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CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE • 2009-10 YOU’RE THE STAR OF THE STORY! CHOOSE FROM COUNTLESS POSSIBLE ENDINGS.

LIFE AT McGILL PUBLISHED BY THE SSMU

100% RECYCLED PAPER AND VEGETABLE INK


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What you need close to you!

3575 Parc Avenue (corner of Prince-Arthur) info: 514 284-2900


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Visit our merchants for student specials

SERVICES Bronzage Pro Soleil 514 288-8666 Coiffeurs La Cité 514 844-9434 Cordonnerie La Cité 514 849-1871 E-media copy 514 288-0074 Nettoyeur La Cité 514 843-7223 Postes Canada 514 499-8524 Rina Esthétique 514 844-9709 Venus Photo 514 286-0108 Voyages Penta-Tours 514 288-0830

Avenue des Pins

Sherbrooke

St-Denis

RESTAURANTS Biscuiterie Treats 514 845-2486 Boccacinos 514 288-4337 Coaster’s Grill & Bar 514 843-3825 Farrouj Restaurant 514 285-8729 Henry’s Deli 514 844-1879 Pita Pit 514 286-0377 Spicy Noodles 514 847-0222 Subway 514 848-0888 Van Houtte 514 842-3774 Thaï Express & Cultures 514 845-5292

Jeanne Mance

FASHION SHOPS Bagage Max 514 906-0841 Chelsea Special 514 842-2676

SHOPS Dollarama 514 843-6265 Dragon d’Orient 514 842-7981 Fruiterie du Parc 514 843-4443 Jardin des Roses 514 285-1954 Librairie Bertrand 514 849-4533 Métro Supermarket 514 843-3530 Montres et Bijoux Karo 514 842-7688 Pharmacie Uniprix 514 849-6176 SAQ Express 514 288-3493 Super Dépanneur 514 288-4000 Tabagie La Cité 514 844-5479 The Source by Circuit City 514 282-6649

Ave. du Parc

ENTERTAINMENT Cinéma du Parc 514 281-1900 DreamNet 514 284-1122 Movieland Video 514 843-5206

SPECIALIZED SHOPS B’Belles 514 845-9403 Papeterie Dépôt Hallmark 514 849-9772 Santé Fitt 514 284-0736

University

CLINIC Clinique Gadban – Chirurgien dentiste 514 849-2037

Berri-UQAM

Place des Arts René-Lévesque

Saint-Antoine Autoroute Ville-Marie to Décarie & Métropolitan

3575 Parc Avenue (corner of Prince-Arthur) info: 514 284-2900


TABLE OF CONTENTS If you want to learn more about this illustrious university, including how it’s governed and what resources are available to you, turn to the McGill section. It’s the only school better than the Starfleet Academy! McGill History

7

McGill Administration

8

Senate and BoG

10

Student Rights

12

Grading

14

Financial Aid

15

Tuition and Fees

16

Libraries

18

Computing on Campus

20

Academic Advising

21

Recommended Courses

22

Study Abroad

24

If you’re new to McGill, looking things to do on campus, or need advice about living on your own, turn to the

Student Living

section. It’s packed with everything you need to enjoy the good life at McGill. Your First Week

38

Living in Residence

40

Living Cheaply

42

Queer Student Life

43

Living Green

44

Living Independently

46

Neighbourhoods

48

Getting Your Own Place 50 If you’re interested in student government and campus activities, turn to the SSMU section. They’re the ones who publish this handbook. SSMU Executives

25

How SSMU Works

28

Student Movement

30

Sustainability

31

Shatner Building

32

Brown Building

33

Clubs and Services

34

How to Start a Club

35

Haven Books and Gerts

36

Tenants’ Rights

52

Gainful Employment

54

Volunteering

60

Student Activism

61

La Vie Francophone

62

McGill Athletics

63

Relax on Campus

64

Eating on Campus

65

Food Alternatives

66

Campus Culture

67

Campus Events

68


If you’re feeling sick or just trying to stay healthy, turn to the

Health section. From sexual health to mental health, and from food to alcohol, it can help ensure a safe and healthy university adventure. Emergency Resources Nutrition The Health Plan Mental Health Safe Sex Sexual Assault STIs Contraceptives Unplanned Pregnancy Alcohol Drugs

71 73 74 76 78 79 80 82 84 85 86

If you’re trying to manage the hectic life of a student, turn to the Agenda section. It’s designed to meet all of your scheduling and procrastination needs.

Agenda Metro Map Conversions 101 Notes Personal Contacts Epilogue

124 220 221 222 223 224

If you’re new to town or trying to break out of the McGill bubble, turn to the

Montreal section. You can learn about local politics, or just find the best spots to eat and see a show.

Montreal Attractions Montreal History Politics in Quebec Politics in Montreal Media The Language Divide Other Universities Mass Transportation Biking in Montreal Professional Sports Festivals Parks Movies Music Art Theatre Reviews

89 90 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 100 101 102 103 104 106 107 110


UNIVERSITÉ LEADER Notre valeur ajoutée aux études supérieures L’Université de Sherbrooke place l’étudiante et l’étudiant au coeur de sa mission. Aux cycles supérieurs, de nombreuses conditions d’études traduisent cet engagement. · Une politique qui protège la propriété intellectuelle de tous les étudiants et étudiantes · Un régime de partenariat pour des études de maîtrise et de doctorat en milieu de travail · Des infrastructures ultramodernes accessibles aux étudiants · Un milieu favorisant la qualité de vie et la conciliation études-famille · Le libre accès au transport en commun

9 facultés 70 chaires de recherche Près de 250 programmes aux 2e et 3e cycles Plus de 100 programmes offerts au Campus de Longueuil

www.USherbrooke.ca/etudes-superieures


McGILL HISTORY You’re not the first person to attend McGill, you know. The university has a long history filled with colourful characters. If you’re interested in learning about it, go read an actual book. But if you just want conversation starters for McGill parties, read on. 1813 – Fur trader, slave owner, and man-about-town James McGill bequeaths his 46-acre estate and $10,000 to found the Royal Institution for the Advancement of Learning, the predecessor of McGill University. 1821 – McGill receives a royal charter and becomes a university. 1875 – James McGill’s remains are dug up and reburied in front of the Arts Building, where they continue to be desecrated on a regular basis by pigeons. 1884 – Women are admitted to McGill for the first time. Five years later, the Royal Victoria College is established as a women’s residence, and dedicated by one official to “the preservation of glorious virginity.” 1907 – McGill’s Macdonald College opens its doors, 32km west of Montreal. Mac campus students begin complaining about their commutes shortly thereafter. 1908 – Feeling that they lack a proper venue to argue in, McGill Debating Union members found the Students’ Society of McGill University (no girls allowed - at least until 1931). 1964 - SSMU begins its long history of joining poorly-acronymed lobby

groups by leaving the CUS to join UGEQ (followed by CASA, the FEUQ, the CFS, and the TDC). 1969 – Students gain eight seats in McGill’s Senate after years of pressuring the administration through sit-ins and occupations. 1971 – Management students move into the newly-erected Bronfman building, named after Samuel Bronfman, a cross-border purveyor of fine whiskies during prohibition. 1980 – The McGill Daily becomes fully independent from student government. One year later, SSMU starts the McGill Tribune. 1985 – 1,200 students demonstrate outside a Board of Governors meeting, calling on McGill to divest from Apartheid South Africa. 2004 – McGill bans large protests on campus and limits small protests to two areas. The policy remains in effect to this day. 2006 – SSMU Council bans blood drives from the Shatner building, arguing that Quebec blood-collection policies are discriminatory because they forbid men who have had sex with men since 1977 from donating blood.

7


McGILL ADMINISTRATION Confused by the red tape and the hierarchy? These are the administrative and governance bodies that call the shots at McGill, along with some of the head honchos.

Board of Governors

Senate

Secretary General

VP Development & Alumni Relations

VP Health & Affairs (Dean of Medicine)

VP Admin & Finance

Provost

Deputy Provost, Student Life and Learning

Director of Libraries Dean of Students

Faculty Deans

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Principal and Vice Chancellor: Heather Munroe-Blum (HMB) Recently appointed for a second term (until 2012) as the head of McGill University, Munroe-Blum continues her restructuring of the university’s administration and decison-making structures. She remains focused on fundraising initiatives and external representation. HMB has been concerned with combating McGill’s underfunding. After lobbying all levels of government for a reinvestment in post-secondary education, she turned her energies toward forging public-private parternerships, de-freezing tuition, and attracting donors. The biggest project to date is the Capital Campaign, an attempt to raise $750 million. The Principal holds semesterly Town Halls where student are encouraged to discuss university decisions. Chancellor: Arnold Steinberg Just appointed in 2009, Steinberg replaces Richard Pound as the Chancllor. Steinberg, a Montreal businessman and recipient of the Order of Canada, has been involved with McGill as a member of the Board of Governors and as Chairman of the McGill University Health Centre. His wife is Political Science Professor Blema Steinberg. Get ready to shake his hand on graduation day.

I aspire to one day, take over the McGill universe and surrounding galaxies.

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Provost: Anthony Masi Second in command, Masi oversees everything from the budget to the use of space on campus. He has been teaching at McGill since 1979 in the sociology deparment. Masi has been appointed Provost until 2010.

Deputy Provost: Morton J. Mendelson

A McGill psychology professor, Mendelson was appointed in 2006 to oversee student life at McGill (advising, residences, financial aid, exchanges, course feedback). He deals with the SSMU and PGSS daily.

VP Admin & Finance: Francois Roy

Formerly the CFO of Québecor, Roy now prepares and maintains McGill’s annual billion-dollar budget.

Vp Development & Alumni Relations: Marc Weinstein Appointed in 2008, Weinstein now oversees the University’s $300 million fundraising campaign.

Dean of Students: Jane Everette

A fresh face to campus, Everette is charged with taking care of the student population working in conjunction with many services in the Brown building, Everette is a friend to students!


SENATE These days, it seems like everyone has a senate: Canada, the US, even the Star Wars universe. McGill is no exception, but where other senates declare war or pass legislation, ours governs academic life at McGill. McGill’s Senate handles the policies and guidelines governing academic activities at McGill. It’s composed of professors, students, administrators, and union members, and is supposed to represent the McGill community as a whole. Senate is also where students have the most political influence, so let your Senators know what matters to you. Senate meetings have a reputation for being extremely boring. However, they are open to listeners (but not speakers), so you can go to Leacock 232 at 2:30pm every third Wednesday to remind Senators that they are responsible to the wider community. If you want to shape the decisions before they hit Senate, consider talking to your Senators about issues that matter to you ahead of time. Senators sit on committees ranging from the Committee on Libraries to the Academic Policy Committee and the Committee on Physical Development. These meetings are where Senators craft the recommendations the send to Senate for an official vote. Debate can be much livelier here, and committees can wield significant power. The Issues Last year, the most hotly-contested issue in the Senate was McGill’s new travel policy. The administration imposed blanket travel restrictions on dozens of countries, and seriously limited students’ opportunities to work or study abroad. Senate tried

to suspend the policy, which led to a skirmish over whether they had jurisdiction over the policy. Once the dust settled, the policy survived, albeit with a few alterations suggested by Senators. Senate is also responsible for setting the academic schedule at McGill and policies relating to academic integrity, which affect you daily. Who Represents You? The SSMU President and VP University Affairs sit on Senate and many Senate committees, along with eleven Senators from the university’s various faculties. You can contact them with questions, comments, or concerns. Arts david.marshall@mail.mcgill.ca nicholas.wolf@mail.mcgill.ca sarah.woolf@mail.mcgill.ca Science andrew.ling@mail.mcgill.ca mitran.mehta@mail.mcgill.ca Music alexandros.halavrezos@mail.mcgill. ca Engineering manosij.majumdar@mail.mcgill.ca Management jeremie.drouillard@mail.mcgill.ca Medicine hana.thomas@mail.mcgill.ca Dentistry mostafa.altalibi@mail.mcgill.ca Law faizel.gulamhussein@mail.mcgill.ca

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BOARD OF GOVERNORS While some organizations are controlled by boards of shadowy figures, the reins of power at McGill are held by the Board of Governors. What it lacks in clandestine badassery, it makes up for in confusing bureaucracy. The BoG has final authority over all of the university’s affairs: financial, academic, legal and extra-marital (alright, maybe not that last one). It only meets about six times per year, so Senate exercises day-to-day control in most areas. However, the BoG still has ultimate control over university policy, and governors are the ones who decide what direction the university is heading in. Who Are the Governors? The BoG has 25 voting members and two non-voting student observers. The SSMU President has both a seat and a vote - a concession that was won back in the 1960s through a series of protests and sit-ins. Some governors have also proven themselves sympathetic to student concerns and can be lobbied on impor-

tant issues. But the structure of the BoG may be changing. The provincial government recently tabled Bill 107, which would limit the number of governors and regulate the board’s composition. It would also require two-thirds of the governors to be drawn from outside the university. That’s a significant increase, and there are concerns that student representation could get lost in the shuffle. The Issues McGill often struggles to balance its commitment to undergraduate education with funding research. Because it controls the university’s finances, the BoG is where that struggle happens. Let governors know if you want to see a stronger commitment to undergraduate education.

LET’S PUT A BIG PICTURE IN HERE

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STUDENT RIGHTS It’s important to know your rights as a student! That way, if they’re ever violated, you will know the right actions to take. At McGill, there’s more that the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protecting you. Your Rights As a student, you have important rights that span being able to submit work in either English or French (except for language classes) to religous holiday accomodation. These rights are recorded in a Charter of Studenrts’ Rights which can be found in the “Green Book,” (a.k.a. the Handbook on Student Rights and Responsibilities). The book can be found online at the SSMU website or at www.mcgill.ca/ secretariat/policies/students. It’s also available at the Office of the Dean of Students.

Some important points Sexual Harassment Policy In 2005, McGill adopted the “Policy on Harassment, Sexual Harrassment and Discrimination Prohibited by Law.” This policy outlines procedures for adressing allegations. If you make an allegation, your complaint can spark an investigation, but your name cannot be made public by the person investigating the claim. Grievance Procedure Grievances can be lodged with the Senate Committee on Student Grievances if you beleive that your rights have been infringed by the university. Your first step should be to go through informal conflict-resoluation procedures (eg. talking to the Ombudsperson for students). The grievance procedure is like a court case: you, (the complaintant) and the person who is the subject of your com-

plaint (the respondent) will be called to the Committee on Student Grievances and will present your cases, after being provided with an advisor from McGill Student Advocacy. The Committee will hear your case and decide on the appropriate response. Text-Matching Software You have the right to know about text-maching software used in any of your classes. Text-matching software is sometimes used by professors to combat plagiarism. The software compares your paper to a databse to see if portions of your paper match online text, or any other papers in the database. Your paper is also added to the database, which can be considered a violation of intellectual property rights. Instructors must notify students of of their intentions to use this type of software. Students with Disabilities Sometimes overlooked, if you are registrered with the Office for Students with Disabilities, there are a set of rights also applicable to you! You are entitled to a barrier-free environment as buildings become more acessible on campus, you are entitled to modifications in the evaluation process, (as appropriate) and to use the services including notetakers and readers. For more information visit www.mcgill.ca/osd/rights. Resources Concerning Your Rights Do you feel that you’ve been wronged or that your rights have been

12


overlooked? Use these resources to help yourself. Many students have had run-ins with administrative red tape. If you need someone to help you out through the process, contact the VP University Affairs - Rebecca Dooley (ua@ssmu.mcgill.ca) and don’t forget about the grievance procedure. Ombudsperson for Students The Ombudsperson, working independently of University structures, intervenes at the beginning of the student complaint process to ensure that McGill’s mission is upheld and that all matters presented by students are considered fully and objectively. Mediation is an important role of the Ombudsperson.

any questions. They can help guide you to books like ‘Doing Honest Work in College” or computer citation programs like End Note. Graduating You’ve probably used the degree evaluation on Minerva and been scared by your inability to figure out if you will graduate or not. Make sure you speak to your faculty and departmental advisors about meeting freshman and departmental requirements. You will be sent a flurry of e-mails by the Student Affairs Office in your last year, so make sure you follow their instructions. Apply for graduation in time and you should be set.

Your Responsibilities From Plagiarism to Collusion You’re now a university student and the hand-holding days of high school are over. You’ve probably heard about plagiarism, collusion and the rest when you handed in the outline for your first paper in ninth grade. But in case you’ve forgotten, you should know that plagiarism is a serious offence. Plagiarism at McGill is a violation of Academic Integrity and offenses of this variety can lead to expulsion. McGill’s definition of plagiarism and cheating is representing someone else’s work as your own: plagiarism is not being up front about where your ideas and work came from. Worried about being accused of plagiarism? It’s easy to avoid. First, make sure you do all your own work. Second, keep track of where all of you information comes from. Third, give credit to all of your sources, your ideas can be inspired by others, even if you do not quote them word-forword. Speak to your professors about the accepted sourcing of works. And Speak to a McGill librarian is you have

Plagiarism wasn’t tolerated at the Starfleet academy, either!

13


GRADING Ever wonder how McGill decides to grade your work? Browse through this section to find out, so you can be rewarded for your academic efforts. GPA v. CGPA Most Canadian universities calculate GPAs on a 4.3 or a 4.5 scale, but McGill uses a 4.0 scale. Individual grades, along with class averages for courses taken, are given in letter format on your transcript. The letter grades have corresponding numeric values that are used to calculate your grade point average (GPA) and your overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA). GPAs are calculated for each semester based on your level of performance. CGPAs are calculated as an overall average of every course you have taken at McGill. It’s important to remember that all classes are weighted in the CGPA by the number of credits they are worth. Most classes at McGill range from one to six credits. The average course at McGill is worth three credits. Remember that six-credit classes can hinder or help boost your CGPA depending on whether you received an “A,” a dreaded “D” (Conditional Pass), or an “F” (Fail).

must provide an acceptable reason for the extension, as well as an alternative method of submission of the final work with your professor. An ‘L’ means you have deferred the course and will not affect your GPA because the final exam may have not been written for a valid reason, (eg. illness). You must submit a request for a deferred exam to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs). The Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option (S/U) The S/U option does not count towards your GPA. An ‘S’ indicates that you have received a grade of ‘A’ to ‘C’ and passed the course, while the ‘U’ means that a student has received a failing grade. Students can take one S/U option per term, but the course must not count towards the completion of your program. Make sure you speak to an advisor before selecting any classes as S/U.

Grading Letters You’re probably wondering what all of the letters past F mean on your transcript. Some affect your CGPA and some don’t, so be aware! A “J” indicates that you were absent for the final exam, and counts as an “F” in your GPA. A “K” means that you have an extension on the deadline for the submission of a course assignment. “K”s will not affect your GPA, assuming that you complete the missing assignment. You must complete a “Submission of K” form which can be found in departmental offices. You

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Letter Grade

Numeric Grade

Percentage Bracket

A

4.0

85-100%

A-

3.7

80-84%

B+

3.3

75-79%

B

3.0

70-74%

B-

2.7

65-69%

C+

2.3

60-64%

C

2.0

55-59%

D

1.0

50-54%

F

0

0-49%


FINANCIAL AID Spending money is one of the unfortunate consequences of going to a great school in an exciting city. This section is a primer to financial aid resources at McGill. McGill McGill offers entrance scholarships to deserving students entering into their first year of studies at McGill. These are few and far between, only available to the crème de la crème of the entering class. In-course scholarships and prizes for students currently studying at McGill are more plentiful. These scholarships are awarded through departments and you should check the Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Calendar for full details. The university also offers an incourse financial aid (loans/busuries) to full time undergraduate students with demonstrated financial need. These applications must be made for the current academic year, and are usually available under Financial Aid menu on Minerva as of August. McGill loans are interest-free until their due date. Work Study The Work Study program provides students with demonstrated financial need with clerical, research, technical, library, and other jobs on campus. Acceptance into the program is based on financial need. Students must be registered full time, in satisfactory academic standing, and must apply for the maximum government aid they are eligible for. To find out more about the program visit: www.mcgill. ca/studentaid/workstudy/students/ Government Aid Government aid, through the Canada Student Loan Program, is the most popular source of funding for

undergrads. To find out more about government aid go to www.mcgill. ca/studentaid/government/. Applications should be made before June 30 by Canadian Students to ensure that their aid arrives in time. The Bank If you don’t qualify for government aid or find that government aid is still insufficient, you can look into opening a line of credit with your bank. Banks sometimes require a cosigner. Contact your financial institution for more details. Parents/ RESP On some aid applications, you will be required to fill out forms pertaining to parental contributions. An RESP is a Registered Education Savings Plan, which would have been set up by your parents or relatives. For more information about RESPs visit Canlearns website (www.canlearn.ca/ eng/saving/resp/index.shtml) or learn how to fill out forms through Enrolment Services: www.mcgill.ca/student-records/resp/ Big Money If you’re aiming high and looking for big money for further studies, scholarships like Forces Avenir and the Rhodes are administered by the Office of the Executive Director of Services for Students. Visit this website for more details: www.mcgill.ca/ deanofstudents/recognition. For a comprehensive guide to financial aid at McGill, visit www. mcgill.ca/studentaid/faq.

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TUITION AND FEES Tuition costs have been cause for debate at McGill. This is a summary of what you can expect to be paying. Tuition Tuition at McGill varies depending on the nationality and place of residence of the student. There are three categories: Quebec residents, non-Quebec Canadian residents, and intenational students. For first year students, McGill Student Aid estimates the cost of attendance as follows:

The Student Services Fee funds almost every office in the Brown Building including (but not limited to) the First Year Offiice, Chaplaincy, Student Aid, and Student Health. Full-Time:$133.00 Part-time: $80.00

Quebec tuition

$3,500

Out-of-province tuition

$7,100

International tuition (arts and education)

$15,000

Athletics Fee The Athletics and Recreation fee covers athletics facilities, campus recreation (intramurals, fitness and recreation courses, drop-in recreation, etc.), and intercollegiate sports at both the Downtown and Macdonald campuses. Full-time: $119.00 Part-time: $71.40

International tuition (engineering and science)

$21,500

Registration Charge $7.18 per credit

International tuition (commerce)

$24,500

Books

$1,000

Residence accomodation

$11,000

First-year expenses (for two semesters)

Estimated cost

Information Technology Charge The purpose of the information technology charge is to enhance certain technology services provided to students as well as to provide training and support to students in the use of new technology. $7.01 per credit

Compulsory Fees McGill charges students a series of fees that finance many of the services provided at the university. These fees usually add $500 on top of your tuition per semester. They’re subject to regular increases. Part-time students are defined by McGill as taking less than 12 credits a term, while SSMU defines them as taking less than 9 credits a term. Student Services Fee

Transcripts & Diploma Charge The university will charge a transcripts and diploma charge to all students. This will entitle students to order transcripts free of charge as well as cover the costs of graduation. $1.28 per credit Copyright fee All students in courses and programs are charged the copyright fee which covers the cost of the annual

16


fee that all Quebec universities are required to Copibec (a consortium that protects the interests of authors and editors) for the right to photocopy material protected by copyright. $0.83 per credit

SSMU Fees These fees are collected by the university and given to the Students’ Society. SSMU then distribtues the fees to their respective groups. The only way to introduce or revise these fees is through the referendum. SSMU Base Fee This fee accounts for the operating budget of SSMU. It pays for administrative fees, the upkeep of the university centre, governance, operations (like Gerts and Haven Books), campus events (like 4Floors), and it funds all of the clubs and services under SSMU. $1 of this fee goes toward the safety network: Drivesafe, Walksafe, and First Aid. You’ll pay either $38.44 per semester full-time and $18.19 per semester part-time or $28.29 per semester full-time and $13.12 per-semester part-time, depending on your faculty. McGill Undergraduate Student Fund This fund supports libraries, bursaries for students, and campus events and activities. $19 per semester for full-time students, $9.50 per semester for part-time students. SSMU Health Plan This insurance plan is explained in the health section and costs $184.60 per year. University Centre Renovations This fee is collected to pay for renovations made back in the day.

$11.84 2010.

per

semester,

ending

in

Referral Services All SSMU members contribute $1.75 per semester, split between Queer McGill, the Union for Gender Empowerment, and McGill Nightline. This fee is opt-outble and comes for renewal in 2011. SSMU Daycare A daycare accomodating 32 children and a nursury accomodating eight babies was created by SSMU to support student-parents. Members of SSMU contribute $1.50 per semester to this initiative, which also receives fudning from parents and the Quebec government. Midnight Kitchen The Mignight Kitchen collective serves vegan food in the third floor kitchen of the Shatner Building. Students fund this service with an optoutable $1.25 fee per semester, up for renewal in 2011. Environment Fee Institued by referendum, this $1.25 per semester opt-outable fee is intended to promote more sustainable practices on campus. This fee is distributed to campus groups on a by-application basis, administered through finance committee. Independent Fees You also pay fees to a few groups independent of both SSMU and McGill. These fees are collected by McGill and then distributed to the groups. These groups include: • CKUT • Daily Publications Society • QPIRG • McGill Legal Informations Clinic • The McGill Tribune

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LIBRARIES It’s easy to get lost in the fourteen libraries located on McGill’s Downtown campus, but hard to pick one to study in. Below you’ll find a comprehensive guide to picking a good study space and the perks they have to offer! The Library Catalogue If you ever have trouble trying to find something, don’t be shy and ask a librarian! They are there to help and love it when students ask them for help. They will also help you to refine your search to find the book you are looking for. The catalogue’s best-kept secrets include free access to almost every scholarly journal, and a large collection of free-to-rent DVDs. Theft Although security has become more vigilant, theft is a common occurrence in the library complexes. The best way to avoid being a victim of theft is to keep an eye on your belongings. Don’t let a quick bathroom break or a nap lead you to disappointment and frustration when your laptop or textbook disappears. If it has some value, don’t leave it alone! Ask a trustworthy person to watch your stuff if you have to visit the bathroom, or take it with you. If your stuff is missing, there’s a chance security services has grabbed it – you can call them at 514-3984556. If your belongings have been stolen, report the theft to security services. Remember, prevention is the best mechanism. Use the STOP program run by Security Services to add tracking material to your belongings, invest in locks, and never leave your valuables alone! Late-Return Fines and Renewals The libraries are notorious for their late-return fines. For reserve items you can be charged five cents

per minute for late items. For late DVDs you will be charged $2 per day, the maximum fine for late laptops is $60 (approximately one day late) and you can be charged up to 50 cents per day for late regular items. If you have fines exceeding $10, then you will not be able to borrow materials from the library until the fines are paid down. McGill will also refuse to send you copies of your transcript upon graduation if you have any library debt. Moral of the story: return your items on time! If you can’t make it to the library in time, items that are not DVDs, laptops or reserve items can be renewed online if you log into the catalogue. Other Libraries McGill doesn’t have what you need? Then check out the Montreal public library system – www.ville.montreal.qc.ca/biblio/ If you’re looking for the biggest and the best – check out the Québec National Library or the Grand Bibliothèque. Check out www. banq.qc.ca for information. Don’t forget that we have agreements with other Montreal based universities to allow us to use their catalogues! A McGill favourite for when sought-after texts are already borrowed from McLennan, Concordia will often have copies available. Check out their library system at www. library.concordia.ca. Humanities and Social Sciences (3459 McTavish)

Famous for its brutalist architecture and central location on the south west side of lower campus, McLen-

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nan-Redpath houses most of the resources you could possibly need from your first lecture to your last seminar - if you’re an arts student. This library also has a host of textbooks and course books on reserve, which you can take out in three hour time slots. The reserve section also rents headphones, laptops, and DVDs for free! Library hours are extended during midterms and the complex is open 24 hours during the exam period. The basement hosts a giant computing section with break-out rooms called the Cyberthèque. Schulich Library of Science and Engineering (309 Sherbrooke Ouest)

For science and engineering students, this will be your home for the next four years. Schulich, recently renovated, boasts lots of independent study space, computing stations, and even an entire floor dedicated to group study, a popular choice for the completion of group math assignments and lab reports. Marvin Duchow Music Library (537 Sherbrooke Ouest)

A fantastic new building, Marvin Duchow is the place to be if you’re in music or just want a sweet spot to study. If you like a little entertainment while you study, check out the second-floors record players and huge vinyl collection. Howard Ross Managemet Library (1001 Sherbrooke Ouest)

Located on the second floor of the Bronfman building and newly renovated, the space is full of natural light with lots of individual windowside work stations. Blackader-Lauterman(3459 McTavish)

A cozy spot on top of Redpath, this library is usually full of art history and architecture students (not surprisingly). Computer space is limited,

but there are lots of window-lined work stations. Birks Reading Room (3520 University) You have to take off your shoes to enter, but it’s worth the mild inconvenience. You’ll be surrounded by beautiful stained-glass windows and many leather-bound books. This is as close to the Ivy League as it gets. Nahum Peel)

Gelber

Law

Library

(3660

S.N.A.I.L. (Student Not Actually in Law) That’s the nickname law students have for undergrads taking up their work space by obviously reading anatomy textbooks instead of Supreme Court cases. But if you don’t mind being called names, it’s one of the nicest libraries on campus with some architectural flourishes and lots of electrical outlets. . Islamic Studies (3485 McTavish)

The Islamic Studies library is a hidden jewel. Most students studying there are not reading their voluminous collections, but enjoying the stained glass, hardwood and silence. Osler Library (3655 Promenade Sir William Osler)

Third floor of the McIntyre Medicine building, it’s a trek to get to. Grab a coffee in the sixth floor cafeteria and then head on down to the bibliothèque. For more information regarding hours of operation visit www.mcgill.ca/ library.

If reading is cool, consider me Miles Davis.

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COMPUTING ON CAMPUS Although it took them until 2006, McGill has officially entered the 21st century. Read on to learn about email, WebCT, and other wonderful things. Thanks to the $100 “information technology charge” every student pays, the university has its own web portal, e-mail addresses, computer labs, and course content pages (most of which are probably down for “scheduled maintenance” right now). Here’s what you need to know: Computer Labs The McLennan, Redpath, and Schulich libraries all have large computer labs accessible to any McGill student, complete with printers, photocopiers, and scanners. However, they’ve all been put to shame by the newly-opened Cyberthèque in the basement of the Redpath building. The Cyberthèque (or “Cybertech,” if you’re a tête-carré) lets you access all of these amenities while simultaneously watching students bicker over their group projects inside of spaceage glass pods. Some faculties also have their own computer labs, but access is typically restricted to students from that particular faculty. There are a few hidden gems, though: the Ferrier Building has a large (albeit inconvenientlylocated) Arts computer lab with both Macs and PCs that’s open 24 hours a day. And science students get free printing (yes, you read that correctly), with their main computer labs located in the basement of the Burnside Building. Resources Your McGill e-mail is accessed through the horrific Microsoft Exchange interface, and comes with a paltry 200 MB of storage. Unfor-

tunately, McGill’s official policy is to send e-mails to your McGill e-mail address, so you’re stuck with it. However, you can use another e-mail client (Thunderbird, Apple Mail, or even GMail) to check your McGill account using POP3. The details are available at www.mcgill.ca/it. While you’re at it, you may also want to set up a McGill VPN on your own computer. This will allow you to access all of the online journals and databases McGill subscribes to (they’re also accessible from any campus computer). Websites On those rare occasions when all of them are fully-functional, you can log into the following four essential websites simultaneously through the MyMcGill portal (my.mcgill.ca): Minerva - This is where you’ll register for classes, change your major, pay tuition, and look at your grades. Registration is an electronic free-forall, so log in early. Webmail - Your e-mail account, as mentioned earlier. You really should find a better way to access it. Library - You can renew books online, see your overdue fines, put books on hold, and search the catalogue. WebCT - You will dislike WebCT. It’s sluggish, crash-prone, and brings all the idiocy of YouTube-style comment threads to a classroom discussion. Nevertheless, some professors use it extensively for assignments, announcements, and communication with students. You’ll never love it, but learn to live with it.

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ACADEMIC ADVISING It’s nearing the end of the add/drop period. You’ve survived orientation and settled into your new city, but you’re not sure if your AP credits count towards your freshmen required courses. What do you do? Who do you talk to? Faculty Advising Faculty advising takes place in Dawson Hall. Advisors here provide you with over-arching information about your faculty programs. They can advise you on everything, including freshman requirements, course loads, study abroad, transferring faculties, scholarships, and they can send you in the best direction to get further information.They can also offer lots of moral support should you fail a class. Advisors will be there for you if you’re between a rock and a hard academic place. They will outline your options and help you make informed decisions. All students are assigned a faculty advisor when they enroll at McGill. Last year science and arts advising was separated to ensure greater advisor knowledge in each faculty. Your advisors’ name can be found at the top of your unofficial transcript, and you should have received an e-mail from them over the summer outlining availability over the summer. To see your advisor, you can check their drop in hours from the front desk at Dawson Hall, and make an appointment with them through the front desk or via e-mail. Drop in hours are crowded during the add/ drop period, so make sure you come early or make an appointment. Many students go their entire McGill career without meeting their advisor, but this is not recommended. Departmental Advising This advising is program-specific

(e.g your faculty may be arts, but your department would be history). Your departmental advisors can be found on your department’s webpage and has the potential to change during your undergraduate career. You should see them to get course approvals to meet departmental requirements. They have the power to grant credit from classes not in departmental regulations. Meet with them often so they can track your academic record in your program and help you with scheduling. They can also advise on internships, specific study away programs, honors ,and can help juggle any specific courses you would like to add into your program. In later years they can also prove to be a valuable reference! An important note… Save all e-mail correspondence, especially messages related to permissions granted to take other classes to meet program requirements. These can be helpful proof if ever needed in the future. Peer Advising Peer advising is great. Go to them if you have a quick question and don’t feel like waiting in line or making an appointment. Peer advisors are located on the first floor of Dawson Hall and are a drop-in service. These students can help put your worries in perspective and walk you through the university academic experience.

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RECOMMENDED COURSES Need to take some electives and boost your GPA? Bird courses are a great way to do both. Or, if you’re actually interested in “learning” or “becoming a better person,” try some of the challenging courses on the next page. EAST 216 - Chinese Action Film A hidden gem: spend your afternoons watching Jet Li, Jackie Chan and other kung fu masters dance across the big screen. This class has one lecture each week, while the other class is spent watching a movie.

MUAR 392 - Popular Music After 1945 Listen to The Beatles. Discuss. Listen to The Beach Boys. Discuss. Listen to Pink Floyd. Discuss. You get the idea. RELG 211 - Jesus of Nazareth Remember that carpenter from Israel, who was nailed to a tree for saying how great it would be to be nice to people for a change? This course is about him. You don’t need to be a devout Christian to enjoy it, as much of the course focuses on Jesus’ impact on Western culture. As a bonus, you’ll be able to make smart-ass comments about the extra-biblical evidence for Jesus’ existence at parties. EPSC 250 - Natural Disasters Of all the Earth and Planetary Sciences courses, Natural Disasters is arguably the easiest. Unlike learning to identify different rocks based on their formation (Understanding Planet Earth) or memorizing what elements are found in a given planet’s atmosphere (The Terrestrial Planets), this course teaches you about volcanoes, tsunamis, and ice storms. The other two courses are fine, but this one is much more fun. EDEE 325 - Children’s Literature Although it lacks any mental stimulation, than boring most people into saying it isn’t a bird course, Children’s Literature remains on the list for the enjoyment it brings in re-reading childhood favourites like Robert Munsch. The final project involves writing and illustrating an original children’s book, so it’s perfect for the artistically-inclined.

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PSYC 315 - Computational Psychology This course is where psychology and computer science meet, so you’d better be comfortable with both cognition and writing code. The good news? You’ll get to work with computer simulations of neural networks. The bad news? You’ll stay awake at night, pondering whether the software could one day become sentient and declare war on humans, like Skynet in the Terminator movies.

PHIL 242 - Introduction to Feminist Theory Many McGill students describe this course as a lifechanging experience. It’s a primer for all things feminist, with a focus on all the different streams of feminist political theory. And gentlemen, don’t let yourself be scared away one of the many stereotypes this course defuses is the one about college feminism courses being only for women.

POLI 450 - Peacebuilding Rex Brynen’s course is legendary among political science students. With a strong focus on current events, an emphasis on real cases rather than abstract theories, and a simulation that will make a week of your life disappear, it’s easy to understand why. Just don’t expect it to be easy (world peace isn’t supposed to be, either).

HIST 301 - U.S. Presidential Campaigning Either that course title appeals to you, or it doesn’t. For the political junkies out there, it’s a dream come true: a play-by-play of the most important presidential elections in American history. There’s a hefty load of reading, but it will all be worthwhile when someone compares Obama to Lincoln at a party, and you tell them what’s what.

MGCR 360 - Social Context of Business With all the bad-mouthing of corporate executives and finance professionals that goes on these days, this course helps prove that management students do in fact have souls. It explores business ethics and decision-making by analyzing different cases, and it’s hard not to be engaged when 50% of your grade depends on participation.

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STUDY ABROAD If there’s one thing that’s better than studying at McGill, it’s not studying at McGill. Well, sort of. Many students chose to study abroad for part of their degree, but it takes some serious planning. The first thing you should do is get in touch with the Student Exchange and Study Abroad Office. Check out their website at www.mcgill.ca/studyabroad, visit them in Room 206 the James Administration Building, and keep an eye out for their information sessions in October. The Easy Way A bilateral exchange is an exchange in the purest sense of the term: McGill sends a given number of its students to another university, and they reciprocate. These are relatively hassle-free, as you’ll still be paying McGill tuition and the partner university’s courses should complement your program nicely. However, there are a limited number of spots available at a limited number of universities, so the competition can be stiff. There’s also a parallel, Quebec-wide exchange program run by CRÉPUQ that allows you to pay McGill tuition, although the partner universities’ programs haven’t been vetted. The Not-so-easy Way If your heart is set on a school or a program outside of McGill’s approved list, you can apply to be a visiting student at another university. If you follow this route, the onus is on you: there’s no formal arrangement, so you have to do everything yourself from registering, getting credit for your courses, and paying tuition to the host university. Don’t Screw Up Your Degree The most important thing to do

if you’re planning an exchange (unless you want to do a “victory lap” at McGill) is to ensure you’ll get full credit for the courses you take at your host university. This depends on your particular program, so discuss your plans with a faculty advisor. Most of the exchange application process is automated through Minerva, but getting credit is up to you. Also, a word from the wise: exchange credits are often granted with pass/fail grading. You should look into this. Otherwise, how will you know how much time to spend “studying” in cafés when you’re on exchange at the University of Amsterdam?

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IVAN NEILSON PRESIDENT Hometown: Montreal, Quebec Faculty/Major/Year: BA, Economics, U3.5 Nickname: Van, Vin, iNeils Plans for the Year: Running the show, getting our name (SSMU) out there. I’m always looking for new creative ways to service our students and I have a few ideas already. I’m hoping to get more local students involved in our organization, as they tend to be less interested in what we have to offer. Biggest Fear? Not being in control of my destiny, or not being in control of making the playoffs. Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? Sponsorship Scandal! Federalism at all costs! Favourite Campus Eatery? Super Sandwich Favourite Campus Event? Two way tie for SnowAP and OAP-Lite Politician you would like to emmulate? Woodrow Wilson, R. Clayton “Clay” Davis Future Aspirations? Master of the Universe, International Finance How to Reach you? pres@ssmu.mcgill.ca, BBM, Owl Post

REBECCA DOOLEY VP UNIVERSITY AFFAIRS Hometown: Cranford, New Jersey Faculty/Major/Year? BA, Psychology and Women’s Studies, U2 Nickname: Doolz, Dooley and further variations Plans for the Year... Making SSMU more accessible to all students, implementing structures to foster undergraduate student research, promoting equitable and sustainable practices in the university, and orchestrating a total take over of the Galactic Senate Biggest Fear? Zombie apocalypse Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? 2000 United States Presidential Elections Recount in Florida Favourite Campus Eatery? Architecture Cafe Favourite Campus Event? Most of the anti-oppressive event series put on by various groups Politician you would like to emmulate? Dennis Kucinich Future Aspirations? Full time alternative psychotherapist and part time political activist How to Reach you? ua@ssmu.mcgill.ca or Facebook

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ALEX BROWN VP INTERNAL Hometown: Port Washington, New York Faculty/Major/Year? BASc, Psychology & Economics, U3 Nickname: ABrown, Brownie Plans for the Year... To bring awesome events to campus and be a resource for all students Biggest Fear? Needles! Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? Bill Clinton “not” having sexual relations with that woman. Favourite Campus Eatery? Arch Cafe or Franx Supreme Favourite Campus Event? 4Floors! Politician you would like to emmulate? Yulia Tymoshenko Future Aspirations? Corporate Planning or Film Production How to Reach you? internal@ssmu.mcgill.ca or 514-398-6799

SARAH OLLE VP CLUBS AND SERVICES Hometown: Washington, District of Columbia Faculty/Major/Year? BA, Faculty of Jesus, Majoring in WWJD, U(4?) Nickname: Olle Plans for the Year... Either merge SSMU with McGill, or improve student life - to be determined. Have at least one scandal, Trib independence, Green fee, building improvements, blah blah blah. Biggest Fear? Gerts being closed Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? CSU in its entirety Favourite Campus Eatery? Franx Supreme – ask about the off-menu items Favourite Campus Event? SnowAP, because HMB would come down to pound some beers. That is dedication to a student-centered university! Politician you would like to emmulate? Pontius Pilate Future Aspirations? Getting a job. Any job. It’s a pretty low bar at this point. How to Reach you? cs@ssmu.mcgill.ca

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JOSE DIAZ VP FINANCE AND OPERATIONS Hometown: Panama City, Panama Faculty/Major/Year? BA, Economics, U4 Nickname: Jose the Bull Plans for the Year... Showing you what we do with your $tudent money, revamping Haven Books and making sure you and all students live, breathe and drink Gerts! Biggest Fear? Having a bad hair day Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? The signing of the Hay-Buneau Varilla Treaty Favourite Campus Eatery? Gerts and T-house Favourite Campus Event? QM’s Amateur Drag & Burlesque Shows, MUS 4-to-7, and Blues Pub. Politician you would like to emmulate? Piere Elliot Trudeau Future Aspirations? Trading nuclear warheads on the commodity markets How to Reach you? operations@ssmu.mcgill.ca or 514-398-6802

SEBASTIAN RONDEROS-MORGAN

VP EXTERNAL Hometown: Vancouver, British Columbia Faculty/Major/Year? BA, Political Science, U3 Nickname: Seb, Sebby, Sebbie, Pablo Plans for the Year... Successful advocacy on behalf of students to various levels of government. Improved relations and communication with the Montreal Community Biggest Fear? The end of the airplane, without a quicker alternative (airplanes are bad for the environment though) Favourite Historically-shady Political gamble? Friendship between Trudeau and Fidel. Favourite Campus Eatery? Architecture Cafe Favourite Campus Event? Frosh Politician you would like to emmulate? Rosa Luxemburg Future Aspirations? Farming and pastoral Life How to Reach you? external@ssmu.mcgill. ca or 514-398-6798

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HOW SSMU WORKS Below is a flow chart outlining the decision making process at SSMU. The six executives work with general manager to oversee the workings of SSMU on a daily basis (alongside permanent staffers). Decisions passed in executive committee must be approved by the Legislative Council. Any decision dealing with money over $15,000 must go to the Legislative Council. Each executive oversees a number of committees that assist in decision making and forward reccomendations to council. Alongside council, General Assemblies exist as an independent decision making body.

VP University Affairs

VP External

Commitees

Committees

Committees

Comission des Affairs Francophones Environment Constitution and Bylaw Review Nominating Presidential Affairs

UA Awards of Distinction Selection Library Improvement Fund Student Equity Senate Caucus

External Affairs Student Community Action McGill Living

President

Fact or fiction? Legislative Council creates the Clubs budget...FACT! A note on elections... If you’re interested in running for an executive position, you should contact Elections McGill for up-to-date information (www.electionsmcgill.ca). Elections usually take place in late February or early March. To run you must be nominated by 100 students, filling specific faculty quotas. Forms can also be found on the Elections McGill website.

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Legislative Council

Council is made up of representatives from each faculty (determined by faculty size), an athletics representative, three Senators, three C&S representatives, six SSMU executives, and the General Manager. Council must approve all referenda questions for SSMU and make big policy and financial decisions (like the budget). The SSMU Committees also report here, helping to guide decision making.

Executive Committee

The six executives and the General Manager sit on this committee. Day-to-day operational decisions are made here, and larger scale projects are decided upon.

VP Internal

Committees Internal Students’ Society Programming Network

Speaker of Council The speaker is repsonsible for the smooth functioning of council, usuing Roberts Rule of Orders, they are an impartial guide of debate,

General Assemblies GAS occur once a semester to allow members of SSMU (all undergraduate students) to pass or fail motions (that will not effect SSMU financially or constitutionaly) that are submitted by SSMU members. Motions passed become official policy of SSMU.

VP Finance

VP Clubs and Services

General Manager

Committees

Committees

Financial Budget Operations Investment Financial Ethics Review

C&S Safety Netowrk Media Board QPIRG Board Building

To learn more about SSMU committees, visit www.ssmu.mcgill.ca

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STUDENT MOVEMENT You may find Quebec student politics confusing. That’s normal. With all the different student associations and lobby groups out there, it’s easy to become discombobulated. Read on, and you’ll learn who does what, and how McGill fits into the broader student movement in Quebec and Canada. The Situation in Quebec Quebec universities have the lowest in-province tuition in Canada, in part because of the province’s vociferous student movement. In 2005, for example, many students went on strike to protest changes to education funding proposed by the Charest government. There are two main provincial student associations in Quebec. The largest is the Fédération Étudiante Universitaire du Québec (FEUQ). Founded in 1989, they focus on lobbying and detailed policy research. However, they’ve lost many members in recent years, and McGill undergraduates voted to leave the FEUQ in the fall of 2006, in part because of their support for Quebec sovereignty and higher tuition for out-of-province students. The other main player in the Quebec student movement is the Association pour une Solidarité Sydicale Étudiante (ASSÉ). They’re smaller and more radical than the FEUQ, with a focus on demonstrations and demanding free tuition. Canadian Student Associaions In the past, SSMU has also been associated with the two main federal student lobby groups: the Canadian Alliance of Students’ Associations (CASA) and the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS). Although McGill undergraduates helped found CASA, the two parted ways in 2005 when

CASA was deemed ineffective by SSMU Council. That led to a brief flirtation with the CFS, which then refused to grant SSMU full membership in the fall of 2007, after some very public bickering. These bad breakups were only aggravated by subsequent lawsuits, which make it unlikely that SSMU will let itself be wooed (or jilted) by a national student lobby group again. A Brave New Lobby Group After so many years of unhappy associations with various lobby groups, SSMU decided to represent itself independently. But that didn’t work out too well, given McGill’s lack of leverage as a single university negotiating with the government. So now there’s a new player on the scene. Pursuing the logic of strength in numbers, SSMU recently became a founding member of the Table de Concertation (TDC) along with a handful of other Quebec universities, including the University of Laval and the University of Sherbrooke. There’s a lot to like about the TDC, as it’s less bureaucratic and could fund itself through government grants, thus making it less of an institution and more of a means to common ends for Quebec students. It remains to be seen how well the TDC will work towards SSMU’s intrests, as its still in an incipient stage.

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SUSTAINABILITY Looking for a way to green your undergraduate life? Curious about SSMU’s recent history of sustainability? Read on! Campus Initiatives In 2008, a sustainability assessment of SSMU’s current practices was developed. Last year the SSMU Environment Committee established bench-mark goals to be met in a feasible five year plan. SSMU also employs students in different portfolios to engage in environmental research projects. SSMU has two full time Environment Commissioners who oversee the Environment Committee. The Environment Commissioners also sit on McGill’s Senate Subcommittee on the environment. The Environment Committee coordinates between the Student Society and McGill students interested in building an environmentally sustainable campus. Last spring, McGill proudly opened the Office for Sustainability, which acts as the epicentre of university initiatives for on-campus sustainability. Getting involved The SSMU Environment Committee is the meeting place for all on-campus groups to talk about long term projects – to learn more about meeting times and ways to get involved visit www.ssmu.mcgill.ca/environment. Funding SSMU collects a Green Fee from each of its members that goes towards the Green Fund. The Green Fund is accessible to any student group on campus with an environmental cause. Funding can go towards awareness

events, materials to make your event more sustainable and any long term projects your group would like to implement on campus. To apply to the Green Fund visit ssmu.mcgill. ca/?page_id=48 Green Events SSMU published a Green Events Guide in 2009 outlining all of the ways to make on-campus events more sustainable, with an attached reference guide. This guide is available at www. ssmu.mcgill.ca/?page_id=28.

Spotlight

on

Campus Groups

Gorilla Composting Gorilla Composting is a campus group dedicated to decreasing waste by increasing acess to composting. GC was just awarded major funding from the Generations Pact and the Green Fund to help construct an industrial composter on lower campus, allowing them to expand their composting abilities. Learn more about the project at gorilla.mcgill.ca The Plate Club The Plate Club is SSMU’s dishlending service. If you’re having an event and want to borrow reusable dishware, the plate club is the service for you. E-mail them at theplateclub@ gmail.com To find a complete list of environmental groups, visit www.ssmu. mcgill.ca/environment/?q=projects.

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SHATNER BUILDING Shatner, (a.k.a. the William Shatner University Centre) is the base of operations for student life on campus. Located at 3480 McTavish, it has the world to offer! Fourth Floor You’ll find the Clubs Lounge with four computers and printers for the use of SSMU groups. You’ll also find a piano for those of you who are musically inclined. The floor also has two conference rooms and the clubs and services offices, as well as their mailboxes. If you’re looking to reach a club - their office is the best bet!

Third Floor Here you’ll find the ballroom, used for large events and minicourses. You’ll also find Player’s Theatre (a black box theatre with stage and costume shops), and the Midnight kitchen (serving vegan meals for a small donation).

Second Floor Most of this floor is taken up by the cafeteria, home to Tiki Ming, Franx Supreme and Cultures. In the south-west section of the cafeteria, you’ll find Organic Campus (when they’re not selling veggies outside the building). You’ll also find the Lev Bukhman Room, the home of SSMU Council and various speakers throughout the year. The room is excellently equipped for all your audio-visual needs!

First Floor On this floor, to your left when entering the building, you’ll find the SSMU Lounge, the brand-new Cafe Supreme, and the McGill Tribune. On your right, you’ll find Liquid Nutirition, Sadie’s Coin Corner (with vending machines and a cellphone charger...), Voyages Campus (a student travel outlet), the Legal Informtion Clinic (staffed by McGill Law students), and McGill Student Advocay. You’ll also find the SSMU nursery and the SSMU offices down the hall on the way to the Brown Building.

Basement In the basement you’ll find the campus bar, Gerts, which houses Al-Taib, a cheap food option. You’ll also find the Bike Collective, the Muslim Students’ Association office, TV McGill, the McGill Daily and Le Délit and the Sexual Assault Centre of the McGill Students’ Society.

Sub Basement Home to a paraking garage and Gorilla Composting’s drop-off point.

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BROWN BUILDING The name may be misleading (it’s grey from the outside), but the Brown Building is where it’s at - at least in terms of university-administered student services. East Wing

The staff at the First-Year Office (Suite 2100) is there to help you transition to life at university, no matter what your program. Services for Francophone students are also available here. Career Planning Service (Suite 2200), better known as CaPS, provides a range of services to students and recent graduates, including workshops, on-line job listings, and much more. Scholarships and Student Aid (Suite 3200) aims to connect students with the resources necessary to help with the financial cost of school and other related expenses. They even offer individualized budget counselling. The Office for Students with Disabilities (Suite 3100) facilitates the integration of students with disabilities by liaising with university departments and administration. International Student Services (Suite 3215) provides a wealth of information on diverse issues, providing assistance with immigration rules, regulations related to your studies, and employment opportunities. They have all the key contacts and can lead you in the right direction. The Office of the Dean of Students and the Office of the Executive Director, Services for Students (Suite 4100) work to promote and support student success. The Dean of Students oversees student rights and responsibilities, academic integrity, academic advising, the student disciplinary process and student recognition. The Executive Director works with student associations and through a number of committees and collaborations on both campuses to ensure that student services proactively address emerging

needs. The offices work together when students are affected by crises, whether at the individual or group level, on campus or anywhere in the world. Counselling & Tutorial Services (Suite 4200) share the same office space. Counselling services focuses on assisting students in dealing with personal, academic, and vocational concerns in a relaxed and confidential atmosphere. Tutorial services offers private tutoring by matching your request for academic assistance with a qualified student selected from their bank of tutors.

West Wing

The Brown Building also houses the SSMU Daycare (Suite 2300). Student Health (Suite 3300) offers drop-in clinical appointments with a doctor or nurse, a dental clinic on the fifth floor, immunizations, medical laboratory service, and the Shag Shop, a safe sex boutique. Chaplaincy (Suite 4400), a multifaith service sponsored by a wide range of faith traditions, puts emphasis on community building and service. Mental Health (Suite 5500) offers consultations and treatments for a range of emotional and personal problems. Psychotherapy and psychiatric treatments are provided. The service strives to provide a secure, non-judgmental space for students of all orientations and backgrounds.

Other Services

The First Peoples’ House (3505 Peel Street) is located next to the Brown Building, This service provides support and advocacy for Aboriginal students who have left their home communities in order to pursue their education.

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CLUBS AND SERVICES Want to get involved? Make new friends, volunteer for a worthy cause, debate, dance, write, sing or act? Then getting involved through clubs and services if for you! Student involvement in the clubs, services and publications under SSMU make up a large part of student life on campus. SSMU currently oversees over 200 active clubs and there are always more on the way! There isn’t enough space in this agenda to print all the descriptions of our clubs, but here is a quick run down on the ‘need-to-knows’ about the kinds of clubs we have and how to get involved. Types of Clubs Our clubs cover all sorts of categories ranging from athletic to charitable organizations and everything inbetween. Below you will find some of our club categories.

Activities Night Activities Night is your one-stop opportunity to see all of the clubs canvassing new members at the same time. Activities Night takes place on September 14 and 15 from 4pm to 9pm in the Shatner Building. All floors of the building will be set up with tables, sectioning the clubs into areas of interest like the categories previously listed. You will have the chance to speak to club executives and sign up for mailing lists. The best part about Activities Night? It’s Free! (There is also a winter activities night that takes place in early January - date to be announced.)

Activist Arts and Culture Career-Oriented Cultural and Ethnic Groups Environment Games and Hobbies Media Netowrking and Councils Political Religious Safety Scholastic Sports and Fitness Theatrical Volunteerism and Causes To find out more about the clubs, to read a description about a club or to learn how to contact them, visit www.ssmu.mcgill.ca/?page_id=83.

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HOW TO START A CLUB Do you want to unite all the Albanian folk music lovers at McGill? Or the feng shui practicioners? Now’s your chance. Here’s your guide to starting a club at McGill. If you’re thinking of starting a club, the first thing you should do is contact the Interest Group Coordinator at igc@ssmu.mcgill.ca. This is the checklist of the official procedure for creating a new club. Make sure you read this carefully and go through all the steps (a printable version of the checklist can be found on the SSMU website). • Find at least five other students (graduate or undergraduate) who share your interest. • Prepare a constitution for the group, including name, mandate, executive structure, and membership. Your constitution should follow more or less the sample club constitution, which can be found online or at the SSMU front desk. But please don’t just hand in the sample! We want to see that each club has a constitution that is specific to its own mandate and mission. • Review your constitution with the Interest Group Coordinator, ensuring that your constitution doesn’t conflict with the SSMU constitution or overlap with any other SSMU group. • Submit your final constitution with an explanation letter and Interim Status Application form to the SSMU front desk. • Once a group is granted interim recognition, it maintains that status for three months. During that time, you will need to sign up 25 members and fill all executive (or other) formal positions mentioned in your constitution. You must also host at least three substantial activities during that

time. Interim Status Clubs can apply for funding through the Campus Life Fund, book rooms in the Shatner Building at no cost, participate in Activities Night at no cost, get a mailbox in the Shatner Building, and get an e-mail address and webspace from SSMU. After three months (or more if necessary), if the club has met the above requirements, you may apply for full status by submitting a Full Status Application form. Your application should contain completed event description forms for at least three events. You must also submit a member list and an executive list (the latter is available at the front desk). In addition, you should explain how your club has been fulfilling its mandate as stated in its constitution during its time as an interim club. If more than three months elapse after the approval of the club for Interim Status and the VP Clubs and Services is not contacted, the club will automatically lose its status. If more than three months are needed, please contact the Interest Group Coordinator with an estimate of when the group will be able to apply for full status. The Clubs and Services Committee will then review your application and contact you if any further requirements must be met. Otherwise the application will be taken to SSMU Council for approval. Full Status clubs have all the privileges of Interim Clubs and can apply for funding directly from SSMU, use the SSMU fax machine and long distance telephone, and apply for office space.

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HAVEN BOOKS The student-owned bookstore Looking for an alternative place to shop for your textbooks? Then Haven is your store! Haven is the student-run bookstore where you can purchase new or used textbooks. Haven is also the place where you can consign your old textbooks and make money back.

Here is how Haven works: - Bring your books - Make an account - Set the price of your books - Get paid when your book sells (you make 80% of the sale price!)

Haven helps you make money and save money. Haven also offers an online system that e-mails you when your book has sold and your check is ready. It also allows you to check book availabilities, so you can check if the textbooks you want are on the shelves. Haven is located at 2070 Alymer, between Sherbrooke and President-Kennedy. Visit the store or online at www.havenbooks.com or call them at 514844-8881.

GERTS BAR The student-run bar Gerts is the campus bar, found in the basement of the Shatner building, serving up cool beers from 11am daily. Gerts is also the home to Al Taib, a Middle Eastern eatery offering up everything from pizza to falafel. Gerts, remodeled in the late 90s has a nightclub-esqe feel and is named after Gertrude, a late 90s drag queen. You will find two pool tables and big screen televisions broadcasting everything from Habs games to international soccer. Gerts has a whole host of weekly evening programming (like hot tub parties, jazz mondays, live music thursdays, trivia night and much much more) and hosts many campus parties throughout the school year. It is rumored that Gerts will be introducing its very own bar food in the fall and maybe a terrace, but we’ll see how that goes. Come stop by between classes for some of the cheapest pints in town and watch for updates on the Gerts calendar found at ssmu.mcgill.ca/gerts/cal/ calendar.php

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YOUR FIRST WEEK Welcome to University. You’d better be well-rested, because this week will exhaust you! From academics to new friends and a new home - you’ve finally arrived at McGill! Registration This should happen in mid August, and you should know your registration date and have already registered for some classes. The best way to get through registration is to browse the course calendar and make a list of the classes that you are interested in taking. Come registration day, try and log onto Minerva as early as possible to make sure you get into classes before they fill up. If a class you need to take is full, don’t worry! Plenty of people change their classes during the add/drop period (approximately the first two weeks of classes) and spots will open up. If all else fails, talk to your professor, they can arrange for you to register in the class. If you have to declare a major, don’t sweat it. A lot of students don’t know what they want to study until the end of first year. It’s easy to change your concentration, just make sure you are meeting your freshmen requirements. Speak to an advisor if you need help. ID Cards This picture will follow you around for the rest of your McGill career, so make sure you say cheese! Your ID card acts as your access key to McGill, and lists your name, student number ,and faculty. It will let you into buildings afterhours. You will need it to play intramural sports, access your meal plan, take exams, get into events, and take out items from the library. The ID centre is at Trottier, right up tech alley on the east side of campus. Sometimes there is a long line – but don’t worry, as it

moves quickly. Arrive early to minimize the wait. If you loose your ID you can get another one from James Admin with a nominal fee and a piece of government ID. Books Aside from tuition, books can be one of the most costly things at the beginning of each semester. Your professor should give you a syllabus outlining the course materials at your first lecture. Textbook and coursepack costs can vary from $5 to $200. Don’t get too excited and run out and buy your books the minute class is dismissed. If money is no object, you can purchase brand-spankingnew books at the McGill Bookstore. But if you’d like the extra cash in your pocket, there are many great alternatives for new and used books. You can check out The Word Bookstore (469 Milton), the McGill Classifieds, Facebook Marketplace, or SSMU’s Haven Books (2070 Alymer). Also, talk to your frosh leaders - they or their friends may have a copy of a textbook you need lying around.

Events Trust us, your first week at McGill will be jam-packed with events from moving in to your new place of residence to faculty frosh. Here’s the low down on Orientation. Move-in This day can be really hectic. For a nominal fee, you are able to move in a few days in advance. If you can

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get to Montreal early, we suggest this tactic. If you’re moving in during the regular period, get ready for elevator lines, lots of sweat, and long car lines coming too and from upper res. Things are a little smoother at any of the residences on lower campus, due to more access points. Rez Fest This day is for getting to know your residence, your floormates, your floor fellows, and what the McGill residence experience is all about. You’ll be dressed in a festive t-shirt playing games on Forbes field all day. Discover McGill You, along with 5,000 other first year students will be indoctrinated into McGill today. This day has a larger university and academic focus. You will meet the principal, the SSMU execs, and some other administrators. You’ll also be broken down into smaller groups with student leaders, get a free lunch, a helpful tour of campus, and attend a faculty session to learn about what your next four years will be like. Bonus: a bag full of McGill-related goodies. Frosh Frosh is the most social part of orientation at McGill, where you will be introduced to the fabulous city of Montreal and meet lots of new people. You should have received a package in the mail before school started, which guided you to on-line registration sites. If you still need to register, or pick up your frosh goods (typically a bag full of goodies, a bracelet for event access and a t-shirt) you can find all the frosh registration at the Y-Intersection of campus. There are two rounds of Frosh: Faculty Frosh and University-Wide Frosh. Faculty Frosh is run by the faculty associations and University-

Wide frosh is run by SSMU, alongside Radical Frosh, focused more on social and environmental issues. There are also many other froshes offered by groups on campus for students with like-minded issues, like Muslim Students’ Association Frosh and Fish Frosh, run by the Newman Centre. There will be plenty of BEvERages at the beer tent on lower campus, but Frosh isn’t only about alcohol. Frosh is about having fun, meeting new people, and getting to do exciting things you wouldn’t normally have the chance to experience. Past frosh activities have included white water rafting, boat cruises on the St. Lawrence River, concerts, and varsity sports games. Just remember to drink lots of water and to eat well! Activities Night Not sure how you want to get involved in at McGill, or which club or activity would be the best for you? You must check out this semester’s Activities Night. On Activities Night, every club and service at McGill (and some faculty associations) descend on the Shatner Building, setting up booths with sign up lists and information about their respective clubs. The best way to navigate activities night is to sign up for everything you’re interested in to get the downlow, and then pick and choose in the weeks to come. Making Friends Arriving in a new city and at a new school with a huge entry class may seem intimidating, but try to embrace this opportunity. Think of your first week as a test drive. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there everyone is on a level playing field. Introduce yourself, try to ask questions that elicit more than one-word answers, be yourself, and trust your instincts.

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LIVING IN RESIDENCE You think you know, but you have no idea. Residence life at McGill is one of the best experiences you’ll have. You’ll learn alot about yourself and your neighbours. Food Where you live determines what you eat. Upper residence dwellers dine in the circular Bishop Mountain Hall, Douglas dwellers dine in the Harry-Potter-esque dinning hall (open to other residence students), RVC dwellers dine in the bright basement cafeteria and New Residence folk dine in their food-of-choice dining area. If you live in a dormitory-style residence, you will have a five day meal plan (and students living in RVC will also have weekend brunch and dinner tacked on to that). Your meal plan includes three meals a day with a choice of vegetarian or meat entrees and desserts. If you’re really hungry you can cash in your desserts for an extra entrée. If you’re living in New Rez, your meals are on a pay-per-meal basis, with a bunch of cash already added onto your McGill ID. Make sure to keep an eye on your swipe card, or you will run out of cash! New Rezers can also use their swipe cards at many campus locations. And for upper residence students wanting to grab a bite to eat near campus, don’t worry: RVC cafeteria is available for you to use for breakfast, lunch, and dinner! Keeping Clean Each residence is equipped with laundry facilities, usually in the basement. If you’re not into many of the student-run laundry pick up services, card-operated machines in the basement will be the next best choice. Load up your card with some cash and you’re good to go - but don’t

forget to buy detergent. Early mornings or late nights are the best times to find a free machine. You may want to consider hang-drying your clothes as there always tends to be a line up for the dryer. Once your clothes are in the machine, don’t disappear for two hours, as you’ll find your next-door neighbour handling your tightie whities as they get the washer ready for their load. And don’t forget to keep your whites and colours separate, even if pink is making a comeback. Laundry’s Done - Now What? Don’t forget about dorm-room cleanliness. Use your frosh bag as a laundry bag to get those clothes off the floor. Check out dollarama for some discount cleaning supplies. Get yourself some rubber gloves, a dustpan, and a broom. You’d be surprised at the amount of dirt and dust that collects over the period of a week. Make sure to wash your sheets. Nobody wants to chill on the sheets where you did the deed the night before. Making food? Clean up your mess - nobody appreciates a pile of dirty dishes in the sink. If you’re living in a dorm-style residence, cleaners will take care of the washrooms, but if you leave a nasty mess there after Saturday night’s booze-fest, take responsibility and get in there before they do. Academic Staff, a.k.a. Floor Fellows, Dons, and RAs In the tradition of most universities, McGill has a system of older students working throughout the

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residences to help coach and support first-year students in their journey. These dudes are some of the coolest people you’ll meet at McGill. Handselected by a committee of students from last year’s residence, these are your go-to people. They‘re not scary and won‘t get you in trouble, and they’re a bucketful of advice and helpfulness when you need it. You may also find your RA really attractive. We advise to wait until first year is over to engage in that. Getting Personal with Hygiene Number one rule: don’t forget about cleaning yourself. Sure, no one will force you to shower, but your floor mates will begin to notice. Some residences do have co-ed showers, but it’s not as if Jane showers within view of John. The showers are separated, but still allow you to carry on a conversation when you suds up. If this still freaks you out, befriend someone in McConnell Hall or RVC and shower there, or plan late-night shower trips. Flip-flops are recommended along with bathrobes for shower time. Getting Involved Each residence has Hall Council that works with a budget alongside “Residence Lifers” to plan events and perks for the members of their residence. Inter-Residence Council is another residence-wide council where VP Externals and Presidents of the halls come together to meet with a residence-wide council to discuss residence life and plan residencewide events. There’s also the Environmental Residence Council (ERC) to plan and implement environmental initiatives in residence. Elections are in September of each school year, talk to your Floor Fellow or Residence Lifer for more information.

Roommates and Floormates Love them or hate them, they are there for the year. These people and your relationships with them can make or break your residence experience. And come second year, you may be living with these people or hanging out with them a lot! Talk to your Floor Fellow about any floor events to get to know the people you’ll be living with. Always remember to respect each other’s space. Maybe everyone isn’t as touchy-feely as you, or into listening to death metal with full bass at 3am? If you are having some serious issues, talk to your floor fellow or hall director. They usually have all the answers. Staying Healthy Residence food, drinking, a lot of work, and being over-tired can pack on the pounds. Make sure you get adequate rest, eat some veggies once in a while, and try and get some exercise. If you’re in upper residence, walking up and down that hill a few times a day should do the trick, but don’t forget about alternatives like getting a gym membership or making an intramural team with your floor!

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Remember eat your wheaties to stay healthy, so that you will have the strength to fight intergallactic battles!


LIVING CHEAPLY Dead people have it easy: no assignments, no hangovers, and no need to worry about their cost of living. You, on the other hand, have all of these challenges to contend with. The following pages will be of no use to you when you’re writing a term paper or trying to cure a headache, but they do have some tips for being thrifty. Fees Although the cost of tuition isn’t negotiable, you can shave a few dollars off what you pay in terms of fees. If you’re already covered by a health insurance plan, such as your parents’, you can save hundreds of dollars by opting-out of SSMU’s insurance plan. Books Avoid the McGill Bookstore. The Word, a smelly-but-charming used bookstore on Milton, is an excellent source for copies of the classics and textbooks. The same is true of SSMU’s very own Haven Books on Aylmer, so beat the rush and save some money. McGill’s online classifieds are another popular way for students to buy and sell secondhand books, and Amazon.ca and AbeBooks.ca both have great bargains. And finally, remember that “copyright fee” you paid McGill? It gives you the right to photocopy anything you want in the library. Your required texts will be available on reserve, so if you just need a few pages, the copy room is usually nearby. Food First of all, ramen isn’t so bad. Momofuku Ando, the creator of instant ramen, ate his invention every day and lived to the age of 96. But whatever you choose to eat, remember that Provigo has a 10% student

discount every Monday on purchases over $50. For even better bargains, try shopping at the Jean-Talon or Atwater markets. You can also join the “Free Food at McGill” group on Facebook, where students can list events offering free grub. Entertainment There’s always some kind of guest speaker, concert, recital, film showing, or other event happening on campus. They’re usually advertised on bulletin boards and listservs, so keep your eyes peeled. McGill’s libraries also have tons of new and old movies available for students to rent, and movies are only $5 at the Scotiabank Movie Theatre on Tuesdays. Alcohol Drinking fifties isn’t the only way to be thrifty (although it’s certainly an option). First of all, watch out for drink specials. Some of these are well-known - such as happy hour at Bifteck - but almost every watering hole has some kind of special. And don’t forget about campus events and Gert’s, both of which serve surprisingly cheap brews. All of that being said, the best way to save money at the bar is show up slightly drunk. Discover the joy that is buying booze in bulk and predrink with friends before your night out.

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QUEER STUDENT LIFE You may not have heard “queer” used in a positive context, but in most circles its is the most accepted word to describe the LGBTTIQ community. Campus Resources Queer McGill (queermcgill.ca) is a student-run organization for queeridentifiers and their allies. There’s always something going on, be it social, political, or both! The office on the fourth floor of the Shatner building is a hang-out space and a great place to meet new people. If you’re intimidated, you’re not alone. Check out QM’s welcome sessions for new students, or check out the Coming Out discussion group, held weekly. Queer McGill also runs Queer Line (514-398-6822), an anonymous and confidential peer support line. The Union for Gener Empowerment is another popular hang-out space. Their chill office and huge library make a good atmosphere. If you’re looking for a more political side of things - check out QPIRG and Q-Team (one of their working groups). Community Organizations Many organizations off-campus also have services available or offer volunteer oppertunities. Project 10 (www.p10.qc.ca) is a support service for queer youth that’s always looking for volunteers. AlterHeros (alterheros.com) is another volunteer support organization you can get involved with. AIDs Community Care Montreal (accmontreal.org) and Head & Hands (headandhands.ca) are queer-friendly health and education centres that are worth looking into. Being Queer in Montreal Being queer in a new city can be scarey, but you’ve probably come to

the right place. While violence is not unheard of, Montreal has one of the largest queer-positive populations in North America. In most neighbourhoods, no one will look twice if you’re hlding hands or making out with someone of the same sex or gender. Despite this, people often make mistakes with gender assumptions and pronouns. Also, “queer” does not translate into French. Similarly, gender neutal pronouns and genderqueer are almost impossible to navigate. This doesn’t mean there’s a huge divide within the queer community, but you’ll notice it, if you volunteer for some organizations. Clubs, Bars and Parties Montreal has a vibrant village that has something going on all year long. Some of the most popular places include Le Drugstore (1366 St. Catherine E.), a six story bar with huge terraces and lots of pool tables. Club Date (1218 St. Catherine E.) is a low-key karaoke venue. If you like dancing, check out Parking (1296 Amherst) on Thursdays and Unity (1171 St. Catherine E.) on Fridays. Sky (1474 St. Catherine E.) has both dance floors and a terrace for chilling out. There are also great bars scattered around the city - the village isn’t the only place to hang out. Le Cagibi (5490 St. Laurent) in MileEnd for a coffee, a vegetarian meal and quipsters. Meow Mix (mimproductions.org) is a popular event for “bent women and their buddies” happening monthly at Sala Rosa (4848 St. Laurent).

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LIVING GREEN “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” - that should be your mantra if you’re trying to reduce your ecological footprint at home or on campus. Reducing Waste Composting: Try composting to reduce the amount of organic materials you throw out on a daily basis. Join Gorilla Composting, McGill’s own composting network, to help assist you. It’s good for the environment and not a big hassle because the composter is located in the basement of the Shatner building. Reusable Bags: When going to the grocery store or buying anything in general, bring reusable grocery bags with you, or just use your knapsack. And cut down on packaging. Buying in bulk is helpful and staying away from pre-packaged vegetables works too. Avoid buying veggies in styrofoam containers or shrink-wrapped. It’s better for the environment and for you. Water Bottles: Don’t buy plastic water bottles, as they are horrible for the environment and needlessly package a free and a limited resource! Use a reusable water bottles to hydrate yourself throughout the day. Recycling Being cognizant of what can and can’t be recycled is important. Don’t throw out paper products - but recycle them, along with cardboard and any plastics, metals, and glassware you have. If you’re not sure what recycling is available where you live - check out this website www.ville.montreal.qc.ca and click on your bourough for more information.

Reuse Doing some spring-cleaning and emptying out your closet? Don’t throw out all those old clothes - Sun Youth and the Salvation Army are always taking donations. If you do end up buying packaged food products, try to reuse the containers they come in. Plastic lettuce boxes can make great storage containers. Yogurt containers can also make handy Tupperware. And when bringing a lunch to campus, use reusable containers or bring a container that a campus vendor can put your lunch in to prevent wasting paper plates or styrofoam. Cleaning Supplies and Hygiene There are multiple green-friendly stores across Montreal and even the larger chain grocery stores carry green-friendly products. For keeping yourself clean, try buying biodegradable all-natural shampoos, soaps, conditioners, and toothpastes. By using natural products you are preventing water contamination. When cleaning clothes and dishes ,use green-friendly products like provigo’s “Attitude” line. Look for them in the cleaning aisles. Sometimes these products can be more expensive than your everyday harmful products, so try making your own cleaning supplies! For an all-purpose surface cleaner put about half a cup of baking soda into a spray bottle and add water until it dissolves. Slowly add a cup of vinegar to the mix. Plain baking soda can be used to scrub sinks and bathtubs.

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Use warm water for laundry instead of hot water, or buy special coldwater laundry detergent to help clean clothes. And if you’re really looking to conserve water, turn off the tap when lathering up or brushing your teeth and turn it back on when you’re ready to rinse off. Responsible Shopping Buying locally-grown organic food is a great way to reduce your carbon footprint, but often it’s hard to find. You’re first stop should be Organic Campus - a SSMU service dedicated to providing locally-grown organic food to the McGill community. They can be found every Tuesday of the year outside the Shatner Building,or in the second floor cafeteria. If you can’t seem to find the organic section when shopping at major grocery stores like Metro or Provigo, look at where the produce is grown. If it’s local, that’s the next best step. When buying gifts, Ten Thousand Villages on St. Denis is a great place to get free-trade products. When buying clothing, look for products that are organic cotton. Organic cotton uses less water,, and pesticides, and has better harvesting practices than conventional cotton. Mountain Equipment Co-op is a great place to shop for envrio-friendly clothing. When buying alcohol try to buy local brands from the SAQ. Here are som options...

Quebec is well-known for its excellent beers. Check them out at microbreweries (les microbrasseries) around town and in supermarkets. Who doesn’t enjoy a bottle or two of Unibroue. School Supplies and Printing When buying school supplies, try to purchase pens with refillable ink cartirdges. Buy paper that is postconsumer and recycled. Make sure to use scrap paper, read as many articles as you can on the computer, and if you need to print them - make sure you print doublesided or on scrap paper. When printing or photo-copying, use recycled paper and shops with good recycling practices, like McGill Copy Service (in the basement of Redpath). Certifications If you’re worried about your clothing and food being properly certified, look for these certifications on your products: Global Organic Textiles Standards (GOTS) (www.global-standard.org). Organic Certification varies from country to country. In Quebec, the provincial government oversees organic certification through the Quebec Accreditation Board. Directory of Quebec Certified Organic Products: www.produitsbioquebec.info/interroGrandPublicEn.do.

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Reducing waste is our only option to save the planet!


LIVING INDEPENDENTLY Freedom! No more living by your parents’ rules! Ah, breathe in the sweet smell of - trash? Was yesterday garbage day? Here are some tips to keep your apartment from becoming the land that soap forgot. Cleaning Paradoxical as it may seem, it’s easier to clean more often. If you wipe down the counter or sweep the floor regularly, it will never become a daunting task. Also, be sure to find out when your garbage and recycling pick-up days are, and get your stuff out to the curb on time. Otherwise fruit flies will gather and everything will start to smell like, you guessed it, garbage. And if that ever becomes true of your fridge, clean the whole thing out. Just throw away whatever’s rotting, toss last month’s leftovers, and wipe it all down. Putting an open box of baking soda in smelly places like the fridge or bathroom also does wonders to reduce odors.

Laundry If you’re lucky, you’ll have a washer and dryer in your apartment. If you’re not so blessed, it’s time to

locate the nearest laundromat, and load up on loonies and quarters (or tokens). Using the washing machine is simple enough, but here are a few reminders: separate your clothes into white or lightly-coloured, mediumcolourful, and dark garments, so the dyes don’t bleed in the wash. Also, check the labels to see if you need to hand-wash or hang-dry anything, so it doesn’t shrink. Change a Fuse If you’ve got a lot of lights and appliances on at once, you run the risk of blowing a fuse or circuit breaker. Make sure you know where the fuse box is in your apartment. In some older apartments, you may have to physically change the fuse. If this is the case, just look at the fuses to see which one has blown (it’ll look like a burned-out light bulb) and buy a replacement with the same rating at the hardware store. If your apartment has a breaker box, life is much easier: just find the right switch and flip it back on. Major Problems If the roof is leaking, your heating won’t turn on, or something else is seriously wrong, it’s your landlord’s responsibility to fix it as soon as they can. Let them know what’s going on, and if they don’t take care of it within a reasonable timespan, contact the Régie du Logement to make sure it gets done. You can also pay for the repairs yourself and get reimbursed

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get a toilet brush and clean the damn thing.

by your landlord. Bugs and Mice Sometimes you’ll find things living in your apartment other than you, your roommate, or your pets. This can be a problem. For mold and bugs that you can’t take care of yourself, you can call your landlord. However, unless it’s really bad, they probably won’t do anything (keep calling, though - being annoying can get results) For fruit flies, cut a two-liter soda bottle in half, pour some cider vinegar into the bottom, put the top half upside-down into the bottom half, and tape it all together. The idea is to create a funnel so the flies can get in but not out. For mice, strategically place mousetraps around your apartment baited with peanut butter - plain and simple. The Toilet There are three common problems with toilets. Scenario one: it won’t flush. Your toilet is probably clogged, so get a plunger and dislodge the “problem.” Scenario two: the water won’t stop running. There’s probably a problem with the seal in your tank. Just take off the lid, and make sure the plug fully covers the hole (it sometimes comes loose, or the chain attaching it to the handle gets tangled up). Scenario three: your toilet is gross. This is often the case, so just

Appliances Sometimes, those wonderful things that heat your food, chill your drinks, and entertain you will break. If your appliances were included in your lease, your landlord is obligated to fix them. If not, you’re on your own. Just make sure that the repairs needed aren’t things you can easily do yourself - like replacing a stove element - before paying someone else lots of money to come in and do them.

Roommates Living with other people can be wonderful, unpleasant, or a bit of both. Try to keep common areas clean, and set up a cleaning schedule if you need to divvy up the responsibilities. If you have an issue with your roommates, avoid the passive-aggressive approach, and just tell them what’s bothering you. That usually makes things better, and if it doesn’t, maybe it’s time for you to consider living with other people.

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NEIGHBOURHOODS There are enough neighbourhoods in Montreal to get lost in for months. But even if you never leave the city centre, there’s still plenty to explore. McGill Ghetto University to St. Laurent, Sherbrooke to Pine Living here is both a blessing and a curse. Officially know as Milton-Parc, this area is largely occupied by McGill students who pay exorbitant prices for shoddy apartments to sketchy landlords. The downside is all the drunks staggering around at 4am and neighbours who appear unable to put their trash in bags before taking it to the curb. But you can also wake up 10 minutes before a class and still make it on time, and it’s pretty close to all the main bar strips. Concordia Ghetto Peel to Atwater, St. Catherine to Dr. Penfield In general, you should try to avoid the Crescent bar scene, which is packed with tourists and greasy nightclub patrons buying overpriced drinks. There are a few exceptions, of course: Upstairs Jazz Bar, Grumpy’s, and Brutopia are all good ways to lighten your wallet. Farther west, is a fairly quiet residential neighbourhood with plenty of good restaurants and amenities. There’s also plenty for McGill students to do at Concordia, from free vegan lunches at the People’s Potato to free political film screenings on Monday nights through Cinema Politica. The Plateau St. Laurent to Papineau; Sherbrooke to Laurier Everyone is are always raving about the Plateau and how wonderful

it is. They have a point: it’s the classic, scenic Montreal neighbourhood with cast-iron staircases, great restaurants, family-owned businesses, and beautiful parks. But rents are rising quickly and the south west Plateau is being swallowed by the Ghetto, so it’s now becoming bourgeois as well as bohemian. Mile End North of the Plateau to Van Horne Mile End is the new Plateau. It’s cheaper, more run-down, and more diverse - thus giving it more hipster credibility, at least until it becomes gentrified. If you’re looking for bagels, pastries, or coffee, this is also the place to be. Mile End has a fairly strong community ethos with plenty of cultural events, so as long as you don’t mind being far from campus, it’s a great place to live. St. Henri Decarie to Atwater, the Lachine Canal to St. Antoine Students are flocking to St. Henri for both the low rent and for a more residential vibe. This is where you will go for the best potlucks of your university years and some of the best house parties, too. It’s a great place if you want to cycle along Lachine Canal, and is still connected to the Metro from Atwater station. Just be prepared to pay through the nose if you decide to take a cab home after a night out. But you’d have spent that money on rent if you lived in the Plateau, right?

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NDG (Notre-Dame-de-Grâce) West of Decarie, north of Sherbrooke NDG is a mainly Anglophone and immigrant working-class and middleclass neighbourhood. Most students think it’s a bit far, but if you’re willing to brave a 20-30 minute bus ride, you should take a look at this affordable and fairly nice area. Your home could even have a front yard, which is more than those Plateau-dwellers can say. Latin Quarter Bleury to Berri, Sherbrooke to ReneLevesque Abutting on the Plateau and the Village, this small section of downtown is bustling with European-styled restaurants, boutiques, and bars (both alcoholic and hookah). It’s a whole other world of nightlife just a metro ride or short walk away. If you love the feel of being in the centre of the action, the Latin Quarter is a great place to emerge yourself in the real Montreal, and to mingle with some UQAM students while you’re at it.

The Queer Village St. Catherine east of St. Denis, and surrounding streets While many only know the Village as a clubbing destination, people do live here too. It’s still quite inexpensive, and you’ll always be right where the action is. Beaudry Metro is right in the heart of the Village, which means easy access to the green line to get to McGill. It’s a great If I place to be if wasn’t you want to 300,000 light break out of years away, I’d be the McGill living in the Plateau, bubble. alongside all of those bohemian young folk.

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GETTING YOUR OWN PLACE Apartment hunting can be stressful, but it’s important to find something you’re happy with. Check out these tips for avoiding crazy landlords, neighbours who have constant loud sex, and Verdun. Location Where do you want to live? Montreal is a fantastic city to live in and has many great neighbourhoods, so picking one can be tough. Ask yourself how you’ll get to campus - do you want to live within walking or cycling distance? If not, are you near a metro or bus stop? How long will it take you to get to and from class? Where is the closest supermarket or laundromat? Are you living near the things that are important to you, be they parks, libraries, nightclubs, or restaurants? If you’re interested in life outside the Ghetto, consider living in one of Montreal’s many other popular neighbourhoods. Go and check them out on page 48 to see what they have to offer.

Costs It’s important that you have a realistic budget which should take into account not only your rent, but also other expenses such as utilities

(if they’re not already included in the rent), internet access, travel costs (such as a transit pass), groceries, and the money you’ll spend going out. If utilities aren’t already included, keep in mind that heating during the Montreal winter will be expensive. Talk to the previous tenants or call HydroQuébec to find out the average cost of heating your home. Who Are You Going To Live With? Are you moving into an established group house, or are you looking to find a vacant apartment with some friends? Keep in mind that your best friend may not make an ideal roommate - finding someone who is similar to you in their daily life is more important. Ask yourself: are you an early riser? Do you like to have friends over? Do you like your place kept tidy and clean? Do you need lots of peace and quiet? The best roommate isn’t who you want to party with - it’s who you don’t mind having around when you’re hungover. Where To Start Looking Once you know where you’d like to live, what you can afford, and who you’re going to live with, start looking at some advertisements. The McGill Off-Campus housing keeps a searchable list of available properties that is updated daily at www.mcgill.ca/offcampus (you will need your student ID number), or you can drop by the office at 3641 University. The McGill Classifieds website is another good source for vacant properties or people

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looking for roommates (www.mcgill. ca/classified/housing), and Craigslist is increasingly the first place for both people advertising a place and for people looking for a place (montreal. en.craigslist.ca). Word of mouth is also a great way to find a place, as some properties aren’t advertised, but transferred from one group of friends to another. Also, when wandering around Montreal, you will see plenty of “À Louer” signs especially during the summer.

lord what to do in the event of repairs, both urgent and non-urgent, so you have a number to call if a pipe bursts in the middle of the night. You can’t always tell what your neighbours will be like, but when you’re in the apartment, listen to see if you can hear them. You can also ask some strategic questions to get a sense of what they’re like: do they have young children or pets, work night shifts, and so on. Utilities If utilities aren’t included in your rent, you need to arrange for them: call Hydro-Québec (514-384-7275) or Gaz Métro (514-598-3222). Be sure to tell them the date you moved in, or else they might charge you for the previous tenant’s utilities. If you want a landline, call Bell (514-310-BELL) – it’ll cost you around $50 to get it set up.

Things To Look For The quality of apartments can vary quite a bit within a price range or area, so shop around to get an idea of what’s available. Also, it should go without saying that you should always see a place before signing a lease. If you’re unable to see an apartment for yourself and are getting desperate, find someone you trust and have them check it out for you. When you’re looking at a place, be sure to consider security (Do the locks work? Do the windows close properly?), check the water pressure, look for things that might be damaged, and consider the age of the apartment. Also, clarify with the land-

Internet Videotron, Bell, and a whole bunch of other companies offer highspeed internet service. Poke around for deals and promotions, but know that customer service at most internet service providers is notoriously bad. If you’re really adventurous, you can try living without the internet at home by using wireless connections on campus and in cafés. Other Basics Find out when the garbage and recycling get picked up as soon as you move in, or where to leave them in your building. Garbage starts to smell bad quickly, and you can incur a significant fine for putting it out on the wrong day: city employees will actually go through your trash to find out who you are, and you can be fined as much as $500. The same goes for putting non-recyclables in the recycling.

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TENANTS’ RIGHTS You may have to fight for your right to party, but there are plenty of other rights you get just by renting an apartment. From sketchy landlords to illegal fees, here’s what you need to know when the going gets tough. Although Quebec’s laws are tenant-friendly, sometimes its landlords are not. The Régie du Logement (rdl. gouv.qc.ca) regulates leases and your rights as a tenant, so visit their website or contact them if you think you’re being screwed over. Signing a Lease Some landlords will require you to sign an application for the apartment. They can do a brief background and credit check to ensure that you can pay your rent, and if they’re satisfied then the application can become legally binding. The moral of the story? Don’t sign more than one! Your landlord is permitted to ask for the first month’s rent in advance, and nothing else. In Quebec, it’s illegal to charge a damage deposit, key deposit, or any other form of special fee. If you’ve already paid one, go to the Régie to get compensated. Once you sign a lease, your landlord is required to give you a written copy within ten days. Make sure that you do sign one! You can buy a standard lease form if needed. If you have roommates, the person whose name is on the lease is responsible for the rent. If only one of you signs the lease, then they’re responsible for everything, and can be held responsible by the landlord if any of the other occupants fail to pay. If you cosign, you’re either jointly liable or liable in solidarity. Joint liability means each tenant is responsible for their own portion of the rent, and liability in solidarity means that each

tenant can be held accountable for the full rent. Unless your lease states otherwise, you are jointly liable. Your landlord is obligated to tell you what previous tenants paid in rent. If you think the rent has increased unreasonably, contact the Régie and they’ll adjust it to what they feel is appropriate. If your landlord lied about the previous rent, you have two months from when you find out to bring it to the Régie. Sometimes you’ll be charged a finder’s fee by the previous tenants, who seem to want a reward for moving out. Although it’s a common practice, particularly for high-demand buildings, these fees are completely illegal and make housing inaccessible. Don’t pay them, and don’t charge them either.

Living in your apartment If you’re more that three weeks late on rent, or are frequently late, your landlord has grounds to evict you. Pay on time! You can ask your landlord for a receipt in case you need

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proof of payment later. Minor repairs are up to you, but your landlord is responsible for major repairs. If they don’t take action promptly, you can pay to get something fixed, and your landlord must reimburse you. If there’s conflict over the extent or cost of the repairs, contact the Régie. Your landlord can’t just drop by the apartment all the time. They must give you 24 hours notice first, and they can only do non-urgent repairs between 7am and 7pm. If they’re showing the place, it has to be between 9am and 9pm. But in emergencies, no notice is required. Renewing a Lease Your lease will be renewed automatically unless you inform your landlord three to six months before it ends that you intend to move out. Your landlord can only refuse to renew for certain reasons, such as your rent being more than three weeks late, or if they’re repossessing the space for their family’s use. Rent can only be increased within certain limits set by law, and the landlord must contact you about a proposed increase three to six months before the renewal of your lease. You

can refuse an unreasonable rent increase, but check it out with the Régie first. Moving Out If you’ve signed a lease, you’re responsible for all 12 (or 6, or whatever) months of rent. So what if you want to leave early? Find a sub-letter, or transfer your lease. Sub-letting is a great way to avoid paying rent if you’re going on vacation, but want to come back to the same place. You’re essentially renting your place out to another tenant. That means you’re still responsible to the landlord for rent and damages, so be sure to choose your sub-letter wisely and have a written agreement. Look on the Régie’s website for sub-letting contracts. You must inform your landlord if you sub-let your apartment, and they can refuse the sub-letter if they have serious reason to do so. Lease transfers are for when you want someone to take over your apartment permanently. They replace you on the lease, and you are no longer responsible for anything. Again, you must get your landlord’s approval, but they can only refuse in extreme circumstances. Print a contract from the Régie’s website, and sign away.

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GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT Tuition, Rent, Food, Movies, Bike Repairs, Concerts, Beer - it all adds up! If you’re having trouble making ends meet, you may need to get a job. Below you’ll find many of the resources available to you at McGill. On Campus Work Study: McGill will help set you up with an on-campus job if you have sufficient need. To enroll go to the Student Aid Office (Brown Building, Suite 3200, 514-398-2551) for an application, or apply on Minerva. Some of the best on-campus jobs like library ambassadors - are available through this program.

Teacher’s Assistant If you do really well in a class (mostly “A”s) you may be able to TA a class. In the science faculty, undergraduate students sometimes TA in labs or conferences. Ask your professors about availabilities to see what’s on the table.

Cafeterias BMH, RVC, and Douglas Hall are frequently in need of cafeteria workers. This is one of the best on-campus jobs – it offers free meals, good pay, theme nights, and a friendly work environment. Visit BMH to find out more details. Floor Fellows If you feel like making a difference and really care about McGill residences, then this job is for you! Applications are due in late January. The job perks include free room and board, but the job’s a tough one – you’re helping first years adjust to life at McGill and the other temptations of Montreal. Athletics The gym is frequently hiring, usually for referee and intramural facilitator positions. These are great jobs if you make the cut. Job perks include, good pay, flexible hours, and low time commitment. Stop by Client Services office (in the gym 475 Pins) to fill out an application.

SSMU SSMU is always looking to employ students! Available positions are always posted on their website ssmu. mcgill.ca/jobs, and sometimes mentioned in their listservs. Most hiring is done in the months of April and May for the following school year, but web designers, DJs, and researchers are always needed throughout the year! CaPS McGill’s Career and Planning Services offers one-on-one career advising and resume help, as well

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as career workshops throughout the school year. You can find them in the Brown Building in Suite 2200 or call them at 514-398-3304. Job listings can be found at the CaPS “my Future” site. Log in with your McGill username and password to start searching. Faculty Internships and Career Office The Faculties of Engineering and Management both have great job fairs and career workshops throughout the year, with some of the most prestigious companies recruiting. The faculties of arts and science also have grad and career fairs in the fall semester. The arts internship office has recently moved to the third floor of Leacock, and places students in great programs over the summer. Stop by and check them out. McGill Classifieds The jobs can be sketchy, but the classifieds are another great place to check for work. Babysitting jobs are often posted, as well as businesses close to McGill that are looking for employees. McGill Classifieds are also known for advertising on-campus experiments for cash (usually in the psychology department). If you’re willing to have a MRI, participate in multistage studies, or donate your sperm, you can make a good buck.

Networking The McGill Alumni Association and CaPS collaborate to offer a mentor program where you’re paired with a McGill Alum working in the field that interests you. Your mentor will be able to advise you on your career path and perhaps will be a good future connection. Don’t be afraid to ask people you know about jobs. Most people these days get their jobs through recommendations or word of mouth - not every job is ever posted on line. The Alumni Association also offers workshops entitled “backpack to briefcase” in the winter semester, with recent McGill alumni speaking about their work experience. Get Involved You should be getting involved because you want to meet people and genuinely care about a cause, but getting involved also helps you pad your resume for any future jobs you may be interested in. Companies often look for leadership qualities in the resume, or evidence of a prolonged interest in their cause. If you’re interested in journalism, you’re also going to need some published clips somewhere in your personal history.

Facebook, Craigslist, and Workopolis If you’re looking for work in the city instead of at McGill, free online job listings are a great place to start looking. Send lots of e-mails, make lots of calls, go to interviews, and something will work out. Don’t forget to first update your resume. And if you’re an international student, you’ll need a work permit to work off-campus.

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Getting a job, like captaining a space craft takes time, dedication and effort. Do not fear rejection, live long and prosper!


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VOLUNTEERING If you’re looking to add some meaning to your daily activities, volunteering is a rewarding experience. Check out these oppertunities listed below! Activities Night is the best way to get involved in the community. There’s a club for just about every cause and interest. Volunteer to run an event, staff an office, or sit on an executive committee. And, keep your eyes peeled for the volunteer fair in September, run by the Volunteers Bureau (a SSMU service). The Sexual Assault Centre of McGill Students’ Society (SACOMSS) is an amazing service. You can volunteer for the helpline, help run support groups, or do workshops in local schools on sexual assault. Check SACOMSS out on Activities Night or call 514-398-8500 and tell them you want to get involved. The Yellow Door is right in the heart of the McGill ghetto and is always looking for volunteers to help organize small acoustic gigs or vegan lunches. Their main focus is the Elderly Project: providing elderly resident with students as errand-runners and companions. Go to www.yellowdoor.org for more details. Head & Hands are dedicated to providing more accessible healthcare, and raising awareness about physical, mental, and sexual health, especially to otherwise marginalized community members and youth. There’s a bunch of ways you can help them out, including tutoring and babysitting. Visit www.headandhands.ca or e-mail info@headandhands.ca. Food Not Bombs is a no commitment Sunday gathering of a small group of laid-back radicals cooking up a vegetarian storm. All the food

goes down to Berri Square and you can dine away with the homeless people you serve the food to. Cooking locations change so e-mail fnbmontreal@linuxmail.org for more information. AIDS Community Care Montreal (ACCM) can send you off into local schools to do presentations focusing on providing young people with information on HIV/AIDS prevention and stigma-busting. Contact them at 514-527-0928. QPIRG is a great resource for finding out about more volunteer opportunities in the city. They also do a lot of work organizing events and raising awareness through their working groups, which focus on particular social justice issues. Swing by their office at 3647 University and press the buzzer or go to their website qpirgmcgill.org. McGill Univeristy Health Centre also offers tons of volunteer opportunities working in the various hospitals. Visit www.muhc.ca/about/ volunteering Arts Internship Office has an online database of internships available in Montreal and around the world, or you can find your own. If you’re an arts student you may even be able to get three academic credits and financial support for your endeavors. Check out their website at www.mcgill.ca/arts-internships. If you’re still looking, call the Volunteer Bureau of Montreal (514-842-3351). Also, visiting cabm. net is a good heads up. Alright, get out there and do something worthy!

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STUDENT ACTIVISM Don’t just sit there - do something! There’s a large and loud community of activists in Montreal and on campus who want your help. If you want to stand up against oppression and demonstrate your commitment to social justice, there are plenty of ways to become an activist in Montreal and at McGill. Whatever your political inclination or preferred means of involvement, just find an organization that you feel comfortable working with. Staying in the Loop There’s a semi-bilingual mailing list for social justice and activist evens in Montreal, which you can join at masses.tao.ca/lists/listinfo/ act-mtl. Or, if you can’t stand a cluttered inbox, the Montreal Mirror frequently prints announcements about upcoming protests and demonstrations.

about QPIRG, or just borrow some books form their Alternative Resource Library, visit them on the third floor of 3647 University, or at qpirgmcgill.org. The other prominent McGill activist group in recent years has been the GrassRoots Association for Student Power (GRASPé). They’re an autonomous, non-hierarchical group of McGill students committed to direct action, and have been responsible for a number of high-profile campus demonstrations. Although they were off the radar for the 2008-2009 year (their website at grasp.wordpress.com hasn’t been updated for a while), GRASPé members are still a force to be reckoned with at McGill.

McGill Activism McGill also has a number of vibrant activist groups. The bestknown is undoubtedly McGill’s branch of the Quebec Public Interest Research Group. QPIRG is funded by a fee collected from McGill students, and their goal is to raise awareness and motivate grassroots activism around diverse social and environmental justice issues. In recent years, QPIRG has been involved in putting on a number of campus events, including Social Justice Days, Culture Shock, and various Pride events. They also operate Radical Frosh, a political and activist alternative to the usual booze-drenched introduction to McGill, immerses students in the activist culture of campus and the city. If you want to learn more

Montreal Activism There are plenty of activist groups in Montreal as well, from the Lebanese solidarity group Tadamon! (tadamon.resist.ca) to the anti-war group Échec à la Guerre (aqoci. qc.ca/ceg). The Anachist Bookfair Collective also hosts the largest gathering of anarchists in North America every May at its annual bookfair (anarchistbookfair.ca), and it has an anarchist bookstore and infoshop called L’Insoumise at 2033 St. Laurent. Of course, that’s just the start of it. As a large and diverse city, Montreal has plenty of different groups to suit your activist inclinations. Most of them maintain online presences, so fire up your computer or just ask around, and soon you’ll be sticking it to the man.

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LA VIE FRANCOPHONE Être francophone à McGill, c’est faire partie d’une minorité plus ou moins visible au sein d’un Québec à majorité francophone. Mais n’est-ce pas une contradiction? En tant que francophone, lorsque je passe par les portes Roddick, j’ai toujours l’impression d’entrer dans un autre monde. Dès mon premier semestre à McGill, j’ai tout de suite su apprécier ce dépaysement. Malgré tout, je n’ai jamais oublié que j’étais avant tout une étudiante francophone au sein d’une université anglophone qui octroie certains droits à une minorité francophone. En effet, les 17% de francophones présents à McGill, qui soit dit en passant que ce pourcentage a déjà atteint près du quart des étudiants, ont le droit de rédiger leurs examens, thèses, et dissertations en français ou en anglais. Désormais, l’article 15 de la Charte des Droits des Étudiants de l’Université McGill apparaîtra sur tous les plans de cours. C’est beau toutes ces statistiques et informations officielles, mais qu’en est-il de la vie étudiante francophone? Une grande partie des francophones à McGill n’habitent pas sur le campus. Ils ont souvent un réseau d’amis à l’extérieur du campus et ne sentent donc pas le besoin de s’impliquer. Par contre, une autre partie de ce 17% s’implique grandement dans la communauté étudiante. En tant que commissaire francophone de l’Association Étudiante de l’Université McGill (AÉUM), j’ai eu la chance de rencontrer des francophones passionnés et impliqués. La Commission des Affaires Francophones (CAF) de l’AÉUM est un comité permanent regroupant divers clubs étudiants ayant pour objectif premier l’amélioration de la situation du Français à McGill. Que ce soit par des activités, événements, résolutions, ou par la Francofête, la CAF

fait tout en son pouvoir pour accroître la visibilité des francophones sur le campus. La Francofête est une célébration de tout ce qui est en lien avec le Français ou la Francophonie. Il s’agit donc de rappeler aux francophones qu’ils ne sont pas seuls, mais aussi de rappeler aux anglophones que nous existons. Outre la CAF qui est l’organe principal de la vie francophone de l’AÉUM, divers clubs francophones, bilingues, ou tout simplement à saveur francophone existent aussi tel que le comité souverainiste, l’action indépendantiste, le PLQ-McGill et le NDP-McGill. Dans une optique un peu moins politique, le French Student Society (FSC), le International Students Network (MISN) et le McGill Afrtican Students Society (MASS) ont tous quelque chose en commun avec la culture francophone. Sur un plan plus artistique, le Théâtre de la Grenouille et le journal le Délit Français, publié par la Société des Publications du Daily, vous offrent la chance de vous exprimer en Français. Peu importe la façon que vous choisirez de vous impliquer, ce qui est primordial, c’est de s’impliquer. C’est la meilleure façon de vivre pleinement votre passage à McGill en tant que francophone. Voulezvous couchez avec moi? Ce soir? Zut alors.

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McGILL ATHLETICS “Put on your red and white sweater, the dirtier the better, and we’ll open up another keg of beer. For it’s not for knowledge that we go to college, but to raise hell all the year!” You already pay a base fee for athletics that gives you access a weight room, the field house, the pool, and much more. For about $15 a semester you can upgrade your membership to have access to the McGill Sports Centre. The schedules and opening hours are all posted on the McGill Athletics webpage, so make sure you check out www.mcgill.ca/athletics before heading down to the gym to work out. Equipment Rentals and Classes McGill Athletics also offers a rental service for a large amount of sports. Drop-in hours are available for sports like soccer, basketball, and volleyball with equipment also available for rent through the new card system. If you feel like doing something a little outdoorsier, they also rent everything from snowshoes to cross-country skis for winter sports. And, if you’re into squash, there also courts available for rent. McGill Athletics also offers a whole host of gym classes from salsa dancing to power yoga. Check out the schedule in the McGill athletics magazine for more information. Intramurals Couldn’t make the varsity team? Whether it’s skills or timing that are holding you back, intramurals may be the right choice for you. Always a popular activity and a great way to make friends, pick up an athletics magazine (available at athletics or in the Brown Building) to check out this semester’s intramural schedule. Grab a motley crew of friends, pick a ridiculous team name, choose your skill level, pay the

registration fees, and you’re good to go. Who knows - your team may even walk away with a cherished intramural mug. If you can’t put together a team, not to worry - there is a free-agents’ night each semester to allow for team recruiting. For more information and times, visit www.mcgill.ca/athlertics/ intramurals. Varsity Sports McGill’s Varsity teams fall under two names - the Martlets for our women and the Redmen for our men. Most of the teams have try-outs in mid-August and exhibition games, regular games, and training camps begin at the end of the month. If you’re playing on a big-budget team like hockey or football, chances are you’ve already been recruited for your mad skills. If you think you’re talented and have been overlooked, or didn’t think to contact teams ahead of time, it’s never too late check out the coaches’ pages and get the ball rolling. Number One Fan If you’re not the most athletic of the bunch, but still love to hoot and holler in the stands, while decked out in red and white, then being a fan is for you! Attending varsity sports games is a favourite pastime at McGill - most games are free or cost under $5 to attend. If you really feel like cheering on the red and white, then you should consider joining Red Thunder, the new McGill athletics fan club, under SSMU. If you pay the membership fee, you get free admission to some games and a fan pack.

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RELAX ON CAMPUS Brought your lunch to campus? Looking for a spot to eat or maybe grab a beer? Need a cozy nook to read your course pack or meet up with a friend? Below you’ll find some popular spots on lower campus. Three Bares East of Redpath Museum Pros: Beautiful fountain and shade. Cons: Not so happening come winter or rain. Stairs to Nowhere In front of Burnside Hall Pros: Often Sunny, back support. Cons: Outdoors come winter. The Hill In front of Redpath Museum Pros: Everyone you know will be hanging out when the sun is shining. It’s a great place to throw a Frisbee or tan. Cons: Rain leaves the ground moist and a lack of shade sometimes makes the heat unbearable. Reservoir East of Education Building Pros: Great for sports and panoramas. Cons: Softball games and soccer matches take up most of the field, and it’s prone to mud post rain. Lounge First Floor Shatner Pros: Some of the best couches on campus, good for group study or a nap. Cons: No food. Arts Lounge Leacock Basement Pros: Free Pool, wicked soundsystem, computer lab. Cons: Bad sleeping sofas, only for arts students. Science Lounge Burnside Basement Pros: Open 24 hours for science students only, free printing, vending machines. Cons: Short on comfortable seating, more of a study space than lounge.

MUS Lounge Bronfman Basement Pros: Recently renovated, convenience store and swivel chairs. Cons: If you’re not in management, you’re easy to spot. Architecture Café MacDonald-Harrington Building Pros: fifty-cent coffee if you bring your own mug, amazing atmosphere, cheap and delicious food, piano. Cons: Always busy, often runs out of the food your craving. Bookstore Café Second Floor McGill Bookstore Pros: Starbucks coffee, lots of seating Cons: expensive, poor lighting, lack of good atmosphere. Gerts Shatner Basement Pros: Cheap beer, free popcorn, amazing food, big screen TVs. Cons: Early 90s nightclub décor, unreliable “food” hours. Thompson House McTavish Street Pros: Amazing atmosphere, cheap restaurant and beer. Cons: You have to be a grad student to get in, or be invited by one. Best of luck with that. Engineering Lounge McConnell Basement Pros: Recently painted, comfortable couches, pool table. Cons: Dungy basement feel, often dirty. Cafeterias are also sweet spots – good lighting and food is accessible. Don’t relax in the library – you’ll be in there too much anyway.

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EATING ON CAMPUS Campus has an array of eats, from overpriced cellophanewrapped sandwiches to vegan gumbo to wonton soup. Read on if you’re hungry... McGill students have a history going up against McGill administrators for a right to decide what food is served on campus. Two years ago, McGill tried to take over the Architecture Café from its humble beginnings run by Architecture students. Architecture students still work there, but it’s now run by McGill Food Services, as usual McGill was worried about “health” and “liability.” It’s also rumored that the students’ society used to control most cafeterias on campus. Chartwells Now most campus cafeterias are run by the externally owned Chartwells. Chartwells cafeterias are in every major building on campus serving a vareity of foods. You can find them at Redpath, the Bookstore, Bronfman, McConnell, Trottier, Education, Law, McMed, New Rez. Shatner Eats SSMU leases many food service spots in the building to external vendors. These vendors are under the jurisdiction of SSMU and are not realted to McGill Food Services in any way. The second floor cafeteria has Tiki Ming, Cultures, Franx Supreme, and Organic Campus. Gerts has the famed and delicious Al Taib. The first floor boasts Liquid Nutrition and Café Supreme. Eating Kosher and Halal If you’re looking to grab a specific bite, be it kosher or halal, check out the following options - Homemade Kosher products

are available at most Chartwells cafeterias Al Taib in Gerts is halal and they also offer food thatcan be consumed by those keeping kosher Check out Hillel house on Stanley, they have a restaurant dedicated to Kosher eats (Yoel’s Dizengoff Café) Student-Run Architecture Café (Basement, Macdonald Harrington) - Although under Food Services, the Arch Café still maintains its student-friendly atmosphere. It serves fair-trade coffee and wonderful locally-made delights (including samosas, zatars, calzones, and baked goods). Midnight Kitchen (3rd Floor, Shatner) - MK runs the kitchen on the third floor of Shatner, pumping out hot vegan meals on a daily basis. Volunteer-run, the kitchen serves lunch from 12:30 until they run out. Bring your own tuperware and a donation of a few dollars, (if you can afford it). Leacock Hallway - During the week you will find an array of food sales ranging from samosas to grilled cheese in the Leacock hallway. Lunch is easily purchased fromthe student vendors (fundraising for a cause or organization) for about $3. Frostbite (McConnell Eng) - Run by the Engineering Undergraduate Society, this tasty little stand sells ice cream. Look out for toonie tuesdays and if you score below 30% on a test, it’s free!

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FOOD ALTERNATIVES There are pleny of new food projects starting up at McGill, finding ways to fill your belly in a sustainable manner. Read on, hungry one. Farmers’ Market An annual fall event on McGill’s downtown campus, the Farmers’ Market provides students, employees, and neighbourhood residents with the opportunity to buy fresh, healthy, organic, and local food directly from the farmers who produce it, and to engage with community and student groups working on personal, community, and ecological food sustainability initiatives. Developed at the 2008 Rethink conference, the market is a continuing collaboration between undergraduate and graduate students, SSMU, and McGill Food and Dining Services. Founded to support community-building and local, sustainable agriculture, we hope to foster inclusiveness, participation, communication, and learning throughout both the market’s fall presence at Three Bares Park and its yearlong planning process. The market is open every Tuesday in September and October, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Three Bares Park, and you can contact them at mcgillfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

campus, such as Chartwells and Sodexo. They’re working to maximize the amount of locally-grown food in campus cafeterias, while initiating new standards for production, transportation, and packaging. A part of MFSP’s project mandate is to support student-run research projects throughout the academic year. They hope to establish partnerships with existing McGill courses and provide students with the opportunity to conduct research that will be used to improve campus food-sourcing decisions. MFSP wants to help your class research projects make a difference in the real world, and it’s a great way to prevent all of your hard work from going to waste! Look out for events that MFSP will be holding this fall and make an impact on your food options on campus! You can also contact them for more information at mcgill.foodsystems. project@gmail.com.

The McGill Food Systems Project The McGill Food Systems Project (MFSP) is a collaborative initiative between students, McGill Food and Dining Services, and the McGill Office of Sustainability, which uses student research to improve the sustainability of the food systems at McGill. The MFSP conducted research this past summer to assess the food purchasing and sourcing decisions of the major food service providers on

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CAMPUS CULTURE Some people think McGill is lacking in the fine arts department, but they’re dead wrong. It may be low-key, but there’s a vibrant community of musicians, thespians, and artists to give you an art fix without leaving campus. Theatre Perhaps you’ve given up on your dream of going to the National Theatre School, and chosen the academic life at McGill instead. But, believe it or not, the English department offers a drama and theatre degree with practical classes in performance, stage scenery, voice, and more. There’s also a vibrant extracurricular theatre community at McGill. Both Players’ Theatre and Tuesday Night Café have year-long seasons, not to mention the McGill Drama Festival, ARTifact, or the Arts Undergraduate Theatre Society’s big-budget musicals. Whether you’re looking so get involved or just see a show, take a look at the drama bulletin board on the main floor of the Arts Building (it’s on the left after you come through the main doors).

thing else you can think of. Each issue is centered around a theme and distributed across campus, but you can also read pieces or get involved by visiting stepsmagazine.ca. The Scrivener Creative Review could be considered Steps’ grown-up sister. It began as a Canadian literary review published by the English Department, and now attracts international contributors. They’ve also interviewed famous writers like Leonard Cohen and Margaret Atwood. Scrivner is online at scrivenerreview.com, or you can find issues for sale at bookstores around Montreal. Music The Shulich School of Music always has some concert or other performance going on, and most of the time they’re free! Head over to the music building and pick up a schedule. Also, there are a number of choirs and acappella groups at McGill who perform year-round and typically recruit new members at Activities Night. Art

Creative Writing Apart from the McGill Daily’s literary supplement, there are two main literary magazines at McGill. Steps is published quarterly by the AUS, and they welcome written pieces as well as photography, art, comics, and any-

The visual arts are less strongly represented, but the AUS recently created a Fine Arts Council to encourage projects. The Fridge Door Gallery also displays student artwork. And if photography’s your thing, check out the McGill Undergraduate Photography Society (MUPS). They run photography contests and have a fully equipped studio (with darkroom) for members.

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CAMPUS EVENTS Follow the yellow brick-erm, black dotted line-to discover the seasonal campus events put on by various student organizations at McGill.

INDIAN SUMMER

FALL Movies in the Park Come and watch your favourite films under the stars September 8 ,9, and 10.

Orientation It’s August and orientation is just starting to get going. The last week of august will find you at the following events: Rez Fest Discover McGill Faculty Frosh SSMU Frosh

Fill the Stadium Now an annual event run by Athletics, 6,000 people will fill Molson Stadium on September 18 to watch the Redmen play footbal!

OAP The engineers throw down an awesome week-long outdoor pub in the Three Bares park. Relax, grab a beer and meet up with old and new friends. Much class will be skipped.

BBQs Keep your eyes peeled for free food - tons of campus groups will be giving away everything from ice cream to hamburgers.

Farmers Market Come and connect with local farmers at the Three Bares in late August and pick up some fresh veggies and fruit!

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Activities Night September 14, 15 (4-9pm, Shatner) - Come and check out all the clubs, services, and associations the university has to offer. OktoberhAUS Another beer tent graces campus at the beginning of October with its Bavarian charm. 4Floors Get ready for the biggest party of the semester - 4 Floors Halloween, October 29th (Shatner Building, get tickets early!). CASCO & Ballroom parties MUS throws down some wicked parties this semester. Get ready for them!


WINTER

SPRING

Winter Carnival SUS and MUS throw down the biggest week-long team competitons at the beginnning or each semester, power hours and scavenger hunts included. The engineers also throw it down at E-Week festivities.

Red and White The AUS and SUS team up to host their graduation ball for their faculties. It’s a wellattended large shindig at the end of March.

OAP Lite OAP redux, takes place on the last day of exams (end of April). Remember good times with old friends over cheap beer and burgers.

Snow AP An old favourite: a heated beer tent on lower field ...It may or may not return this year due to financial and environmental concerns. Keep your fingers crossed. P(h)assion An MUS-sponsored fundraiser, this event rasies money for charity with a party and fashion show. Francofete A celebration of Francophone culture that takes place at the end of January.

Nuit Blanche Look for this event in Early March. Held by the AUS Fine Arts Council, come and celebrate the art of your fellow students! Green Week SUS’s environmental marathon takes places in mid-March, celebrating a greener McGill with fashion shows and lectures!

Weekly Events The faculties are famous for their weekly pub nights (well not every week, but most). Check this out for some cheeap beer and (mostly) good music. -Bar des Arts (Thursdays, Arts Lounge, Leacock basement, 5-9) -Management 4-à-7 (Thursdays, Bronfmen Basement, 4-7) -Engineering Blues Pub (Friday, McConnell Engineering Common Room, 4-9) Quick Tip... Check out the deparmtental associations (especially after midterms) for free wine and cheeses. Popular ones include Chemistry and History.

There isn’t anything quite like OAP in any other part of the galaxy.

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>̅œˆV >ÌÊVˆ - Holy Mass: Saturdays 6pm & Sundays 5pm - Courses, Bible studies, Discussions - Meals and social activities - Volunteering, Social Justice - Daily Mass, Confession

Newman Centre

McGill’s Catholic Community

3484 Peel (between Dr Penfield and Sherbrooke, one minute from campus) (514) 398-4106 Supported by Pillars’ Trust

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EMERGENCY RESOURCES If you’re very lucky, you’ll never need any of these resources during your time in Montreal. But when something goes wrong, these are the people and places that can help you out. In case of emergency - 911 Royal Victoria Hospital 678 Pine W., 514-842-1231 Montreal General Hospital 1650 Cedar, 514-937-6011 Montreal Hotel-Dieu Hospital 3840 St. Urbain, 514-843-2611 Montreal Jewish General Hospital 3755 Chemin Côte-Ste-Catherine, 514-340-8222 St. Mary’s Hospital 3830 Lacombe, 514-345-3511

Appointments and Drop-in McGill Student Health Services 3600 McTavish, Suite 3300, 514-3986017 Health Services is where you’ll wind up for most of your health problems while you’re at McGill, since it’s convenient, offers most things, and is totally free for full-time students. You can call and make an appointment or, if it’s urgent, go to drop-in hours between 9am and 4pm Monday through Friday. Show up early, because there’s always a long line, and patients are seen on a first-come, first-served basis. Health Services is also the most convenient place to go to get medical notes if you’re too sick to take a test – remember that you have to get the note on the day of illness (professors’ decisions are not bound by them), and you’ll only get one if you’re actually sick. Also at McGill are a Dental Clinic (514-398-3155) and Mental Health Clinic (514-398-6019), both on the fifth floor of the Brown Building. The Office for Students with Dis-

abilities (514-398-6009) is on the third floor of the Brown Building, and there’s also a Sports Medicine Clinic in the gym (514-398- 7007, 475 Pine W.).

CLSCs

If Health Services is closed or extremely busy, CLSCs and other clinics may be your best bet. They’re the main source for health and social services in Quebec, and most of them offer appointments and drop-in hours. If you’re from outside Quebec, be sure to tell the clinic staff - they may need additional paperwork or require payment up-front (to be reimbursed by your insurance provider). Every neighbourhood has a specific CLSC which only serves people from its defined area. The three locations closest to McGill are CLSC Metro (1801 Maisonneuve W., 514-934-0534), Clinique Medicale de la Cite (300 LéoPariseau, 514-281-1721), and CLSC Plateau Mont-Royal (4689 Papineau, 514-521-7663), which only offers appointments. You can also find a full lisiting at www.indexsante.ca/CLSC.

Phone Lines

Copy this list and stick it on your fridge – at least one of these numbers will come in handy sometime. Campus Security – Emergencies: 514-398-3000, general information: 514-398-4566 Urgence Toxico – 514-288-1515 24/7 information on drugs, alcohol,

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and gambling. Suicide-Action Montreal – 514723-4000 A support service for anything to do with suicide. Nightline – 514-398-MAIN Open 6pm to 3am, 7 days a week. A confidential listening, information, and referral service operated by students. Queerline – 514-398-6822 Open 8pm to 11pm, Monday through Saturday, a non-judgmental listening, support, and referral service for people who identify as queer or for anyone who wants to discuss queer issues. Gayline - gayline.qc.ca; 514866-5090 - An English-only helpline and information resource from 7pm to 11 pm for gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and trans people. Info-Santé – 811 24/7 number for a nurse who can give you health advice and information on nearby resources.

Sexual Assault Resources

Your first resource in emergencies is always 911, but there is also a network of sexual assault services. For more complete listings, e-mail main@sacomss.org. SACOMSS helpline – 514-3988500 S.O.S Violence conjugale 514-873-9010 or 1-800-363-9010 - 24/7 helpline with resources for female victims of domestic violence Montreal Sexual Assault Centre - 1801 Maisonneuve O., Suite 400; 514-934-4504 - Free, bilingual,24/7, helpline providing a listening service, counseling, accompaniment services for court cases of clients in counseling, and emergency services with accompaniment. (Note that if the assault happened over six months ago, the waiting list is over a year long.) Groupe d’intervention en violence conjugal chez les lesbiennes - 514-526-2452, givcl.qc.ca -

A French-only organization devoted to addressing lesbian domestic violence, based in the Plateau, offering support groups, intervention, and information. Head and Hands - 5833 Sherbrooke W., 514-481-0277, info@ headandhands.ca - A bilingual organization dedicated to addressing youth sexuality. It offers medical clinics, legal clinics, counseling, a food pantry, a young parents’ program, information, and referrals. CLSC Metro - 1801 Maisonneuve W., Suite 400, 514-934-0354 (helpline at 514-934-4504), clscmetro.qc.ca Daytime medical services from 8 am-5 pm, including ambulatory services, a legal information clinic, and medical services such as the morning-after pill, assault kits, anonymous HIV testing, follow-ups for people living with HIV and their loved ones, and counseling. They also offer special services for women with HIV. Call ahead for the hours of special services. Hotel de Dieu Montréal - 3840 St. Urbain, 514-843-2645 - The hospital offers 24-hour French medical service for sexual assault survivors, including consultation, evaluation, treatment (medical and psychological), listening, referral, and legal information. Montreal General Hospital Emergency Department - 1650 Cedar, 514-934-8090 - English nighttime medical services offered from 5pm to 8am daily.

Places to sleep

If you find yourself without a place to lay your head, try these addresses: Montreal Youth Hostel - 3541 Aylmer, 514-843-3317 - A $25 per night hostel located downtown.

Women’s shelters

For a complete listing of shelters, please contact main@sacomss.org.

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NUTRITION Eat well, excercise, sleep, and use common sense. This advice will keep you out of the doctor’s office this year. Don’t end your year with health issues you didn’t have when you came in. Watch what you eat - too much 2am chow mein can add to your waistline. You should be eating up to eight servings of fruit and vegetables a day and consuming fat, salt and alcohol in moderation. And remember that no food is bad for you, if you eat it in moderation! Body Mass Index BMI has been used by nutritionists for years to determine healthy weight categories, but it’s not the be all and end all. We all come in different shapes and sizes, so don’t get discouraged if you qualify as overweight. And if you’re concerned, go to a doctor to talk about your options. Remember that muscle weighs more that fat, so you could be short and weigh a lot but still be healthy.

Calculate Your BMI Weight (lb)/{Height (in)} 2 x 703 Below 18.5 ...............Underwight 18.5-24.9..................Normal 25.0-29.9..................Overweight 30.0 and above.........Obese

Vitamins and Supplements If you’re eating well, you shouldn’t need to take many supplements. If you are worried about your habits, talk to your doctor. You can have a blood screen to measure your nutrient levels and then take doctor-reccomended supplements

and vitamins. It’s really important to do research before investing money in supplements. Some can be detrimental to your well-being. Healthy Eating Tips • Eat serving sized portions, don’t gorge out on food! • Eat slowly - your body will tell you when it’s full. • Don’t skip meals! Hunger casues your body to slow down and store fats. • Snacking is good, if your eating nutritious foods. • Drink lots of water. Eating Disorders Eating disorders stem from a preoccupation with body image and food. Most eating disorders are not simply about food, but are influenced by societal, familial, and individual factors. The three most common types of eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder (BED). If the way you eat and think about food interferes with your life and keeps you from enjoying it, then that is disordered eating. Take it seriously and talk to someone who can help. If you think you have an eating disorder, are concerend someone you know might have one, or want information on nutrition, healthy eating, excercise and support groups, feel free to contact McGill Student Health (39806017), McGill Counselling Service (398-3601) or McGill Mental Health Services (3986019).

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THE HEALTH PLAN The SSMU Health and Dental Plan was designed speicifcally for you, made to fill the gaps left by the provincial system. Read on to find out more about your coverage. Who’s Covered? All undergraduate students (members of SSMU) who are citizens or permanent residents of Canada are automatically covered. International students are covered by a different, university administered plan (www.mcgill.ca/internationalstudents/health). International students have dental coverage under the SSMU plan. New students entering in the winter semester (January) are not automatically covered, but can enroll themselves during the “Change of Coverage” period in January. Check the ASEQ (www.ihaveaplan. ca) to find more definitive dates. Can I Enroll my Family? You have the option to have your family covered by completing the enrolment process and paying additonal fees. Common-law and same sex couples are eligible. Visit aseq.com and follow the on-screen instructions for enrolments. What’s Covered? Knowing your health plan and what you are covered for is imporBenefit

tant. There are all sorts of things can claim - everything from contact lenses to wisdom tooth removal. If you have a health concern and need to see a health practicionner, visit a doctor who is a member of the ASEQ Dental, Vision and Chiropractic Network. If you visit a doctor from ASEQ’s list - you get additional covereage. An Important Note You are automatically enrolled and charged for the health plan. If you already have a plan or wish to opt-out, you must do so by a specific date. Please note that all opt-outs must be completed during the “Change of Coverage” period. For a full list of benefits and details, visit aseq.com. More Information Needed? Visit www.ihaveaplan.ca or call 514-7889-8775 or toll free at 1-866795-4435. Claims Visit www.ihaveaplan.ca to fill out claim forms.

Coverage Per Year

Perscription Drugs and Vaccinations

Persriptions Drugs

Covers most medications legally requring a persription. It also covers most oral contraceptives, anti-smoking aids, and insulin.

Vaccination

Up to $300 per policy year.

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Benefit

Coverage Per Year

Health Practitioners Physiotherapist, chiropractor, naturopath, osteopath, registered dietician (upon referral), podiatrist/chiropodist, athletic therapist, speech therapist.

Maximum of $20 per visit and up to $400 per category of practitioner per year. One x-ray policy per year is included in the overal maximum for chiropractors, osteopaths, and podiatrists/ chriopodists.

Massage Therapist, Psychiatrist, psychologist, homeopath, acupuncturist, ayurveda, siddhi, unani.

Not covered.

Vision Care Eyeglasses or Contact Lenses

Covers new or replacement eyeglasses or contact lenses. The maximum allowed is $75 per year (eligible 12 months after the amount is claimed).

Eye exam

One eye exam, up to $30, per policy year.

Laser eye surgery

Maximum of $150 per policy year.

Medical Equipment Medical Equipment

100% of the cost of stipulated medical equipment, including hearing aids, crutches, wheelchair rental, hospital-type bed, and permanent prosthesis. Rigid and semi-rigid braces (not for athletic use), orthotics, and orthopedic shoes are also covered. Before incurring any medical equipment expense, you should contact ASEQ for eligibility information and any applicable maximums of all equipment. A medical doctor’s authorization is required for these claims.

Ambulance

$250 per occurrence

Hospitalization

Cost of an upgrade from a public ward to a semi-private hospital room. A hospital cash benefit will also provide $50 per day of hospitalization to offset any incidental expenses, payable from the first day and up to a 30-day maximum.

Diagnostic services, accident benefits

Yes, see website for details.

Travel Health Coverage Benefits

You are covered for up to 120 days per trip and up to a maximum of $5,000,000 per incident.

Exchange and Internships

Coverage for the first 120 days of trip and for 120 days after the end of exchange or internship.

Dental Care Preventative Services

$750 of coverage per year with 60% coverage of fillings, oral surgery, and root canals.

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MENTAL HEALTH Do you need some extra support, or are you curious about where to go to discuss mental health issues? These resources can help you with any of your mental health needs. What are my options on campus if I need to talk to someone? Your faculty advisor is a good resource if you are having questions about your major, academic path, program, course requirements, and possible future career options. This person is assigned to help you complete your degree in a way that works with your interests and talents, and to inform you of your credit obligations in a clear and expedient manner. Many people find that their advisor is helpful to them, but others feel that they are led around in circles, misinformed, and forced to do everything by themselves. If your advisor is not living up to your expectations, than you should contact the head of your department in order to get a new advisor. McGill Counseling Services This is a good resource for people who have general vocational concerns, want help in managing a particular area of their life that is problematic, or are facing sudden relational, social, identity or moodbased concerns. The counselors at McGill Counseling Services are trained to listen to you and to help provide you with tools and perspectives on managing your life. At counseling, you will be expected to be ready and proactive, so come to the sessions with a clear set of expectations, and to take steps to make these expectations a reality. Counseling also has, in the past, offered group-based therapies. It often

sees students that are relatively stable save for certain aspects of their lives, which need extra support. McGill Mental Health Services Mental Health Services bases its services on the most current and useful therapeutic models. This means that although they do provide talk therapy, what they consider to be the most important are therapies that encourage people to empower themselves in the present instead of focusing solely on the past. Though Counseling Services will often follow the same student for years, Mental Health Services will focus on shorter time periods such as semesters. Mental Health Services often encounters students with disruptive life patterns or a mood disorder that affects every aspect of the student’s life. The counselor helps the student until he or she reaches a more stable state, at which point the student is encouraged to face life with the new perspective learned and reinforced in the sessions. Another difference between the two services is that, along with psychotherapists and counselors, Mental Health Services employs psychiatrists with a medical background. Psychiatrists, in addition to being familiar with the biological structures of the brain and the mind-body connection, can prescribe medication that may be useful in managing aspects of your illness. Mental Health Services generally believes that medication is only one aspect of therapy, however,

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and that, if prescribed, it should be used in conjunction with talk, behavioral therapy, or some other type of support. If your advisor, counselor, or therapist turns out not to be accepting of issues such as gender expression, sexual orientation, race, class differences, etc., you should stop seeing this person and request a new therapist. If you wish to lodge a complaint, please contact Headspace at safe.minds.mha@gmail.com. We act as an ombudsperson between students and the Mental Health and Counseling Services, and we direct all complaints to the director of Mental Health Services and to the director of Student Services in the Brown Building. What if I don’t have a diagnosable mental disorder? Should I really be seeing a therapist? You need not have a diagnosable mental health disorder to see a therapist at Counseling or Mental Health Services. Many people feel distressed and anxious but do not have symptoms that fit neatly into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). This does not mean that they do not need the support of a professional. Anyone experiencing stress, difficulty managing life situations, seeking guidance, experiencing insomnia, overeating, undereating, or suffering from low self-esteem, anxiety, malaise, or grief should seek these services if necessary. Use your judgment: if your mental state is currently precarious, as is the case with many people undergoing the extreme stress of transferring from home to a new environment, do not hesitate to seek help - whether that means seeking support from fellow students or from a trained counselor.

What if I want to seek help outside of McGill? This is certainly an option for those who feel that they want to address their personal situations in an environment away from campus. Unfortunately, although seeing a psychiatrist for medication is free with a provincial health card, many private counselors in Montreal charge fees for multiple sessions. Luckily, these fees will probably be placed on a sliding-scale based on your income. Seeking help outside of campus is a good option for those who want alternative therapies, such as art or music therapy, or those who have the financial means to do so. One wonderful group that exists in Montreal is Head and Hands. They offer free services for youths from age 12 through 25, have a queerpositive mandate, and work based on “humanistic principles of equality, confidentiality and client self-determination (Headandhands.ca).” For more information on their services, which include legal counseling and a young parents program, please contact 514-481-277. Headspace Headspace is a non-hierarchical student collective looking to improve the way issues surrounding mental health are dealt with on campus and in society as a whole. They believe that people benefit from forming a community of support and friendship, and that dialogue about our problems should not only be dealt with in a therapist’s office, but when situations pop up in our everyday lives. If you’re interested in for nonjudgmental peer support, a resource library, information about Montreal and McGill Mental Health Services, or any combination of the above, then Headspace would love to have you get involved.

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SAFE SEX Sex! Now that we have your attention, whatever your experience, preference, likes, or dislikes keep this advice in mind when engaging in the act. But it Feels Better... You may have come in contact with that notorious one-liner, “but it feels better with no condom, protection, etc.” Don’t listen. Even if you’ve been with your partner for a long time, it’s always important to use protection when engaging in activites when bodily fluids are transfered.

some toys to keep the bedroom lively. Dildos, vibrators, anal beads, butt plugs, and handcuffs are a great way to spice up the bedroom. Be sure to change condoms and clean your toys between use so that bacteria doesn’t accumulate. If lending toys, make sure they are extra clean before using them on yourself.

Oral Things Oral sex is still sex. With hair in the teeth and bodily fluids in the mouth, the transmission of STIs is still possible. Cunnilingus, fellatio, and more comes with the risk of contracting STIs like gonorrhoea and herpes, so the need for condoms and dental dams still applies.

Baker’s Dozen If you have a vagina, it’s important to keep it clean, even after evening activities. Avoid flavored lubes and condoms with sugar. Sugar + Vagina = Yeast. If you want to use food products, be sure to use a condom with them to prevent yeast build-up.

Membranes and More Membranes are surrounded by blood vessels and act as an unfortunate transfer spot for STIs. Activities with lots of membranetearing are high risk, so make sure to use extra caution. Condoms and gloves (latex or nylon) are a great idea. Lubing up also works to decrease friction that could cause tears. Self-Love Masturbation is a fun way to find out more about your body and how to please it. Mutual masturbation is a great way to minimize your risk of STIs. Just make sure to give your hands or other instruments a postpleasure wash. Toys If you’re getting bored, invest in

Kink Be it BDSM or an army fetish, we all have our preferences and getting to know them can be fun. Ask your partner(s) if they are comfortable in joining you in some of these activities. Fetish gear can get pricey, but if you check out the Fetish and Kink Enthusiats (FAKE) at SSMU, they have great do-it-yourself toy ideas. Communication You’ll never know if that moan was positive or negative unless you ask. You’ll never get what you want unless you tell your partner what to do. So talk to each other. It may be awkward, but your reward is better sex. Also, remember that the only acceptable kind of sex is consensual. Visit The Shag Shop on campus to check out some awesome supplies and purchase cheap condoms.

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SEXUAL ASSAULT Always ask, and always take no for an answer. Consensual sex is is hot - assault is not. Here the Sexual Assault Centre of McGill Students’ Society (SACOMSS) helps you understand the myths, facts and resources. SACOMSS defines sexual assault as any unwanted act of a sexual nature, or any type of sexual activity in which one partner does not consent. Sexual assault is first and foremost an act of violence. It is not natural, and is not the result of some uncontrollable urge. No one ever asks to be sexually assaulted. Sexual assault happens to people of all experiences and backgrounds. it often reflects power imbalances due to race, class, gender sexuality, ability, age, religion, ethnicity, education, citizen status, political views, occupation, and physical appearance. There is no such thing as a stereotypical example of sexual assault.

power are much more subtle and difficult to perceive. Not struggling or screaming in no way means that someone “asked for it,” and a physical response doesn’t mean that they enjoyed it. Sexual assault is the most underreported crime, and has the same rate of false accusations as any other crime.

Myths and Facts

Help is available

Here are some common myths about sexual assault: • Rapists are most often strangers and sexual assault occurs in dark deserted places, like alleys and parking lots. • Men can’t be raped. • Women are incpaable of committing sexual assault. • If a male experiences erection of ejaculation during sexual assault , he “really wanted it” or consented to it. • It is not a real assault if there are no weapons or physical violence. • If someone didn’t scream and struggle, they must have secretly wanted to be raped. • People frequently lie about being raped. These are all myths. In fact, sexual assault occurs most often in a familiar place with a familiar person. Anyone can be sexually assaulted. A weapon, physical size, and violence are obvious forms of power that an assailant may weild, but they are not the only ones. Many forms of

SACOMSS offers a phone line, support groups, accompanient through the McGill harassment procedures, and information and workshops about sexual assault. They are open to individuals of all communities and can be reached at (514) 398-8500, main@sacomss.org, in room B-27 of the Shatner Building, and at www.sacomss. org.

Boundaries and Consent It’s important to recognize differences in people’s boundaries. Different people have different ideas of what is comfortable, what is intimate, and what is enjoyable. Even simple activities such as making eye contact, holding hands, or hugging may have very different meanings to different people. Communicate: find out what your partner enjoys and be clear about your own boundaries. Always get consent.

You have the right to make your own decisions about your body. That being said, if you are sexually assaulted, you may want to address your immediate health and safety by calling 911 or seeing a health professional. The CLSC Metro (514934-0354) is one of the clinics in Montreal where anyone can get care, even if they have no health insurance card, or money. Seeking medical help does not obligate you to discuss the assault or to report it to the police. If you seek medical help, nurses and doctors are able to collect evidence, but will ask for you consent during the steps of the procedure.

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STIs Sex can be fun, but sometimes the consequences are itchy, blotchy, or incurable. Know your partner, always use precautions, get tested, and don’t be careless. Condoms can help effectively prevent the transmission of any of the infections below, but it is important to be aware that condoms are never 100% effective. The message here is: be aware, know your partner, and always use protection. CHLAMYDIA WHAT IS IT? A bacteria-based STI, the most common STI in the world. There were over 3,000 reported cases in Montreal alone last year. CONTRACTION: It can be contracted through vaginal, anal, or oral sex and can be passed to a baby during childbirth. SYMPTOMS: About 75% of the women infected are symptomatic. In men, infection of the urethra is a clear symptom. Usually a white discharge from the penis occurs with or without pain when urinating. Sometimes it can spread to the upper genital tract causing pelvic inflammatory disease in women or epididymis in men. If untreated, Chlamydia can cause serious reproductive and other health problems. The STI can also be transferred to the eyes, causing blindness. TREATMENT: Chlamydia, once diagnosed, can be treated with antibiotics. HERPES WHAT IS IT? HSV-1 is a viral infection causing cold sores to appear on the mouth and face. Yes, cold sores are herpes. HSV-2 is a viral infection causing genital herpes to appear. HSV-1 is recurrent in 80-90% of the population. HSV-1 can never turn into HSV-2, but sometimes can affect genitalia. CONTRACTION: Herpes can be

contracted through exchange of bodily fluids, contact with a skin lesion, or by skin contact during asymptomatic “shedding.” Early stages of oral and genital herpes are not always visible when shedding is occurring. Barrier methods are the most reliable when protecting against herpes, but they aren’t 100% effective. SYMPTOMS: Herpes follow a cycle between active disease, lasting from two to 21 days where they appear as blisters containing infectious virus particles, followed by a remission period where the sores disappear. Genital herpes is often asymptomatic, although it can still be spread by contact. Sometimes genital herpes manifest as red sores and inflammation of the cervix in women. After initial infection, the viruses move to sensory nerves, where they reside as latent viruses. Overtime episodes of active disease reduce in frequency. TREATMENT: There is no cure for herpes. Treatments are available to reduce viral reproduction, prevent the virus from entering the skin and reduce the severity of active episodes. GONORRHOEA WHAT IS IT? A bacterial diesease that, if left untreated, can spread throughout the body to joints and heart valves. CONTRACTION: Gonorrhoea is spread through sexual contact (vaginal, oral, or anal). Ejaculation does not have to occur for gonorrhoea to be transmitted or acquired. Gonorrhoea is a very common STI. SYMPTOMS: Symptoms of gonorrhoea are limited for women, but for men the symptoms include a

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burning sensation while urinating and yellowish-white discharge from the penis. For anal gonorrhoea, symptoms include itching, swelling, painful bowel movements, bleeding, and discharge. The symptoms of gonorrhoea usually take two to five days to show up. Women can develop pelvic inflammatory disease, whereas men can develop epididymitis, which can lead to infertility. TREATMENT: Antibiotics, like amoxicillin, can be used to treat gonorrhoea. HPV WHAT IS IT? Human Papillomavirus infects the skin and mucous membranes of humans. There are over 30 types of HPV that can infect humans as an STI. CONTRACTION: HPV is spread primarily through genital contact, and since most HPV infections have no symptoms, it can be spread without either partner knowing it. SYMPTOMS: The effects of HPV are varied. Certain forms of HPV can cause genital warts in men and women, whereas other forms of HPV can cause cervical cancer or other less common cancers, such as cancers of the vulva, vagina, anus, and penis. TREATMENT: There is no cure for HPV. There is a vaccine available that acts as a preventative to the strains of HPV that cause cervical cancer and genital warts. SYPHILIS WHAT IS IT? Syphilis is a baccterial infection. CONTRACTION: Syphilis is almost always contracted through sex and can still be contracted even with the use of a condom, although condoms do significantly reduce the risk. SYMPTOMS: First symptoms appear within three months after it is initially contracted. The symptoms usually include a large ulcer where contact with syphilis was made and swelling of the lymph nodes. The sec-

ondary stages of syphilis have symptoms occurring within six months after initial contraction. Sores can appear on the palms of the hands, soles of the feat, and around the genitalia. Patients are most contagious when they have secondary syphilis. In some cases this stage can cause psychosis and mania. Effects of the later stages of syphilis include serious damage to the brain, eyes, bones, heart, and blood vessels. TREATMENT: Fortunately, syphilis is a curable disease, usually with penicillin or some other antibiotic. HIV/AIDS WHAT IS IT? HIV is a virus that infects the human body and that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, better known as AIDS, which causes the immune system to weaken, making the invasion of other viruses much easier. CONTRACTION: HIV is transferred via blood, vaginal fluid, preejaculate, semen, and breast milk. Once HIV progresses to AIDS, the average lifespan of a patient taking medication is five years. Without the medication, death usually occurs within a year from infections. SYMPTOMS: Symptoms include the development of a flu-like fever after initial contraction, and later symptoms include frequent sickness. TREATMENT: Today there is neither a cure nor a vaccine. If you think you have had sex with an HIV infected partner, seek treatment at a hospital within 24 hours. There is a treatment called post exposure prophylaxis which, after a severe month of steady treatment, can prevent the development of HIV. The most effective way to prevent HIV transmission is using a condom. Getting tested frequently is also another way to prevent the HIV virus from turning into AIDS. HIV can be detected by tests one to three months after exposure.

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CONTRACEPTIVES Sex is much more fun when you’ve covered the unknowns. Protect yourself and your body with these common precautions. Contraceptives Nothing takes the fun out of sex like an unplanned pregnancy. For peace of mind and protection of the temple that is your body, use contraceptives!

Hormonal Birth Control For many women, hormonal methods of birth control are a good choice to protect against pregnancy. These include the pill (a.k.a. the Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill), which uses a combination of estrogen and progestagen to prevent ovulation and to thicken cervical mucus, making it difficult for sperm to enter the uterus. When taken properly every day, the pill is 99.9% effective. The birth control patch, worn externally, and the birth control ring, which is inserted into the vagina, appear to be just as effective as the pill taken orally. The pill isn’t for everyone though, and is not recommended for smokers or women who are prone to blood clots. If you fall into these categories, the mini-pill (a.k.a. the Progestogen-Only Pill) might be a good option for you. The mini-pill

has to be taken at the same time every day to be effective so it requires a bit more attention, but it is also 95% effective in protecting against pregnancy. If you don’t want to take a pill every day or if you’re finding it difficult to remember your pills, you can get the same hormones from a DepoProvera injection given by a doctor every three months. It’s also 99.7% effective in prevention of pregnancy and you only have to think of it four times a year. These hormonal methods of birth control do not protect against Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) or HIV, so it’s wise to use them together with a barrier method of birth control.

Barrier Methods of Birth Control Barriers keep out unwanted invasion. The most popular barrier method is the male condom. They’re easy to use and available at even the worst depanneurs when your situation is dire. They also come in a variety of fun colours, styles, and flavours. A condom is rolled over an erect penis and functions by preventing the

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release of ejaculate. This means that the condom protects against pregnancy, STIs, and HIV with 97% effectiveness when used properly. Condoms can even make things more fun: you can make condoms sexy by learning to put one on your partner with your mouth. If you’re a lady who likes to be in control, there is also the option of the female condom. It can be inserted into the vagina hours before sex and operates as a barrier in the same way as the male condom. It is slightly less reliable at 95% effectiveness, but it protects against the same things. You can also be fitted for a diaphragm by your doctor. Diaphragms are also inserted before sex and give a woman privacy and control with a 4-8% failure rate when used properly. Other woman-controlled barrier methods are the contraceptive sponge and the cervical cap, which prevent sperm from entering the cervix. The contraceptive sponge has a failure rate of 10% when used alone, and 2% when used with a male condom, and the cervical cap has a failure rate of 10-13% even when used perfectly. Because of this, the cap and the sponge are often paired with spermicide foams or creams that destroy sperm on contact. The failure rate of spermicides can be between 6% and 21%, and they don’t protect against STIs or disease, so pair them with another barrier method. IUDs Women can also use Intra-Uterine Devices (IUDs) to prevent pregnancy. They are small, cross-shaped devices that are inserted into your uterus by your doctor once every five years. You can get either a copper IUD or a hormonal IUD. The copper in a copper IUD changes the chemistry of your uterus to destroy sperm and is 99% effective. The hormonal IUD releases levonorgestrel, which makes the lining of the uterus thinner and cervical mucus

thicker to prevent sperm from entering the uterus. Hormonal IUDs are more than 99% effective.

Natural Methods of Birth Control The so-called “natural” methods of birth control are the rhythm method and withdrawal, but they may leave you with your fingers crossed. The rhythm method requires a woman to monitor her cycle, temperature, and cervical mucus to avoid having sex when she is most fertile. This is pretty intense stuff for a university student, and even amongst women with predictable cycles, 20% will still become pregnant within the first year of using this method properly. Withdrawal is precisely what it sounds like: the guy pulls out before ejaculating. However, if you’ve sat through a health class you know that this method isn’t terribly effective. Pre-ejaculate that is on the penis can still lead to pregnancy or infection, and withdrawal requires self-control and trust. When there is no other method

available, withdrawal is better than nothing, but do yourself a favour and don’t count on it.

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UNPLANNED PREGNANCY No method of birth control is 100% effective, and it’s good to know your options should you be faced with an unplanned pregnancy. There are many options, such as keeping your pregnancy to term and keeping the child, putting it up for adoption, or terminating the pregnancy. These options are very personal and the realities are different for everyone. Keeping your pregnancy to term Daycare There are many options should you decide to keep your pregnancy to term. Recently SSMU opened the “Baby Bears” Nursery which has eight spaces for undergraduate children under the age of 18 months. SSMU also has a daycare that the nursery spots feed into for children aged 18 months to five 5 years. There are also many government-subsidized daycares throughout the province (you only need to pay about $7 per day). To learn more about SSMU’s daycare options, visit www.ssmu.mcgill.ca/ daycare. Adoption All adoptions in the province of Quebec are run through the office of Social Services - Association des Centres Jeunesse de Québec. To find out more about carrying your pregnancy to term and putting your child up for adoption please visit www.centrejeunessedequebec.qc.ca/Afficher. aspx?section=627.

Terminating your pregnancy Is it legal in Quebec? Abortions are legal in Canada and funded by Medicare. Abortions are available in Quebec up to 22 weeks of pregnancy. Is abortion safe? Though no medical procedure is without risk, abortion is considered a

minor medical procedure and has a low rate of complication. What about the morning after pill? The morning after pill can end a pregnancy with 72 hours of having unprotected sex. Also called “Plan B,” you can get the morning after pill over the counter at most pharmacies and public clinics. What is a medical abortion and what is a surgical abortion? A medical abortion can be performed with a pregnancy of less than 49 days. One medication is given to stop the growth of the pregnancy, and another to expel the tissue. It’s noninvasive and similar to a miscarriage. Surgical abortion can be performed up to twenty-two weeks of pregnancy. It’s a more invasive procedure, but the good news is that there’s only a 1% complication rate and minimal pain. Where do I go? You can choose to go to either a public or private clinic. In public clinics, the procedure is free with valid Quebec health insurance, but you may have to wait as long as ten days for an appointment. Private clinics charge between $200 and $400, but you can expect a shorter wait. Who can I contact? Montréal Morgentaler Clinic 514-844-4844 morgentalermontreal.ca Centre de Sante des Femmes 514-270-6114

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ALCOHOL If you choose to drink during university, be smart about it. Drinking can be perfectly safe and very fun, as long as you go about it the right way. General Alcohol Safety So you’ve never had more than half a bottle of Bud Light before, and now you’ve been challenged to chug a six-pack. What do you do? Well, that’s up to you. But if you do end up getting a little tipsy, here are some ways to prevent the worst effects: Drink water in between alcoholic drinks - this has the effect of diluting the alcohol that your body is processing and will prevent you getting drunk too quickly. Boozing also dehydrates you, so drinking water is important to stave off dehydration and. Hydrating yourself before falling asleep will also reduce the effects of a hangover, so have some water before you go to bed. Eat before and after drinking - consuming alcohol on a full stomach will prevent it from hitting you all at once, giving you more control over how intoxicated you become. After the night is over, you may want to get some grease and carbohydrates (there’s a reason poutine was invented), to prevent a painful hangover. Don’t leave drinks unattended - it’s always best to be safe when it comes to this. Either leave it with an attentive friend or finish it before you leave for the powder room. Alcohol makes you feel warm, but it actually lowers your body temperature. This is particularly problematic during cold Montreal winters, so make sure to dress appropriately! If a person is unresponsive, breathing slowly and has bluish skin, they may have alcohol poisoning. If this is the case, be sure to call for medical help immediately! If a friend passes out drunk, there

is a danger that they might vomit in their sleep and choke. Make sure they’re lying on their side, so if they do vomit, they won’t choke. Wine You can buy wine in just about every grocery store in Montreal. If you’re on a budget, get some wine from a dépanneur - it’s almost universally horrid, but offers great bang for the buck. However, you can probably do much better for a comparable price (or you can go upscale) by purchasing wine from an SAQ outlet. The employees there are also trained to know their wines, so tell them what sort of occasion the wine is for, and your price range. They’ll help you pick from the many options. Beer You can also buy beer just about anywhere in Montreal. For the true penny pinchers among us, “forties” of beer such as Colt 45 or Black Label are a good choice. Or, if you want to actually enjoy your beer, there are a number of good Quebec brands (such as Unibroue) who have budget offerings. And if you’re a true connoisseur of the suds, try a local microbrewery like Benelux (245 Sherbrooke West), Reservoir (9 Duluth East), or Dieu Du Ciel! (29 Laurier West). Hard Liquor The only place to buy hard liquor is usually in an SAQ store. Unfortunately for you, the selection available in Quebec is terrible, but the “Signature” and “Selection” stores have the best offerings of the bunch.

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DRUGS Before you indulge in the university lifestyle, where you may partake in a joint, pill, or powder, It’s important to know what you’re sniffing and smoking, and the hazards you may encounter. If you make the choice to dable in drugs, remember that safety comes first. Marijuana While there is no medical proof of marijuana’s neurotoxicity, habitual use in some has the potential to cause lethargy, a loss of words, and general spaciness. Marijuana also has four times as much tar as tobacco. Although THC’s anti-carcinogenic effects mean that marijuana users may not develop lung cancer, breathing troubles like bronchitis can result from habitual marijuana use. Mari­juana also decreases circulation, lowering immunity. One study indicated that a vaporizer has the highest THC-to-tar content, with the ubiquitous joint in second place, the pipe in third place, and the bong in fourth. Another option is eating marijuana in baked goods, which eliminates the associated breathing problem. However, many users report increased negative side effects of marijuana when it is eaten, such as delusional behavior and nausea. It is important to regulate your marijuana use, since its cheap price and lack of hangover can lead to a dependency that may hinder daily life. Cocaine Cocaine is an expensive habit. The hourly cost, physically and mentally, is quite high. Taking coke repeatedly in higher and higher doses leads to irritabil­ity, restlessness, and paranoia. This can (in severe cases) lead to full-blown paranoid psy-

chosis. Hallucinations, terror, and other uncomfortable sensations are usually asso­ciated with this drug, and usually go away once the drug leaves the system. Have a bottle of nasal spray handy - a saline spray can help clean out your nose. Also, the simultaneous use of alcohol and cocaine results in a totally different substance being produced – cocaethylene. In rats, coca­ethylene is associated with seizures, liver damage, and compromised functioning of the immune system. In humans, some studies have shown that cocaethylene is less potent than cocaine with respect to cardiovascular and subjective effects. Study Drugs If you choose to use study drugs, there are ways of reducing potential harm. Snorting, smoking, or injecting these substances will make you too spun to do any work. Swallowing them will make them last for the longest possible time at the lowest possible level. When is it best to use a study aid? A few days before an exam, particularly if you’ve been procrastinating in your studies. This is essentially the best thing about study drugs – you can do work for hours and it becomes fun. They can get you over the hump by doing a lot of work in the evening, and you can do the rest with just coffee and hard work.

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If your task is impossible, avoid study drugs. Go talk to the professor and try to get an exten­sion. You’ll quickly figure out that sleeping before an exam and organizing your time will always win out over drug use. Ecstasy MDMA, also known as ecstasy, is a serious drug. The repercussions of long term MDMA use are not extensively known due to the drug’s more recent arrival on the scene. However, in the short term, MDMA prevents the reuptake of serotonin on a large scale, and to a lesser degree, dopamine. This stress of MDMA usage can be minimized. It is impor­tant to take lots of anti-oxidants, such as Vitamin C, before, during, and after MDMA use. Five-hydroxy-tryptophan, a precursor to serotonin capable of passing the blood-brain barrier, also helps restore previous serotonin levels, and can be purchased at any pharmacy. If you are taking an MAOI or SSRI for depres­sion or anxiety, it is extremely important that you do not take MDMA. Such a combination can cause irreversible brain damage. Also, stay hydrated with water and juice! Mushrooms Though there is no indication that mush­rooms are neurotoxic or physi­cally dangerous, their effects on the psyche might be hard to grapple with. For this reason, it is important that mushrooms be used in a comfortable setting with a trip sitter – a trusted friend who will stay sober to ensure your physical and mental health. If you choose to use mushrooms, start your dosage small, at about half of an eighth, to see how

you react to the drug. If you find you are comfortable with the effects, and wish to go further, try taking a whole eighth. At this dosage, many feel comfortable. However, you may wish to take higher doses. If you do venture to these depths of subconscious illumination, use caution – high doses lead to emotional disturbances, terrifying revelations, and potentially harmful consequences. LSD With all drugs, but especially with halluci­nogens like LSD, it is a good idea to have a trip sitter. A comfortable, safe space with plenty of music is an ideal setting. Initial states of depression and anxiety often become overwhelming after consuming hallucinogens. This can lead to a “bad” and a possibly dangerous trip. Always start your dosage low – you can always increase it. There is no way to know how intense a hit could be, so begin conservatively with an unfamiliar source. Periodic flashbacks (short periods during which you feel like you are on acid even when you are not) are a relatively common side effect of repeated use. You should avoid LSD if you have a history of mental instability in your family, as it has been known to trigger latent schizo­ phrenia and psychosis. Take Note Remember safety first! Not all drugs are legal, not all drugs are the same, and not everything you’ve learned about drugs is accurate. Keep in mind basic precautions and ask for help and information if you need it. For more drug info, visit www.ssmu. mcgill.ca/hrc, www.erowid.org, or www.lycaeum.org.

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MONTREAL ATTRACTIONS Music, theatre, film, nightlife, and campus events aren’t enough for you? Here are some other ways to spend an afternoon or evening out on the town. Go Skating by the Saint Lawrence in Old Montreal During the winter, the Quays Skating Rink opens daily from 10am to 10pm. It usually opens in December and closes in early March, and part of the rink can be artificially frozen to accommodate these dates. Look out for the days when it’s open 24 hours in case you feel like a 3am skate. Find a Sloth at the Biodome These slow-moving furballs have been eluding visitors for years, but if you hang around the Biodome for long enough, you may be able to see one. Or, if you’re feeling impatient, just rush through the first few zones and check out the Anartctic, with penguins galore. Jonesing for Some Poutine? La Banquise (994 Rachel E.) is open 24 hours and has 25 different types of poutine to satisfy all your wildest desires. It’s the city’s premiere poutine joint, and possibly its leading cause of heart attacks. Check out the Berlin Wall It’s closer than you think. Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, parts of it have been given to institutions or cities around the world. In 1992, one meter of the wall from a location near the Brandenburg Gate was given to Montreal, and is currently on display at the World Trade Centre (747 Victoria Square). Climb a Mountain And not that figurative triumph

over adversity - a real mountain. Sure, anyone who has seen the Rockies or the Alps will only consider it a hill, but what Mount Royal lacks in elevation, it makes up for with an impressive view. The exercise can’t hurt, either. Is it Cold Outside? Is the ground covered with lots of white stuff? Think you’re probably suffering from seasonal affective disorder? Go tobogganing! The west side of Mount Royal is the best place to go, but watch out for the natural hazards (trees) and the moving hazards (people, dogs, etc.). You can buy something cheap to slide on at Dollarama, or go upscale and buy something sturdier at Canadian Tire or Zellers. Obey the Beat at Tam-Tams Every Sunday when the weather is warm, a cool mix of people congregate at the base of Mount Royal (facing Parc Avenuec) to play drums, dance, smoke, eat, play hacky-sack, and just have a good time. Further up the hill, “Live Action Role-Players” dress up as medieval warriors and battle it out with all sorts of unusual swords and spears. Bring along your drums or sword and join in the fun. Chinese Lanterns at the Botanical Gardens Like pretty lights? From September to October each year, the Chinese Garden at the Botanical Gardens lights up the night with “The Magic of Lanterns.”

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MONTREAL HISTORY Montreal has a long and colourful history, but certain themes seem to repeat throughout: English-French tensions, people moving to Toronto, radical politicians, and even more radical debauchery. Here are some of the highlights and low points. 1535 - While searching for a shortcut to Asia, the French explorer Jacques “won’t ask for directions” Cartier arrives at the village of Hochelaga (present-day Montreal). 1605 - Samuel de Chaplain establishes a fur trading post on the island, but this prompts fierce clashes with the Iroquois and the post is soon abandoned. 1642 - French colonists and missionaries establish Ville Marie, the predecessor of modern Montreal. Armed conflict with the Iroquois will continue until a peace treaty is signed in 1701. 1763 - The French concede all of their territory in Canada to the British in the Treaty of Paris, after faring poorly in the Seven Years’ War. Montreal sees an influx of British immigrants, and within a century the majority of the city’s population will be Anglophone. 1832 - Montreal is incorporated as a city, and has established itself as the largest industrial centre in Canada. Much of the capital has been supplied by Scottish businessmen, including James McGill and James Redpath. 1849 - Tory-led rioters burn the Canadian provincial parliament (which was located in Montreal) to the ground, while the legislature is in session. Two weeks later, foreshad-

owing things to come, the parliamentarians decide to move to Toronto. 1909 - The Montreal Canadiens are founded as one of the original teams in the National Hockey Association (the predecessor of the present-day NHL). They will go on to win more Stanley Cups than any other team. 1920 - Prohibition comes into effect in the United States, and Montreal becomes a popular destination (nicknamed “Sin City” long before Las Vegas existed) for Americans seeking alcohol, gambling, and prostitution. 1928 - To feed all those Americans seeking alcohol (among other people), Schwartz’s Deli opens on St. Laurent Boulevard. 1940 - Montreal mayor Camillien Houde is arrested by the RCMP for sedition, after telling Quebeckers to disobey federal law and refuse to register as potential military conscripts. After being released from prison in 1944, he receives a hero’s welcome and is re-elected as mayor. 1942 - Maurice “Rocket” Richard debuts with the Canadiens, and two seasons later becomes the first NHL player to score 50 goals in 50 games. 1960 - The Liberal government of Jean Lesage is elected, kicking off the period of secular liberalization

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that will be dubbed the “Quiet Revolution.” 1967 - Montreal hosts Expo 67, and French President Charles de Gaulle gives his famous “Vive le Québec libre!” speech. However, for most Montrealers, the Expo will forever be remembered as “the only time that the Biosphere was actually worth visiting.” 1969 - The Montreal Stock Exchange is bombed - the largest of a series of attacks by members of the Front de Libération de Québec, a radical Quebec nationalist group. 1970 - The FLQ kidnaps Quebec Minister of Labour Pierre Laporte and a British diplomat James Cross from their homes in Montreal, and subsequently murders Laporte. The federal government invokes the War Measures Act in response, and rounds up hundreds of suspected FLQ members.

other sovereignty referendum, which is defeated by a margin of less than 1% - a failure for that PQ leader and then-Premier Jacques Parizeau blames on “money and ethnic votes.” 2002 - Montreal’s many smaller municipalities are merged, although this proves unpopular and many subdivisions resume independence four years later. 2004 - The Montreal Expos relocate to Washington, D.C., due to poor attendance at games. Most Montrealers react to this news by looking puzzled and saying “We had a baseball team?”

1976 - Montreal hosts the summer Olympics, and Quebec elects the Parti Québécois to a majority government position. 1977 - The PQ introduces provincial language regulation by passing Bill 101. The 1970s are the first decade on record when Montreal’s population declines, as roughly 300,000 Anglophone Montrealers and countless businesses leave (mostly to Toronto) due to the political climate. 1980 - The province holds a referendum on moving towards sovereignty, which is rejected by 60% of the population. The strongest opposition to sovereignty is expressed by Montrealers. 1995 - The province holds an-

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POLITICS IN QUEBEC After reading this page, you will know everything there is to know about Quebec politics. That’s right - it can all be summarized in less than 500 words. All those people with political science degrees are just spewing hot air. And while we’re at it, would you like to buy the Brooklyn Bridge? Key Factors Language arguably plays a bigger political role in Quebec than anywhere else in North America. Although the province fell under British control in 1760, it is predominantly (and proudly) French. Legal guarantees of language rights were first given to Quebeckers in 1774, and were renewed during the confederation process. Religious guarantees were also made to Quebeckers at that time, as the province was predominantly Catholic. For many years, politicians in Quebec were closely allied with the Catholic Church: the church controlled schools and hospitals, the Vatican’s list of banned books was enforced in Quebec, and power lay in the hands of Montreal’s Anglophone business elite. Quiet Revolution and Sovereignty When Jean Lesage’s Liberals were elected in 1960, they severed ties with the Church, invigorated unions, and sparked an era of secular Quebec nationalism known as “The Quiet Revolution.” It’s without a doubt the most imporant era in Quebec’s recent history, and the repercussions are still being felt. But if you wanted to know about that, you’d read a history book. The point here is that eventually, this new political climate led to calls for Quebec sovereignty. In 1980, René Lévesque held a referendum on the issue (and lost), and another attempt

was made (with similar results) in 1995 under the leadership of Jacques Parizeau. The pro-sovreignty climate also led to controversial legislation like Bill 101, which makes French the sole official language of Quebec, and an exodus of Anglophones (as well as businesses) from Montreal in the 1970s. The Current Situation Sovereignty has remained the primary fault line in provincial politics. As a result, Quebec defaults to a two-party arrangement, the current division being between the federalist Liberals, led by Jean Charest, and the sovereigntist Parti Québécois, led by Pauline Marois. With rare exceptions - such as the ADQ’s 2007 electoral upset - these two parties have dominated the provincial legislature for more than 30 years. Both are left-of-centre on economic issues (the PQ more so), and they end up battling to win the support of moderate urban voters, who are Quebec’s swing vote. The most recent provincial election was in December of 2008, returning a Liberal majority. That means you can expect a stable government for the time being. But if you want to get involved, don’t be shy! From campus clubs to small parties, there are plenty of ways to become part of Quebec’s exciting (and confusing) political culture.

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POLITICS IN MONTREAL If Quebec politics weren’t complicatd enough, Montreal’s are a unique mixture of parties and boroughs. Here’s how the city runs (or doesn’t). The Setup The City of Montreal is organized on a two-tier model. At the bottom are the 19 boroughs, each of which covers a specific neighbourhood. These authorities are responsible for local issues like snow removal, park maintenance, and issuing permits. Above the boroughs is the city council and administration, which deals with larger issues like transportation, long-term planning, and policing. This system is a recent development. Previously, the island of Montreal was made composed of a patchwork of municipalities. But in 2002, the provincial government tried to merge all the municipalities on the island of Montreal into a single government. Their goal was to make local government more efficient, but many Montrealers resented the lack of consultation and the loss of their local communities’ autonomy. With the election of the Liberals in 2003, a series of referenda were held in formerly independent municipalities. Much of the Anglophone-dominated West Island chose to leave the megacity. The issue has died down in recent years, but local government is still undergoing growing pains. The Players Unlike most Canadian cities, Montreal’s city politics are based on parties. Forming government under mayor Gérald Tremblay is Union Montréal. Tremblay rose to power in 2001, riding the backlash against the municipal mergers. He was reelected in 2005, with a stronger mandate. The official opposition is Vision

Montréal. They’ve been losing steam in recent years, and are in the middle of a leadership shuffle, but former PQ minister Louise Harel will lead them in the next election. In practice, it’s hard to tell the two major parties apart. They’re driven more by personalities than by policies, as they serve the mayoral campaigns of specific politicians. The possible exception is Projet Montréal, a relatively new party focused on environmental issues. They’ve only contested one election, so it’s hard to tell if they will become a viable alternative. The Issues Montreal has recently committed to extending the Metro, increasing bus service, and building new tramway lines, but the recent economic downturn may have thrown a wrench in these plans. Social problems, particularly in terms of police interaction with immigrant communities, have also been a hot-button issue in recent years. Also, in July a defector from Union Montréal leaked documents revealing that the borough administration for the Plateau is in dire financial straits. There was some discussion of cutting services or levying a special tax to make up for budgetary shortfalls, which would affect many local residents (or their landlords). There’s a municipal election scheduled for November of 2009, so expect plenty of placards and municipal politicking this fall. It could be a pivotal election for Tremblay’s administration, so if you’re looking to make a wave in local politics, now’s your chance.

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MEDIA Want to know what’s going on in the world? Or the latest sports scores? Just turn to your campus and city media. On Campus The McGill Daily publishes every Monday and Thursday. It has a long history of political radicalism, and the newspaper is mandated to to focus on power relations and marginalized groups. Along with activist journalism, they publish a variety of content including art and literary supplements, and a letters section filled with lively (albeit snarky) exchanges. The other English-language campus newspaper is the McGill Tribune, which hits stands every Tuesday. It’s a more conventional newspaper than the Daily, featuring traditional news reporting and a sports section. The Tribune is usually considered more centrist than the Daily, but it publishes columnists from across the political spectrum and prints all letters received, just like the Daily. The Tribune is editorially independent, but published by SSMU. That’s scheduled to change this year, however, as the newspaper was ordered to go independent by SSMU Council. They’ll be asking for your support in upcoming referenda, so do your part to maintain McGill’s tradition of diverse campus media. Speaking of which, Le Délit Français is the only French-language newspaper on campus, and it publishes editions every Tuesday. It’s the sister paper of the Daily, and the two publications share an office and a student fee. It’s also a left-leaning paper, but with a strong focus on Francophone issues and culture. McGill is also home to CKUT Radio (on the dial at 90.3 FM), your community radio station. They provide an eclectic mix of music and news con-

tent, ranging from current events in Africa to Scandinavian heavy metal. Around Town La Presse is probably the best mainstream Montreal daily newspaper. It includes everything you’d expect of a major paper, and provides good coverage of Montreal and Quebec politics along with sports. The Gazette is Montreal’s Anglophone newspaper, and is part of the CanWest syndicate. It’s an unremarkable newspaper by national standards, but it’s your only real option for coverage of Quebec politics in English. Montreal is also home to the thinbut-trenchant Le Devoir, a high-brow newspaper that could be considered Quebec’s counterpart to the Globe and Mail. And finally, there’s Le Journal de Montréal, the city’s Frenchlanguage tabloid. Montreal also has a great set of independent weekly newspapers. The Hour, the Mirror, Voir, and Ici all do a good job of covering Montreal news and entertainment. And in terms of magazines, Maisonneuve is the largest one in Montreal, and offers a quarterly selection of cultural criticism and off-beat reporting. Online Media The Montreal Weblog (w5.montreal.com/mtlweblog) pays someone to sort through all the news articles of interest throughout the day, and is a good way to keep on top of it all. And Midnight Poutine (midnightpoutine. com) is great for keeping tabs on cultural events or human interest pieces, providing content both in English and in French.

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THE LANGUAGE DIVIDE Wondering why you find yourself in such a bilingual environment all of a sudden? Then take a quick dip into the linguistic history of Montreal. Quebec is a French-language province. French is the language most residents speak, the official language for business and government is, and the default language for communicating in this province. That being said, Montreal is an extremely bilingual – if not multilingual – city. There are still many unilingual English speakers who live and work in Quebec with little to no problems. So why does language seem like language is so controversial in Quebec? Because it still is. Quebec was first colonized by France, which sent settlers to establishea new, French-speaking society. In 1760, after the battle of the Plains of Abraham, the British Empire took over control of Quebec. While the majority of the citizenry were still Francophones in rural areas, the emerging urban centres and commerce of the 18th and 19th century were dominated by English speaking settlers, or Anglophones. The result was that government services, business, commerce, and most higher education was conducted in English, and totally inaccessible to the Francophone population. One of the primary goals of the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s in Quebec was to shift the scales in favour of the Francophone majority, who until that time were confined to industrial or agrarian jobs. Any sort of service or business job re-

quired that the worker speak English, a skill the Church-run education system did not teach, thus discriminating against generations of Francophones. Through the establishment of Francophone education institutions, the creation of local, nationalized businesses that hired primarily in French, and ultimately through the French Language Charter, the government tried to make French the language of business, government, and society. The French Language Charter, also called Bill 101, it makes it a legal obligation to have French as the primary language of business and government. It also obliges all children in the province to attend school in French, unless their parents went to an English-language institution. Some people – mostly Anglophones – are offended by this stringent approach to the French language. However, one must remember the historical context: for many years, Anglophones used their political and economic power to make sure that Francophones could never fully integrate. Multilingualism in the 21st century is an advantage. Take advantage of being in the only Francophone jurisdiction in North America to learn a second language. McGill offers for-credit language courses, and there are many places around the city that offer government-paid for (and thus free) French classes.

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OTHER UNIVERSITIES Montreal is a student-friendly city, housing four universities and a host of CEGEPs. Get to know your neighbours in this section. Concordia Founded in 1974 in a merger between Loyola College and Sir George William University, Concordia used to specialize as a technical university. While some McGill students may turn their noses up at our Anglophone neighbours, Concordia offers a large array of programs that are arguably better than those at McGill, such as women’s studies, communications, a practical engineering program, a well-sponsored business school (John Molson), a great fine arts program, and a full theatre program. Concordia is often viewed by the public with an air of unease. In 1992, Concordia was the site of Canada’s first-ever school shooting, in which four professors were killed by a colleague Valery Fabrikant, a professor of engineering. In 2002, Concordia was the site of aggressive protests against a visit by former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, which was eventually cancelled due to the unrest. UQAM UQAM stands for the Université d Québec à Montréal. Founded as one of the central institutions of the University of Quebec system during the Quiet Revolution of the 1960s, UQAM remains one of the foremost institution dabbling in radical and progressive academia in North America. UQAM has specialized courses in every major Marxist and anarchist thinker and philosopher of our times. UQAM doesn’t have an overarching student union, but indepen-

dent faculty associations that sometimes coordinate with one another. The university is considered one of the hubs of student activism in Montreal. Two years ago, UQAM was put under government trusteeship due to a financial crisis ballooning from a over-budget construction project. Universityof Montreal The University of Montreal resides on the other side of Mont Royal. Most McGill students never make it over for a tour of the campus in their four years of undergrad, but a walk over is well worth it. The U of M was originally the Montreal chapter of the University of Laval, a Vatican-owned university in Quebec City. In 1967 they became an independent, public university. The U of M is a bit of a McGill rival on the sports field, boasting an accomplished football team and giant student body. Bishop’s University and the University of Sherbooke Although not located in Montreal, a 90-minute drive will bring you to both of these universities. Bishop’s is located in the town of Lennoxville, and is also an English university. They have great school sprit and are not to be approached when wearing purple and holding beer, especially if they know you’re a McGill student. Bishop’s students are often violently proud of their university. Sherbrooke is just about the opposite of Bishop’s. Located in Sherbooke, it’s a Francophone university of a good size with a well-known graduate school.

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MASS TRANSPORTATION Remember that John Candy and Steve Martin film, Planes, Trains & Automobiles? So do we. Lucky for you, getting around Montreal is much easier than that. Metro and City Busses Montreal’s public transit system, the STM (www.stm.info), will take you pretty much anywhere you need to go on the island. The Metro runs right through the downtown core and stretches its underground tentacles to much of the island, while buses go almost everywhere else. To get student fares, you’ll need to go to Speq Photo, in the underground complex next to McGill Metro station, and get an STM student photo ID. Bring proof of residency (like a copy of your lease), a letter from McGill stating that you’re a full time student (you can get this in the James Administration building), and around $10. The Metro is open from 5:30am to 12:30am (weekdays and Sundays) or 1:00am (Saturdays). Trains come about every five minutes during peak weekday hours, and slightly less often at night or on the weekends. Bus schedules vary - some of the busier routes run until around 1:00 am, and there are several all-night routes. The STM website is a great resource not only for schedules and routes, but also because of the “Tous Azimuts” trip planner. You plug in your origin, destination, and time you’d like to arrive, and it tells you how to get there using transit. Bus There’s a Greyhound terminal at Berri and Maisonneuve, accessible from the Berri-UQAM Metro station. Student discounts are available when you show your McGill ID card, and if you buy tickets a week or two in ad-

vance, they cost significantly less. Trains Trains come in to the Gare Centrale, on the corner of Rene-Levesque and University. For students, ISIC cards are available for $16 from Voyages Campus or at any VIA Rail station, and they qualify you for a 35% student discount. You can also buy a “6 pak” of tickets back and forth from the same destination, which will get you an even larger discount. Planes First, you need to get to your plane. There’s a $38 fixed rate for a cab ride from downtown to the airport in Dorval, but you may be tempted to pay it after trying to get to the airport using public transit (it takes more than an hour). You can also catch also a shuttle (the Aérobus) that goes from the Berri station to the airport, with tickets for $16. Just check the schedule on their website (www.autobus. qc.ca/anglais/ aeroportuaire_an.html). Rideshare Find a rideshare online at montreal. craigslist.org/rid. There’s usually someone going to Ottawa or Toronto who’s looking for passengers. Typically, passengers are expected to split gas costs - just be sure to ask about the arrangement before the trip. And take precautions before hopping into a stranger’s car for a 14-hour ride. Try to travel with a friend, let someone know your itinerary, and don’t get in the car if you’re not comfortable with the driver.

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BIKING IN MONTREAL You’ve seen them zoom past your car window, beat you on your way to school, and glide down St. Urbain. Here’s how the bikers of Montreal keep their chains oiled. The amount of money you spend on your bike should be equivalent to the type of security you can get for your new purchase. You may think your new bike will last forever, but you’re wrong. Bike theives rule the Montreal streets and unless you have the right security measures to foil their plans (including stealing your tires, brakes, or entire bike) it’s not worth your dime! Before you buy your bike, you need to think where you will be riding it. Pavement or gravel? Bumps, hills or flatlands? This will help you narrow your search to a mountain, road, or hybrid bike. If you’re looking to spend a lot and be the next Lance Armstrong road-warrior, check out Velo Villenneuve (75 Villeneuve O., 514 282 8356). For new bikes in the $30 to $150 price range, check out sproting goods stores like Canadian Tire or Sports Experts to purchase yourself an Iron Horse, a Nakamura, a CCM, or the ever-popular Super Cycle. These are all affordable mid-range bikes. You don’t need a Canondale to get to school. For both new and nicely restored used bikes, head towards the old port and check out Velomakak (215 Murray). Depending on what you’re looking for, a solid vintage bike may run you about $150. Be wary, the streets are full of used bikes with “For Sale” signs. Keep your eyes peeled, but make sure they’re in good condition (chain isn’t rusted, etc.) before you make your purchase. There’s usualy a fel-

low who sells refurbished bikes outside the Word Bookstore on Milton. His price-point is good (about $50) and he always has a wide variety of bikes for sale. You can also check out the McGill Classified or Craigslist Montreal. Don’t be afraid to bargain down the price! Avoiding Theft You probably know someone or have had your own bike stolen. Here are some tips to keep your ride safe: 1. Store your bike inside, if your apartment has room. 2. Invest in a good U-shaped lock, available at most bicyle shops. Don’t cheap out on this - if you do, your bike is a goner. 3. When locking your bike outside, remove all easily removeable parts of your bike (e.g. seat, front tire) and take them inside. 4. Always lock your bike to something safe and sturdy (chain link fences can be taken apart). 5. Buy two locks and use one to lock your tire if you don’t want to take it inside. 6. Buy a cheaper bike - it will be less attractive to thieves. Staying Safe There’s no doubt about it: Montreal may be bike-friendly, but it’s not the safest town to ride a bike. Nonetheless, there are a few things you can do to increase your chances of staying alive. • Wear a helmet (we know it doesn’t “look cool,” but brain damage isn’t cool either). • Stick to bike paths whenever pos-

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sible, especially those with concrete barriers. But don’t get too lazy about your safety in these routes because car doors can open and cars cans till zip in front of you when turning or going into driveways. • When riding close to parked cars, be wary of car doors. • At the beginning of bike season, take your ride into the shop for a full tune. • Put lights on your bike (front and back) and wear reflective gear at night. Maintenance With bumpy roads and harsh winters, your bike takes a beating in the Montreal streets. It’s no surprise that your bike is going to need some care once in a while. A great maintenance shop is J.R.’s (151 Rue Rachel E. 514-843-6989). Don’t be deceived by the mountains of bikes - your bike will get fixed promptly, and they’ll call you when you’re bike is good to go. The best (arguably) and most affordable option is the new studentrun SSMU Bicycle Collective (The Flat), located in the basement of the Shatner Building (Room B-04). Here, you can learn about the basics of bike repair as trained students help you. You only have to pay a small cost for any parts you may need. Bring your bent fenders, flat tires, and squeaky brakes to learn how to make your bike like new. The collective has limited hours, so make sure you know they’re open before you show up. Winter Biking This activity is only for those able to withstand extreme temperatures. Many paths aren’t cleared, making riding treacherous, and windchills can easily cause frostbite. If you’re venturing out on your bike, bundle up, ride slow, and wear goggles.

BIXI Montreal has introduced a new city-wide bike system to help people change their commuting habits. These stands can be found all over the downtown core and usually hold about a dozen BIXIs (bike-taxis). You need a credit card to get one out (they cost $5 for the day) or you can buy a membership for unlimited usage with a “BIXI key.” The upside is that you don’t have to worry about having your bike stolen, but relying on the system can be a challenge because the bikes get snapped up fast. To find locations near you, or to get a membership, visit www.bixi.com. Bike Paths With 400 kilometres of bike lanes and a new municiple transportation plan aimed at doubling the existing network over the next seven years, crusing around the city by bike has never been better, Montreal’s bike lanes come in various forms. The most effective are those guarded by either posts on cocnerte barriers, which help to protect bikers from motorists. Other lanes are just painted on the street, but they’re still better than nothing. In Montreal, bikers can travel from one end of the city to the most in bike paths. In the downtown and and Plateau area you can go north to south on Parc, Clark, or St. Urbain. Try using the east-west lanes on Milton, Rachel, Prince Arthur and Maisonneuve (this is the best path for the downtown core). If you are coming from the west you can take de la Montagne, Greene and Atwater, as well as St. Antoine to get downtown. And for recreational time, try a scenic ride along the Lachine Canal, Parc Jean Drapeau or Parc Mont Royal.

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PROFESSIONAL SPORTS Incase the Redmen and Martlets are’t kicking it for you...you can check out some of these awesome local teams. Hockey: Montreal Canadians Despite winning the Eastern Conference final in 2007-2008 the Habs (the nickname for the team, short for “Habitants”) fell short this past season, leaving behind a disappointed fan base. Winning their first-round playoff series against Boston in 2008 led to the biggest riot Montreal has seen since they last won the Stanley Cup in 1993 (the last Canadian team to do so). Unfortunately they haven’t done that much better since then. But never underestimate Montreal hockey fans. The season up ahead will be interesting. With the recent move of star forward Alex Kovalev to the Ottawa Senators, an old rivalry is bound to be fired up as “Les Boys” (another nickname for the Canadians) have something to prove. Goalie Carey Price, despite his young age has a lot of pressure to make up for a lacklustre playoff performance. Tickets are easy to get from scalpers at the Bell Centre and nosebleed seats for weekday games go for about $40. The Bell Centre is gigantic (21,500 seats). It’s recommended wear Habs colours if you’re going to a game. The Bell Centre is located at 1260 de la Gauchetiere West. If you can’t afford tickets, just get to a bar early (especially during playoffs) and wear your red, white and blue - it will be a fantastic party. No Leafs fans allowed. Football: Montreal Alouettes If you live in Upper Residence, you’ve definitely heard the deafening roar of a sold-out crowd at an Alou-

ettes playoff game. For those of you not accustomed to this roar, stop by Molson Stadium on any weekend from June through October to witness it. The Alouettes play the three-down, pass-heavy, minimal-running, higher-scoring Canadian version of football as part of the Canadian Football League (CFL). Last year Montreal hosted the Grey Cup (the major trophy awarded at the CFL finals) at the Olympic Stadium. The Als are expanding the stadium to make room for their growing fan base. If you feel like becoming a fan, try to get some cheap seats for a game - it’ll be worth it. Molson Stadium is located at 475 Pine Avenue, and is part of the McGill campus. Soccer: Montreal Impact Soccer fans get their riotous fix with the Montreal Impact. Although they play in the second tier of the American Soccer pyramid, the Impact have a dedicated fan base. Playing their games in the brand-new, cheese-empire-owned Saputo Stadium get ready for rowdy fans dressed in blue and white. Tickets cost about $10, and Saputo Stadium is located at 4750 Sherbrooke E., near Viau Metro. Baseball: Montreal Expos. If you’re wondering about that innocuous symbol you’ve seen floating around sports shops and haven’t yet found a team or a stadium to match it, you’re not alone. The Montreal Expos now exist as the Washington Nationals. To see the old team play, you’ll have to head it south of the boarder.

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FESTIVALS If Montreal is known for anything, it’s the city’s cultural life and festivals. From the world-renowned Jazz Festival to the hip and edgy Fringe Festival, there’s no shortage of events to attend this coming year. Osheaga Music and Arts Festival (Early August) Held at Parc Jean-Drapeau, Osheaga is basically a two-day mix-up of international stars and local talent. Past performers include M.I.A., The Decembrists, Feist, Metric, Sonic Youth, and the Smashing Pumpkins. www.osheaga.com World Film Festival (August 27-September 7, 2009) Montreal’s largest film festival draw entries from around the world, which play at theatres all across town. It’s also student-friendly: along with hosting the 40th Canadian Student Film Festival, there are plenty of free outdoor screenings by Place des Arts. www.ffm-montreal.org Pop Montreal (September 30 - October 4, 2009) This Mile-End based music festival includes art, films, and a conference in addition to its over 200 musical acts. If indie music is your thing, Pop Montreal will make you jump up and down with rhythmic glee, while the symposium draws speakers like Patti Smith and David Byrne. www.popmontreal.com Nuit Blanche (February 27, 2010) Have you ever wanted to wander the Musée des Beaux Arts at 5am? Or to ride down a gigantic ice slide in the old port as the clock strikes midnight? If so, you are in luck - Nuit Blanche provides the opportunity for shenanigans all over town. Museums

open their doors to the public until dawn, and the Old Port hosts a silent rave and sugar shack, among other things. Mondial de la Bière (Late May and early June) It isn’t the cheapest way to get a brew, but it’s definitely the most exotic. Montreal’s beer festival attracts brewers from around the world, and gives you a chance to drink their unique creations. festivalmondialbiere.qc.ca Montreal Fringe Festival (June 10-20, 2010) The concept of Fringe is to be completely freewheeling: no artistic direction, no censorship, accessibility to artists, and accessibility to audiences. Artists are selected by lottery and allowed to present anything, while tickets and beer are cheap for patrons. It’s also an excellent festival to volunteer for - what more could you want? www.montrealfringe.ca Montreal Jazz Festival (July 1-11, 2010) Jazz Fest brings more than 2 million people together over the course of 10 days, flooding downtown with tourists and locals alike. It includes hundreds of free outdoors performances, ranging from world music to hip-hop. It’s the definitive Montreal summer festival, and you should attend at least once during your time at McGill. www.montrealjazzfest.com

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PARKS Montreal is full of parks. Take some time to smell the roses in one of these verdant wonderlands over the next few years. Parc Mont Royal This is Montreal’s largest park, covering almost all of the mountain and its base, seen looming over McGill’s lower campus. The park opened in 1876, designed by Frederick Law Olmstead (who is famous for designing New York’s Central Park). Its nearly 500 acres contain many kilometres of footpaths, bike paths, and ski trails. The summit has a wonderful view of downtown Montreal (sunrises recommended). Beaver Lake, located on the south west face of the mountain has some great sledding hills in the winter and a wonderful café in the spring and summer.On Sundays, when there’s no snow - Tam-Tams, the city’s famous drumming circle, takes place in the park at the interesection of Parc and Duluth. Parc Lafontaine Bordered by Sherbrooke, Papineau, and Rachel, this park offers a shady retreat on a hot summer’s day. It includes a bike path, pedestrian footpaths, and makes a great place to jog with natural scenery. There’s also a large pond that has a fountain in the summer and doubles as a skating rink (with skate rentals) in the winter. The park also boasts wading pools, a baseball diamond, and open-air theatre and a dog park. Parc Jean-Drapeau Easily accessible by Metro, Parc Jean Drapeau is composed to two islands - Île Saint Hélène and Île Notre-Dame. Île Notre Dame was

built by displaced dirt from the construction of the Metro in the 1960s. This is a huge park, again with many footpaths and bike paths. The park also contains many Montreal attractions: La Ronde, the Montreal Casino, a beach, the Formula One racetrack and the Biosphere. Many events take place here throughout the summer like Osheaga Music Festival and Piknic Electronik, an electronic music party every Sunday in the summer. Parc Jeanne Mance Right across from Parc Mont Royal, on the east side of Parc Avenue, Parc Jeanne Mance is huge, stretching several city blocks. This park has 10 beach volleyball courts, tennis courts, a baseball diamond, a soccer field, a wading pool and public bathrooms. It’s always lively in the summer, and it also has skating rinks for shinny hockey in the winter. Square St. Louis Located at the end of the cobblestones at Laval and Prince Arthur, the square used to be characterized as a little seedy, but has come into its own in the last few years. The square has a beautiful fountain, active in the summers, an ice cream shop, and lots of bronze statues. You can be enchanted by the strings of Spanish guitar by day or accosted by undercover cops at night. Most parks in Montreal have posted about closing hours. Pay attention to these - you can be ticketed for “loitering” after hours.

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MOVIES If you want to sit in a cold, dark room for two hours, starting at a screen with a bunch of strangers and eating snack food, these are the places to go in Montreal. AMC Forum 22 2313 St. Catherine West Simply put, it’s huge. This theatre is in the building that used to house the Habs, so what else could you expect? As the name suggests, the Forum has 22 screens which usually show standard blockbuster fare, but sometimes feature foreign films, Francophone films, and independent films. With so many movies playing at any given time, one of them is bound to be some good, if you can navigate the right escalator to the right floor at the right time. Cinema du Parc 3573 Parc Avenue Oh, Cinema du Parc. They show glorious (and some not-so-glorious) independent flicks, cult classics, and many film festivals that hit Montreal come through here. The prices are very affordable, and you’ll typically get your money’s worth. Pick up a monthly schedule and go crazy. Cinéma Parallèle 3536 St. Laurent Located in the Ex-Centris production complex, this theatre is Montreal’s ultimate avant-garde screening space. The films are unapologetically artsy (and sometimes unenjoyable), but it’s worth the experience to see something here at least once. Cinerobothèque 1564 St. Denis Operated by the National Film Board, this cinema has thousands of documentaries, animated films,

shorts, and narrative films that cover the entire span of Canada’s cinematic history. You pay two dollars for an hour’s use of a personal viewing station with a recliner and headphones - generally a much better use of a toonie than Dollar Cinema. Pick your poison, and a robotic arm will grab the film you’ve selected and start it up. Definitely worth the visit. Dollar Cinema 6900 Decarie Square They’ve betrayed their namesake and upped their prices: admission now sets you back a toonie. Still, $2 is pretty good compared to the Forum’s ticket prices. Getting here takes a bit of effort - you have to take the metro to Namur and walk along the Décarie freeway for a bit - but the price is hard to beat. But be sure to check their schedule online first - sometimes they show good movies, but not always. Scotiabank Cinema 977 St. Catherine West The main draw of this multiplex cinema is its $5 Tuesdays. It has many floors, big-budget blockbusters, and overpriced concessions. They also have IMAX screens, if you’re seeing something with epic cinematography, or just want your abnormally large talking heads to be even larger. If you need to know what’s playing when and where, www.cinemamontreal.com carries full listings for all the city’s movie theatres.

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MUSIC If you enjoy listening to harmonious (or sometimes dissonant) sounds, this is the page for you. There’s no shortage of concerts in Montreal, and here’s how to find them. As annoying as it is to hear people prattle on about the “Montreal sound” or the “Montreal scene,” the city does have its own distinct brand of pop music. There’s also plenty to see in terms of classical and jazz, if that’s what you’re into. Montreal Pop Artists Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably heard of the Arcade Fire, who pioneered the aforementioned “Montreal sound,” with complex arrangements and fauxorchestral timbres. But the city has produced many other innovative and successful artists. These are a few of the biggest and best-known, and it’s typically worth seeing them whenever they’re in town. Chromeo: Retro-pop group Chromeo bill themselves as the only successful Jewish-Arabic collaboration in history. They’re definitely a success, with a mix of funky tracks and witty lyrics. You’ll probably hear them throughout the city, be it sampled by DJs or blaring in nightclubs. Miracle Fortress: This is the recording project of Graham van Pelt, whose debut “Five Roses” is a stunningly-beautiful record of love-had and love-lost. Deeply influenced by the lush harmonies of the Beach Boys and the synth-drones of Brian Eno, Miracle Fortress’s airy mel-

odies soar when Pelt’s endearinglyshaky vocals come in. A-Trak: At age fifteen, Alain Macklovitch (aka, A-Trak) won a DJ Championship in 1997. As the younger brother of Dave in Chromeo, A-Trak has seen tremendous success as a DJ both in Montreal and internationally. (Among other things, he’s the DJ for Kanye West.)

Champion: One of the biggest club DJs in Montreal for well over a decade, Champion gained a global reputation after releasing his first album in 2004. He tours with a live band (including four guitarists) called the G-Strings, and his home-town concerts draw tremendous (and tremendously loud) crowds. Classical and Jazz If you prefer Mozart to Motown, Montreal is still a good place to be. McGill’s Schulich School of Music puts on plenty of concerts and recitals throughout the year, many of which are free. Fliers are gener-

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ally posted in the music building, or schedules can be found online at www.mcgill.ca/music/events/concerts. The Montreal Symphony Orchestra also has a special promotion for students: leftover tickets for virtually all concerts are available for $10, starting one week before the concert date. To catch some jazz, it’s best to keep an eye on the local entertainment listings (see the section below), since even the best shows are often underpublicized. But if you’re just looking for a fun night out, there’s something to hear on any given week. That being said, avoid tourist traps like House of Jazz or Modavie - the drinks are overpriced and the music is often stale. If you want to hear top-shelf jazz musicians at work, stop by Upstairs (1254 Mackay), Billy Kun (354 Mont-Royal East), and Dièse Onze (4115-A St. Denis). Want to see a show? There are plenty of shows to see in

Montreal, but finding out about them can be difficult. The Mirror (www.montrealmirror.com) and the Hour (www. hour.ca) both publish weekly listings, which are also available online. The Montreal Music Scene (www.montrealmusicscene.com) also maintains a calendar of local shows, and Midnight Poutine (www.midnightpoutine.com) is, as always, the best resource for all things hipster in Montreal. For larger acts at major venues, it’s best to periodically stop by the websites for Ticketpro (www.ticketpro. ca) as well as the Quebec division of Ticketmaster (www.admission.com). You can also take a look at the Tribune’s Arts and Entertainment section, or the Daily’s Culture section, to find out about upcoming concerts. And if you want to write about music, stop by either of their offices. Both newspapers are always looking for writers, and you can get free CDs or concert passes as a bonus.

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ART Montreal’s art scene is a fine balance of big museums and young local artists trying to make it big in this exceptional city, with a smattering of galleries throughout town. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts 1379 and 1980 Sherbrooke W. With just a donation for the entrance fee, it’s worth visiting regularly because of its large permanent collection and world-class exhibitions throughout the year. The MMFA is a great place to find both classics and pop-culture exhibitions. Montreal Museum of Modern Art 185 St. Catherine W. Most of the gallery space showcases Canadian and Quebec contemporary artsits, but it also houses international exhibitions (obviously) highlighting new trends in contemporary art. Admission is free for students on Wednesday nights! Canadian Centre for Architecture 1920 Baile Most people are surprised to find the centre right on the outskirts of downtown Montreal, but it hosts a wide array of architectural exhibits. The centre covers everything from sensory to mechanical manifestations of architecture. New exhibits arrive with welcoming vernissages, and admission is free on Thursday nights. McCord Museum 690 Sherbrooke W. Housed in the old McGill student union building and directly across the street from campus, this museum is devoted to the history of Montreal and is packed with Canadiana. Depending on how you define art, you may find some here. Galleries

One of the more vibrant aspects of the art scene in Montreal is the incredible number of pedestrian-friendly galleries. If you’re looking for galleries with a more stuffy atmosphere, try Sherbooke’s golden mile between the MMFA and Guy, Westmount’s Green Street, or Old Montreal on St. Paul and de la Commune (some of the Old Montreal galleries are less pedestrian-friendly, hoping to attract serious buyers only). If you’re looking for younger and more contemporary art, you should check out the student scene. Head to the Belgo Building (372 St. Catherine W.) to check out some of the cities best galleries on it’s upper levels. Also, check out the Concordia student-run VAV Gallery (1395 René-Lévesque W.), which exhibits new works by fine arts students. Also affiliated with Concordia are the Leonard and Bina Ellen Gallery (1400 Maisonneuve) and Faculty of Fine Arts Gallery (1515 St. Catherine W.). Photography For the budding photographers looking for inspiration, the Just for Laughs Museum brings in the World Press photo exhibition each year alongside an exhibit by Magum Photos, with admission discounts for students. Some galleries on and around St. Laurent also specialize in photography (VOX Comtemporary image, 1211 St. Laurent), emerging local artists (Gallery Gora, 279 Sherbrooke W.), and not-for-profit artist-run exhibitiions (La Centrale Gallery Powerhouse, 4269 St. Laurent).

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THEATRE Home to the National Theatre School, Montreal has a lively up and coming theatrical scene in both English and French! Theatre at McGill McGill students put together many productions each school year. They run the full spectrum from modern experimental plays to popular musicals and classical theatre. Here’s a breakdown on what to find on campus: Player’s Theatre - SSMU’s black box theatre, famous for the McGill Drama Festival, showcasing McGill scripts. Tuesday Night Café Theatre A small theatre in the Islamic Studies building. Visit TNC for lower-budget creative delights. AUTS - New to the scene, AUTS is now famous for their big-budget musical theatre productions each winter, including past hits like Hair and Urinetown. English Theatre Program One of the oldest theatrical groups on campus, the English department regularly puts on Shakespeare plays, and productions of other highly-acclaimed, full-length plays. Savoy Society - Get your yearly dose of Gilbert and Sullivan in these carefully crafted and true-to-script productions. Professional Theatres For theatre-going in Montreal, the best theatre choices are often Francophone. North-east of campus you’ll find Theatre d’Aujourd’hui (3900 St. Denis) and le Theatre du

Rideau Vert (4664 St. Denis). They showcase contemporary and mostly Canadian plays, which makes for an interesting variety of performed works and provides an opportunity to practice your French. The edgy and experimental productions at Usine C (1345 Lalonde) and Theatre Prospero 1371 Ontario E.), both southeast of campus near the gay village, are also worth a look. Usine C is located in a multidisciplinary theatre space in a renovated factory building, and is definitely worth at least one visit during your time in Montreal. With regards to English theatre, Mainline Theatre (4398 St. Laurant) is a great starting place for Anglophone theatre pursuits. It’s both geographically and financially accessible to McGill students. You can also check out a National Theatre School production - the bigger budgets and stronger acting makes for a terrific show. Concordia’s theatre department is a good bet for English-language productions. Because Concordia has an actual theatre department, production quality typically runs a little higher. There’s also Theatre Sainte Catherine (264 St. Catherine E.) that features work in English and French - it’s a small space, but it’s cozy and certainly worth stopping by. Place des Arts also has some wonderful productions and houses the Montreal Symphony, the Montreal Opera (which has great student rates), and the Montreal Ballet. If you’re lacking in culture - it’s a great first stop.

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REVIEWS If you’re looking for a place to take a date, be treated to dinner by your parents, or get a snack on the way back from the bar, you’ll find it here.

RESTAURANTS

Breakfast

Price guide:

Café Art Java

$: less than $5 $$: 5-10 $$$: 10-20 $$$$: 20-30 $$$$$: 30+

Afghan Khyber Pass 506 Duluth E., 514-849-1775 A warm and intimate restaurant with an unusual menu – so if you’re unfamiliar with Afghan food (as most poeple likely are) you may want to go with the table d’hôte option ($14). The Afghan chutneys and braised lamb shank are both delicious. It’s affordable, BYOW, and an all-around lovely place. $$$

African

837 Mont Royal, 514-927-9990 After the requisite rounds of Eggspectation, Chez Cora, and other touristy Montreal brunch favourites, Café Art Java is a breath of fresh air. For brunch, check out the French toast, served with fresh fruit, and omelets (with such winning combinations as mushrooms, chevre, and fresh herbs). $$$

L’Avenue du Plateau 922 Mont Royal E., 514-523-8780 Pricy and always busy, but worth it. Threeegg enormous omelets, delicious fresh fruit and berry juice, and a lively young crowd make this place a treat. There’s a huge menu, with something for everyone. $$$

Cafeteria

Abiata 3435 St. Denis, 514-281-0111 With an identical menu to its cousin Blue Nile, this smaller restaurant offers a convenient alternative. The African décor and utensils-free eating style make a meal at Abiata more than worthwhile, but the beef and lamb dishes tend to be a bit under par. $$$

Blue Nile 3706 St. Denis, 514-285-4628 Eating Ethiopian cuisine is a unique experience, where you use your hands to eat with spongy, naan-like pancake bread. It takes a while to get used to, but we guarantee it is lots of fun. Here, the setting is quiet and sweet, and there are plates you can split between two, allowing you to save some cash. For those who have never had Ethiopian food, don’t miss out. $$$$

3581 St. Laurent, 514-849-3855 Looking for a chic first date breakfast joint that doubles as a trendy hotspot by night? Then Cafeteria is the place for you! It’s known among McGill students as an affordable but upscale alternative. Try their chive scrambled eggs in the morning and their juicy burgers by night! $$$

Chez Jose 173 Duluth E., 514-845-0693 Fun, colorful, delicious. Café feel. Good service. It has a hippie (and hipster) clientele, so it’s vegetarian-friendly. $$

Fuschia 4050 Coloniale, 514-842-1232 A set menu of eggs with salad, tea or coffee of choice, and a pastry, all for $10. It’s a beautiful place with a gentle and friendly resident husky. It also sells homemade

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teas, meat rubs, bathing salts, etc. Go on Saturdays for some live morning jazz, if you want to have a relaxing morning. $$

cheap coffee (if you bring your own mug) and fresh-baked goodies. The Jamaican patties are an ideal snack for between classes. $

Petit Marché 5035 St. Denis, 514-842-1994 If you like fruit with breakfast, you’ll love this place. All sorts of fruit is served with every dish, be it crêpes or simple eggs. Your meal also comes with freshly-squeezed juice, friendly service, lots of coffee, and a beautiful atmosphere. Great for large groups of friends. If you’re looking for a cheaper breakfast, be sure to check out the regular menu instead of the brunch menu. $$-$$$

Place Milton 220 Milton, 514-285-0011 Another popular ghetto locale, you’ll find many students there on weekend afternoons exchanging stories from last night over hearty breakfast food. With everything from crepes to omelets and a variety of breakfast meats, Place Milton is an affordable hangover cure. $$

McGill Pizza 625 Milton, 514-845-8011 With the cheapest breakfast around town, McGill Pizza is buzzing on Saturday and Sunday mornings, with eggs, toast, bacon, home fries, juice, and coffee for $4.25. They also serve an array of lunch and dinner foods including burgers, club sandwiches, and pizza. $

Le Vieux St. Laurent 3993 St. Laurent, 514-848-0983 The Place Milton of St. Laurent. Eggs are served with roasted potatoes, a meat of your choice, toast, and a melon fruit cup. Breakfast is quick, cheap, and comes with unlimited coffee. If you’re feeling down, try the happy-face breakfast. $$

Cafés Architecture Café Macdonald-Harrington basement If you need a campus caffeine fix, this is a reliable stop. Run by McGill’s architecture students, the Architecture Café offers

Arts Café 201 Fairmount, 514-274-0919 Cozy place in Mile End with each dish named after a different famous artist. Good food for all meals, and with wireless internet, a patio, and enough space to lounge around for an afternoon. It’s also a good place to study or slowly get drunk. $$

AUS Snax Leacock Building, main floor Life is all about compromises: the coffee at Snax is mediocre at best, but you can’t beat it in terms of price and convenience. If you need to peel your eyes open for that 8:30 lecture in Leacock 132, this is the place to go. $

Brulerie St. Denis Various locations The food and desserts are overpriced, but Brulerie St. Denis is a decent place for coffee and pastries. There’s no wireless, but it’s a good place to study if you don’t need a computer. $$

Caffè in Gamba 5263 Parc Avenue, 514-656-6852 It’s the best espresso bar in Montreal, plain and simple. Their beans are shipped in from some of North America’s best roasters every week, and the café combines Mile-End chic with classic Italian influences. $$

Java U Various locations Although their wraps and fries are tasty, they’re also overpriced. But respectable coffee and an excellent morning special ($3 for a small coffee and a pastry) make it a reliable source of caffeine. $$

L’Escalier 552 St. Catherine E., 514-670-5812 Formerly L’Utopik, this cute café on the edge of the Village offers delicious vege-

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tarian fare and fair-trade coffees and teas. This former residential space is a maze of colorfully painted rooms with comfy couches and frequent live performances of music, storytelling, and probably anything else you can think of. It has mostly Francophone clientele, and is a frequent studying destination for nearby UQAM students. The cozy atmosphere can’t be beat. $$

as wine and beer, but nothing costs more than $8. The coffee may be average, but the atmosphere is one of a kind. $

Presse Café Various locations It’s offers the same all-night convenience as the Second Cup in the ghetto (see below), but with slightly inferior coffee. $$

Café République

Laika 4040 St. Laurent, 514-842-8088 Probably one of the hippest hangouts in the Plateau. The glib clientele occasionally includes some serious contenders in the Montreal film, music, and fashion scenes. It turns into a lounge later in the evening, with a DJ, drinks, and the usual St. Laurent rigmarole. The brunch is well-known, the food is good, and the menu is extensive, but the prices can be steep for the portion size. $$$

Mimi & Coco 4927 Sherbrooke W., 514-482-6362 This made-in-Montreal clothing store offers more than print dresses and shirts. The well-kept secret (not anymore!) boutique serves delicious salads and sandwiches in the back. Try the Asian salad with chicken, avocado, and crunchy noodles. They have three locations in Montreal, but only this one has the edible goods. $$

Café Myriade 1432 MacKay, 514-939-1717 In terms of quality and craftsmanship, Café Myriade is hard to beat. Every cup of coffee is brewed to order, and while the prices may be slightly higher than chain cafés, their coffee is worth every penny. $$

Pi Café 4127 St. Laurent, 514-286-4828 Pi, the hip chess café in the Plateau with a dark and cavernous interior, is surprisingly hospitable. Small tables, local artwork, and good music floating on the air-waves (classical in the mornings, indie rock later on) make it worth a visit. There’s an array of snacks and meal-time food, as well

3563 St. Laurent, 514-840-9044 It’s part of a chain, so it’s a pretty safe bet with no surprises. The western-style meals are delicious, huge, and reasonably priced. Centrally located, it’s worth a visit. $$

Second Cup Various locations The Second Cup in the ghetto has become a McGill institution: it’s open 24/7, and it’s not unusual to see people studying there at 3am on any given night. The food and coffee are unremarkable but edible, like most chain cafés. $$

Chinese Maison Kam Fung 1111 St. Urbain, 514-878-2888 Maison Kam Fung offers casual Chinese dining in the heart of Montreal’s Chinatown. Their Sunday Dim Sum will touch your heart and your stomach, but leave your wallet in good shape. Our suggestion: the pork buns and – for the more adventurous – chicken feet! $$$

Niu Kee 1163 Clark, 514-227-0464 Just above the gates of Chinatown at Clark and René-Lévesque, you’ll find the city’s best hot-and-spicy Szechuan cuisine. This family-run restaurant features secret homemade sauces and fresh ingredients that reward the senses. Unusual fare, great prices, and vegetarian-friendly offerings make for a memorable eating experience. $$$

Restaurant de Bonheur 1441 St. Mathieu, 514-935-2321 Awesome and authentic Chinese food.

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Helpful tips: ask for the tea (it’s free), and put some soy sauce in the hot and sour soup. Some of the best dishes are the mau-pau tofu with (or without) pork, the chicken and eggplant, and the chicken and cashews. They also have $8 pitchers. $$-$$$

Diners Alto’s 3462 Parc, 514-844-9898 Deity of diners and delivery, Alto’s has got it all, and for cheap: pizza, burgers, fries, subs, as well as Greek and Italian fare. $$

L’Amère à Boire 2049 St. Denis, 514-282-7448 This brew pub has a large selection of wild game and locally-produced meats to go with their wide variety of beer. Get some rabbit, lamb, or pheasant and pair it with the beer suggested by your server. You won’t be disappointed. $$-$$$

It’s open late and located on St. Laurent, which also makes it a great hangover-prevention stop. $

Frites Alors! Various locations Belgian fries. Caribou burger. Vegetarian croque-monsieur with goat cheese, avocado, onions, mushrooms and asparagus. Sausages. Tintin. Ten spiced mayonnaises to choose from. Belgian Beers. All that, and one of the better poutines in town. $$

Mamma’s 75 Pins W., 514-288-1128 The restaurant of choice for drunken ghetto kids, Mamma’s also makes for good sober dining if you like meat, cheese, and grease. But apart from the pizza and fries, there isn’t much here for vegetarians. The veggie poutine substitutes tomato sauce for gravy, so order it at own risk. $$

The Orange Julep

La Belle Province Various locations The burgers are anemic and the poutine is mediocre, but when you’re drunk, La Belle is a great place to be. With a location on the corner of St. Laurent and Prince Arthur (as well as pretty much everywhere else), it’s certainly not hard to find. Vegetarian tip: they’re too cheap to use real meat in their gravy, so the poutine is veggie-safe! $

Bofinger 1250 University, 514-750-9095 Your arteries will hate you, but your stomach will thank you. Bofinger serves Southern-style barbecue in all of its glory: ribs, pulled pork, brisket, and more. The sides include macaroni and cheese, beans, coleslaw, and fries. Vegetarians need not apply. $$

Buns Hamburger House 3673 St. Laurent, 514-759-7799 Alright, it’s a minimalist burger joint rather than a traditional diner, but if you want one of Montreal’s best quarter-pounders at an unbeatable price, Buns is your ticket.

7700 Decarie, 514-738-7486 A Montreal landmark. The food is nothing special, but they’re famous for their “Orange Julep,” which is something like an orange milkshake. If you’re looking for an adventure, hop on the Metro’s orange line, get off at Namur, and then walk towards the gigantic orange. You’ll know it when you see it. $$

Patati Patata 4177 St. Laurent, 514-844-016 One of the best places to eat in Montreal. Everything is less than five dollars, and it’s absolutely delicious. Go for tiny burgers, tofu sandwiches, onion soup, fish and chips, and legendary fries. It might be smaller than your dorm room, but the food makes it worthwhile. $

La Paryse 302 Ontario E., 514-842-2040 The king of diners. The service isn’t great, but everything on the menu is delicious – particularly their burgers (both regular and veggie). And don’t miss the chance to top your meal off with a milkshake. $$

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Restaurant Lafleur

La Colombe

Various locations See the entry for “La Belle Province.” They’re virtually indistinguishable. $

554 Duluth E., 514-849-8844 Located in the heart of the Plateau, this is the classiest BYOW restaurant in Montreal. Marked by its cozy wood-dominated interior, its new French cuisine and its knowledgeable yet surprisingly unpretentious staff, La Colombe is an unforgettable dining experience. Some popular dishes include a delicate salmon, a succulent tenderloin of pork, and a savory duck breast. $$$$$

St. Hubert Various locations Like poutine, you can’t live in Quebec and not have St. Hubert chicken. The timetested brand of rotisserie chicken, served with fries and gravy, is not to be missed. $$$

Cuisine et Dépendance

French Café Cherrier 3635 St. Denis, 514-843-4308 Located at Cherrier and St. Denis, this Parisian-inspired spot is a little taste of elegance in the Plateau. Their vine-covered summer terrace with black-and-white awning makes it hard to miss as a cool place to beat the heat. If you’re a fan of seafood or steak and fries, then this bistro is for you. A little pricy for an average night out, but if it’s pay day we suggest their pistachio-encrusted salmon and shrimp tempura to start! $$$$

Claremont 5032 Sherbrooke W., 514-483-1557 You probably don’t know about this delicious eatery because it’s situated at the border of Westmount and NDG. For a mere ten dollars, you can taste food that should be sold for thirty. From sweet potato fries to tiger shrimp flambéed in sambuca and walnut ravioli in a white wine and roast garlic reduction, anything you see on the menu is guaranteed to be unique and scrumptious. $$-$$$

La Charade 4115 St. Denis, 514-842-7916 You’ll find all the classic French bistro offerings at this dining spot in the heart of the Plateau. Everything on the menu looks tempting, but the bruschetta appetizer and leg of duck are not to be missed. There are also two terraces open in the summer, one of which looks onto the bustling St. Denis. $$$-$$$$

4902 St. Laurent, 514-842-1500 Possibly one of the best restaurants in the city. The menu changes regularly and prices can range up to $100 per person including wine, but are definitely worth it. All the dishes are creative and the cooks and table staff are always happy to advise you and talk about the food. Vegetarians beware: the only thing that you’ll be able to eat are desserts, but those are amazing too. $$$$$

L’Entrecôte St. Jean 2022 Peel, 514-281-6492 Only blocks from campus, this restaurant captures the feel and flavour of a Parisian brasserie. Steak and fries is the only dish on the menu, but they do it so well that there’s no reason to worry (unless you’re vegetarian). It also comes with a salad and baguette to start, as well as the option to add a soup and profiteroles. $$$$

L’Express 3927 St. Denis, 514-845-5333 L’Express will take you back to 1920s Paris. A deep burgundy room with black-andwhite tiled floors and brass railings awaits you. But the real appeal is the food: you can expect authentic, classic French gastronomy. Foie gras and an extensive wine list are just a few delights that will get your mouth watering. $$$$$

Figaro 5200 Hutchinson, 514-278-6567 The ambience is perfectly French, with marble tables and a patio surrounded with wrought iron fencing, and the cuisine is a

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perfect match. They offer a lunch menu with great sandwiches and salads, and a dinner menu with more traditional hot meals like lamb and tortiere. They take reservations – if you don’t have one, be prepared to wait. $$

Holder 407 McGill, 514-849-0333 Holder is a nice restaurant in Old Montreal that doesn’t break the bank. Spending less than $30 is feasible, but then you’d have to scrimp on the food, and you really shouldn’t do that. Get the whole shebang: a meal, dessert, and a bottle of wine. It’s worth it. $$$$-$$$$$

Laloux 250 Pins E., 514-287-9127 The lavish flavours here come with a hefty price tag, so this is only for when family is in town (and forget it for dates – the lighting is too bright). The menu is creative and the plates ornately presented. They have a very extensive wine list. $$$$-$$$$$

Lemeac 1045 Laurier W., 514-270-0999 This is one of the classics for Montreal foodies and yuppies. It’s a French-style bistro with home-smoked salmon, among other things. Try their homemade ice cream – it’s one of the lesser-known items on the menu, but it’s delicious nonetheless. $$$$$

Greek

Villa de Souvlaki 5437 Sherbrooke W., 514-489-2039 One bus ride away from McGill (24 west, get off at Décarie), this place has some kick-ass souvlaki. The souvlakis taste even better cold, so feel free to over-order and put a souvlaki or two away for the next day (or late-night drunken binges). $$$

Indian Asha 3490 Parc, 514-844-3178 Everything you expect from an Indian restaurant, Asha has all the choices from spicy to mild and meat to veggie, with a friendly staff and great location. It’s been on Parc longer than any other establishment in the area, so they must be doing something right. $$$

Le Taj 2077 Stanley, 514-845-9015 It’s not the best place to go if you’re ordering off the menu, but Le Taj’s $12.95 lunch buffet is hard to beat. The good service and pleasant ambience are the icing on on a well-priced cake. $$-$$$

Nouveau Delhi 3464 St. Denis Nice place but perhaps not the best Indian food you’ll ever have. Nevertheless, the meals are good and with nearly everything priced from $8 to $12, it’s hard to complain. $$-$$$

Pains de L’Inde

Milos 5357 Parc Avenue Get ready to be transported to a small sea-side town in Greece as you step from Avenue du Parc into Milos’ white-washed world of terracotta and its lantern-lit atmosphere. You’ll be dining on fresh seafood, but before your entrée arrives, be sure to sample their tomato salad and the “Milos special” zucchini chips. It’s definitely not a staple on the McGill circuit, but if you’re a foodie or looking to celebrate something important, then Milos makes the short-list. $$$$$

2027 St. Laurent, 514-982-3724 It’s greasy and far from fantastic, but they serve totally satisfying Indian cuisine in the kind of laid-back environment that’s ideal for students. $$

Pushap 5195 Pare, 514-274-3003 This cozy Indian restaurant near Namur metro requires a trek, but the long metro ride (and short walk afterwards) are certainly worth it if you’re looking to eat cheap. The vegetarian fare is filling, though far from gourmet. However, the real reason to go there is the cheap samo-

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sas (three for a dollar). $$

Italian L’Académie Two locations, including 4051 St. Denis, 514-849-2249 One of the top date spots among McGill students, L’Académie can be difficult to eat at on Friday nights due to the sheer number of people vying for a spot in line. A simple menu offers classic steak, veal, pasta, and mussels (which are much cheaper when ordered off the appetizer menu). It’s a good BYOW for a nice night out.

Amelio’s 201 Milton, 514-845-8396 Known among students as the top ghetto date spot, Amelio’s combines fine Italian food with a prime location on Milton at St. Famille. The line runs out the door many nights, but don’t worry – it goes quickly. Some favourites include their four cheese pizza and pan-prepared lasagna, and of course it’s BYOW. $$$

Euro Deli 3619 St. Laurent, 514-843-7853 Need a quick Italian fix? Then Euro Deli’s your dealer. They specialize in popular Tuscan delights ranging from lasagna to large buffalo mozzarella. You can enjoy your meal in their trendy St. Laurent store front location, or take it to go. They even have tiramisu and an array of popular Italian soft-drinks. $$

Le Petit Italien 1265 Bernard, 514-278-0888 Deep in the heart of Outremont, Le Petit Italian stands out among the neighbourhood’s many restaurants. Their modern atmosphere is juxtaposed with the gourmet Italian fare that could rival anything served in Bologna. Their mushroom risotto with a glass of red wine is the perfect way to end a cold Montreal day. $$$$$

Pasta e Basta 896 Sherbrooke W., 514-288-7874 It may look a little sketchy, but if you’re

aching for a quick bite around campus, Pasta e Basta does great panini, pasta, and calzones. The prices are a bit high, but there is a 15% discount for students. Just avoid it at lunchtime, when the restaurant is swamped with suits from downtown scarfing down pasta trio specials. $$$

Japanese Odaki 3977 St. Laurent, 514-282-1268 If you’re a huge sushi fan and literally cannot get enough, no matter how big your maki set or bento box, then you must visit Odaki. A little on the pricey side, you should prepare for an evening there by skipping lunch and mid-afternoon snacking. Odaki is all you can eat from miso soup to chicken teriyaki, and all seaweedwrapped things in between. $$$$

Kanda 2045 Bishop, 514-845-8868 Good all you can eat sushi, with chefs preparing the food right in front of you. In addition to basic sushi items (maki, sashimi, etc.), tempura, teriyaki chicken, and salmon are all included in the set price. Go here hungry, and it’s cheaper at lunch. $$$

Yoy 4526 St. Denis, 514-844-9884 Yoy manages to provide all things at once for the insomniac student. Yes, they have sushi and sahimi, Thai noodles, spare ribs, and even green tea ice cream. But the real game-changer is that they have a full espresso bar, bake their own croissants, are open 24 hours, and have free wireless internet. $-$$

Mexican Carlos and Pepes 1420 Peel, 514-288-3090 With cheap tacos on Mondays, drink specials all week long, and margaritas the size of your head, this is a student-friendly spot. The lower dining room is more formal, but if you walk upstairs it’s a fiesta for students with free chips and salsa at every table! $$

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Marché Andes 4387 St. Laurent, 514-848-1078 The closest thing you’ll get to Tex-Mex in Montreal. Appetizing taco trios stuffed with vegetarian black beans or meat, and your choice of fine salsas, avocado, and cheese. It’s also a grocery store, so grab some cold Jarritos Tamarindo to wash it down, or pick up some charras and frijoles refritos for easy tostadas at home. $

Maria Bonita 5269 Casgrain, 514-807-4377 Probably the city’s best Mexican restaurant, if you’re willing to dish out the money. The highlight is definitely the cazuelitas, which are kind of like tapas served with tiny tortillas for scooping. The cohinita pibil is heavenly, as are some of their vegetarian dishes. $$$$

Pakistani Halal 786 786 Jean-Talon, 514-270-0786 Do you like spicy, greasy food? Then this is the Pakistani place for you. It’s worth the trek to Parc Ex, even for the staunchest McGill ghetto kid. Highlights include the mustard greens with chickpeas and whole hot peppers. And as the name implies, everything is Halal. $$

Persian Café Rumi 5198 Hutchinson, 514-490-1999 Located on the border of Mile End and Outremont (just up the street from Fairmount Bagels), Cafe Rumi is a well-known stop for locals and tourists alike. Though a bit on the pricey side, the warm ambiance and generous portions make it ideal for a dinner out. The mezzes are especially good, and the lamb and chicken mains are infused with apricots, dates, and citrus. $$$$

Portugese and Spanish Janos 3883 St. Laurent, 514-849-0646 Delicious Portugese food. Try the simple yet spectacular quarter chicken, with Por-

tugese chips instead of fries. Everything comes with fresh olives and a salad appetizer, and make sure you lather on plenty of their special sauce on both the meat and the chips. $$$-$$$$

Rotisserie Romados 115 Rachel E., 514-849-1803 You’re standing in line, chatting with friends. You order a quarter chicken with fries and salad, get your soda, pay, and head to the park up the street for the most mind-blowing chicken this side of the Atlantic. $$

Sala Rossa 4848 St. Laurent, 514-284-0122 Montreal isn’t known for Spanish restaurants, but Sala Rossa is a good choice. It has the advantage of being open relatively late and serving great sandwiches and tapas, with plenty of vegetarian options. $$$

Soup & Sandwich Casa del Popolo 4873 St. Laurent, 514-284-3804 Every sunny evening not spent on Casa’s back patio with a sandwich and a pint is an evening lost. The happy hour deals are amazing, the coffee’s cheap, and the food is the kind you actually feel good eating. $$

The Main Deli 3864 St. Laurent, 514-843-8126 This deli across from Schwartz’s gets a bad rap - it’s a good alternative with a shorter line. And ask about their take-out special: $15 gets you 1lb smoked meat, 1lb coleslaw, 1lb potato salad or three latkes, 1lb chopped liver, a loaf of bread, and a pickle. $$

Navarino 5563 Parc, 514-279-7725 Although there are plenty of cafés and bakeries in Mile End, this Greek one is fantastic, particularly in the winter. All of their pastries are special, and you can also get very decent (and cheap) lunch and coffee. $

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Pagel

Wilensky’s

231 St. Viateur W., 514-271-3082 This Mile End bakery has amazing pastries, breads, cakes, chocolates, and Sicilian pizza. There are tables inside and out, so eating there is always an option. It’s the Mile-End version of the Plateau’s Patisserie Belge (just below Milton on Parc), but even better. $-$$

34 Fairmount W., 514-271-0247 A landmark immortalized in Mordecai Richler novels, it’s been family-owned for 75 years. The staff can be frank with newcomers, but they warm quickly. Their flagship sandwich is “The Special,” a grillpressed onion roll filled with assorted meats. Visitors are expected to have one. It must come with mustard. Their oldfashioned frappés and unbeatable sodas are hand-mixed. $

Santropol 3990 St. Urbain, 514-842-3110 Located on the south-east corner of Parc Jeanne-Mance, this café is known for their gargantuan and unorthodox sandwiches, served with a variety of coffees, teas, and milkshakes. An ideal choice only when you’re not in a rush because the service is slow, but at least they don’t mind if you loiter for long stretches of time. $$

Schwartz’s 3895 St. Laurent, 514-842-4813 If you do nothing else while you’re in Montreal, eat at Schwartz’s. There is no smoked meat sandwich better than a Schwartz’s smoked meat sandwich. There’ll be lines out the door but it’s worth the wait. Don’t even bother looking at the menu until you’ve already been here a few times - just order the smoked meat with fries and a cherry cola, and dig in.

SoupeSoup Two locations, including 80 Duluth E., 514-380-0880 If you like soup, go here for lunch. Even if you don’t, you can get excellent sandwiches. But be sure to arrive before 2 pm, or else you’ll be disappointed: by then, nearly every menu item has been (distressingly) crossed off their wall menu, which is written in chalk every morning. $$

Super Sandwich Corner Sherbrooke and Peel Close to campus in the basement of Le Cartier, this sandwich counter in the building’s dépanneur has much to recommend it: good prices, decent selection, and friendly staff who memorize your order after a few visits. $

Vegetarian Aux Vivres 4631 St. Laurent, 514-842-3479 If you’re vegan, this will be your favourite restaurant in the city. Absolutely everything is vegan, ranging from the tasty vegelox to their smoothies. Some of the bowls are a little bland but, if you’re into kale and the like, you’ll probably be pretty happy with them too. $$$

Le Cagibi 5490 St. Laurent, 514-948-3303 Formerly Pharmacie Esperanza, the Cagibi maintains an all-vegetarian, all-delicious menu, including great dinner and brunch specials, stunning baked goods, great coffee, and a hearty selection of booze. The atmosphere is super relaxed: the foundobject decor and huge ‘zine library make it easy to lose an afternoon as your coffees turn into whisky shots. $-$$

Chu Chai 4088 St. Denis, 514-843-4194 Shrimp, duck, chicken, beef – all fake? It sounds bizarre, and while it may not taste like chicken, their bean curd creations still taste like something sent from heaven. They also have simpler dishes like Pad Thai and mushroom dumplings, if you aren’t a believer. $$$-$$$$

Le Commensal Various locations, including 1204 McGill College, 514-871-1480 It’s vegetarian self-serve heaven. Commensal offers a wide range of food, from Kashmir rice to couscous to avocado-or-

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ange salad. However, be smart when you serve yourself: the lighter the food you choose, the cheaper your plate will be. A smart Commensal eater will pay only $7 for a satisfying plate, while someone whose eyes are bigger than their stomach can easily see it go up to $15 or $20. Don’t forget to ask for the student discount! $$$

La Faim du Monde 4110 St. Denis, 514-906-0432 Move over Aux Vivres – there’s a new game in town. With rich, earthy flavours, Faim du Monde satisfies your hunger with a seasonal menu filled with tasty options. The soups and homemade vege-paté are unbeatable, and try the samosas and vegan desserts to go. $-$$$

Lola Rosa 545 Milton, 514-287-9337 This gem located only a block away from the Milton Gates offers up vegetarian fare that is fresh and tasty—you’ll never leave with a heavy stomach. The ratatouille is a stellar choice on a cold winter’s night, while the easy-on-the-grease nachos are a consistently tasty option. They also do breakfast, providing a delicious alternative to Chez Cora or Place Milton any day. $$$

Spirite Lounge 1201 Ontario E., 514-522-5353 If its name hasn’t already given you an idea of what to expect, this vegan joint on the edge of the Village is the wildest place that you can dine in Montreal – hands down! From the tinfoil on the wall to the exotic plants, you’ll feel like you’re tripping on LSD in some far-away place. What’s more, the food is delicious, but be sure to eat everything on your plate. Otherwise, the owner will make it clear that you’re not welcome back. $$$

Yuan 400 Sherbrooke E., 514-848-0513 This vegetarian restaurant specializes in fake meat, though that’s something of a misnomer. Dishes such General Tao VegeChicken aren’t made to taste like meat – it’s just that the various vegetarian pro-

teins (mostly soy-based) are cooked the same way meat is. The results are unique and delicious, and the prices are reasonable. $$$

Vietnamese Chez Van 288 Laurier W., 514-278-6753 This Mile End BYOW restaurant combines a good menu and an affordable prix fixe. Whether you start with a hot Tonkin soup or a cold spring roll, the warm and friendly atmosphere will leave you coming back for more. $$$

Le Clafouti 2122 Drummond, 514-272-5339 The widest selection of meats and cheese, along with the cheapest prices of any Vietnamese sandwich shop in town. Plus the baguettes are fresh and perfect, and occasionally available in whole wheat. This downtown treasure is popular, so avoid the lunch rush. $

Zyng 1748 St. Denis, 514 284 2016 Another one of those trendy stir-fry places where you can design your own meal or order from the smaller menu. The portions aren’t huge, but the service is quick and the atmosphere is great when the place gets busy. The location means it’s suited for a quick bite before you head out to the bar. $$$

BARS & CLUBS McGill Ghetto Bar des Pins 3714 Parc Known as BDP for short, this place is everything you could want in a dive bar: cheap beer, washed-out regulars, pool and foosball tables, and weekly beer pong tournaments (Tuesdays). Its proximity to campus, and especially to New Rez, make this watering hole a weekly destination for some students. They also have cheap food, although few people have ever tried it.

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Benelux 245 Sherbrooke W. This bank-turned-microbrewery opened three years ago and quickly became a hit with students, boasting great drink specials (two pints for $7.75 on Wednesdays), the best smoked almonds around, and a private room inside the old vault. Come with a group of friends for a relaxed evening or come to watch the game during playoffs.

Gerts Shatner building, in the basement Your friendly campus bar, with the cheapest drink specials around, a pool table, delicious pizza and zatar from Al Taib during the day, and student group parties hosted here nearly every night. The music is either great or totally bizarre, and there’s occasionally live jazz. Also, big screens are available to watch whatever game happens to be on.

in this place is playing pool in the back! This Montreal institution has been frequented by such rockers as the Foo Fighters and Nirvana in past years. Bifteck’s cheap pitchers and super-salty free keeps the clientele satisfied year-long. You’ll be bound to run into everyone you know

Billy Kun 354 Mont Royal E. What’s better than drinking cheap beer in an eclectic bar adorned with stuffed ostriches? Doing so while listening to some damn fine jazz music.

Blue Dog 3958 St. Laurent This new locale has become an instant hit among McGill students. With cheap beer and a retro-funk atmosphere, everyone will be pleased. Sex tape Fridays with DJ Kid Legit are where it’s at these days.

Dieu du Ciel

The Main and the Plateau B-Side 3616 St. Laurent One of St. Laurent’s many clubs, B-Side may not strike you as anything special with its mirrored street-side window adornment, but a young and hot crew can stir it up on Friday night. With a DJ playing hits from the 90s and a long bar, the entire place is electric, especially when a classic track hits the deck. It also has an awesome rooftop terrace for you to cool down on a sweaty September night.

Barfly 4062 St. Laurent Possible the grungiest of the Main’s dive bars, the Barfly plays host to an eclectic mix of music. Whether it’s roots rock, heavy metal, or the legendary Sundayevening bluegrass sessions, it’s a reliable haunt if you want some tunes with your beer.

Bifteck 3702 St. Laurent Don’t let the name fool you – the only meat

29 Laurier W. A microbrewery with delicious seasonal offerings, it has a great atmosphere and beer selection. But get there early if you want to relax a bit, as it gets crowded quickly.

Frappé 3900 St. Laurent Huge and oddly empty. The drinks are reasonable, and there are lots of pool tables if that’s your thing. There’s also a foosball table and a huge upstairs terrace – this is a great place to go with a large group of friends.

Tokyo 3709 St. Laurent Known for its “Tokyo Thursdays,” this upstairs club has the biggest line and the shortest skirts of any club on the Main. Why? Because everyone sitting in your Leacock 132 class tomorrow morning is going to be there! This is the Thursday night see-and-be-seen spot of McGill. The DJs play popular tracks and the drinks are reasonably priced. The best strategy is to arrive early, relax on the amazing roof-top terraces, dance the rest of the night away,

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Cock’n’Bull

and leave alone.

Vol de Nuit 14 Prince Arthur Cheap beer, decent music from the 80s and 90s, and big screens if you’re there for a game. It’s a great dive bar, with a terrace right on the cobblestones of Prince Arthur.

The Latin Quarter

1944 St. Catherine W. Why Cock’n’Bull? Cheap Alexander Keith’s on tap, and Mondays are arts and crafts nights. They provide the supplies and the theme varies from week to week, from collages to popsicle stick art. They also offer Tuesday-night bingo nights and Wednesday-night karaoke. It’s popular with the Solin crowd because of its proximity.

McKibbins

Bar Baloos 403 Ontario E. Imagine Bifteck, just twice as large with live music and a dance floor in the basement. The popcorn is just as salty, the beer is just as cheap, and you can ditch the McGill dive-bar crowd in favour of the UQAM dive-bar crowd.

1426 Bishop Two bars in one! The main floor is an Irish pub with live music, good food, and average prices. Upstairs, there’s a dance floor that’s often packed – especially on Wednesdays, which is an open-bar ladies night.

The Old Dublin

La Distillerie 300 Ontario E. A low-key bar that creates amazing concoctions in mason jars that are often stronger than necessary – if there is such a thing. Bring a date here to impress them with how well you know the Montreal bar scene, but expect a line!

636 Cathcart A classic Irish pub with a great selection of beers, everyone you know will be there on St. Patrick’s Day. Their new location is much nicer than the old one, and save some money by using the coupons in this handbook (look for the green divider).

Peel Pub

St. Sulpice 680 St. Denis The most popular place to drink in Montreal when it’s warm. It boasts a patio almost as big as lower field filled with every type of Montrealer. You will end up here on the last day of exams in April, because it’s the only place that fits everyone you know. And here’s a hint: sneak in through the hot dog place on the south side of the bar if the line out front is too long.

Downtown Brutopia 1219 Crescent A brewpub that caters mostly to university students, you can get many house beers for $5.50 per pint. It also has a live music, decent food, and a friendly staff. They have happy hour all night on Mondays, along with pub trivia where you can win free beer.

1196 Peel Love it or hate it, Peel Pub is an institution among the McGill first-year scene. It offers cheap drinks, Thursday-night dancing, and you’ll see most of your friends there. If you stop by during waking hours, try their kitchen’s fare – it’s cheap and quite good.

The Village Le Drugstore 1366 St. Catherine E. This place has been around for ages and has managed to stay popular while almost much every other lesbian-oriented bar has closed. The crowd is truly diverse in every sense of the term (from twinky fashionistas to middle-aged lesbians and CEGEP punk-rock dykes) and it has some of the cheapest pitchers in the city on weekdays – not to mention two terraces, a dancefloor, and a number of pooltables spread out over six floors.

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Parking 296 Amherst Located in the heart of the Village, Parking’s Thursday nights attract a great crowd of young Montrealers who love to dance. For the ladies, it’s also your only night to party in this exclusively male joint. By inviting the best international DJs, offering drink specials, and charging a reasonable cover, Parking has carved a reputation for partying in Montreal.

Sky Pub 1474 St. Catherine E. If Thursday nights in the Village should be spent at Parking, then Friday nights are best spent at Sky. This four-floor complex has the capacity for thousands, but on Friday the third floor cabaret is where it’s at. With great music that spans the decades, it’s a good spot to get to know the person you’re grinding up against.

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1MondayAUGUST/AOUT Mon/ Tue/ Lun Mar

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AO没T

24 Monday lundi

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Discover McGill

Faculty Frosh Open Air Pub starts


AUGUST

27 Thursday jeudi

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Friday vendredi

29 Saturday samedi

SSMU Frosh RAD Frosh

30 Sunday dimanche

SSMU Frosh RAD Frosh

“It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.” - Walt Disney

Faculty Frosh

Faculty Frosh

TO DO: (or maybe not)


AUGUST/ août

31 Monday lundi

01

Tuesday mardi

02 Wednesday mercredi

Day of rest, no classes

First Day of Classes Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00


SEPTEMBER/ SEPTEMBRE

“When a thing is funny, search it carefully for a hidden truth.” -George Bernard Shaw

03 Thursday jeudi

04

Friday vendredi

05 Saturday samedi 06 Sunday dimanche

Last Day of OAP

TO DO: (or maybe not)


SEPTEMBRE

07

Monday lundi

Labour Day, no class

08

Tuesday mardi

Poster sale in Shatner building

09 Wednesday mercredi

Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00


SEPTEMBER

10 Thursday jeudi

11

“Do not fight verbosity with words: speech is given to all, intelligence to few.� - Moralia

Friday vendredi

12 Saturday samedi 13 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


SEPTEMBRE

14 Monday lundi

Activities Night (4pm-9pm)

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Tuesday mardi

Movies in the Park

****COURSE CHANGE/ ADD DROP DEADLINE**** Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00

16 Wednesday mercredi

Movies in the Park


SEPTEMBER

17 Thursday jeudi

18

Friday vendredi

19 Saturday samedi Rosh Hashanah End of Ramadan

20 Sunday dimanche

“I have come to the conclusion that politics are too serious a matter to be left to the politicians.� -Charles de Gaulle

Movies in the Park

Rosh Hashanah begins at sunset.

TO DO: (or maybe not)


SEPTEMBRE

21 Monday lundi

22

Tuesday mardi

23 Wednesday mercredi

Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00


SEPTEMBER

24 Thursday jeudi

25

“I pay no attention whatever to anybody’s praise or blame. I simply follow my own feelings.” -Mozart

SSMU Volunteer Fair

Friday vendredi

26 Saturday samedi 27 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBRE

1Monday 28

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Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00

Monday lundi

Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 30 December

Wednesday mercredi

200


OCTOBER OCTOBRE

“Your name doesn`t give a damn, it`s your talent and feelings that matter.” - Jimi Hendrix

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TO DO: (or maybe not)


OCTOBRE

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07 Wednesday mercredi

Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00

McGill Study Abroad Fair


OCTOBER

“Politics is the skilled use of blunt objects.” - Lester B. Pearson

08 Thursday jeudi

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10 Saturday samedi 11 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


OCTOBRE

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Thanksgiving, no classes

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Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00

Tuesday mardi

14 Wednesday mercredi


OCTOBER

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McGill Homecoming

McGill Homecoming

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McGill Homecoming

18 Sunday dimanche

“I hate quotations. Tell me what you know.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

McGill Homecoming

TO DO: (or maybe not)


OCTOBRE Monday 1Monday 19 lundi

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3Wednesdsay 21 December

Wednesday mercredi

200

Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00


OCTOBER

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“Whatever you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it.� -Ghandi

Friday vendredi

24 Saturday samedi 25 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


OCTOBER OCTOBRE

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28 Wednesday mercredi

Farmers’ Market 11:30-4:00

SSMU Presents: 4FLOORS


NOVEMBER NOVEMBRE

29 Thursday jeudi

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“I told my psychiatrist that everyone hates me. He said I was being ridiculous - everyone hasn’t met me yet.” -Rodney Dangerfield

Friday vendredi

Saturday 31 samedi Halloween

01 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


NOVEMBRE

02 Monday lundi

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Tuesday mardi

04 Wednesday mercredi


NOVEMBER

“In politics, absurdity is not a handicap.� - Napoleon Bonaparte

05 Thursday jeudi

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Friday vendredi

07 Saturday samedi 08 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


NOVEMBRE

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11 Wednesday mercredi

Remembrance Day


NOVEMBER

“Whatever you are, be a good one.” -Abraham Lincoln

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Friday vendredi

14 Saturday samedi 15 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


NOVEMBRE

16 Monday lundi

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Tuesday mardi

18 Wednesday mercredi


NOVEMBER

19 Thursday jeudi

20

“I love deadlines. I like the whoosing sound they make as they fly by.” -Douglas Adams

Friday vendredi

21 Saturday samedi 22 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


NOVEMBRE

23 Monday lundi

24

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25 Wednesday mercredi


NOVEMBER

26 Thursday jeudi

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“Friendship with oneself is allimportant, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else in the world.� -Eleanor Roosevelt

American Thanksgiving

Friday vendredi

28 Saturday samedi 29 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


NOVEMBER NOVEMBRE

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01

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02 Wednesday mercredi


DECEMBER DÉCEMBRE

“Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another: What! You too? I thought I was the only one.” -C.S. Lewis

03 Thursday jeudi Monday schedule, last day of classes

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05 Saturday samedi 06 Sunday dimanche

STUDY DAY

TO DO: (or maybe not)


DÉCEMBRE

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Fall exam period begins


DECEMBER

“We are time`s subjets and time bids be gone.� - William Shakespeare

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12 Saturday samedi

Hanukkah begins

13 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


DÉCEMBRE Monday 1Monday 14 lundi

2Tuesday 15 Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 16 December

Wednesday mercredi

200


DECEMBER

17 Thursday jeudi

18

“Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.� -Aristotle

Friday vendredi

19 Saturday samedi 20 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


DÉCEMBRE

21 Monday lundi

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23 Wednesday mercredi


DECEMBER

24 Thursday jeudi

25

Friday vendredi

26 Saturday samedi Boxing Day

27 Sunday dimanche

“A great artist is always before his time or behind it.” - George Edward Moore

Winter vacation begins

Christmas Day

TO DO: (or maybe not)


DECEMBER DÉCEMBRE

28 Monday lundi

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JANUARY JANVIER

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01

Friday vendredi

02 Saturday samedi 03 Sunday dimanche

“Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten.” - B.F. Skinner

New Year’s Eve

Welcome to 2010! New Year’s Day

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JANVIER

04 Monday lundi

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Tuesday mardi

06 Wednesday mercredi

Winter term begins


JANUARY

07 Thursday jeudi

08

“A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both.� Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday vendredi

09 Saturday samedi 10 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JANVIER

11 Monday lundi

12

Tuesday mardi

13 Wednesday mercredi


JANUARY

14 Thursday jeudi

15

“ I am accustomed to sleep and in my dreams to imagine the same things that lunatics imagine when awake.” -René Descartes

Friday vendredi

16 Saturday samedi 17 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JANVIER

18 Monday lundi

19

Tuesday mardi

20 Wednesday mercredi

COURSE CHANGE - ADD/DROP DEADLINE


JANUARY

“Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.” -Oscar Wilde

21 Thursday jeudi

22

Friday vendredi

23 Saturday samedi 24 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JANVIER

25 Monday lundi

26

Tuesday mardi

27 Wednesday mercredi


JANUARY

28 Thursday jeudi

29

“An artist is somebody who produces things that people don’t have to have.” -Andy Warhol

Friday vendredi

30 Saturday samedi 31 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


FÉVRIER

01 Monday lundi

Black History Month begins

02

Groundhog Day

Tuesday mardi

03 Wednesday mercredi


FEBRUARY

04 Thursday jeudi

05

“ Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.� -Victor Hugo

Friday vendredi

06 Saturday samedi 07 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


FÉVRIER

08 Monday lundi

09

Tuesday mardi

10 Wednesday mercredi


FEBRUARY

“The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.” -Aristotle

11 Thursday jeudi

12

Friday vendredi

13 Saturday samedi 14 Sunday dimanche

Valentine’s Day Chinese New Year

TO DO: (or maybe not)


FÉVRIER Monday 1Monday 15 lundi

2Tuesday 16 Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 17 December

Wednesday mercredi

200

Ash Wednesday


FEBRUARY

“ It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” -Henry David Thoreau

18 Thursday jeudi

19

Friday vendredi

20 Saturday samedi 21 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


FÉVRIER

22

Monday lundi

23

Tuesday mardi

24 Wednesday mercredi

READING WEEK STUDY BREAK

READING WEEK STUDY BREAK

READING WEEK STUDY BREAK


FEBRUARY

25 Thursday jeudi

26

Friday vendredi

27 Saturday samedi 28 Sunday dimanche Purim

“Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things that escape those who dream only at night.” - Edgar Allan Poe

READING WEEK STUDY BREAK

READING WEEK STUDY BREAK Mawlid al-Nabi

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MARS

01 Monday lundi

02

Tuesday mardi

03 Wednesday mercredi


MARCH

“Because things are the way they are, things will not stay the way they are.� - Bertolt Brecht

04 Thursday jeudi

05

Friday vendredi

06 Saturday samedi 07 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MARS

08 Monday lundi

09

Tuesday mardi

10 Wednesday mercredi


MARCH

“Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.” -Confucius

11 Thursday jeudi

12

Friday vendredi

13 Saturday samedi 14 Sunday dimanche Daylight Savings time begins

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MARS

15 Monday lundi

16

Tuesday mardi

17 Wednesday mercredi

St. Patrick’s Day


MARCH

18 Thursday jeudi

19

“ If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There’s no point in being a damn fool about it.” - W.C. Fields

Friday vendredi

20 Saturday samedi 21 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MARS

22 Monday lundi

23

Tuesday mardi

24 Wednesday mercredi


MARCH

“ I came, I saw, I conquered.” - Julius Caesar

25 Thursday jeudi

26

Friday vendredi

27 Saturday samedi 28 Sunday dimanche Palm Sunday

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MARCH MARS

29 Monday lundi

30

Tuesday mardi

31 Wednesday mercredi

First day of Passover


APRIL AVRIL

01 Thursday jeudi

02

Friday vendredi

03 Saturday samedi 04 Sunday dimanche

“ Success is a lousy teacher. It seduces smart people into thinking they can’t lose.” - Bill Gates

April Fools Day

Good Friday, no classes

TO DO: (or maybe not)


AVRIL

05

Monday lundi

06

Tuesday mardi

07 Wednesday mercredi

Easter Monday, no classes


APRIL

“Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils.� -Louis-Hector Berlioz

08 Thursday jeudi

09

Friday vendredi

10 Saturday samedi 11 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


AVRIL Monday 1Monday 12 lundi

2Tuesday 13 Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 14 December

Wednesday mercredi

200

Last day of lectures


APRIL

15 Thursday jeudi

16

“I’ve seen a heap of trouble in my life, and most of it never came to pass.” -Mark Twain

Exams begin

Friday vendredi

17 Saturday samedi 18 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


AVRIL

19 Monday lundi

20

Tuesday mardi

21 Wednesday mercredi


APRIL

22 Thursday jeudi

23

“A man can do only what a man can do. But if he does that each day, he can sleep at night and do it again the next day.” -Albert Schweitzer

Earth Day

Friday vendredi

24 Saturday samedi 25 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


APRIL AVRIL Monday 1Monday 26 lundi

2Tuesday 27 Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 28 December

Wednesday mercredi

200

Earth Hour (9pm-10pm)


MAY MAI

“Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.” -Frank Zappa

29 Thursday jeudi

30

Friday vendredi

Last day of exams

OAP Lite

01 Saturday samedi 02 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MAI

03 Monday lundi

04

Tuesday mardi

05 Wednesday mercredi


MAY

“Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.” -Benjamin Franklin

06 Thursday jeudi

07

Friday vendredi

08 Saturday samedi 09 Sunday dimanche Mother’s Day

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MAI

10 Monday lundi

11

Tuesday mardi

12 Wednesday mercredi


MAY

“A man can do as he wills, but not will as he wills.� -Arthur Schopenhauer

13 Thursday jeudi

14

Friday vendredi

15 Saturday samedi 16 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MAI

17 Monday lundi

18

Tuesday mardi

19 Wednesday mercredi


MAY

20 Thursday jeudi

21

“Without music to decorate it, time is just a bunch of boring production deadlines or dates by which bills must be paid.� -Frank Zappa

Friday vendredi

22 Saturday samedi 23 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MAI Monday 1Monday 24 lundi

2Tuesday 25 Tuesday Lecturesmardi end

3Wednesdsay 26 December

Wednesday mercredi

200

Victoria Day


MAY

“It is the dull man who is always sure, and the sure man who is always dull.� -H.L. Mencken

27 Thursday jeudi

28

Friday vendredi

29 Saturday samedi 30 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


MAY MAI

31 Monday lundi

01

Tuesday mardi

02 Wednesday mercredi


JUNE JUIN

“It’s taken me all my life to learn what not to play.” —Dizzy Gillespie

03 Thursday jeudi

04

Friday vendredi

05 Saturday samedi 06 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JUIN

07 Monday lundi

08

Tuesday mardi

09 Wednesday mercredi


JUNE

“Do not fear mistakes. There are none.� -Miles Davis

10 Thursday jeudi

11

Friday vendredi

12 Saturday samedi 13 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JUIN

14 Monday lundi

15

Tuesday mardi

16 Wednesday mercredi


JUNE

“Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” -Vincent Van Gogh

17 Thursday jeudi

18

Friday vendredi

19 Saturday samedi 20 Sunday dimanche Father’s Day

TO DO: (or maybe not)


JUIN

21 Monday lundi

22

Tuesday mardi

23 Wednesday mercredi


JUNE

24 Thursday jeudi

25

“A mind is like a parachute - it doesn’t work if it isn’t open.” -Frank Zappa

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day

Friday vendredi

26 Saturday samedi 27 Sunday dimanche

TO DO: (or maybe not)


A

B

C

1

N

Campus map McGill University 2 Royal Victoria Hospital Allan Memorial Institute

101

3

Bus

Montreal General Hospital

154

Pin e Bus 144

126

174

155

113

196

127

148

173

117

147

Rutherford Reservoir

168

166 137 132

111

149

167

231

122

Bus 144

d

Bu

s

4 14

112

198

190 103

Peel

Stanley

152 236

Bus 107

138 145 187 213 151 136 140 192 191

165

172

123

131

179

150

McTavish Gates

Drummond

Mountain

Newman Centre

124

112

182

Dr. Pen fiel

4

1

10

197

188

194

156

229

McTavish

175

128

161

144

130 163

118 181

17

129 104 114 135 185

143

5

170

178

158

108

110

11

102 Bus 24

C

186

Victoria

McGill College

B

Mansfield

A

Metcalfe

6

Peel

Solin Hall Residence 146

Roddick Gates

Sherbrooke

McCord Museum

2


C

D

116

Tennis Courts

133

N

105

221

134

Forbes Field 227

125

106 Molson Stadium Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital 159

Royal Victoria Hospital

139

184 141

153 171

169

162

Bus

144 218 216 154

126 Prince Arthur

189

d

Durocher

Aylmer

124

112

123

198

131

Milton Gates

112

103

Lorne

176 109

197

University

229

130

United Theological College Milton Presbyterian College Montreal Diocesan College

118 177 Montreal High School 170 158 110 119 180 Roddick Gates

City Councillors

Aylmer

Union

McCord Museum

201

233

University

Victoria

McGill College

C

186

115

120

D

177177 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon ADAMS ADAMS Building Building 103103 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon desdes ARTS ARTS Building Building 113113 A3 A3 Pavillon Pavillon BEATTY BEATTY HallHall 124124 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon BIRKS BIRKS Building Building 185185 B5 B5 BOOKSTORE BOOKSTORE Librarie Librarie 102102 B5 B5 Pavillon Pavillon BRONFMAN BRONFMAN Building Building C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon BURNSIDE BURNSIDE 110110 1 HallHall 139139 D2 D2 Gymnase Gymnase CURRIE CURRIE Gymnasium Gymnasium 128128 A3 A3 Maison Maison DAVIS DAVIS House House 123123 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon DAWSON DAWSON HallHall 122122 B4 B4 Pavillon Pavillon CHANCELLOR CHANCELLOR DAY DAY MiddleHallHall (CDH) (CDH) Field 126126 C3 C3 Pavillon Pavillon DONNER DONNER Building Building 125125 D2 D2 Résidence Résidence DOUGLAS DOUGLAS HadHad 169169 D2 D2 Pavillon Pavillon de médicine de médicine DUFF DUFF Medical Medical Building Building 127127 B3 B3 Maison Maison DUGGAN DUGGAN House House 168168 B3 B3 Pavillon Pavillon de l’de EDUCATION l’ EDUCATION Building Building CLUB CLUB 129129 B5 B5 FACULTY FACULTY Cercie Cercie universitaire universitaire 2 197197 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon FERRIER FERRIER Building Building 133133 D1 D1 Résidence Résidence GARDNER GARDNER HallHall 149149 A3 A3 Maison Maison HOSMER HOSMER House House (HOSMER) (HOSMER) 132132 A3 A3 Annexe Annexe HOSMER HOSMER Annex Annex (MOSMCH) (MOSMCH) 167167 B4 B4 Maison Maison HUGESSON HUGESSON House House 112112 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon de de l’administration l’administration JAMES JAMES Administration Administration Building Building 112112 C4 C4 Annexe Annexe JAMES JAMES Annex Annex 150150 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon LEACOCK LEACOCK 3626 St-Urbain Building Building 3 183 119119 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon de chimie de chimie MAASS MAASS Chemistry Chemistry Building Building 130130 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon de génie de génie MACDONALD MACDONALD Engineering Engineering Building Building 118118 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon MACDONALD MACDONALD HARRINGTON HARRINGTON Building Building 170170 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon de la de la bibliothèque bibliothèque MACDONALD MACDONALD STEWART STEWART Library Library Building Building 156156 A4 A4 Maison Maison MARTLET MARTLET House House 131131 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon de génie de génie 4 McCONNELL McCONNELL Engineering Engineering Building Building 105105 D1 D1 Aréna Aréna McCONNELL McCONNELL Arena Arena 221221 D1 D1 Résidence Résidence McCONNELL McCONNELL HallHall 186186 C6 C6 Musée Musée McCORD McCORD Museum Museum 155155 B3 B3 Pavillon Pavillon desdes sciences sciences médicales médicales McINTYRE McINTYRE Medical Medical Building Building (MCMED) (MCMED) 108108 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon de la de la 5 bibliothèque bibliothèque McLENNAN McLENNAN Library Library Building Building 135135 B5 B5 McTAVISH, McTAVISH, 3430 3430 114114 B5 B5 McTAVISH, McTAVISH, 3434 3434 104104 B5 B5 McTAVISH, McTAVISH, 3438 3438 147147 B3 B3 Annexe Annexe MEREDITH MEREDITH Annex Annex 173173 B3 B3 Maison Maison CHARLES CHARLES MEREDITH MEREDITH House House (CDH) (CDH) 6 148148 B3 B3 Maison Maison LADY LADY MEREDITH MEREDITH House House (L.H.) (L.H.) 116116 D1 D1 Résidence Résidence MOLSON MOLSON HallHall

106106 D2 D2 Staked Staked MOLSON MOLSON Stadium Stadium 159159 D2 D2 MONTREAL MONTREAL NEUROLOGICAL NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE INSTITUTE Instituted Instituted Neurologic Neurologic de Montréal de Montréal 163163 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon MORRIE MORRIE HallHall 134134 D1 D1 Pavillon Pavillon Bishop Bishop MOUNTAIN MOUNTAIN HallHall 103103 C4 C4 Salle Salle MOOSE MOOSE HallHall 227227 D2 D2 OBSERVATOR OBSERVATOR Y Y Observatories Observatories 143143 B5 B5 PEEL, PEEL, 3437 3437 191191 B5 B5 PEEL, PEEL, 3459 3459 192192 B5 B5 PEEL, PEEL, 3463 3463 140140 B5 B5 PEEL, PEEL, 3465 3465 136136 B5 B5 PEEL, PEEL, 3475 3475 151151 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3479 3479 213213 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3483 3483 187187 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3487 3487 145145 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3491 3491 138138 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3495 3495 152152 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3511 3511 194194 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3647 3647 137137 B4 B4 PEEL, PEEL, 3661 3661 166166 B3 B3 PEEL, PEEL, 3674 3674 175175 B3 B3 PEEL, PEEL, 3690 3690 117117 B3 B3 PEEL, PEEL, 3715 3715 190190 B4 B4 PENFIELD, PENFIELD, 1085 1085 165165 B5 B5 Pavillon Pavillon PETERSON PETERSON HallHall 153153 D2 D2 desdes PINS, PINS, 505505 171171 D2 D2 desdes PINS, PINS, 509509 184184 D2 D2 desdes PINS, PINS, 515515 141141 D2 D2 desdes PINS, PINS, 517517 162162 D3 D3 desdes PINS, PINS, 546546 101101 B3 B3 desdes PINS, PINS, 1033 1033 196196 B3 B3 desdes PINS, PINS, 1140 1140 120120 D5 D5 Salle Salle POLLOCK POLLOCK HallHall 182182 B4 B4 Pavillon Pavillon desdes services services auxaux étudiants étudiants POWELL POWELL Student Student Services Services Building Building 158158 C5 C5 PULP PULP & PAPER & PAPER Research Research Centre Centre Centre Centre do recherche do recherche sur sur les les pâtes pâtes et papiers et papiers 174174 B3 B3 Pavillon Pavillon PURVIS PURVIS HallHall 161161 A4 A4 Maison Maison RABINOVITCH RABINOVITCH House House 178178 C5 C5 Pavillon Pavillon de la debibliothèque la bibliothèque REDPATH REDPATH Library Library Building Building 181181 C5 C5 Salle Salle REDPATH REDPATH HallHall 179179 C4 C4 Musée Musée REDPATH REDPATH Museum Museum 180180 D5 D5 Résidence Résidence ROYAL ROYAL VICTORIA VICTORIA COLLEGE COLLEGE Residence Residence 189189 C3 C3 Pavillon Pavillon de physique de physique RUTHERFORD RUTHERFORD Physics Physics Building Building 183183 SAINT SAINT URBAIN, URBAIN, 3626 3626 (Rue (Rue St. Urbain) St. Urbain) 201201 D6 D6 SHERBROOKE, SHERBROOKE, 550550 204204 C6 C6 SHERBROOKE, SHERBROOKE, 770770 146146 Résidence Résidence SOLIN SOLIN HallHall (Avenue (Avenue Lionel Lionel Groulx) Groulx) 111111 B4 B4 Pavillon Pavillon desdes sciences sciences biologique biologique STEWART STEWART Biology Biology Building Building (STBIO) (STBIO) 154154 C3 C3 Pavillon Pavillon d’anatomie d’anatomie et et de médicine de médicine dentaire dentaire STRATHCONA STRATHCONA Anatomy Anatomy & & Dentistry Dentistry Building Building 120120 D5 D5 Pavillon Pavillon do musique do musique STRATHCONA STRATHCONA Music Music Building Building 188188 B4 B4 Maison Maison THOMSON THOMSON House House 210210 C6 C6 UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY, 2020 2020 109109 C4 C4 UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY, 3534 3534 176176 C3 C3 UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY, 3550 3550 216216 D3 D3 UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY, 3641 3641 218218 D3 D3 UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY, 3647 3647 172172 B4 B4 UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY CENTRE CENTRE Centre Centre Universitaire Universitaire 115115 D5 D5 Piscine Piscine WESTON WESTON PoolPool 198198 C4 C4 Pavillon Pavillon WILSON WILSON HallHall 229229 C3 C3 Pavillon Pavillon WONG WONG Building Building


METRO MAP For bus routes and scheduling, check out www.stcum.qc.ca.

220


CONVERSIONS 101 Baking, Counting, doing homework - this chart should help you if you’ve always had problems with conversions. Distances 1 milliliter (ml) = 1 cubic centimeter (cc) 1 inch (in) = 2.54 centimeters (cm) 1 mile (m) = 1.6 kilometers (km) 1 foot (ft) = 12 inches (in) Volumes 1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 3 teaspoons (tsp) 1/16 cup (c) = 1 tablespoon 1/8 cup = 2 tablespoons 1/6 cup = 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons 1/4 cup = 4 tablespoons 1/3 cup = 5 tablespoons + 1 teaspoon 3/8 cup = 6 tablespoons 1/2 cup = 8 tablespoons 2/3 cup = 10 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons 3/4 cup = 12 tablespoons 1 cup = 48 teaspoons 1 cup= 16 tablespoons 8 fluid ounces (fl oz) = 1 cup 1 pint (pt) = 2 cups 1 quart (qt) = 2 pints 4 cups = 1 quart 1 gallon (gal) = 4 quarts 16 ounces (oz) = 1 pound (lb)

Multiply

By

To Get...

Fluid Ounces

29.57

grams

Ounces (dry)

28.35

grams

Grams

0.0353

ounces

Grams

0.0022

pounds

Kilograms

2.21

pounds

Pounds

453.6

grams

Pounds

0.4536

kilograms

Quarts

0.946

litres

Quarts (dry)

67.2

cubic inches

Quarts (liquid)

57.7

cubic inches

Litres

1.0567

quarts

Gallons

3785

cubic centimeters

Gallons

3.785

litres

221

Temperature Conversion Celcius = c Fahrenheit = F C = (5/9) x ( F-32) Ex. 100 degree F C = (5/9) x (100 - 32) C = (5/9) x 68 C = 37.774 There! Now you can convert temperatures and win trivia matches!


NOTES

222


PERSONAL CONTACTS Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

Name: E-mail:

Phone:

223


EPILOGUE After a long and eventful university adventure, you find yourself clinging to the flagpole at the top of the Arts Building, having been chased across town by a mob of angry Live Action Role-Players from Tam-Tams, and a few Concordia students. Clearly, this is a dire situation. However, just as you’re about to give up hope, William Shatner swoops in, riding on the back of a giant martlet. He rescues you from the clutches of the mob and you fly off to safety. “Thank you Mr. Shatner,” you say. He gives you a puzzled look. “Who is this Mr. Shatner of whom you speak?” he asks. “I’m Captain James T. Kirk, of the USS Enterprise.” You explain that Captain Kirk is in fact a fictional character from the television series Star Trek, who is portrayed by the esteemed actor and spoken-word performer William Shatner. “Balderdash!” he replies. “If I’m fictional, how did I just rescue you from that angry mob?” That last question has you stumped, but it doesn’t matter much. Given your lack of faith, Captain Kirk has decided to turn you back over to the mob, which spells the end of Life at McGill for you. There aren’t many good ways to go, but being fatally pummeled with cardboard swords may be the worst. Next time, perhaps you won’t ask so many questions of the starship captain riding on a giant mythical bird.

THE END This handbook was designed, edited, and produced by Bernard Rudny and Julia Webster for the Students’ Society of McGill University. The editors would like to thank Dallas Bentley, Alana Boileau, Samantha Cook, Katasoho Design and Printing, Sarah Olle, Max Silverman, Matthew Ward, and everyone else who contributed to the production of this handbook. This handbook is published by the Students’ Society of McGill University. The opinions expressed in this handbook are strictly those of the contributors, and do not necessarily represent those of the Students’ Society or McGill University.

224


Dr. Javid Musevi, D.M.D. Dr. Annie Benlolo, D.M.D. Dr. S. Heydari, B.S.C., D.M.D.


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info@mpbc.ca Te;.: 514-694-8751 Fax: 514-694-6869

www.mpbcommunications.com ISO 9001-2000

C.E. TRANSPORT SERVICES INC. 5 VALOIS BAY POINTE CLAIRE, QUEBEC 514-695-3227


10% DISCOUNT WITH McGILL ID. TERRASSE EXTÉRIEURE

BAR SALON FRAPPE MONDAYS AT FRAPPE’S FREE POOL FROM 1PM TO 3AM SPECIALS BEER ON TAP-BOTTLES 2 FOR 8 FRAPPES ALL WEEK 2 FLOORS - TERRASSE FOR 200 PEOPLE SPECIALS FOR GROUPS OVER 70 PEOPLE D.J. WEEKENDS 3900 boul. St-Laurent, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1Y2 CONTACT LIONEL 514-289-9462 CELL 514-240-8015 WWW.BARSTLAURENTFRAPPE.COM


BREAKFAST SPECIALS ALL DAY $4.75

FREE DELIVERY

625 Milton

514-845-8011 • 514-845-8382 www.mcgillpizza.com

STUDENT SPECIAL Show your student I.D. and receive 10% off your purchase at this location only, 705 rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest QUIZNOS EATON CENTRE

WOK Café

1845 Ste. Catherine O.. Montréal, QC. Tél/Fax: (514) 938-1882 www.wokcafe.cjb.net


10%

Discount with “Student” I.D. On colour & B/W Laser Printing

C.C. Copy 5298 Cote-des-Neiges

(between Jean Brillant & Lacombe) Metro C.D.N. T F E

(514) 344-9728 (514) 344-9754 Info@cccopy.ca www.cccopy.ca t Colour & B/W Printing t Colour & B/W Copies t Bindings t Fax t Plastification t High Speed Internet tT-Shirts, Mouse Pads, Puzzles & Calendars t Scan tLarge Format Posters

www.corbeilelectro.com

4646-A, Avenue duParc Montreal, Quebec H2V 4E5

Tel: 514-270-7811 Fax: 514-270-1790 Courriel: corbeil26@bellnet.ca

AIRPORT RESERVATIONS

& LOCAL CALLS

5 MINUTE SERVICE 24/7


THE FOLLOWING COMPANIES WOULD LIKE TO WISH ALL NEW AND RETURNING STUDENTS BEST WISHES FOR A GOOD YEAR.

B.I. COHEN INC. (OPTOMETRIST) - MONTREAL CABLE EXPERTS - POINTE CLAIRE CDN ISOTOPES INC. - POINTE CLAIRE DISTRNS. FISHER - ST. LAURENT ENTRS. PAPETERIES INC. - ST. LAURENT FORD ELECTRIC SUPPLY - ST. LAURENT GARAGE A X X INC. - LACHINE HOUSE OF VACUUMS - POINTE CLAIRE KASTLEWOOD CARRIERS INC. - POINTE CLAIRE MARTIN & CIE. - LACHINE MAXI CRISP CANADA - LACHINE MEDITERRANEO - ST. LAURENT METRO AUTO BODY REG’D. - POINTE CLAIRE POT POURRI ACCENT INC. - ST. LAURENT PRODUITS PHOENICIA INC. - ST. LAURENT REBOX - ST. LAURENT RESTAURANT LA BELLE PROVINCE - DORVAL SANY TECH - MONTREAL SERRUBEC INC. -DORVAL VIABLE POWER CONVERSION INC. -DORVAL MALIBU GOURMET 514.486.6200 malibugourmet.com 5751, MONKLAND AVE., NDG


PARAGRAPHE HAS SERVED MONTREAL READERS FOR OVER A QUARTER CENTURY #OMEANDDISCOVEROURRElNEDSELECTIONOFBOTHACADEMICANDTRADETITLES OUROUTSTANDINGSERVICEANDOURWIDERANGEOFAUTHOREVENTSTHROUGHOUTTHE YEAR INCLUDINGOURRENOWNED"OOKS"REAKFASTSERIES OPENING HOURS Monday to Friday Saturday and Sunday

7am to 11pm 9am to 11pm

-C'ILL#OLLEGE!VENUE -ONTREALs0HONE


2070 Aylmer, just below Sherbrooke - (514) 844-8881


SSMU Student Handbook & Agenda 2009-10  

Annual guide to student life published by the Students' Society of McGill University

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