Cowessess First Nation Annual Report 2019-2020

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AR NE NP UO AR L T

COWESSESS FIRST NATION 2019-2020


CONTENTS

03 Community Profile 04 A Message From Chief Delorme 06 A Message From the Executive Director 09 COVID-19 Response 13

Governance Structure

21 Urban Services 25 Education 32 Justice 36 Lands 41 Health

47 Prevention & Resources 52 Preparation Centre 56 Facilities & Infrastructure 60 Sports 63 Housing 67 Finance 71

Cowessess Ventures


ABOUT CFN COMMUNITY

PROFILE

237

03


A MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF CHIEF CADMUS DELORME

It is with great honour to provide words on behalf of the Council and Cowessess First Nation. This year has included a little bit of everything. Since our last Annual Report a year ago, we have fulfilled another unqualified audit and Council approved a balanced budget. Our Executive Director and Director of Finance have lead an amazing team in our administration programs. Our entities Cowessess Ventures and Little Child Community Development have been growing. We are proud to introduce two new entities, Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge and Mikiwam Housing Inc. Our credit and professional partnership approach in the government and business world has gotten stronger. As a First Nation, we are healing one day at a time and building a governance house that is decolonizing and setting our next generation up for success.

COVID-19 has reminded us of the things that a fast moving world sometimes makes us forget. Staying home more, less gatherings, and celebrations and ceremonies cancelled have tested us in ways we have not encountered before. Since March, we have provided masks, groceries, financial assistance, protection, and more to the 237 residential homes on the reserve and through the Urban Office. Our way of life has adjusted and with great leadership, staff, and citizens wanting to help, we have remained a proactive First Nation in a time of major challenges.

One highlight of many for this year has been the ratification of the Miyo Pimatisowin Act. This is the third ratified major legislation passed by citizens; the Constitution and Custom Election Act being the other two. Since 1951 the jurisdiction has been removed from us when it comes to Children in Care. We are currently finalizing a Coordination Agreement with the Government of Canada and Government of Saskatchewan and when finalized, Cowessess First Nation will fully have jurisdiction over our children in care. The Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge is the name of our agency. We will chart our own course in assuring we do not sentence another generation. A second highlight from this past year has been the 1907 Land Surrender. In 1907, the then Government of Canada tricked our ancestors into surrendering 1/3 of our reserve land (see Youtube video for more details). The Government of Canada accepted the claim and we are currently in

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negotiations to settle this claim. If the settlement is finalized, we can invest in our present to assure our next generations are better off than we are today. If negotiations go as scheduled, we should be bringing something to the citizens in the following year. I want to thank Council for leading our change management in our governance structure. Over the past two years Council have transitioned from an Indian Act administration portfolio system to a Nation Building Governance Structure. The Nation Building Governance Structure places Council in areas Council can make a positive difference for our First Nation while removing politics from administration. We want to assure our voice is heard in all areas but we want to empower our staff to do a great job while Council focuses on new areas. Please see more in the Governance section of this Annual Report. In conclusion, the Cowessess First Nation remains the largest First Nation in Treaty Four Territory and we own collectively a large portion of land. The history we all inherited can be a challenge at time but our culture and family kinship has been our strength. We must unite to heal and not allow the fear driven comments to hinder us from striving for greatness. Our children are watching us and learning about how to respond to challenges and opportunities. Let's wire our children with resilience.

- Chief Cadmus Delorme

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COWESSESS FIRST NATION ORGANIZATION

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT ANGIE YELLOWBIRD

The Executive Director’s office is available to all members and can be reached by calling the Band Office.

The Executive Director is under the direct supervision of the Chief and is the only employee of the Chief & Council. The Executive director works in collaboration with the Executive office which includes the Director of Finance, The Executive Assistant, HR and Communications Specialists and the Nation Navigators. Overall, the Executive Director has the responsibility of ensuring that there are reliable, credible and accountable programs & services being provided by the many Departments of Cowessess First Nation; which includes the Post Office and the Chief Henry S. Delorme Mall. To accomplish this task, the Executive Director, in collaboration with the Executive Office, must ensure that all the necessary policies, procedures, processes and finances are in place to support the organization in achieving their goals and objectives. Good Governance

The CFN Organization is governed by the various Law’s, Agreements, Bylaws, Policy & Procedures and Plans that, as the Executive Director, am responsible for ensuring that all the departments, programs, services and staff are abiding by and adhering to in all the decisions that are being made. Values & Trust

Each and every one of the director’s share the same values as it relates to the betterment of the organization. It is their intention to enhance the environment and lives of who they provide programs & services too. By working as a team, the trust is strengthened as they move forward by supporting and assisting one another. Strategic Planning

The Executive Office and the Program Directors continuously strive to plan for a brighter future in all the areas that they work within. It is our intention that on annual basis, strategic planning sessions will be conducted to ensure that we are consistently working towards that same goal of improving the environment and lives of those we serve.

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ADMINISTRATION STATS

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COMMUNICATIONS STATS

4,600 VIEWS PER MONTH

2,876 FOLLOWERS

4,840 PROCESSED PEICES OF MAIL 463 EMAIL NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIBERS

84 UBSCRIBERS, 8,514 VIEWS COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS

COWESSESS FIRST NATION OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

APPROXIMATELY FOR

THE

$16

2019/2020

FUNDING SOURCES

MILLION FISCAL

DOLLARS

YEAR.

ISC FNIH CMHC FSIN SITAG First Nations Trust Revenue Trust Account Painted Hand CDC Sask Justice Justice Canada

And other grants and funding obtained through proposal driven activities. 07


EXECUTIVE OFFICE ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE STRATEGIC PLAN

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COVID-19

OUR RESPONSE


KEEPING OUR COMMUNITY SAFE COVID-19 Response and Planning

Coordinated meetings were conducted by Zoom to ensure the health & safety of all those who participated, Research and information gathering began, assessing the effects of COVID-19 provincial restrictions and beginning to implement necessary steps for food security,

"IN THESE UNPRECEDENTED TIMES, ALL STEPS THAT HAVE BEEN TAKEN WILL BE LESSONS LEARNED"

Monitoring stations were implemented at our borders to prevent the possibility of someone infected with COVID-19 from entering our community, Staff ensured the necessary day-to-day essential services were being provided,

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MARCH 19/20 MARKED THE FIRST DAY OF UNPRECEDENTED TIMES. MARCH 20/20, ALL OFFICES, DEPARTMENTS AND CCEC CLOSED THEIR DOORS AND STAFF WERE REQUIRED TO STAY HOME. MARCH 20/20 WAS THE FIRST MEETING OF THE COVID 19 TASK FORCE WHICH INCLUDED ALL CHIEF & COUNCIL MEMBERS, ALL EXECUTIVE OFFICE MEMBERS AND ALL PROGRAM DIRECTORS. WE MET EVERY MONDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY TO WORK TOGETHER TO PRODUCE PLANS OF ACTION TO ADDRESS THE NEED OF ENSURING THE SAFETY OF OUR STAFF AND COMMUNITY CITIZENS.

The Emergency Management Plan was implemented and the Flagging System was incorporated to allow for an effective communication tool for citizens in stating their needs to the Peacekeepers and the community was saturated with educational information that was delivered to their homes, posted on the website and on social media pages. Daily and weekly update reports were also provided by Chief Delorme through videos and memos.

In these unprecedented times, all steps that have been taken will be lessons learned and a new Pandemic Response Plan will be created to continue to protect our community and citizens.

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IT'S FOR THEM. 12


CHIEF &

COUNCIL Chief and Council are central and

Left to right back row:

Left to right front row:

hold weekly meetings to assure

Malcolm Delorme

Denise Pelletier

ongoing progress of the Nation.

Jon Z. Lerat

Cadmus Delorme

Gary Sparvier

Pat Sparvier

This governance structure will empower specialists to help make major decisions on behalf of the Nation as well as assure your elected officials remain central to the affairs of the Nation.

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Curtis Lerat, Damon Delorme Richard Asiacian


COUNCIL RESPONSIBILITIES CHIEF

AND

COUNCIL

ARE

CENTRAL

AND

HOLD

WEEKLY

MEETINGS

TO

ASSURE

ONGOING

PROGRESS

OF

THE

NATION.

EAGLE WOMAN TRIBUNAL

THE LITTLE CHILD COMMITTEE

The first judicial system the Nation has. It will take complaints and disputes and provide a process to find solutions internally. One Council member sits on the committee and the remaining nine are nonpolitical.

DEVELOPMENT BOARD

ADMINISTRATION

MIKIWAM HOUSING

is the biggest of them all. The Council oversees the Executive Director and Director of Finance. The Finance and Admin Committee takes ideas and gives direction to the Senior Executive.

will create a housing authority on the Nation to oversee the affairs of the homes on Cowessess First Nation. There will be one Council member on the Board and remaining non-political.

TREATY LAND ENTITLEMENT

TREATY LAND ENTITLEMENT

was settled in 1996. It has two duties, purchase land and manage investments. One Council member is on Trust along with five non-political.

is not implemented as of yet. It will create an Education authority on the Nation to oversee the affairs of CCEC on Cowessess First Nation. There will be one Council member on the Board and remaining non-political.

oversees gaming on the Nation as well is the Community Development Committee (CDC), to help with citizen donations. There is one Council member on the Board and five nonpolitical.

THE CHILD FAMILY SERVICES BOARD

The Child Family Services Board is in black as it is not implemented as of yet. It will create a CFS authority to oversee all children in care as well in prevention. There will be one Council member on the Board and remaining non-political.

THE VENTURES BOARD

oversees the business entities of the Nation. Two elected officials sit on the board along with five non political. 19


OUR GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

The Cowessess First Nation is at a moment in time filled with opportunities Citizens have an inherent right which derives well before first contact with settler society. This is foundational in the Cowessess First Nation Constitution. Cowessess First Nation agreed to Treaty with the Crown 145 years. This Treaty Agreement affirms our responsibility to work with the Crowns Canadian State while assuring the fiduciary obligation for sharing our land is fulfilled. The challenge remains to work with the Canadian State which has attempted to harm and break our spirit as Cowessess First Nation. This challenge is now transitioning back to a true Cowessess First Nation governing body which our ancestors used prior to the Indian Act and help Cowessess First Nation move beyond the Indian Act. There are three outcomes the Cowessess First Nation focuses on: Economic Self-Sustainability, Political Sovereignty, and Cultural Rejuvenation.

Economic Self-Sustainability includes creating jobs, training, education, businesses, utilizing the land, enhancing citizens, taking pride in citizens, less reliant on others, efficiency, and more.

Economic Self-sustainability

Political Sovereignty is accountability, thinking Nationbuilding, empowering the Constitution, moving beyond the Indian Act, empower Cowessess laws, internal dispute

Political Sovereignty

resolutions, and more. Cultural Rejuvenation is language, healing, strengthening kinship, empowering citizens, strengthening the identity of being a Cowessess citizen, strengthening protocols and

Cultural Rejuvenation

culture, and more. These outcomes lead to core strategic areas citizens can focus on to have stronger results based impact on the Nation.

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THERE ARE EIGHT CORE STRATEGIC AREAS COUNCIL FOCUS ON BEHALF OF CITIZENS. THESE NATION BUILDING PORTFOLIOS ARE AS FOLLOWS:

Finance & Administration

Committee

Governance Committee

Inherent & Treaty Rights

Stewards of the Land

This committee has elected Council and assures the bylaws and policies are being adhered too and helps citizens and staff This committee has elected Council and assesses bylaws and policies to assure are up to date as well fulfills the Constitution obligations This area will bring speakers to help citizens better understand what inherent Rights are and what Treaty Rights are This area assures our land, water, air, animals and more are protected for generations to come

This area will bring language back, Decolonization

help to heal, strengthen the ideology of being from Cowessess First Nation This area will help with better

Citizen Enhancement

training, partnerships which involve empowering citizens strengthening minds of citizens This area will help with empowering

Community Planning

the 2009 Community Plan, update the plan, make the community stronger This area will help with having plans

Capital Projects

ready for a Community Centre, lowpressure water system, lake front property projects and more

These strategic Nation Building Portfolios provide core areas for Council to lead on behalf of citizens and when are ongoing, will help administration, future planning, and help Council provide results based duties to the citizens. There are six foundation areas to assure the three outcomes are fulfilled.

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SIX FOUNDATIONS

Citizens, Council, Administration, and external Stakeholders must better understand and respect The Cowessess First Nation governance.

Good Governance

Citizens, Council, Administration, and external Stakeholders must understand change is not easy and feedback and

Change Management

adjustment is ongoing

Cowessess First Nation has values and these need to be at the forefront and respected. The Trust in citizens, Council, the governance must be enhanced. A Safe place to ask questions

Values and Trust

and appeal decisions Is good governance.

Planning in many areas is key to understanding goals, accomplishments, and areas which need improvement.

Strategic Planning

Planning shall be continually updated

The key to inclusion is good communication. The Annual report, website social media, and more are required to keep all updated. A place to ask questions is also key to good

Communication

communications

Having data will result in being able to make better Decisions. This has been a weak area and with more data will

Data

have better results.

Having better results in these foundational areas will help with fulfilling the Cowessess First Nation outcomes. Fulfilling the outcomes will result in the First Nation being the greatest Nation we can be. Below is the entire map.

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Outcome

Foundation

Strategies

Finance & Administration

Committee

Good Governance

Governance Committee

Change Management

Inherent and Treaty Rights

Economic Self-sustainability

Values and Trust

Stewards of the Land

Political Sovereignty

Strategic Planning Decolonization

Cultural Rejuvenation

Citizen Enhancement

Communication

Community Planning

Data

Capital Projects

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OUR NEW GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

The Cowessess First Nation has been transitioning to a central delegated governance structure. As Chief and Council are elected to oversee the affairs of the Nation, the core centre is elected officials. At the centre is also the Oversight Committee. Surrounding the centre are areas to fulfilled the best service as well as professionalism.

Child Child & Family Child & & Family Family Administration Administration Administration

Services Services Services

Education Education Board Education Board Board

Chief Chief & Council Chief & & Council Council

TLE TLE Trustees TLE Trustees Trustees

Oversight Oversight Oversight

Housing Housing Board Housing Board Board Ventures Ventures Board Ventures Board Board

Little Little Child Little Child Child

Community Community Community

Development Development Development

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DEPARTMENTS

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DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION

MISSION The mission of the Executive Office is to be an excellent resource to Chief and Council, Program Directors, staff and citizens by providing clear information to guide decisions, implement policy and support projects.

VISION The Executive Office, led by the Executive Director supports community leaders in achieving the Nation's vision.

STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: ANGIE YELLOWBIRD

Pat Criddle – Executive Assistant Kathy Buckles - Director Of Finance Kim Delorme - HR Specialist Rhoda Twumasi - Communications Specialist Debbie Delorme - Membership Coordinator Bryon Lerat - Administration Assistant Nation Navigators - Ella Redwood

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OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$430,196.25

Our sources of funding for programs are from the First Nations Trust and money received from Grants and proposals.

| Â 03 22


DEPARTMENT OF URBAN URBAN SERVICES SERVICES

VISION The Urban Department has a mandate to deliver programs and services on behalf of membership following the Cowessess First Nation Urban Department Policy. The Department advocates and assists members when needed. Our goal is to continue to improve the quality of life for our community and our members; and to help achieve selfsufficiency.

STAFF

DIRECTOR OF URBAN SERVICES: JODIE DELORME

Francis Delorme – Program Assistant Bryton Lerat – Receptionist Sandra Lavallee – Janitor/Casual Receptionist

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OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$430,196.25

Our sources of funding for programs are from the First Nations Trust and money received from Grants and proposals.

| Â 03 22


PROGRAM STATS AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

Almost 3 0 0 Children and youth received School Supplies was funded by programming for the 2019/2020 school year.

The 2019 Christmas dinners welcomed members and their families.

1,700

The Home Ownership 7 Program assisted members with purchasing their first home.

Over 1 , 5 5 0 sandwiches have been made and handed out to those in need through Sandwiches to the Streets program.

Over 8 0 youth have had their sports registration fees covered through the Youth Assistance Program.

We have participated in the Salvation Army’s Z99 Adopt a Family for the last 3 years and have adopted 1 4 families during the holiday season so far.

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PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

CURRENT INITIATIVES Cree Classes Soup & Bannock Day Arts & Crafts School Supplies Distribution

Accomplishments

WORKING TOWARDS Youth Volleyball Development & Skill Enhancement Program; 35 youth participated in this program. The youth improved so much over the period of this program, it prepared them for upcoming tournaments and helped to build their self-confidence. The youth attended the FSIN Youth Volleyball Championships in Prince Albert 2019, our Under 14 Ladies and Under 12 Coed team came home with Silver Medals. We attended the Tony Cote Summer Games 2019 Under 14 girls & Under 12 Coed came home with gold. We are extremely proud of our Youth and with this Volleyball program, our focus was to improve our youth in developing their skills and enhancing their possible interest in sports, as well as to promote physical activity. Sandwiches to the Streets; since this initiative started in July 2019 over 1550 sandwiches have been handed out. We had volunteers come all the way from Prince Albert to assist us in distributing packages to those in need.

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Volleyball & Basketball Program Coming of Age - Hunting Program Triple P Men’s & Women’s Group


DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EDUCATION

VISION We respect and honour the diversity of our First Nation; from this strength we will all walk together to flourish as a united, healthy community for generations to come.

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K’AWASIS DAY CARE

STAFF DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION: SANDY PINAY-SCHINDLER

COWESSESS COMMUNITY EDUCATION CENTRE

Principal Natasha Isaac Cary Delorme (Gr. 2)3. Carrie Pratt (Learning Supports Teacher) Andrew Starblanket (High School) Ashley McNabb (Educational Assistant) Bethany Nickel (Gr. 3) Darwin Bear (Hot Lunch Assistant) Chenaya Taypotat (Grade 5) Debra Gray (Grade 4) Cliff Prokopchuk (High School) Daydree Delorme (Educational Assistant) Jan Sparvier (Literacy Teacher) Jackie Bellegarde (Gr. 9) Jessie Lerat (Educational Assistant) Janice Friesen (Kindergarten) Kaitlyn Taylor (Grade 8) Laura Petschulat (High School) Karen Agecoutay (Grade 6) Lois Delorme (Grade 7) Koletta Delorme (Educational Assistant) Melodie Lavalee (Hot Lunch Cook) Maria Sparvier (High School/Library) Ruby Delorme (Administrative Assistant) Rhonda Watson (Following Their Voices Facilitator) Samantha Pelletier (Educational Assistant) Sarah Zuiker (High School) Sandy Stradeski (Educational Assistant) Tanya Bellegarde (Grade 1) Troy Lavallee (Educational Assistant) Tricia Desnomie (Educational Assistant) 26

Donna L. Lerat, Day Care Coordinator Kerry Williams Doraleen Standing Ready Brittany Delorme Cianna Perkins Bevin Delorme

COWESSESS COMMUNITY EDUCATION CENTRE

Sandy Pinay-Schindler Director of Education Ashley Delorme Post-Secondary Education Coordinator Saria Roussin-Stevenson, Education Administrative Assistant Rosie Haywahe, Bus Driver Terry G.D. Lerat, Bus Driver Dallas Redwood, Bus Driver Avery Tanner, Bus Driver

COWESSESS HEAD START

Head Start/PreK Coordinator: Loretta Lerat Head Start/PreK Assistant: Sharon Nelson


BUDGET & OPERATING BUDGET STATISTICS AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$2,638,711.00

A variety of funding sources enables CCEC to remain operational and continuall improve on educationd elivery for students.

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CCEC ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS In March, June and September of 2019, six community engagement sessions were held to specifically discuss the educational vision and goals for the Cowessess community. Over 200 participants provided feedback on the following questions in the categories of Relationships, Values, Governance and Programming. A detailed summary of the responses is available on the Cowessess Website. The engagement work was started in 2019 in order to prepare for the writing and development of an education model (‘Education Act’) and for the updating of CCEC policies. ISC funding ($20,000) was received through the Regional Partnership funding application process in December 2018. Two more Regional Partnership project applications were submitted in 2019-2020 which resulted in approximately $168,000 in educational development activities (CCEC policy updates and a partnership with

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Zagime Anishnabek to develop educational goals). Some of the questions asked are found below.

How can we foster and build community involvement in school? How do we strengthen connections between youth & community? What could outdoor/land-based learning look like? What practical skills should be taught? What are important community values & what do they look like? How can we foster caring relationships in school? What would governance look like for CCEC, Daycare, Head Start? Who should govern? How do we build accountability, advising and support into education?


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS Accomplishments

Continuation of Cree language classes for a core group of learnings in 2019-2020 The first ever Cowessess Cree Language Camp was held in July of 2019 with the core group of language learners teaching over 120 community participants in Cree Continuation of Cree classes in the fall of 2019 with a local Cree speaker Beginner Cree classes were offered in the community prior to the COVID-19 shut down (February 2020) Cowessess Community Educational Centre participated in the annual Treaty 4 Gathering parade in September of 2018 and September of 2019. The CCEC float won first prize in two categories: Best Business 2018 (due to the Cowessess Gas & Grocery flag on the front of the Peacekeeper truck!) and Best School 2019 for the Language Theme of the parade (Language learners, CCEC students & leadership assisted with the float) Complete refresh of CCEC IT equipment including a wifi review and upgrade in 2019 Purchase of select second level services from File Hills Qu’Appelle Tribal Council IT Service contract with Prairie Valley School Division Recipient of the one in 10 year National Indian Brotherhood grant (March 2020) of $175,000 to support Cree and Saulteaux language programming in the community in 2020-2021.

Recipient of a $22,000 Community Foundations Grant in April of 2020 to purchase chromebooks for Grade 9- 12 students to support distance learning during Covid-19 School Bus Driver Training session held in July of 2019 Completion of Head Start Playground Installation in the fall of 2019 (removal of 20 year old playground equipment and installation of new sand and structures) Purchase of new CCEC white bus for student transportation to extra-curricular events (February 2019) Purchase of two new CCEC school buses (July 2020) for the fall of 2020 (two 54 passenger buses) Completion of K’Awasis Day Care basement renovations in July 2020 CCEC teachers established online google classrooms and instruction (March and April 2020) in response to the Covid-19 shutdown CCEC Graduation held on June 26 2020 at the Cowessess First Nation pow-wow arbour CCEC Policy Revisions have been in progress since October 2019 CCEC policy Focus Group meets regularly to review policies (March 2020 to present)

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CURRENT INITIATIVES Working on implementation of Daily 5 and balanced literacy in K to 6 classrooms (started in 2018 and the work continues) Completion of accurate data compilation (Our School Survey, Fountas & Pinnell Reading, WIAT, Early Years’ Evaluation for PreK and K) Language Revitalization in the community (12 committed learners continue their weekly lessons in preparation for a second language camp; expansion into CCEC in the fall of 2020 is planned) Completion of a 3 and 5 year Education Strategic plan Updating of CCEC policies (which were 18 years old) and the creation of a community, Indigenized educational framework for Cowessess (based on the engagement information from 2019)

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WORKING TOWARDS Re-Opening of CCEC – Fall 2020 - An adapted DRAFT plan for options was shared\with leadership and Program Directors (Covid-19 Response team) on Thursday, July 2, 2020. The goal is to have a tentative plan by the first week of August. Community Learning Plan – CCEC – This model incorporates community mentors and department programming in small groups in order to support small group learning in the fall. With the assistance of two teachers as well as the CCEC Principal and Director of Education, the plan will be in development for the month of July.


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DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JUSTICE

MISSION Justice is guide by our constitution to develop a system that will provide holistic services to enhance a self-governing structure that will reflect our seven sacred teachings: Respect, Love, Courage, Honesty, Wisdom, Humility and Truthfulness. Through theses teachings, every citizen with in Cowessess will be treated in a dignified and honourable manner.

VISION The goal is to enhance the lives our out children, youth and families in the community by protecting life, rights and property, by way of community-based decision making and intervention. We will do this through effective networking and cooperation with external agencies. Cowessess First Nation will progressively develop a system that sustains a healthy and safe environment, which will enable the community to grow to their full physical, mental emotional and spiritual potential. 32


The Cowessess Justice Department will be promoting a Restorative Justice program that will enhance the services already being provided such as the Peacekeepers program, Alternative Measures and the Fine Option Program as well other programming as it is developed. The Justice department also oversees the Fire Department and the Animal Control program. Currently we have also taken on the role for the Frontline Safety Workers Initiative as well.

STAFF

DIRECTOR OF JUSTICE: JENNIFER PELLETIER

FRONTLINE SAFETY PEACEKEEPERS WORKERS

Dawn, Ashleigh Delorme, Tyson Delorme, Zachery Gambler, Danica Lerat, Colleen Moosimin, Jeff Redwood, Susannah Stevenson, Elayne Stevenson, Jesse Sparvier, Deneene

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Aisaican, Joshua Delorme, Desmond Delorme, Regina Desjarlais, Kerry Desjarlais, Taryn Lerat, Wade McCallum, Dante Fuchs, Kurt


OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$404,526.00

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CURRENT INITIATIVES The Justice Department will be going through a Strategic Planning process once programming can be re-established after COVID 19 period has ended. Justice works closely with the Health & Social Development Department in meeting the training needs of individuals to attend to emergencies that may arise in the community. The Director works closely with all Program Directors in addressing the needs of the community. In addition, the Director of Justice is also available to deal with those are dealing with court issues, who are on probation and who are in the need of fine option.

WORKING TOWARDS Currently in the process of preparing for upcoming training for the CFN Volunteer Fire Department which includes procuring new equipment to affectively attend to the different kinds of emergencies that may arise. Ă˜Currently developing a Peacekeepers Policy & Procedures Manual that will govern and guide the current Peacekeeper Program.

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DEPARTMENT OF LANDS LANDS AND AND NATURAL NATURAL RESOURCES RESOURCES

MISSION We respect and honour the diversity of our First Nation; from this strength we will walk together to flourish as a united, healthy community for generations to come (Land use Plan).

VISION Cowessess Treaty Land Entitlement are accountable leaders in securing and managing a land base that provides beneficial opportunities to its membership and surrounding communities to build a strong economic base for present and future generations

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STAFF

DIRECTOR OF LANDS: LORETTA DELORME

Christopher Lerat Leasing Officer Stephanie Delorme Admin. Assist. Lois (Chooch) Taypotat Lands Acquisition Clerk

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OPERATING OPERATING BUDGET OPERATING BUDGET BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$188,192.33

TLE (Fee Simple) Revenue Spring 2020

$413,700.32

2019 Total Revenue

Agriculture Lands 47,103.8 acres Grazing Lands 37,985.3 acres Forage Lands 1,367.41 acres Not leased 415 acres TLE 18,280.5 acres 120 Farmers with 27 Rural

$724,959.26

TLE Reserve Revenue Spring 2020. Fall 2020 payments with $ going down every time land turns to reserve status

Municipalities

$1,310,857.99

$

1,280,076.32

-

total

(

2

revenue

litigations)

Fall 2020 Revenue going up every time land turns Reserve Status

$270,173.35

Original Reserve Spring 2020 $

$586,199.20

2019 Total Revenue | 03 38


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LANDS AND NATURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Lands Department is responsible for managing all Cowessess First Nation lands including both reserve status and fee simple lands. All revenue goes towards unfunded areas of Cowessess First Nation. The department negotiates leases with local producers and Nation members on a cost per acre basis for crop and pasture lands. Lands are managed in accordance with the Reserve Land and Environment Management Program (RLEMP). Land Use Plan- planning a scientific and orderly allocation of land, community resources, facilities, and services with a view to maintaining and improving the physical environment and the economic and social conditions of the community. Zoning Bylaw – Zoning is the vehicle that is used to describe in more specific terms the kind of uses that are permitted on a parcel of land. Single family housing, commercial retail, industrial are examples of land uses that are described in zoning bylaws which provide the conditions that the land use development must meet.

Highlights

The Lands department bought new furniture for office since 1996 Bought a 16’ tech trailerBought a drone·

CURRENT INITIATIVES Goat grazing up on Sakimay Cowessess border Fencing projects·

WORKING TOWARDS Working on bin inventory for database This fall renewals on home reserve find each quarter markers put in database Getting each sections of land in pictures for database

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH HEALTH & & SOCIAL SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT

MISSION To provide safe, effective, quality services to meet current community needs and be responsive to needs that arise.

VISION Continue striving for a balanced holistic community through the provision of safe, quality services for our future generations.

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COVID-19 RESPONSE The onset of the COVID-19 Pandemic has affected the offering of programming by the Health & Social Development department. As essential workers, several staff members continued to work to provide home care and food security services to the nation during the height of the Pandemic. All of the staff are currently back to work but the way that we offer services has changed. We are looking for unique and safe ways to be able to meet the needs of the members. We continue to be available to try and assist so just give us a call.

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STAFF

DIRECTOR OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: EMILY WATSON

Teena Redwoo,d Receptionist/Medical Transportation Clerk Rodney Delorme, Home Care Maintenance Worker Randi Lerat, Youth Outreach Worker Lyndon Lerat, Health Centre Supervisor Joanne Buckles, Community Health Representative Cheryl Delorme, Maternal Child Health Coordinator Poppy Ma Dietitian Charity Taypotat, Addictions Worker Aaliyah Grey, Health Support Worker Tyeshia Natewa, Home Care Aide Wynter Goodman, Community Liaison Worker

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OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$1,362,002.87

$1,253,417.66 Medical travel reimbursements per year

For the 2019-2020 fiscal year the Health & Social Development

$25,000 FSIN through the First Nations Addiction and Rehabilitation Foundation

office received $1,362,002.87. The following is the breakdown of our

$52,150 INAC

funding:

$27,874.61 YTCCFS for rent and shared programming

$1,881.60 TIPI Insurance as a donation

$1,679.00 Good Food Box sales

44


HIGHLIGHTS Our department tries to plan and carry out one or more major events each month. In the past year we have coordinated and provided the following: April 2019 Community Easter Event May 2019 Kinship Rejuvenation, Community Cleanup, Safe Food Handling Training June 2019 Youth Outing – PRIDE Parade July 2019 Berry Picking; Cree Language Camp, Hunter Safety Course Aug 2019 Feast Bag Making, Traditional Health Gathering, Treaty Day, Pow Wow Sept 2019 Twilight Drive In opportunities Oct 2019 Manitou Springs Seniors’ Trip Nov 2019 Liver Health Day, National Addictions Awareness Week Dec 2019 Christmas Crafts, Community Garden Prizes given out, National Aboriginal Day, AIDS Awareness Week Jan 2020 Kidney Health Day Feb 2020 Family Fun Fest, Sexual Health Day, Safe Food Handling Training Mar 2020 Youth Conference

CURRENT INITIATIVES Completion of the hiring of a Community Care Nurse and a Registered Dietitian. Al Anon

45

WORKING TOWARDS Aquasize for Seniors Having the Good Food Box program available twice a monthStarting a men’s group Elder support teachings for child development Cultural programming for Fetal Wellness – the importance of bringing a life into this world and the responsibility within the family and community. Healthy Start programming with the Day Care Aboriginal Shield – Grade 8 Initiate Al Teen


46

24

STATS HTLAEH


DEPARTMENT OF

PREVENTION & RESOURCES

47


STAFF

DIRECTOR OF PREVENTION AND RESOURCES: EVA COLES

Acting Director, Geneen Sparvier Program Coordinator, Cynthia (Cindy) Sparvier Supervisor, Samantha Sigurdson Program Assistant, Family and Youth Coordinator, Eunice Tanner Cultural Coordinator, Glenn Pelletier

YOUTH MENTORS

Ronalee Lavlee Stacy Buckles Candida (Candi) Carel Sheena Musqua Shania Kequahtooway

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OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge – The Miyo Pimatisowin Act was

$967,000.00

The operating budget coves the following areas:

ratified in the spring of 2020. This Act under Federal C-92 Legislation paves the way for Cowessess First Nation to self-govern its own child welfare/prevention system across Canada. This system will be built from the ground up to support Cowessess First Nation families to heal and be healthy in the years to come. It will be based on several prevention/cultural models that will best suit Cowessess First Nation.

49

Prevention activities Travel for staff and facilitators Salaries & benefits Food for the lodge and families participating in healing activities.


CHIEF REDBEAR CHILDREN'S LODGE & SACRED WOLF LODGE The Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge will host a number of departments needed for this important work, including the Sacred Wolf Lodge. The Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge is in the development/design stage. The Board of Directors has been appointed. The board has made the CEO selection for the Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge and her name is Eva Coles. The funding and legal agreement has been under negotiation since March 2020 and is now in the Coordination agreement writing stage between Canada, Saskatchewan and Cowessess First Nation for the funding and handover. It is hoped that the agreement will be finalized in the Fall 2020. The CEO along with the Board of Directors have taken the initial steps to begin the Strategic plan for the Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge. Community and stakeholder engagement sessions will take place in August and September 2020. We are seeking the best information, ideas, experiences and research to create a system that has not been seen before, so as not to replicate a child safety system that has not been working, for Cowessess members. Initial prevention funds have been received and programming is in the development stage for families residing on the Cowessess First Nation. Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge alongside Chief Delorme are representing Cowessess in all child welfare matters with Child and Family Ministries across Canada. When a Cowessess member is in need of information or advocacy we will seek to support them in any way that we can. The Prevention department which includes the Sacred Wolf Lodge has been operating under Cowessess First Nation since April 1, 2020. The focus of prevention is to work with families who are at risk of children being apprehended and/or wanting to start their family’s journey of healing. We have assisted a total of 9 families from April 1 to July 31, 2020 which consists of 12 adults and 25 children. Chief Red Bear Children’s Lodge and Sacred Wolf Lodge are welcoming home Cowessess’ children that are living away for whatever reason. We have cultural kits for mail out and offer tours of Cowessess to children and their families who feel they have lost their connection to their homeland. If you would like more information or would like a tour of the Sacred Wolf Lodge, please call 306-696-5010.

50


CURRENT INITIATIVES Individual/couples counselling Mediation services Cultural activities.

51

WORKING TOWARDS The lodge is completing the finishing touches needed for licensing. The referral list has been started and we have several families and young people on the waiting list. We will be open to support Cowessess children and their families in September 2020.


DEPARTMENT OF

PREPARATION CENTRE The Cowessess Preparation Center exists to fill the gap between eligible workers and labour force needs. The prep centre focuses on four main areas: Skill development Job Readiness Career Assessments Apprenticeships

52


STAFF

PROGRAM DIRECTOR: BARRY SPARVIER

Administrative Assistant, Luana Redwood Intake Specialist, Stacey Van Metre Administrative Clerk, Elisha Delorme

Target Groups

Social Assistance Recipients Individuals Eligible for Employment Insurance Individuals looking for employment

Mentoring Career planning Counseling Training Upgrading Driver Training

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Safety tickets Lifeskills/wellness Adult Basic Education GED Tutoring CPR & First Aid


OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$1,593,661

Wages, Benefits, Staff training 10.7% Administratio

WAGES,

BENEFITS,

ADMINISTRATION

n 4.5%

&

ADMIN

BENEFITS

&

OFFICE

$124,542

$52,272

PROGRAMMING

WAGES

$982,352

$102,500 COSTS

PROGRAMMING

Programmin g 84.7%

TRAINING

$8,500

$312,495

Wages & Benefits 24.2%

Admin & Office costs 2%

Programmin g 73.8%

54


CURRENT INITIATIVES Office Administration: students are doing their classes online Community Helpers Program: physical distancing: working with the Golf Course, health department and other areas Income Support Applications: physical distancing through phone calls and emails Labour Force Development: Still working with clients who need help with new jobs (tools, PPE), summer student program Life Skills: Driver’s License Program: Security Training – Online – process still to be outlined by SITAG Fire Fighting Training: Working with Southeast College on the ABE program that may start in September, preparing on how that’s going to look, Online or other options Working with 4C Farms with a summer student: Working with most of the First Nations departments with the community helpers program Working with human resource starting Summer student program

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WORKING TOWARDS In this trying time of COVID 19 pandemic, we are doing our best to serve the community, keeping in mind the health and safety of who we serve and the community at large


THE DEPARTMENT OF

FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE

The DepartmentIs accountable to and takes overall direction from the Executive Director. The Dept. provides biweekly reports to the Executive Director who then updates Chief and Council.

56


STAFF

DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES & INFRASTRUCTURE: IRA AISAICAN

Administrative Assistant, Sandy Delorme

COMMUNITY BUILDINGS ROADS

Art lerat, Backhoe operator Lance Pelletier, Grader operator John D. Lerat, Truck driver

WATER TREATMENT PLANT

Doug Kovach, Level one operator Kayleigh Dawn, Operator trainee Shane Okemaysim, Operator trainee Peter Bunnie, Water truck driver Chris lerat, Casual employee

57

Grady Lerat, Supervisor William Tanner Jr, carpenter helper Shelley Delorme, Custodian Melody Delorme Justin Delorme Wes Lerat


OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$967,000.00

58


CURRENT INITIATIVES The Department uses meetings Program Directors and the support of the Cowessess Firat Nation Ad Hoc citizens committee committees to plan, coordinate and initiate projects, such as: Automated garbage collection for our subdivisions, Capitol roads application to recap our roads and a 2nd Capital project to bring low-pressure water to all the homes on Cowessess.

59

WORKING TOWARDS The Dept. has implemented changes to address funding shortages within our Dept. through user fees for equipment, services and rental rates. We believe these changes will make us more efficient and accountable.


THE DEPARTMENT OF

SPORTS Director of Sports, currently vacant

VALUES Sports promotes healthy living, healthy socializing and promotes good team ethics and comradery amongst our children, youth and adults.

60


OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$167,000.00

Due to the pandemic we have not filled the vacant Director position as of yet. Nor has there been sporting activities. This department was funded by the dollars received from the First Nations Trust Fund which consisted of dollars from profits made by Casinos. Since Casinos were closed, funding has yet to be determined.

61


CURRENT INITIATIVES The Department of Sports is always planning for the future to ensure proper preparedness and training for the children, youth and adults who would potentially benefit from participating in sports. Before COVID-19, this dapartment offered the following programs:

Hip Hop Classes Community Slopitch Adult Slo-pitch League(Melville) Community golf Twilite Drive-in Swimming/Gym Passes (Yorkton) Youth Softball

Wrestling Clinic Lacrosse Golf Lessons Mini Golf Tournament Youth Basketball Camp Tony Cote Summer Games 4 Band Amazing Race

WORKING TOWARDS The Director of Sports position is currently vacant. With the onset of COVID 19, and with the inability to gather in groups of 10 or more, all sports activities are postponed until further notice. This department will be continually be assessed and will be reinstated once sporting activities have been reinstated.

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THE DEPARTMENT OF

HOUSING

The Housing Department manages 199 Housing Units on reserve which comprise of 1-5-bedroom units. In addition, the staff within the department manage tenant relations, renovation, and new construction projects.-Leadership approved the Revised Housing Policy April 2019.

63


STAFF

DIRECTOR OF HOUSING: BONNIE LAVALLE

Tennent Relations Officer, Roger Stevenson Administrative, Sandy Delorme Maintenance Worker, Leo Delorme

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OPERATING BUDGET AND

SOURCES

OF

FUNDING

$338,440

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DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING The Housing Department works side by side with other Departments in the best interest of the nation. This includes Public Works for the water, Infrastructure for the sewage, Health for assistance with Home Care, Addictions and other Family support, Justice in the Peacekeeping program. The networking with other departments will alleviate stress Housing has always had to face.

CURRENT INITIATIVES Presently working on a 3-year Strategic Plan to repair & renovate homes. Year 1 will be the older homes, year 2 will be the following homes. Prior to entering into the Cowessess Mikiwam Housing Inc., the majority of the homes will be up to standard, but will need your help to maintain the house. Communication – As part of the strategic plan, the Housing Department will facilitate workshop, such as Maintenance, the True Cost of Housing, Rental Collection and oneon-one strategic planning with the Tenant. A qualified Inspection will visit and do a complete inspection of all Houses.

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WORKING TOWARDS Change Management – The Housing Department is a moving, living body that’s exploring a changed government system through the Cowessess MikiwamHousing Inc. The goal in the creation of this entity is to improve financial sustainability of housing, support fair allocation of houses, and minimize the risk of political interference.


THE DEPARTMENT OF

FINANCE

67


STAFF

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE: KATHY BUCKLES

Corey Stevenson Account, Payable Assistant/Payroll Cecelia Kaysaywaysemet, Jr. Accountant Judy Delorme, Sr. Accountant Roberta Delorme, Accounts Payable Clerk Shannon Delorme, Accounts Payable Assistant

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FINANCIAL REPORT KATHY BUCKLES

Total Revenues

$15,146,012

Total Expenses

$14,788,576

Surplus (Deficit)

$357,436

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EXPENSES BY CATEGORY TOTAL

EXPENSES:

$14,788,576

Surplus (deficit) before amortization 2.4%

Programmin g 33%

Wage s 45.4%

Operatin g 19.3% The operating budget coves the following areas:

WAGES

46.45%

OPERATING

19.79%

PROGRAMMING

SURPLUS(DEFICIT)

70

33.76%

2.42%


CFN ENTITIES

33

71


TREATY LAND ENTITLEMENT Lois Taypotat, Lands Acquisition Clerk Lloyd Lerat, Chairman Off Reserve Trustees: Deloris Delorme and Janice Thompson On Reserve Trustee: Barry Sparvier. Malcolm Delorme, Linus Lerat and Kevin Friesen. Treaty Land Entitlement continues to strengthen land purchasing and managing investments. As of 2020, Treaty Land Entitlement have added 72,000 acres to Cowessess First Nation. Some highlights from this past year few years have been to transition the trust to Stocks and Bonds. This has increased the return on investment. Another highlight is the internal sale of Yorkton and Regina lands to the Flood Claim Trust. This increased the TLE Trust to $14 million. Investment Performance/Gains - RBC Global Asset Management and PH&N Investment Management 2nd Quarter Report June 30, 2020

MARKET VALUE

NET CONTRIBUTIONS SINCE INCEPTION

TRUST ACCOUNT

$14,094,20

REVENUE TRUST ACCOUNT

$7,980

TOTAL

$14,102,187

$12,582,948 $1,797

$12,584,745

GAIN (LOSS) SINCE INCEPTION

$1,511,259 $6,183

$1,517,442

Inception: April 2018 Trust Property transferred from Affinity Credit Union to Royal Trust, and Investment Managers RBC/PHN. Market Value: represents the value of all the investments held inside the portfolio at the date of the report. Net Contributions: Original amount of funds invested plus all the additional contributions less all withdrawals. Gain/(Loss): Increase or decrease in market value of assets from investment returns (market value minus net contributions).

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INDIGENOUS SERVICES CANADA FILE MANGER – APRIL 15, 2020

The graph below represents the total equity acres and lands that have attained reserve status. There are 57 active files with 7 files in transition. There are issues with selections that will not attain reserve status due to the complex subsurface issues with the Gross Royalty Trust Certificates (GRTC). These lands are in the process of being sold on a willing buyer willing seller basis. 200,000

150,000

100,000

50,000

Ac re s

Ba la nc e

of Eq ui ty

Ac re s Re se rv e

Eq ui ty

Ac re s

0

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MIKIWAM HOUSING Cowessess Mikiwam Housing Inc. will be the operation responsible for leading the strategic direction, managing the housing assets, working with tenants and empowering policies on behalf of Cowessess First Nation and its citizens.Mikiwam means lodge/house in the Cree language.The goal in the creation of this entity is to improve financial sustainability of housing, support fair allocation of houses, and maintain long-term growth. And in order for this organization to operate as a results-based corporation, it has been set-up as an arm’s length company with delegated authority provided to it by Chief and Council, and appointed Board of Directors created to drive governance and decision-making. It is the Board’s duty to finalize Board bylaws and policies, establish management and operating plans, policies, and procedures. Once operational, Council will appoint the Board and the Board’s responsibility to seek/help a CEO/Manager to fulfill long fairness and long-term growth for on-reserve housing on behalf of Chief and Council.

LITTLE CHILD COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Little Child Community Development has been successful in Chase the Ace. The board is tasked with exploring gaming to help increase profit to give back to citizens. The current 4-Trust is in the process of transitioning to Little Child Community Development to have our own internal CDC.

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COWESSESS VENTURES

33

71


GUIDING PRINCIPLES

72


CVL GOVERNANCE MODEL

73


MEET THE BOARD

Chief Cadmus Delorme Cowessess First Nation Chief Board Chair

Brayden Parisan, Founder & CEO, Mo' Solar Company Ltd., Seasonal Lecturer & Rawlinson Executive in Residence, U of R

John Hopkins CEO, Regina Chamber of Commerce

Cory Furman, Solicitor, Furman Law & Strategy

Dana Soonias Director , Economic Development & Employment Training Services, Red Pheasant First Nation

Gary Sparvier Council Representative, Cowessess First Nation

Tonii Lerat Partner, Urban Systems & Cowessess Citizen

Lucy Pelletier Governance Specialist, Cowessess Citizen

Cowessess Ventures Ltd. has a professional working Board of Directors that report to the Chief & Council of Cowessess First Nation. The role of CVL Board is to provide strategic direction, fiduciary oversight, establish outcomes/performance expectations, and approve policies and plans. CVL Board has been structured to be independent of political influence from Chief & Council, thereby comprising of professional individuals who hold a wealth of expertise in business, legal, government relations, and corporate governance. We are proud to have these board members providing strategic direction to CVL since September 2018.

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COWESSESS GAS AND GROCERY Originally established in the early 1990’s, Cowessess Gas & Grocery (CGG) is comprised of two Esso branded gas stations. The original location is located on the home reserve, just off highway #247 on the 605 grid in the Qu'Appelle valley. We refer to the on reserve location as Store 1, which offers regular, premium, and diesel fuels, lottery, confectionery and grocery items. The second location, Store 2, opened its doors in 2003 3km SE of Regina and offers regular and diesel fuels and convenience items. Between the two locations the stores employ 26 full-time and part-time employees. 18 of these employees are Cowessess citizens.

75


2019 UPDATE STORE 1, COWESSESS SK

Co-branded with Esso, a national brand to elevate the CGG brand Installed new dispensers, tanks Now offer PC Optimum Points Addition of premium fuel option to existing regular and diesel, expanded product selection Indigenous art painted on the walls Backoffice reorganization and deep cleaning of entire store New Point of Sale System New LED lighting and secondary electrical panel installed New light highway sign with price changer at #247 and 605 grid intersection Sales increased by 30% at Store 1 in 2019 over 2018. Hosted July 1 Customer Appreciation Celebration

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2019 UPDATE STORE 2, COWESSESS SK

Co-branded with Esso, a national brand to elevate the CGG brand Now offer PC Optimum Points New dispensers for regular and diesel, maintained existing tanks New Esso signage for the store Faced with decreasing sales due to increased market competition from the new Ochapowace Petro Canada Installed temporary highways signs, this has increase sales rapidly. Moved from market pricing to margin pricing to ensure bottom line returns are sustained. Hosted a June 21 Customer Appreciation Day!

77


COWESSESS DRIVER SERVICES Cowessess Driver Services is a construction partnership between Cowessess Ventures Ltd. (CVL) and JV Driver Group of companies, established in January 2018. CVL is a 51% limited partner so the company is majority First Nation owned and meets the definition of an indigenous supplier. CVL achieves a percentage of gross revenue as a fee and realizes set aside opportunities for Cowessess citizens to obtain employment on a project basis.

2019 UPDATE Based on quality work delivered in fall 2018, Enbridge provided a scope increase for Cowessess Driver to build all the secondary access roads from municipal roads to the valve stems along the pipeline path. Enbridge Contract Building Access Roads to the Valve Stems along Line 3 from Belle Plaine to Manitoba Border Work Flow: Started November/ December 2018 – 3 citizens employed as Heavy Equipment Operators March 2019 contract scope increase for six additional sites Work resumed at Belle Plaine site from May 15 – June 15, 4 citizens started the job, 2 stayed through to completion. Was challenging keeping members on the job site with the long hours six days a week. Demobilized from June to September to allow Bannister to get farther ahead on main line completion. Cowessess Driver remobilized in late September and worked through until December, two Cowessess citizens invited back. These folks were dedicated to the long hours and were commended for the good work they did by Enbridge. Enbridge was pleased with quality of work, follow up meeting discussing ways to continue to keep Cowessess involved in decommissioning and operations. Enbridge provided a standing letter of support for Cowessess Driver Services. Cowessess Driver also bid on other market RFP’s issued by Mosaic, SaskPower, SaskEnergy and Borea Construction however none were successfully awarded to us.

2020 PLANS AND GOALS

Will continue to bid for new work. Will complete the final access road for Enbridge. Will evaluate partnerships with different firms to bid additional scopes. Providing Indigenous advisory services to PCL for new YWCA building in Regina. Will be preferred civil contractor for Awasis Solar 10 MW Project. 78


4 C FARMS 4C Farms is a mixed cattle and grain farm on Cowessess First Nation land located in the RM of Grayson. Its been incorporated since December, 2010. This operation consists of 145 black Angus cows, 2500 acres of pasture and hay land, and 600 acres of grain land. 4C Farms presently has two employees and both are Cowessess citizens.

2019 UPDATE

Hired Terry Lerat as Ranch Manager and all labour hours delivered by Cowessess citizens in 2019. Obtained an Ag Canada Youth Employment Grant. Obtained a Saskatchewan Indian Equity Foundation Grant (SIEF). Grant to offset 30% of equipment purchases. Purchased six pieces of equipment:

Obtained Farm Credit Canada Input Loan. Custom hired neighbours to seed 620 acres of grain: 330 acres wheat 100 acres canola 190 acres barley Due to a dry spring the crops were late germinating and therefore late maturing. Despite being ready with our new equipment, the wet fall and late maturing crops, made it difficult to harvest wet grain. Without drying capacity 4C Farms was unable to harvest the majority of the crop in fall 2019. The barley was grazed by the cows over the winter, and the intent is to harvest wheat and canola in Spring 2020.

2009 Case swather/ haybine 1995 JD combine 1983 JD 8260 4wd Tractor 2005 F-250 Truck Sakundiak Auger 1979 GMC grain truck

79


CATTLE INVENTORY ON NOVEMBER 30, 2019:

146 COWS 125 CALVES 6 BULLS

Three new registered pure bred bulls purchased to rebuild the herd genetics and animal quality. Vaccination programs and herd record management implemented. Increase weaned weight per cow by 26% and increased return per cow by 36% over 2018.

2020 PLANS AND GOALS

Leaders, elders and those with agriculture experience in the community imparted their aspirations to grow in agriculture and make higher use of the vast agriculture land owned by Cowessess. 4C Farms is making a bold move to take on an additional 1000 acres of grain land in 2020 bringing total seeded acres up to 1600. The new land under three year permit is located on south side of the valley on prime well cared for soil. Grant applications to assist with the purchase of new equipment did not materialize in time for seeding, therefore 4C Farms hired neighbouring farmer who is a registered Agrologist to custom seed and spray for 4C Farms. The goal is to harvest with our own crew and equipment, with some support and oversight by the Agrologist as well. Cowessess citizens will be hired and mentored under the Agrologist and Ranch Manager. Additional equipment and grain bin storage is required, however 4C Farms needs to turn around its financial situation before taking on any more lending for equipment. Cowessess First Nation has provided an equity infusion into 4C Farms for the 2020 growth year. The team will continue to assess grant opportunities to offset any eligible costs within the operation. Crops Seeded in 2020 include canola, wheat and barley. Will be a busy spring getting the crop off from 2019 harvested and the new crop seeded in a timely manner.

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COWESSESS WIND DEVELOPMENT LTD Cowessess Wind Development Ltd. (CWDL) was established in January 2012. This business operates a one MW renewable energy generation facility located 3 km SE of Regina. The facility includes an 800kW Enercon wind turbine, 500kW of photovoltaic solar panels, and 400kW of lithium-ion battery storage. Cowessess Wind Development sells all the power generated from this facility to SaskPower through a 20-year power purchase agreement.

2019 UPDATE

Increased solar capacity from 400kW to 500KW through the 100 kW contract with the Power Generator Partners ProgramSkyfire installed in September 2019. Of the three-person crew to complete the 100kW installation, two employees were Cowessess citizens - Cory Lavallee (Lead Electrician) and James Lerat (Labour). From direct work at the CWDL solar site in 2018, Cory Lavallee was hired full time by Skyfire in 2019. Provided multiple facility tours throughout the year. Presented at multiple conferences throughout Canada about the uniqueness of the Cowessess Renewable Energy Storage Facility. 2020 PLANS AND GOALS

No expansion or growth plans for 2020. Saskatchewan Research Council will complete their research on the solar storage system. Hire Community Energy Specialist to take over invoicing for the site from SRC and begin to provide field tours when requested. Priority is in completed head lease with Canada and sub lease with Awasis Solar. Priority is to maintain profitable operations. Create surplus for reinvestment in CVL and Awasis Solar.

PAGEÂ 13

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COWESSESS URBAN DEVELOPMENT Established in January 2012, Cowessess Urban Developments is responsible for developing the land owned by Cowessess First Nation to generate new business opportunities and sources of revenue. Cowessess Urban Developments is currently developing two main projects: 1246 Albert Street, Regina and 130 Lawrence Ave, Yorkton. As of 2019, there are no staff and no revenue generating assets in the Cowessess Urban Development Portfolio. 2019 UPDATE - 1246 ALBERT STREET Negotiated Municipal Servicing Agreement with the City of Regina Entered into relationship with real estate broker to facilitate the franchise lease agreement. Signed Letter of Intent with future tenant. Some delays and internal change of process with tenant required new pricing on an alternate scope of work which included more tenant fit ups. Completed topographic survey, geotechnical survey and traffic impact study in 2019. All of these studies inform the detailed engineering. Hired civil engineering firm and building architecture firm to design the site and building; the bulk of design work will occur in Q1 2020. 2020 PLANS AND GOALS - 1246 ALBERT STREET

Achieve Addition to Reserve from Canada on the subject property. Establish a headlease with Canada for the property. Negotiate the sublease agreement with the franchise owners. Source project financing. Attain all City development and building permits. Issue Construction tender and begin construction of the building in summer 2020. 2019 UPDATE - YORKTON LAND DEVELOPMENT Concluded the Concept Plan for 19 acres development and submitted to the City of Yorkton. Obtained City of Yorkton approval of subdivision. Negotiated Municipal Servicing Agreement with the City of Regina. Subdivided 4 acre parcel from 19 acres. Dedicated roadways to City of Yorkton. Obtained City of Yorkton approval of the concept plan in July 2019. Completed detailed engineering drawings for the underground servicing of the 4 acre parcel. Facilitated partnership negotiations with Yorkton Tribal Council for their new head office, but were unsuccessful as they are building on Kahkewistahaw land on west end of Yorkton instead. 2020 PLANS AND GOALS - YORKTON LAND DEVELOPMENT

Conduct market study on viability of a third gas station in Yorkton. Develop a business plan and architectural concept plan for gas station on the development Secure Addition to Reserve status on land, negotiate headlease with Canada. Secure Infrastructure funding grant for servicing. Attract new anchor tenant to the site. 82


AWASIS NEHIYAWEWINI ENERGY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Awasis Nehiyawewini Energy Development Corp. was established in May 2009 to pursue utility scale renewable energy projects. ANEDC in partnership with Elemental Energy was awarded a 10MW solar contract through First Nations Power Authority in spring 2019. Construction on this development will start in 2020. ANEDC is also active in partnerships to pursue utility scale wind in SaskPower’s upcoming procurements. As of 2019, there are no staff and no revenue generating assets in the ANEDC. 2019 UPDATE Awarded FNPA 10 MW Solar Set aside.

2020 PLANS AND GOALS

Conclude the headlease process with Canada on SE 7-

Completed Phase 1 Environmental Site

17-18 W2.

Assessment, and Indigenous Services Canada Environmental approval to proceed.

Site Interconnection Study and Topographic survey.

Completed geotechnical study and subsequent

All site engineering based on preliminary technical

pull testing to determine ground stability.

studies.

Negotiated and signed limited partnership

Executing PPA with SaskPower.

agreement with Elemental Energy which had

Obtaining grant funding.

resulted in the creation of Awasis Solar.

Working through project development in due course

Awasis Solar is 51% owned by ANEDC and 49%

with target construction start in September 2020 and

owned by Elemental Energy.

target Commercial Operations date in fall 2021.

Facilitated community engagements at Cowessess on November 13 which included an Education Day at the Cowessess High School and November 14 at White City as Public Consultation. Gave away 50 home Energy Savings Kits. Hired Community Energy Specialist to join CVL

In addition to our efforts on the 10 MW Solar project, both of our wind industry partnerships will submit Request for Qualification proposals to the SaskPower 300 MW wind opportunity.

Team – Daphne Kay.

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Cowessess First Nation Annual Report

Contact us:

Cowessess First Nation Band Office 306-696-2520 Toll Free (888) 772-7790 Fax (306) 696-2767 Po Box 100,Cowessess, SK. S0G 5L0 Cowessess Urban Office 306-522-5558 Toll Free (866) 744-0677107A Albert StreetRegina, Sk. S4R 2N3


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