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Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Mixed messages: highway signs on the block? ANDREA RONDEAU CITIZEN

A Port Alberni man was killed and two other people were taken to hospital with injuries after a Toyota sedan slammed into a traffic light standard at the intersection of Bench Road and the Trans Canada Highway just before 8 a.m. Sunday. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

One dead in crash, two injured KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

One person was killed and two more were injured — one seriously — in a motor vehicle incident at the intersection of the Trans Canada Highway and Bench Road just before 8 a.m. on Sunday. A sand-coloured Toyota sedan carrying three people was north-

bound on the highway when it slammed into a traffic light standard on the northeast corner of the intersection. A male passenger, identified as Zakkaree Coss, 22, of Port Alberni was pronounced dead at the scene, while the male driver was taken to hospital with serious, life-threatening injuries.

A female passenger in the back seat suffered minor injuries and was also taken to hospital. The driver and female passenger were believed to be from Port Alberni as well. Along with local responders from the North Cowichan/ Duncan RCMP, the Cowichan Bay volunteer fire department and

BC Ambulance, the BC Coroner’s service and a collision reconstruction expert also attended the scene. “Initial indications are that fatigue may have been a contributing factor in this collision, however the investigation is continuing,” said Cpl. Jon Stuart of the North Cowichan/Duncan RCMP.

Businesses and local governments in the Cowichan Valley are worried the signs they use to get people off the Trans Canada Highway and into communities are slated to become a thing of the past under a new draft provincial highway signage policy. Geoff Millar of the Cowichan Valley Regional District’s Economic Development Commission said he hopes that visits now scheduled for April and May by Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure officials to the CVRD board will clear up mixed messages coming from the province on the issue. “It would be quite devastating,” said Merridale Cider owner Janet Docherty of what she’s heard of the proposed changes. The problems, explained Millar, stem from a possible proposal to designate the TCH between Victoria and Nanaimo an expressway. “The problem that creates for us is a lot of the signs that are currently in place would have to come See EXPRESSWAY, Page 5

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

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Woman haunted by questions after assault ANDREA RONDEAU CITIZEN

“I want to find out who did this to me and why,” said a tearful Elizabeth Louie Friday, April 4, the day after she suffered an assault that has left her badly bruised and frightened in her own neighbourhood. Her movements slow and in visible pain, Louie described what she can remember of the events of early Thursday morning around 3:30 a.m. from where she was recuperating at her mother’s house. After drinking for a while with her sister, Louie got a ride back alone to her home on Stotlou Road just outside of Duncan. There was a party going on at a nearby house, so she decided to head there to continue her evening. The people there, at least 15 to 20 according to Louie and her partner Mark Puska, who was asleep at the time of the assault, were “friends and family, so I thought it would be all right,” Louie said. She remembers being at the party and having some drinks, and thinks she was trying to leave when it happened. Her memory is spotty. “I remember being hit and covering myself,” she said, also recalling being struck so hard she saw bright lights. There were at least two people hitting her, Louie said, but one of the things that disturbs her the most about the attack is that nobody came to her aid and stopped the violence. “I remember screaming and telling them to stop and ‘somebody help me’,” she said. “All it would have taken was one person.” She would have intervened if it was happening to someone else, she said. One of the attackers grabbed her by the throat and said he was going to mess up her face, Louie said. Another threatened to cut off her breasts

“I remember screaming and telling them to stop and ‘somebody help me’...All it would have taken was one person.” ELIZABETH LOUIE, assault victim

so that nobody would want her anymore. “It’s all so foggy,” she said. “They could have killed me.” Louie got out of the house and began screaming for her mother. Injured and bleeding, she made her way to her home, a trailer beside her mom’s house. Police and an ambulance were called, and Louie was taken to hospital, where it was determined she had suffered some serious bruising. “I’ve got bruises all over my head,” she said. She doesn’t know why she was attacked, but speculates it might have been for the diamond in her ring, which was pried out during the assault, leaving her finger bloody. On Monday, Louie made her statement to the police. “Ms. Louie has attended our detachment and supplied the investigator with a second, more formal statement,” said Cpl. Krista Hobday. “The investigator is now acting on that information as he conducts his investigation into the allegations. We cannot speak to the specifics of the contents of the statement until they are verified or negated by way of a thorough investigation.” Louie said she remains afraid for her safety, but is determined to try to find justice. “What’s going to stop them from doing this to someone else?” she asked. “I don’t want this to happen to somebody else. “Nobody deserves this.”

The day after the assault, Elizabeth Louie tries to rest and recuperate, haunted by questions about who did this to her and why. [ANDREA RONDEAU/CITIZEN]

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News

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

◆ POLICE BEAT

Robbery suspect tries swim escape KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Quick action by a store owner and other residents helped police nab a suspect following a robbery in Youbou last Saturday. Around 3 p.m. on April 5, a man wearing a hoodie with a mask over his face entered the Youbou Shop and Save convenience store, threatened the store owner with a chisel and demanded money from the cash register. After pushing the store owner out of the way, he grabbed the drawer from the cash register and fled on foot. The store owner’s husband had witnessed the robbery and chased after the suspect as he ran. The suspect first tried to hide in a yard, but when he was discovered, he jumped into Cowichan Lake and tried to swim out to a nearby log boom. He surrendered without incident when Lake

Cowichan RCMP arrived. When arrested, the suspect was found with an undisclosed amount of cash from the store. He had thrown the weapon into the lake, but it was later recovered by the RCMP dive team. Lead investigator Const. Grant Desmet gave credit for the arrest to the store owner and other residents, while Lake Cowichan Detachment Commander Sgt. Wes Olsen commended the individuals for not trying to confront the suspect directly. Twenty-year-old Travis Katzel of Duncan has been charged with robbery, disguise with intent to commit an indictable offence, and mischief under $5,000. Police are also recommending a charge of assault and failure to comply with a condition of undertaking. Katzel appeared in Duncan court on Monday and was remanded into custody.

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Cowichan Valley projects in the running for 2014 Council VIREB awards settles on $127K in grants A near record number of nominations will vie for top honours in the Seventh Annual Vancouver Island Real Estate Board Commercial Building Awards, Thursday, April 24. “It’s been amazing to see the number of quality projects that have entered this year’s competition,” said Robert MacDonald, who is coordinating the event for Business Examiner Vancouver Island newspaper. “Last year was a complete sellout and had two more finalists, and early indications are this event will sell out very quickly.” The 49 nominations are just under last year’s alltime high for the event, which honours the best in commercial and industrial building north of the Malahat on Vancouver Island. Re/MAX Commercial is title sponsor of the event, with Coastal Community Credit Union and Colliers as gold sponsors. Category sponsors are DTZ Nanaimo, Invest Comox Valley, the Canadian Western Bank, RBC Royal Bank, the Business Development Bank of Canada, Nanaimo Economic Development Corporation, MNP Chartered Accountants, BC Hydro and the Vancouver Island NewsMedia Group. Finalists from the Cowichan Valley are: Parhar Business Park, 5301 B Chaster Rd., Duncan; Mill Bay Fire Hall #2, 1171 Hutchinson Rd., Mill Bay; Cowichan Regional Visitor Centre, 2896 Drinkwater Rd., Duncan; Flagship Ford, 6456 Norcross Rd., Duncan; Chemainus Village Square, 3050 Oak St., Chemainus; Cowichan Lake Library – New Building, 68 Renfrew Ave., Lake Cowichan; Municipal Hall Addition, 7030 Trans Canada Highway, Duncan; The Waterfront at Mill Bay, 740 Handy Rd., Mill Bay; Cowichan Health & Wealth Centre, 435 Trunk Rd., Duncan. For questions about the event, call Robert MacDonald at 250-758-2684. Tickets are $95 plus tax, and are available until April 18 through www.businessvi.ca/events

Cowichan Bay Fisherman’s Wharf Association

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Passion for God Compassion for People ST JOHN THE BAPTIST ANGLICAN CHURCH First & Jubilee Street Duncan

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Palm Sunday – April 13 @ 9:30 a.m. Maunday Thursday – April 17 @ 7:00 p.m. Good Friday – Stations of the Cross @ 11:00 a.m. at St. Peter Quamichan. The parishes of St. John the Baptist Cobble Hill & Duncan & St. Peter Quamichan will journey together through the Stations of the Cross. Easter Sunday April 20 @ 9:30 a.m. All are welcome

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

North Cowichan councillors carefully picked through a list of 70 applications for grants at a committee of the whole meeting March 25 before divvying up $127,000 in funding as they wound down towards finalizing their 2014 budget. They began with a discussion of the state of their reserves. Mayor Jon Lefebure said Wednesday that the requests totalled $244,000 “so we had to really go through them and see which ones we could support and which ones we couldn’t.” The requests for money came from groups large and small. “We looked at institutions like the BC Forest Discovery Centre and Cowichan Community Kitchens and Harvest House and Meals on Wheels, all those kinds of organizations. Most of them got some support,” Lefebure said. “If we felt the money would be better used elsewhere, we looked at their financial statements to determine the ones who seemed to need it most and the ones who kind of see us as an add-on,” he said and then gave an example. “Those would be situations where we’re asked to provide $1,000 and their overall budget is over $300,000. We know that we’re really not making a big difference with that $1,000 but for something like the Bread Van it might really make a huge difference,” he said. After that, councillors looked at the surpluses and reserves that North Cowichan could count on for 2014. “The general feeling was that we were in good shape with our unappropriated surplus. It’s a little low but we are trying to build it up a little and our reserves are in good shape generally,” Lefebure said. Like every local government around, North Cowichan is looking down the road at what infrastructure needs replacing in the short and long term. “We have a lot of infrastructure and probably there are very few local governments that have a large enough capital replacement portion of their budgets that they are fully covered for all their infrastructure. What we end up doing is we end up getting grants that help us make up the gap,” the mayor concluded.


News

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

5

Expressway would make no sense, argue Cowichan officials Businesses want to talk timing of Malahat work

MIXED, From Page 1

A FURTHER concern for tourism busi-

Geoff Millar of the Cowichan Valley Regional District’s Economic Development Commission stands by the side of the Trans Canada Highway running through Duncan. The roadway is lined with signs. [ANDREA RONDEAU/CITIZEN] Business signs will be allowed on municipal entrance signs, but only six different types, according to Millar’s report, and it would be up to the municipality to choose who would be included. “That’s a horrible decision [for the municipalities] to have to make,” said Millar. If there is an expressway plan, it’s also unclear how the province

would deal with the Duncan section of the highway, lined as it is on both sides by numerous businesses — all with signs. Further, Millar pointed out, the 50 km/h speed limit puts the lie to an expressway designation for this corridor. “Clearly, from our point of view, the highway with so many entries and exits and stop lights and so on

does not fit our conception of an expressway. So for the province to call it that, we just don’t think it’s realistic and we don’t think it reflects the current situation,” agreed North Cowichan Mayor Jon Lefebure, calling such a designation for the Duncan corridor in particular “ridiculous”. “We don’t want to lose the ability we have to advertise businesses

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STUDENT PLANNER The City of Duncan is seeking a planning student or recent graduate for a Temporary Student Planner position during the summer of 2014. The position is supervised by the City Planner in the Development Services Department. This is a temporary student position within the Canadian Union of Public Employees - Local 358, with an hourly rate of $20.37 (2013 rate), plus 4% vacation pay. The th position begins as early as June 9 , 2014 and ends no th later than September 29 , 2014. The work week is 35 hours and the position lasts for 16 weeks. Candidates must have completed their degree within the past six months or be a returning student. More information is available online at www.duncan.ca under ‘City Hall’, ‘Jobs’. Applicants are invited to submit their cover letter and detailed resume, containing full details of education, training and experience, date available, and three references, by 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014 to the attention of Michelle Geneau, Planner, City of Duncan, 200 Craig Street, Duncan, B.C., V9L 1W3 or by email to michelle@duncan.ca

off the highway,” he said. The goal, Millar said, is to have the TCH between Victoria and Nanaimo designated as a regular highway, not an expressway.

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nesses like Merridale Cider is summertime roadwork slated for the Malahat Highway between Victoria and the Cowichan Valley. LAST YEAR, work on the highway during the busiest part of the tourist season was badly mis-timed, said Janet Docherty, owner of Merridale Cider in the Cowichan Valley. “IT HAD a massive impact on our business,” she said. “Last year we basically got shut down at various points in the year because they chose to do the work in prime tourism season and even advised people not to travel unless it was absolutely necessary.” DOCHERTY WANTS to make sure that the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure realizes what a big deal this kind of disruption is for the Cowichan business community. THIS SUBJECT is also on the agenda for discussion for when a representative of the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure addresses the CVRD’s regional services committee.

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down,” said Millar. Under the draft Service and Attraction Signage Policy, the rules for signs on an expressway are strict, and would eliminate virtually all of the directional signs Valley businesses currently count on to get people through their doors. When Millar spoke to a Ministry official Thursday, April 3, an expressway still seemed to be in the works, he said. When the Citizen contacted the Ministry the same day, the message was very different. “The Ministry is not considering an expressway on Highway 1 between Victoria and Nanaimo,” the Ministry stated in an email response. In a report presented to the CVRD Regional Services Committee March 26, Millar quoted previous Ministry statements on the issue: “On Expressways in rural areas (Electoral Areas), only essential services, certain public facilities (marina, sani-station, etc.), visitor centres, and destination attractions (100,000+ annual visitors) will be represented under the current policy. These business types will be represented with internationally recognized symbols only, no business names.” This is a huge concern for tourism-related businesses such as Merridale Cider, owned by Docherty and Rick Pipes. “It’s a large part of how they [customers] get to us,” Docherty said. For example, while regular highways in the province would continue to be allowed to host wine route signs they would have to be removed from an expressway. “That obviously can’t happen,” said Docherty. “It’s absolutely ridiculous, and as a business in this community I would fight that.” Docherty said they already hear from visitors that signage is poor and people get lost trying to find the various businesses, and they’d like to see more signage, not less. “They think that the local business is responsible for it and we’re just being cheap and not wanting to put something out when in fact all of us would be quite ecstatic to put up more,” she said. It’s particularly important, she said, in a rural area where finding your way around can be a challenge. “If we want our economy to be focusing on tourism, and we’ve said that — B.C. has even made that a big deal as a province and we as a region have made a big deal out of it — then this is an incredibly important piece,” Docherty said. “It’s one of the top priorities, I think.” “There are lots of good things that are happening in the area as far as tourism is concerned and we’d just hate to see them sidelined with problems that have been created because of a policy that’s meant to apply to the whole province,” agreed Millar.

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

OUR VIEW

Here’s to hoping expressway idea really is dead he good news is that logic may already have prevailed and the idea is dead. We’re not sure whose idea it ever was to propose making the Trans Canada Highway between Victoria and Nanaimo an expressway, but we can only imagine they’ve never actually travelled the route. Such a designation, apart from the disaster it would amount to for local businesses because of the restrictions on signs on an expressway, simply makes no sense in terms of speed, either. The TCH goes right through the City of Duncan, lined on

T

both sides with businesses. Further, a 50 km/h speed limit, numerous traffic lights and pedestrian crossings, not to mention the volume of traffic, ensure that there’s nothing quick about travelling this stretch of blacktop. Anyone who’s ever tried to get through Duncan on a Friday afternoon in the summer knows full well that to call it an expressway is ridiculous. That’s not to dismiss the subject of the signs along the highway and what it would mean to basically have to remove them all. This would be a death knell for

ABOUT US

OTHER VIEWS

many of our Cowichan Valley businesses, from Ladysmith to Mill Bay. We’ve become well-known for our numerous wineries and agribusinesses, but if people can’t find them, look for all that hard work at promotion to go right down the tubes. The highway’s function is to get people from one place to another at a relatively high rate of speed. Plenty of folks from the Cowichan Valley use it to get to Nanaimo and Victoria. But plenty of people count on it as a way to get people from Victoria and Nanaimo to here,

as well. It’s a bit insulting for the Cowichan Valley to be considered simply a place to get people to speed through at the greatest possible rate. On the contrary, we wager that folks in Cowichan want people to stop and patronize our businesses — even stay a while. We’ve got lots to offer, from great food and wine to unique artisans and experiences. Designating the highway an expressway would essentially encourage people to bypass our communities. That’s a knife in the heart of our tourism industry.

Schools need real solutions to problems

Cowichan Valley Citizen is a division of VI Newspaper Group Limited Partnership., 251 Jubilee St., Duncan, B.C., V9L 1W8 Phone: 250-748-2666 Fax: 250-748-1552 Publisher Shirley Skolos Editor Andrea Rondeau Customer service manager Dawn Heggie Production supervisor Alice Brownbridge Newsroom 250-748-2666, extension 235 news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Advertising 250-748-2666, extensions 223, 227, 228, 229, 230 Classified ads 1-866-415-9169

Copyright information This newspaper’s contents are protected by copyright and may be used only for personal, non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved. Commercial use is prohibited. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the newspaper. Complaint resolution If speaking to the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about a story we publish, contact the B.C. Press Council, which examines complaints from the public about the conduct of the press in gathering and presenting the news. Send your written concern and documentation within 45 days to: B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C., V9R 2R2. Website: www.bcpresscouncil.org.

As important as it is to let people know where they can next fuel up, it’s equally important to let people know where they can turn off to get to Merridale Cider, Hilary’s Cheese, or the Chemainus Theatre Festival. We cringe at the idea of municipal governments trying to decide which businesses will take the limited number of spots on their entry signs, and who will be out of luck. Yikes. An expressway defies logic, and the will of the community at the same time. A regular highway is good enough for us, and we dearly hope that’s the new plan.

Something rotten, and it’s not the garbage This MMBC project looks to be cut and dried, a done deal. What right has this government to sign off on a deal such as this without consulting at the very least the mayors of this province, let alone the residents who have had this stupid, wasteful thing foisted on to us, right after the blue and black bins were injected into the waste material system? Something is decidedly rotten here and it is not the garbage! Our MLA has rightly questioned the premier, who as far as I know, has not and does not seem capable of giving the public any satisfactory explanation of why

it is needed. Why also is she pushing it onto our backs? There is an unpleasant odour about this whole affair. Further to our garbage, it needs to be processed locally by someone with some common sense. It can and should be done. George Manners Cowichan Bay

Officials just looking out for paycheques Here is an example of how amalgamation does save taxpayer dollars big time! Victoria, Saanich, Oak Bay, and Esquimalt, combined top salaries of the four mayors is more than what is paid to the mayor of

Toronto. The combined salaries of the four top city managers is four times higher than what is paid to Saskatoon’s city manager. The total cost to pay three fire chiefs is more than what is paid to the New York City fire commissioner. Wages alone of these four areas tells you why city services such as pavement and sidewalks are not being completed. To keep these wages being paid with yearly increases is why property taxes are increasing. Taxpayers, time to face reality. Present mayors and councillors are against amalgamation because of the elimination of their paycheques. Joe Sawchuk Duncan

Lack of leadership has plagued our school district for some time. Rather than looking after the educational needs of our children today, it is ever busy in miring us in some mirage-like tomorrow. Parents need real solutions to their real problems in schools today, and not these promises and some airy-fairy “multi-layered” responses from the district. Ever since the duly elected board was removed, the focus of the district seems to have shifted from creating a safe and supporting learning environment for our children to closing schools and selling school lands, with a total disregard for the educational needs of our children. This cutand-run mentality has created chaotic and crisis-like situations in our schools. More and more parents are voicing their frustration with this district. Their demands are reasonable. It is heartbreaking for the parents to see their children come home in tears. Turmoil at Discovery Elementary School has caused many parents to ask for “counseling for upset kids who have been ‘left-floundering’ by the situation.” If our schools go, so will go the future of our communities. Amrik Prihar Duncan

Send us your letter Write 300 words or less on the topic of your choice and email news@cowichanvalleycitizen.com Include: your name, a town you hail from and a phone number.


Opinion

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

BC Ferries loss is Washington State’s gain Once again later this month my wife and I are headed off Vancouver Island with our RV, a fifth-wheel trailer. Since 2011, we have taken our RV on holidays off the Island. Twice each year and we use Washington State Ferries, Sydney to Anacortes and return the same way. Six return trips on/off Vancouver Island with two more planned this year and we have and will never use BC Ferries. It’s simple math. BC Ferries charges recreation vehicles identical to commercial carriers, by the foot, for anything over 20 feet. Washington State ferries encourages recreational vehicle travel and charges category rates that are almost half of that of BC Ferries. For example, to take my fifthwheel and truck, a total length of 49 feet, two passengers (my wife and I), with assurances that we have a spot on BC Ferries (a reservation), pay the fuel surcharge and PST/GST taxes, it costs $627.60 return — this is a staggering cost

[CITIZEN FILE]

and one most families cannot afford. The same trip via Washington State ferries return costs is $336.15 includes no reservation fee, only one passenger fee — an overwhelming savings of $291.45! Or $145.73 each way. It does not take rocket science to see how financially beneficial it is for those with recreational vehicles to use anything other than BC Ferries. We have approached BC Ferries about this situation, trying to encourage them to become competitive, to encourage folks to use BC Ferries, to provide cheaper opportunities for younger families to take their trailer or

camper on and off Vancouver Island. BC Ferries staff cite all sorts of ridiculous things about not being able to compare service with that of WSF. This is simply about BC Ferries not providing our citizens with a service we deserve that is competitive and reasonable in cost. Further, if using WSF and then heading back into Canada toward the interior of B.C., it is far cheaper for fuel costs, easy to use Hwy 20 through Washington State and end up anywhere in Southern B.C. in the same time it would if going through B.C. without the headache of going through the traffic mess of the Lower Mainland and long border crossing delays. The B.C. government and BC Ferries just don’t get it. All my business has gone to Washington State and will continue to do so until the B.C. government and BC Ferries can price match Washington State. We are not alone, many others are also using this fantastic service provided by WSF. Bryan Wallis Maple Bay

contact us

Don’t let our health care system be destroyed March 31 was the day the Harper government, (it used to be the Canadian Government) started to dismantle our national health care. Equalization payments to the provinces are being eliminated and replaced by a system that ignores the demographics of the provinces. Thirty-six billion dollars are also being cut from healthcare funding. Some provinces will survive the cuts to their health care but others will not. The belief that all Canadians deserve equal access health care regardless of income is disappearing. At the same time there is a push by a few, Dr. Brian Day, in particular, to establish for profit clinics. One of the arguments he has used is that by allowing those who can afford to pay for private care in a for profit facility to do so, the facility is saving taxpayers’ money. Does anyone actually believe that is the purpose of a for profit, private facility? Does Dr. Day really expect us to believe that this is his purpose? A for profit facility is built for one reason — to make a profit. All health care workers deserve to be

compensated fairly for their training and ability but to profit from someone’s illness is wrong! An investor only invests in a for profit facility to make more money. The health care system can be improved of course. If the same money, energy and time were put into working on ways to improve it as they are putting into ways to dismantle it, we could have a very good system. I’ve heard some people, those who weren’t around before our publicly funded system, say that we should try a two-tiered system. People who could afford to pay for procedures privately should be able to do that. Who decides whether a patient can afford to be able to jump the line? The publicly funded system was established so that people would not become bankrupted by medical expenses. Many people did. Many people will again do so with a for profit private system as they will be pressured into using it for a child or parent. Who could blame them? They should not have to do it. We can’t let our system be destroyed. Trudy Thorgeirson Duncan

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

‘My Fair Lady’ worth the wait

A&E

Duo brings award-worthy blues April 12 LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

While life at the busy market goes on around her, flower seller Eliza Dolittle dreams of a brighter day in the famous song, Wouldn’t It Be Loverly, from the South Island Musical Theatre Society’s production of ‘My Fair Lady’ at the Cowichan Theatre that concludes this weekend. [LEXI BAINAS/CITIZEN]

With a little bit o’ luck, you’ll find there are still some tickets left for the final performances of the South Island Musical Society’s production of My Fair Lady, which winds up its run at the Cowichan Theatre this weekend. But, don’t wait too long. After last Friday’s opening night smash, the word was out on the street: this is one super show. Of course everyone knows why it’s running so late in the season: the entire cast, devastated when their beloved Eliza got the flu, chose to postpone the show till she could join them. That meant a delay because dates at the theatre just don’t appear by magic but everyone persisted and, boy, was it worth the wait. Sarah Lane as Eliza Dolittle charmed more than Professor Higgins. She lit up the stage with an incandescent performance Friday. But then, so did everyone else. Their enthusiasm for this show, so long held back, burst like a

Alex Gallacher as Professor Higgins dam, and the big opening night audience was the winner. Led by such quality veterans as Alex Gallacher as Higgins, Ian Rothnie as Alfred Dolittle and Bob Norris as Colonel Pickering, everyone stepped up to present the enduringly popular musical with style and fervour. The music was sprightly, the choreography delightful, the sets and costumes everything that could be wished and overall direction and management of this big production was tight and professional. Check with the Cowichan Ticket Centre right now (250748-7529) to see if any space is left for you.

The Cowichan Folk Guild coffeehouse on Saturday, April 12 brings Diana Braithwaite and Chris Whiteley back to the Valley for an evening of “hot blues”. It’s a show that promises to combine classic and original blues with a vintage flavour, showcasing Braithwaite’s internationally renowned vocals, and Whiteley’s award winning skill on guitar, trumpet and harmonica. In other words, they draw the audience in with their musicianship, stories and history. Braithwaite and Whiteley have recently visited South Carolina and Virginia for festival appearances, and, of course, they have visited the UK, Russia and Europe many times in a busy touring schedule. Their list of awards includes eight Maple Blues awards, a Gemini, a Golden Sheaf for songwriting, and six Juno nominations. Doors open at 7 p.m. An open stage begins at 7:30 p.m. followed by the main show. The bargain admission for this event is $5 for CFG members or $10 for non-members. Don’t miss it.

YOUNG MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK

Kai Vander Veen is a senior piano student at Jo Wright’s music studio. He is also completing his advanced theory. Kai is a diligent student in both music and in his Grade 11 studies at Cowichan District High school. Music is one of his keen interests, and he applies tremendous focus and effort. He played trumpet with Joy Ann Bannerman in Mt. Prevost Middle School Band’s program and is now a leader in the brass section. COWICHANMUSICTEACHERS.COM


A&E ◆ COMING UP IN THE ARTS

Artisans open their doors for weekend LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

The Cowichan Valley Artisans group are ready to open their 2014 season with their annual open studio weekend April 25-27. From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Vancouver Island art lovers will be flocking to visit the nine studios. Why not join them? This year, the group includes wood workers Karen Trickett and Ken Broadland, vinegar makers Venturi-Schulze Vineyards, painters Jennifer Lawson and Cheryl Painter, potters Cathi Jefferson and Mary Fox and glass workers Peggy Brackett and Jo Ludwig. Their pieces range from jewelry to furniture and, if you can’t make the grand opening weekend, most of the studios will be open to visitors during the summer season if the artists and artisans are contacted ahead of time. Check out www.cowichanvalley artisans.com for all the information on who’s where and exactly what they have to offer but don’t miss this chance to get in early on the new season’s work from these creative Valley talents.

Casting call for famous love tragedy LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore are thou, Romeo? The Shawnigan Players are echoing the sentiment. They’re following up their crowdpleasing outdoor productions of Pride and Prejudice and Twelfth Night by mounting Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet this summer. Get ready for another al fresco show at Cowichan Station’s Gem’o’ the Isle said Director Alex Gallacher. But now it’s time for auditions. “There are many speaking roles for male and female actors of all ages and many non-speaking roles are also available: dancers, fighters, townspeople,” he said. Auditions are scheduled for Wednesday, April 9, at 6:30 p.m. at 5856 Clements St. in Duncan and Sunday, April 13, at 4 p.m. at Evergreen Independent School, at 3515 Watson Ave. in Cobble Hill. Rehearsals will begin April 14 and continue through July 29. The production will open July 31 and close Aug. 10.

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

9

Festival films cover culture to environment LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

The 10th annual Cowichan Aboriginal Festival of Film & Art returns to the Cowichan Theatre April 23-26. Following opening ceremonies on Wednesday, April 23, filmgoers can enjoy an exciting series of presentations beginning with indigenous experimental film icon Dana Claxton’s film He Who Dreams. Using symbolism and allegory, Claxton addresses the trauma wrought by the imposition of Western values, customs, and systems upon the First Nations of North America and the resurgence of an indigenous cultural presence. On following nights, look for Sacred Lands: Profit & Loss, directed by Toby McLeod, a look at how native people fight the loss of land, water and health to mining and oil industries, and Oil Sands Karaoke from director Charles Wilkinson, which looks at the lives, the work, and the people of Fort McMurray. On Friday, April 25, it’s time to focus on youth films and performances in evening emceed by Nathaniel Arcand and Dakota House. Finally, on Saturday, April 26, at 7 p.m., enjoy the world premiere of the 12-minute film My Cousin Lived Next Door, written and directed by Lori S. Lewis, which tells the tale of Mary and Nelly, two very close cousins and best friends, who grow up on a native reserve in coastal B.C. but who led extremely different lives. Also on the big screen that night, This is How a People Live, written and directed by Lisa Jackson, that traces the history of the Gwa’sala-Nakwaxda’xw Nations, who the Canadian Government forcibly relocated from their traditional territories in B.C. in 1964, and later, Empire of Dirt, directed by Peter Stebbings, about three generations of women in an aboriginal family. Films will also be shown starting Thursday, April 24, in the lecture hall theatre at

nearby Vancouver Island University. These include It Was a Woman directed Cherri Low Horn, about victims of sexual abuse, which includes a post-film discussion, Rhymes for Young Ghouls, directed by Jeff Marnard, about a Mi’kmaq youth who loses her mother to suicide and her father to a prison term. Film Cowichan’s Louise McMurray is the festival’s perennial director and, when we spoke to her this week she called this year’s lineup of films “amazing”. How does she go about getting them? “We are established now. We put a call out for films and they just come from all over the world. Some of them are world premieres because of the timing of our festival. And with us, because we showcase few films instead of hundreds, it’s the selection, pulling the program together that’s the challenge. “That becomes evident with the films that come in. All of a sudden it’s telling me: this is what needs to be shown, this is the strong film, that is the strong message around environment that needs to be part of it,” she said. The program starts to evolve as the committee starts screening the films. “I don’t know if people realize what goes into the pre-programming of a festival like this,” she said. A special art show, From the Medicine Wheel to Mandalas, which celebrates the diversity of the earth’s four great nations, is being held in the Cowichan Theatre lobby during the month of April. Be sure to check it out during the festival as well. Featured artists include Lynn Henry, Charlene George, Darrell Charles, Joe Circle, Barbara Sobon, Herb Rice, the Hakuna Matada Kenyan collective, Joel Good and Melanie Circle. Tickets for the official opening and all screenings, both at the Cowichan Theatre and at VIU’s Cowichan Campus, are available at the Cowichan Ticket Centre. Call 250-748-7259 to book seats.

Freedom Gospel Choir presents

drawing by Suzanne S. LaPierre

directed by Ann Antonides accompanied by Tanya Gillespie

Saturday, April 26 at 7:30 pm Sunday, April 27 at 2:00 pm sponsored by and performing at

St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church 531 Herbert Street, Duncan tickets $15 / children 12 and under - free available at Fitstop in Duncan, West Coast Roar in Mill Bay, from choir members and at the door

Nathaniel Arcand

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10

Living

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Historic Ross Bridge saved from demo — maybe Built in 1943, the demolished”. bridge originally She wrote me on served an oil pipeline March 10. On March during construction of 25, a CBC headline the Alaska Highway. proclaimed, “Yukon e know all relents on Ross River about saving bridge demolition.” historic bridgWell, events ceres in the Cowichan tainly didn’t move CHRONICLES Valley from demolithat quickly for the T.W. Paterson tion, don’t we? (Think Kinsol! Kinsol Trestle.) Back to the CBC: The residents of Ross River, “...After government officials YT, recently survived their own repeatedly said the 70-year-old near-loss of a beloved heritage structure was unsalvageable span, built by the American mil- and must be torn down because itary during the Second World of safety concerns, Premier War, by successfully mounting Darrell Pasloski now says the a campaign of public awareness government will issue a request and passive resistance that led for proposals to stabilize it.” to a last-minute reprieve by the Among those who congratulatYukon government. ed the premier for the change of I’d heard of the impeding mind was Heritage Canada The demolition of the 192-metre-long National Trust (HCNT) which suspension bridge — the longest also commended Ross River single-span suspension footand Yukon residents for their bridge in Canada — on the CBC. “tremendous effort...to secure a Then came an email from Sue future for the historic bridge”. Thomas, formerly with MacdonSo, how did the Ross River ald & Lawrence Timber Framfolks convince Premier Pasloski ing, the local restoration special- to take a second look? Not just ists who convinced the CVRD to by lobbying, but by camping out take another look at the Kinsol’s on the ice (this was mid-winter, proposed destruction. remember) for weeks to prevent “Tom: A local issue has the contractors from beginning attention of many and I’m demolition. hoping to spark your inter“As a community we came est, too. The government has together and [our] voice was decided to tear down the Ross heard...” said Ross River Dena River suspension bridge, originChief Brian Ladue, who said ally built to carry the Canol that the government’s aboutpipeline across the Pelly River... face tacitly acknowledged outThe structural engineer [who] standing aboriginal rights and has been lobbying to save the title. bridge...is certain it can be staBuilt in 1943 as part of the bilized, has thought it through CANOL (Canadian Pipeline), and consulted with colleagues when the Canadian and Amerabout it.” (Shades of M&L!) ican governments feared the Sue thought I’d be interested threat of Japanese actions in “another historical bridge against West Coast supply lines, needing to be saved before it is the bridge served as a conduit

W

Got a hot tip? Call the Citizen 250-748-2666

Tel: 250·746·8123 Email: ken@kenneal.com Website: KenNeal.com Facebook.com/kennealduncan

Paul Ruszel is part of the lineup. [CITIZEN FILE]

The suspension bridge has suffered from a lack of maintenance over the years. [SUBMITTED]

LEXI BAINAS CITIZEN

Local residents’ peaceful protests in the dead of winter have been effective in getting a stay for the landmark span. [SUBMITTED] for oils from Norman Wells, NWT, to a refinery at Whitehorse, YT, during construction of the Alaska Highway. By the time of the bridge’s completion in 1944, the Japanese threat had eased to the point that the pipeline project was shut down and dismantled in 1949. The bridge, however, became a popular foot crossing of the Pelly River for the residents of one of the remotest areas of the Canadian North. Hence their loyalty upon word of its impending demolition because of structural and

safety concerns after decades without maintenance. So, is the Ross River suspension bridge now safe? Can we count on the Yukon government to follow through on the structure’s rehabilitation? Despite such a dramatic turnaround by the politicians, Sue Thomas prefers to wait before ordering champagne: “The government [has] announced they will issue a [Request For Proposal] to stabilize it. So, we’ll see.” www.twpaterson.com

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Island Oak High School students want to fight poverty and give you a fun afternoon out at the same time. This Saturday, April 12, the student committee will be presenting a show called Talent for Charity at the Sylvan United Church on Shawnigan-Mill Bay Road at 3 p.m. Half the proceeds from the event will go to One! International Poverty Relief to fund schools for children living in the slum areas of Mumbai, India. Grade 11 student Taya Wall has had a personal connection to Mumbai since her time volunteering there eight years ago and she’s taking action. “It shocked me how different their society is from ours, and how privileged we are without knowing it,” she said. Wall has vowed to do everything she can from here in Canada to help the situation in Mumbai. “I feel very strongly about everyone having a fair and equal chance,” she said. Principal Gary Ward praised his students’ initiative. “Doing something for students elsewhere in the world helps our students to know this is not the only place on the planet,” he said in talking about the upcoming performance. The Island Oak High School Choir are the featured act, performing selections from Les Misérables, but they will also be supported by noted Valley choir director Annette Lampson and pianist Ron Kilian. The presentation will also include the Glenora Handbell Choir and singer-songwriters Aidan Thorne and Paul Ruszel plus additional Island Oak students and other Valley performers. Entry is by donation at the door.


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

+

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250-748-2666 ext. 236 sports@cowichanvalleycitizen.com

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

Cowichan try-scorer Bruce Moss goes for a run against the UVic Saxons. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Cowichan Thirds top UVic Saxons KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Germain Lamothe scored two tries for the second consecutive week, and Bruce Moss matched his feat as the Cowichan Piggies held on to first place in the Vancouver Island Rugby Third Division with a 24-12 win over the University of Victoria Saxons last Saturday. Will Wheaton kicked a pair of conversions to round out Cowichan’s total. The Piggies will play host to Velox at the Herd Road pitch this Saturday at 1 p.m. in their final league fixture. Cowichan and Velox are the only Third Division sides that have played a full schedule, so Saturday’s game will determine who has home-field advantage for the Island final between the same two teams, on April 26. The winner of that game will move on to the provincial final on May 10.

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Cowichan players celebrate Peter Budina’s try late in last Saturday’s game against Velox. With the 26-11 win, the Piggies finish first in the Vancouver Island First Division. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

Piggies secure top spot FIRST DIVISION: Cowichan

play the fast, expansive style of rugby that suits them best. “It was very wet and sloppy,” head coach Gord McGeachy said. “Ball-handKEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN ling was difficult again.” Regardless of the weather, Cowichan A huge win over the Velox Valhallians got off to a strong start in the match, last Saturday secured home-field advan- controlling most of the play in the first tage throughout the Vancouver Island half. Good forward work by Rob McDonRugby Union playoffs for the First Div- nell led to the first try, about 10 minutes ision Cowichan Piggies. into the game. Not long after that, Owen In their most important game of the Wood added to the total with a try that season so far, the Piggies topped Velox he converted himself. 26-11 at the Herd Road pitch, lockA few minutes before halftime, ing themselves into first place in the Andrew Gudmundseth added to the league. damage with a try that Wood converted Rain and mud created “trying con- for a 19-0 Piggies lead. ditions” on the field that meant, once At that point, the Piggies started to get again, that the Piggies were unable to into penalty trouble, and were awarded a yellow card late in the half, dropping their numbers to 14. Velox took advantage and kicked penalty goals late in the first half and early in the second to make it 19-6. The score stayed that way for some time, and then with about 10 minutes left in the match, Velox intercepted a Cowichan pass and ran it in for a try, which they failed to convert. The missed convert came NO ANESTHETIC DOG AND CAT as a relief to the Piggies, as ULTRASONIC TEETH CLEANING AND POLISHING. the extra two points would ‘NO GROGGY PETS’ FREE CONSULTATION. have cut their margin to less DUNCAN: 250-597-2275 than one try. VICTORIA: 250-592-2323 Velox continued to press President and founder of K9OHA – Sylvia MacDonald for more points, but with Vet approved. www.k9britebark.com about four minutes left,

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Cowichan’s Peter Budina went over for a try to make it 26-11, putting the game out of reach. In addition to the try-scorers, the Piggies also got a strong game from George Bantin at fullback, while Ty Jones played what McGeachy called “by far his best game of the season.” “They were definitely two standout performers on the weekend,” the coach said. As long as the Piggies keep playing on Vancouver Island, they will hold homefield advantage. They will try to put it to good use this Saturday when they play host to the Port Alberni Black Sheep in a league semifinal. Cowichan has two wins and a loss against Port Alberni this season, and won’t be taking the Black Sheep lightly. “We’ve lost two games this year, and one was to them,” McGeachy noted. In their last meeting, on March 29, Cowichan edged Alberni 20-17. “Last week was a battle, but we scraped out a three-point win,” McGeachy said. “We’re expecting another one.” The conditions are expected to be drier and sunnier this weekend, which should favour the Piggies. “Fingers crossed that we’ll get to play our game,” McGeachy said. “If not, we’ll do what we have to do.” In the other semifinal, the Nanaimo Hornets will visit the Valhallians. “All the top four teams are evenly matched,” McGeachy said. “Nanaimo and Velox will come down to who’s playing well on the day.”


Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Road Warriors: T-Birds learn lessons on trip KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

Queen Margaret’s student and up-and-coming freestyle skier Keaton Heisterman. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

QMS freestyler is ready to make the jump KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

A student from Queen Margaret’s School has been making tracks on the freestyle skiing circuit this year. Keaton Heisterman, 11, took up the sport four years ago, and is on the cusp of getting to the next level. “One of my parents’ friends’ sons is an extremely good freestyle skier, and I found it interesting, all the tricks he did in the park, so I started and got really into it and started competing,” he said. Heisterman, who hails from Cedar, trains and competes with the Mt. Washington Freestyle Club. At Apex in January, he took first in both the slopestyle and big air competitions, and second in moguls. More recently, at Silverstar in March, he finished second in big air, which is similar to aerials. Next year, at 12, Heisterman will be eligible to compete at the next level, which includes moving from big air to aerials. He will also be old enough to qualify for events like the BC Winter Games, although the next BC Winter Games are in 2016. This year, he competed in the super youth division for 10- and 11-year-olds, and he can’t wait to make the jump, so to speak. “It’s pretty difficult to get good practice right now in super youth because the park is pretty small,” he said. “You have to set yourself apart from everybody else.” Once he makes it to the next level, Heisterman has some other long-term goals. “I want to make it to nationals and compete there, make the B.C. team,” he said. “Hopefully I’ll go to the Olympics, probably in moguls.”

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Cowichan Secondary School’s girls rugby program has continued to grow since winning the provincial XV and sevens championships last year. Now consisting of full-blown first and second teams, the Thunderbirds played six road games in four days last week, and proved they are still among the teams to beat in B.C. “Playing six games in four days was great for our program,” head coach Brad Skene said. “We graduated a number of important players last year but these hard road games have allowed our new senior group to develop roles and the rookies have gotten to play a lot of rugby in a short time.” The busy stretch began last Wednesday when the Cowichan teams travelled to the Comox Valley, where the senior team faced G.P. Vanier and the development side played Mark R. Isfeld. The senior T-Birds defeated Vanier 29-7, but Skene noted that they weren’t facing the full Towhees squad. “We can’t read too much into the score line, as a number of Vanier players were away on a school trip,” he pointed out. “I was pleased with our performance in the second half.” Adrienne Saari scored two tries in the win, while Hannah Morten, Sara Lowes and Mariah Fontana had one each. Fontana also kicked two conversions. The development team lost 2917 to Isfeld, but because Isfeld had to borrow players from Vanier to field a full team, Cowichan won by default. Emily Lindsay and Maddie Pirie each had a try and a conversion, and Drew Hobday also scored a try. “Our development team beat Isfeld during a spring break jamboree, but in this game they found a much more physical

and dynamic opponent,” Skene reported. On Friday, the T-Birds headed for the Lower Mainland, where both teams faced Robert Bateman on Friday. The seniors gave up four firsthalf tries to the quick Bateman team in a 34-26 loss. Morten scored two tries, Meana Manhas and Haeley Lowe had one each, and Fontana kicked three conversions. “Bateman is a strong team with numerous gifted athletes and they had a fantastic start,” Skene said. “This was a lesson that we needed to learn.” The Cowichan development team came up with a 36-27 win over Bateman’s second XV. Kendall Raymond-Stevens scored two tries, while Lindsay, Hobday, Karli Longridge and Jamayna Peppers had one each. Lindsay also kicked two conversions and Pirie added one. “This was a barn-burner,” Skene said. “Back and forth action between two sets of novice players. I think this game was the ‘Wow! I get it now!’ game for a large portion of the development team.” On Saturday, both Cow High teams earned victories over Elgin Park, the seniors winning 14-10 and the development side winning 55-0. Fontana had a try and two conversions for the seniors, and Denise Roy scored a try. As Cowichan improved on the previous day’s performance. Roy and Brigitte Reid had three tries apiece for Cowichan’s development team. Lindsay recorded two tries and four conversions, Hobday had one try, and Pirie kicked one conversion. “I didn’t expect this,” Skene admitted. “I think the score line reflects how much our rookies have learned by playing three games in quick succession.”

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A HERO’S WELCOME

Cowichan’s own star Paralympian Braydon Luscombe gets a warm welcome home from Sochi at CIBC’s Duncan branch Friday, March 28. He was presented with a commemorative coin and banner by Jenn Payer, branch manager, and Deborah Barnes, district vice president, and chatted with people who came to congratulate him on his performance at the Games. [ANDREA RONDEAU/CITIZEN]

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Sports

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

DCS’s Groenendijk commits to TRU KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

I t ’s a b i g l o a d o f f D o u g Groenendijk’s shoulders now that he has picked his next destination. The Duncan Christian School athletic standout was highly sought after by volleyball coaches across the country, but he decided last week to commit to Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops. “The WolfPack are a great volleyball team and I think I can learn a lot from [head coach Pat Hennelly],” Groenendijk said. “I spent some time in Kamloops last summer with Team BC. That experience gave me some great insight into what the campus is like.” Groenendijk will be joining some of his Team BC teammates in Kamloops, which factored into his decision. He will also be play-

“It’s gonna be a big step. It’s a way faster game, and everyone is physically fit, so I no longer have that advantage.” DOUG GROENENDJIK, future TRU WolfPack player

ing alongside Matt Krueger, his head coach with Team BC and a libero with the WolfPack. Playing high-level volleyball in Canadian Interuniversity Sport was a goal of Groenendijk’s, although he knows that the transition from 1A high school volleyball to the CIS will be a challenge. “It’s gonna be a big step,” he acknowledged. “It’s a way faster game, and everyone is physically fit, so I no longer have that advantage.” Groenendijk has registered for

the Bachelor of Arts program. Doug will be the third member of his family to play post-secondary volleyball. His brother Cameron has played four years with Redeemer University College in Ontario, and his older sister Megan has played two years at Vancouver Island University. A younger sister, Danielle, is an emerging star at DCS as well. Hennelly is excited about adding Groenendijk, who helped DCS to a fourth-place finish at the provincial 1A championships last fall. “Douglas has a lot of potential on the court,” he said. “He has good vertical and a long reach. He has a great work ethic like [Krueger] says and will fit in great with our incoming recruits and current players. Douglas is another smalltown guy. I like the work ethic and attitude that often comes from small-town players.”

Duncan Christian School standout athlete Doug Groenendijk has committed to play for the Thompson Rivers WolfPack next year. [KEVIN ROTHBAUER/CITIZEN]

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Sports

Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

15

Cowichan Rec Lacrosse League seeking new players for 2014 season KEVIN ROTHBAUER CITIZEN

New players, regardless of experience, are welcome as the Cowichan Rec Lacrosse League prepares for another season.

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Savings Centre on April 9, and at Fuller Lake Arena on April 16 and 23, all at 8 p.m. For more information, call Dave at 250746-8179 or email cowichanreclacrosse@ hotmail.ca

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen


Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Cowichan Valley Citizen | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen

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SAVE

%

• 1/8” to 2” • 1/4” to 21/4”

40%

COMPRESSION TESTER

SAVE

• For autobody fender repairs

SAVE

Reg. 69.99

Reg. 299.99

407 PC O-RING ASSORTMENT

43

• Handles: glass bead, sand crushed glass walnut shell & more • 30lb capacity • Shoulder strap

SALE

.99

39

49

• Heavy Duty • Heat Treated • Rust resistant • Precision machined to exacting standards • NC/NF 1/4” to 1”

$

$ .99

6

21 PC 3/4” DR SOCKET SET SAVE $

JUMBO 45 PC TAP & DIE SET SAE

TUNGSTEN

SALE

.99

9 PC LOCKOUT TOOL KIT SAVE

70

37%

SAVE

$

60

SALE

89

.99 Reg. 149.99

$

SALE

79

.99 Reg. 149.99

7/8” to 2” in 1/16” increments • Ratchet, breaker & 2 extensions included

SALE

SLIM JIM!

$

18.99

Reg. 29.99

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS -

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

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3

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS 15” HD ADJUSTABLE WRENCH BUNGEE CORDS SAVE SALE % 12” $ .99

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap | Wednesday, April 9, 2014

19

50

Reg. 39.99

VICTOR TYPE WELDING/ CUTTING KIT SAV HOT $ E PRICE SALE

100

$

149

.99

Reg. 249.99

BRUSHLESS PRO KIT

$

SALE

.99

Reg. 499.99

1499

40% SALE

2797-22

12.99

Reg. 19.99

ELECTRICAL CONDUIT BENDER

26999 3499

$

SAVE

44%

SALE

24.99

Reg. 44.99

TRADE IN YOUR OLD STUFF

MOTORCYCLE LIFTTABLE

285LB CAPACITY

$

COMPRESSION TESTER

SAVE

%

35

39.99

HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSION JACK SAV $ E

SAVE

50%

SALE

SALE

Reg. 69.99

SALE

SAVE

$

BUY THIS- GET THIS FREE! YOUR CHOICE! $250.00 Value

18” REG 24.99 $ SALE 24” REG 39.99 $ SALE 36” REG 59.99 $ SALE

99¢

12V MAGNETIC REVOLVING 3 IN 1 LIGHT

• 1/2” Hammer drill • H.D. Impact driver • 2 x M18 4AH Batteries • Smart charger

429

H.D. BOLT CUTTERS

$

YOUR CHOICE

18” 21” 30”

$

DEAD OR ALIVE

19.99

Reg. 39.99

2000 LB PALLET PULLER

We’ll Give You

SAVE

$

20

200

399

$

.99

Reg. 559.99

SALE

49.99

Reg. 69.99

29 1/2” 1/2”TRAFFIC TRAFFIC CONE SAVE %

50

$

SALE

14

.99 Reg. 29.99

MINI BENCH GRINDER W/ FLEX SHAFT

THAT’S

$750.99

SALE

79.99

Reg. 159.99

WORTH OF TOOLS FOR ONLY

$32999!!!

$

CASH!!

OR TAKE IT OFF YOUR BILL...

SAVE

$

80

Flex shaft included

• Direct Drive brushless motor • Permantle lubricated motor bearings • 3” grinding fine grit wheel & fibre buffing wheel • 0-10000 RPM V/S LIMITED STOCK!

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS -


Wednesday, April 9, 2014 | Cowichan Valley Citizen Wrap

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS POST DRIVER 1.3 GALLON GARDEN • Pound fence posts in SPRAYER with ease SAVE

40 % $

$

SALE

14

.99

CEMENT

SALE

Reg. 24.99

SAVE

10” REPLACEMENT DOLLY WHEELS

SALE

Reg. 14.99

SALE

15

.99

Reg. 24.99

MATTOCK FIBERGLASS CUTTER

3 TINE CULTIVATOR

SAVE

50 %

$

SALE

39.99

Reg. 59.99

YARD TOOL STORAGE HOOKS

SAVE

%

20

6 CU. FT. PREMIUM MEDIUM DUTY WHEELBARROW

$

35%

Reg. 449.99

Greenhouse

50 %

7

SALE

349.99

• 5 cubic feet • 1/2 hp motor

$ .50 $

$

MIXERS

399.99

Reg. 499.99

16” REPLACEMENT WHEEL BARROW WHEEL

SAVE

• 20 pcs • Variety of sizes for all sorts of tools

SALE

59

SAVE

50%

SALE

$ .50

7

.99 Reg. 79.99

Reg. 14.99

SHOP AND SHED CLEANUP!

HORSE RAKE

FIBERGLASS PORT HOLE DIGGER

• 55” Fiberglass handle

$

SALE

14

SALE

SALE

$

.99 Reg. 22.99

19

$

.99 Reg. 39.99

SUPER SOFT FLOW THROUGH CAR WASH BRUSH

HEAVY DUTY CORN BROOM

MAILO IRON JOINT TELESCOPING LADDER

SALE

SALE

Reg. 13.99

$ .99

9

Reg. 19.99

to any 14 oz 31”TORCH 31” TORCH • Attaches propane bottle

SUPER GAS STOVE W/STAND SAVE Included: $ • Propane regulator/hose • Stand & burner • Perfect for cooking crab or deep frying turkeys

$

79.99

Reg. 139.99

PERFECT FOR OUTDOOR COOKING

• Lightweight frame • Uses: Burn Piles Weed Control Torch on roofs

60

$

SALE

199

.99

$

SAVE

$

70

$

34.99

Reg. 54.99

SALE

109.99

Reg. 179.99

WEST TORCH

TIGER TORCH

SAVE

SALE

16.99

MULTI-PURPOSE LADDER

$

Reg. 299.99

MADE IN CANADA

SALE

SPECIAL PRICE

Reg. 29.99

• Step ladder adjustment 5’ to 8’ • Extension adjustment 10’ to 16’ • Also stands on stairs

$ .99

8

19

.99

BALL BUNGEES • Replace those “old sagging” ball bungees

SALE

36 %

39¢

each

MADE IN CANADA!

BULK

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS -

TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -TARPS - TOOLS - TARPS - TOOLS -

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April 9, 2014