they use protective equipment. We require that factories with wet processes such as dyeing or washing use wastewater treatment plants. The sludge that the plants produce must be handled according to legislation. Finally, we check whether the factories handle hazardous waste in a responsible manner and send it to an authorised company.

26


1.1.2.2 Restriction of chemicals An important part of ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's environmental work involves reviewing and restricting the use of chemicals which are harmful to health and to the environment. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY has therefore banned or restricted the use of a number of chemicals in production. All the limit values and bans are gathered together in ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's Chemical Restrictions, a list of restrictions that all suppliers must sign up to. Examples of substances on the list of restricted chemicals include metals such as cadmium, lead and mercury, certain dyes, PVC, formaldehyde and brominated flame retardants. Regular testing is carried out at external laboratories to ensure that our suppliers comply with our chemical restrictions. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY's chemical requirements are based on the sales country that has the most stringent requirements.The chemical restrictions have been updated six times since 1995, most recently in 2005. 1.1.2.3 Environmental requirements for IT product suppliers In order to be able to make environmentally sound choices when purchasing IT products, ABC UNIFORM COMPANY requires that all products offered to us are accompanied by an IT Eco Declaration. The IT Eco Declaration is a system for declaration of environmental aspects of IT and telecom products, developed by the Nordic IT organisations, IT-Fรถretagen in Sweden, ITB in Denmark, IKT-Norge in Norway and TTK ry in Finland. The IT Eco Declaration includes information on the environmental practices of the manufacturer as well as environmental performance of their products. Nemko Group, a Norwegian firm that offers testing, inspection and certification services, randomly selects and examines 25 per cent of all companies that submit IT ECO declarations to verify that the information is accurate. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY has developed an evaluation model to assess the information in the IT Eco Declarations. Our evaluation model takes into account legal standards as well as additional ABC UNIFORM COMPANY requirements. 1.1.2.4 Environmental requirements for suppliers of store equipment and furnishings ABC UNIFORM COMPANY has drawn up environmental guidelines for purchasing store equipment and furnishings. Materials such as PVC and halogen-based plastic materials, metals such as lead and chrome and chemicals such brominated flame-retardants should be avoided in the manufacturing of store equipment or in the finished products. In addition, there are some fields of application where we have banned the use of certain materials, metals and chemicals. There is a guideline on first choice materials, metals, and chemicals that should be used instead in order to obtain more environmentally adapted products. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY wants to actively contribute to reducing the environmental impact of cotton growing. Our strategy consists of two parts: promoting organic cotton by demanding it, and improving conventional cotton growing.

27


1.1.3 Raw materials and fibres 1.1.3.1 Continued investment in organic cotton Our intention is to gradually use more cotton that has been grown organically – that is without the use of chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers. We want to contribute towards increased demand and thereby motivate more growers to invest in organic cotton growing. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY has been using organically grown cotton since 2004, when we began to mix some organic cotton into selected children’s clothing. Since 2007 we have had garments made from 100 percent organic cotton in all departments. We also have some garments made from 50 percent organic cotton and 50 percent conventional cotton. All garments made from organic cotton are marked with an “Organic Cotton” label. During 2008 we will be using around 2,000 tonnes of organic cotton. That’s more than in 2006 when we used just 30 tonnes. The increase is down to us expanding the number of garments made in 100 percent organic cotton and the fact that we are mixing organic cotton into more garments too. Our venture into organic cotton will continue with the aim of increasing volumes by at least 50 percent a year in the next five years. All the organic cotton we use in our clothes is certified by the Control Union. 1.1.4

Environmental concern in the supply chain

ABC UNIFORM COMPANY requires its suppliers to comply with local environmental legislation and to have all the necessary permits and licences for their activities. However, the greatest environmental impact comes from the dyeing of fabrics and processing of fibres – production steps that take place before any stitching of ABC UNIFORM COMPANY garments begin. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY is therefore working with certain suppliers, for example to improve water treatment in various types of wet processes. We have started a programme to encourage factories to switch to cleaner production processes involving reduced energy and water consumption and limiting the use of chemicals. We have worked with an independent consultant and the Wuppertal Institute in Germany to create tools for identifying areas for potential resource savings. 1.1.5

Transport

Since 2001, we evaluate our transport service providers on a variety of environmental factors in order to improve their environmental performance. Our requirements are gradually becoming stricter. From January 2005, the following minimum requirements apply to road transport service providers.    

Road transport for ABC UNIFORM COMPANY must be carried out with vehicles which meet the requirements of Euro 1 or US 91. All vehicles purchased must meet the requirements of Euro 3 or US 98. Diesel with maximum sulphur content of 500 ppm (0.050%) for USA and Canada and 350 ppm (0.035%) for other countries. Instructions to drivers on what fuel quality to use.

28


 

1.1.6

At least 50 per cent of all drivers must have received theoretical and practical training on fuel-efficient driving, i.e. eco-driving. Company policy banning idling in excess of one minute. Stores and distribution centres

ABC UNIFORM COMPANY continues to work on reducing consumption and increasing recycling of packaging, hangers, décor materials, consumables, etc. We are also working to reduce energy consumption in our stores from lighting, heating and air conditioning. ABC UNIFORM COMPANY has also drawn up environmental guidelines for the purchase of shop fittings. PVC is avoided in our interior design as far as possible and no new PVC floors have been laid in our stores since the beginning of 2002

29


1.2

Samples of Industry Specific Environment phrases and terms you could use in your Policy

1.3 1.3.1 UNIFORMGROUPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental objectives and sustainability policy 1.3.1.1 Environmental awareness: Promotion of environmental awareness among our employees and suppliers 1.3.1.2 Respect for nature: Caution in decision-making out of respect for nature 1.3.1.3 Sustainable use of resources: Resource conservation, recycling and reduction of waste 1.3.1.4 Healthy products: Products that are safe to use and harmless to the environment 1.3.1.5 Clean production chain: Sustainable production and production methods throughout the supply chain 1.3.1.6 Green transport: Clean and efficient transport with limited influence on the climate 1.3.1.7 Sustainability policy and vision 1.3.1.8 Sustainability vision UNIFORMGROUP's business operations shall be run in a way which is economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. 1.3.1.9 Sustainability policy UNIFORMGROUPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business concept is to offer fashion and quality at the best price. Quality also means that the products have to be manufactured in a way that is environmentally and 30


socially sustainable. Like all UNIFORMGROUP's activity, our CSR work is based on a drive for continuous improvement. We have a responsibility towards everyone who contributes to our success, including those who are not employees of UNIFORMGROUP. That is why we work closely with our suppliers to develop a long-term, sustainable social and environmental standard in the factories that manufacture UNIFORMGROUP's products. We have to ensure that our employees' human rights are not violated, and the same applies to employees of our suppliers and other cooperation partners, and to our customers. We apply the precautionary principle in our environmental work and have adopted a preventative approach with the substitution of hazardous chemicals. We strive to use resources as efficiently as possible and to minimise waste. By adopting new technologies and methods, we can work preventatively to minimise our environmental footprint through improved production processes and our choice of materials. We must continuously review the company's goals and strategies to reduce the company's climate impact. Our decisions are based on careful consideration, where shorter or longer-term environmental benefits are weighed up in order to ensure that we choose solutions which are sustainable in the long term. We want to be a good global citizen and act responsibly in our business relations. We take a clear stand against all forms of corruption. We engage in dialogue with all our various stakeholders to build trust in our operations within the environment we rely on for our long-term success. 1.3.2 Environmental requirements for suppliers 1.3.2.1 Our Code of Conduct sets environmental requirements The environmental requirements in UNIFORMGROUP's Code of Conduct demand that our suppliers comply with the relevant legislation in the countries where they operate. UNIFORMGROUP also encourages suppliers to assume greater responsibility for the environment than is strictly required by the law. When we audit facilities to verify compliance with local environmental law and our Code of Conduct, we focus on four main areas: environmental law and governmental permits, chemicals, wastewater treatment and waste management. We begin by reviewing factories' permits. We also examine how chemicals are handled. The focus is on workers' safety and on chemical emissions to water and into the ground. To evaluate this, we check whether and how chemical containers are labelled, and if there are material safety data sheets (MSDS). We also check whether the MSDSs have been implemented, i.e. if workers have been trained in safe chemical handling, and if they use protective equipment. We require that factories with wet processes such as dyeing or washing use wastewater treatment plants. The sludge that the plants produce must be handled according to legislation. Finally, we check whether the factories handle hazardous waste in a responsible manner and send it to an authorised company.

31


1.3.2.2 Restriction of chemicals An important part of UNIFORMGROUP's environmental work involves reviewing and restricting the use of chemicals which are harmful to health and to the environment. UNIFORMGROUP has therefore banned or restricted the use of a number of chemicals in production. All the limit values and bans are gathered together in UNIFORMGROUP's Chemical Restrictions, a list of restrictions that all suppliers must sign up to. Examples of substances on the list of restricted chemicals include metals such as cadmium, lead and mercury, certain dyes, PVC, formaldehyde and brominated flame retardants. Regular testing is carried out at external laboratories to ensure that our suppliers comply with our chemical restrictions. UNIFORMGROUP's chemical requirements are based on the sales country that has the most stringent requirements.The chemical restrictions have been updated six times since 1995, most recently in 2005. 1.3.2.3 Environmental requirements for IT product suppliers In order to be able to make environmentally sound choices when purchasing IT products, UNIFORMGROUP requires that all products offered to us are accompanied by an IT Eco Declaration. The IT Eco Declaration is a system for declaration of environmental aspects of IT and telecom products, developed by the Nordic IT organisations, IT-Fรถretagen in Sweden, ITB in Denmark, IKT-Norge in Norway and TTK ry in Finland. The IT Eco Declaration includes information on the environmental practices of the manufacturer as well as environmental performance of their products. Nemko Group, a Norwegian firm that offers testing, inspection and certification services, randomly selects and examines 25 per cent of all companies that submit IT ECO declarations to verify that the information is accurate. UNIFORMGROUP has developed an evaluation model to assess the information in the IT Eco Declarations. Our evaluation model takes into account legal standards as well as additional UNIFORMGROUP requirements. 1.3.2.4 Environmental requirements for suppliers of store equipment and furnishings UNIFORMGROUP has drawn up environmental guidelines for purchasing store equipment and furnishings. Materials such as PVC and halogen-based plastic materials, metals such as lead and chrome and chemicals such brominated flame-retardants should be avoided in the manufacturing of store equipment or in the finished products. In addition, there are some fields of application where we have banned the use of certain materials, metals and chemicals. There is a guideline on first choice materials, metals, and chemicals that should be used instead in order to obtain more environmentally adapted products. UNIFORMGROUP wants to actively contribute to reducing the environmental impact of cotton growing. Our strategy consists of two parts: promoting organic cotton by demanding it, and improving conventional cotton growing.

32


1.3.3 Raw materials and fibres 1.3.3.1 Continued investment in organic cotton Our intention is to gradually use more cotton that has been grown organically – that is without the use of chemical pesticides or synthetic fertilizers. We want to contribute towards increased demand and thereby motivate more growers to invest in organic cotton growing. UNIFORMGROUP has been using organically grown cotton since 2004, when we began to mix some organic cotton into selected children’s clothing. Since 2007 we have had garments made from 100 percent organic cotton in all departments. We also have some garments made from 50 percent organic cotton and 50 percent conventional cotton. All garments made from organic cotton are marked with an “Organic Cotton” label. During 2008 we will be using around 2,000 tonnes of organic cotton. That’s more than in 2006 when we used just 30 tonnes. The increase is down to us expanding the number of garments made in 100 percent organic cotton and the fact that we are mixing organic cotton into more garments too. Our venture into organic cotton will continue with the aim of increasing volumes by at least 50 percent a year in the next five years. All the organic cotton we use in our clothes is certified by the Control Union. 1.3.4

Environmental concern in the supply chain

UNIFORMGROUP requires its suppliers to comply with local environmental legislation and to have all the necessary permits and licences for their activities. However, the greatest environmental impact comes from the dyeing of fabrics and processing of fibres – production steps that take place before any stitching of UNIFORMGROUP garments begin. UNIFORMGROUP is therefore working with certain suppliers, for example to improve water treatment in various types of wet processes. We have started a programme to encourage factories to switch to cleaner production processes involving reduced energy and water consumption and limiting the use of chemicals. We have worked with an independent consultant and the Wuppertal Institute in Germany to create tools for identifying areas for potential resource savings. 1.3.5

Transport

Since 2001, we evaluate our transport service providers on a variety of environmental factors in order to improve their environmental performance. Our requirements are gradually becoming stricter. From January 2005, the following minimum requirements apply to road transport service providers.    

Road transport for UNIFORMGROUP must be carried out with vehicles which meet the requirements of Euro 1 or US 91. All vehicles purchased must meet the requirements of Euro 3 or US 98. Diesel with maximum sulphur content of 500 ppm (0.050%) for USA and Canada and 350 ppm (0.035%) for other countries. Instructions to drivers on what fuel quality to use.

33


 

1.3.6

At least 50 per cent of all drivers must have received theoretical and practical training on fuel-efficient driving, i.e. eco-driving. Company policy banning idling in excess of one minute. Stores and distribution centres

UNIFORMGROUP continues to work on reducing consumption and increasing recycling of packaging, hangers, décor materials, consumables, etc. We are also working to reduce energy consumption in our stores from lighting, heating and air conditioning. UNIFORMGROUP has also drawn up environmental guidelines for the purchase of shop fittings. PVC is avoided in our interior design as far as possible and no new PVC floors have been laid in our stores since the beginning of 2002

34

Sustainability Guide  

sustainability guide