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SOLENT HANDBOOK & DIRECTORY

Photo: Paul Wyeth

MARCH 2014 - APRIL 2015

Now including

Poole Harbour

Portsmouth Tide Tables sponsored by

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INTRODUCTION When you dream of sailing, the Solent should be part of that dream…

Photo: Paul Wyeth

Welcome to the fourth edition of the Solent Handbook & Directory, which we believe is looking cleaner and fresher than ever. It is packed full of information for locals, as well as for visitors and holidaymakers to the Solent area. TKZ Media launched the first Solent Handbook in 2011 to wide acclamation from advertisers, readers, and distributors alike. Our unique blend of interesting articles, together with a calendar of Solent sailing events, tide tables, maps, directory of services, and guides to popular destinations ensures a winning combination. The Solent Handbook has now become a must-have on board guide for local racers and cruisers alike. Renowned around the world, the Solent offers everything from sheltered sailing to challenging adventure, depending on your mood and experience. The Solent Handbook shows how easily your sailing dreams and aspirations can be realised. This year we would like to thank Shirley Robertson OBE for providing the Foreword, and talking about her love of the Solent. We also thank sailor, journalist, author and broadcaster Tom Cunliffe, for providing the Epilogue. We’d like to thank all our advertisers for their continued support and ask you to let advertisers know that you’ve seen their adverts in the Solent Handbook. And we can’t forget all those fantastic people who have contributed, supported and made the Handbook possible. Finally, don’t forget to make regular visits to our online publication www.SolentHandbook.com. This constantly evolving website is where sailors and boaters can keep up to date with everything that’s happening in the Solent and beyond. We hope you enjoy this Handbook. Now, set a course for the Solent and experience a new found freedom.

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CONTENTS

CONTENTS

colour key

page

Welcome to the Solent - Shirley Robertson 6 Solent Yacht Clubs

8-14

Solent Racing

16-23

Offshore Racing

24-27

Solent Cruising

28-34

Weather 36-39 Safety Afloat

41

Solent Events Diary

42-51

Solent Events Calendar

52-59

Useful Contacts Solent Ports & Harbours Yarmouth Harbour Newtown Harbour

60 61 64-65 66

Cowes & River Medina

68-79

Wootton Creek

80-82

Ryde Harbour

83-84

Bembridge Harbour

85-86

Ventnor Haven

87-88

Poole Harbour

90-93

Keyhaven 94 Lymington Harbour

95-99

Beaulieu River

100-101

Southampton Water

102-109

River Hamble & Warsash

110-112

Portsmouth & Gosport

113-120

Port Solent

121

Fareham 122 Langstone Harbour

123-124

Chichester Harbour

125-128

Solent Directory Index

129

Solent Directory

130-144

Cowes Tide Tables

146-153

Portsmouth Tide Tables

154-161

Advertisers’ Index

162-163

Acknowledgements 164 An Epilogue - Tom Cunliffe

165

Solent Location Map

Pull out inside back cover

Chatham Marine Racing Marks Map

Pull out inside back cover

Photo: Paul Wyeth

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WELCOME TO THE SOLENT

WELCOME TO THE SOLENT

Sailing has afforded me the most amazing opportunities. I’ve travelled around the globe; I’ve raced across oceans in speed machines; I’ve sailed on luxurious floating marvels with some of the world’s most influential people; I’ve won two gold medals in the Olympic arena. But in my mind the heart of sailing, and particularly British sailing, is right here in the Solent. Growing up as a girl in a small town in Scotland, I gazed out every morning at a mountain not the sea. However, I remember reading sailing magazines and loved finding out about Cowes Week, The Admiral’s Cup, and all these wonderful events. I dreamed of being part of it all. The first time I came and sailed on the Solent we took part in the Junior Championships and sailed from Calshot in a little dinghy. The sheer volume of traffic around us overwhelmed me. It was fabulously chaotic and wonderfully complicated. This is the greatest place to learn to sail. You might start out on the river, then head out into the Solent, and as you get more confident you venture out past the Needles and into the English Channel. You have to be aware of so much from the very beginning. I believe that makes you a better sailor. Mix in the wind; the currents all going in different directions; the tides, the shape of the Isle of the Wight; a huge sandbank right in the middle of the Solent; rocks down one side; spits on the other; a river; the variety of other vessels using it. Nothing else, anywhere else, quite compares to this stretch of water. With so much to do on both sides of the water, this Solent Handbook & Directory will be invaluable to you throughout the year. I live just above the Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes and love waking up, throwing open the curtains and soaking up the beautiful vistas. Sometimes, if I find myself awake in the middle of the night I’ll just sit by the window and watch the world floating by. Even in the dark there is so much going on. It is a view which is ever-changing. The Solent is never, ever a blank canvas. Shirley Robertson OBE Double Olympic Gold Medallist, TV Presenter

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SOLENT YACHT CLUBS

SOLENT YACHT CLUBS BEMBRIDGE SAILING CLUB Founded in 1886, Bembridge Sailing Club provides the base for the Bembridge Redwing, Bembridge One-Design, and Illusion fleets. It is an RYA Training Centre and Volvo Champion Club. Visiting yachtsmen from RYA affiliated clubs arer always welcome. Lunch available every weekend. Rallies by prior arrangement.

BRADING HAVEN YACHT CLUB Set up by businessmen and artisans, Brading Haven Yacht Club has gained a reputation with visiting yachtsmen for being one of the friendliest clubs in the Solent area. The active cruising section and year round dinghy sailors make full use of the comfortable clubhouse, bar, and high quality affordable catering.

CHICHESTER CRUISER RACING CLUB Chichester Cruiser Racing Club offers two handicap fleets Alpha (VPRS) and Beta (progressive) for round the cans racing in Hayling Bay and passage races to Littlehampton and Yarmouth and everywhere between. Plus a week-long cruise in company across the Channel. All events have lively social dinners.

CHICHESTER YACHT CLUB Beautifully situated between Premier and Birdham Marinas with restaurant and bar open all year except Sunday, Monday and Tuesday evenings, October through March. A family friendly members’ club catering for yacht and motor cruising in company, dinghy racing, and model yachting with a warm welcome for visiting sailors and rallies.

COWES CORINTHIAN YACHT CLUB Cowes Corinthian Yacht Club was established in 1952 by the late “Tiny” Mitchell as a club for local sailors. CCYC has recently undergone a refurbishment including the installing of new pontoons, a new walkway and access bridge, and an 8m boom crane lift.

EAST COWES SAILING CLUB The Club - which was founded in 1912 encourages sailing, good sportsmanship, youth training, racing and fishing. ECSC boasts its own river frontage, small craft moorings, deep-water pontoon and secure shore side premises. It organises weekly racing for cruisers, keelboats and dinghies and annual charity event ‘Sail the Wight’.

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Cruise. Race. Win. In 2012, Nexus became part of the Garmin family, bringing expertise and passion for sailing to the world leader in satellite navigation. In 2014, Garmin and Nexus become one, introducing instrumentation and navigation solutions to all sailors for both cruising and racing. Display laylines, tidal flow, true/apparent wind, VMG and much more with Garmin’s new plotter range that completes this ultimate sailing system. That’s the power of simple. To learn more visit Garmin.com


SOLENT YACHT CLUBS

SOLENT YACHT CLUBS GURNARD SAILING CLUB Gurnard SC is the leading dinghy sailing club on the Isle of Wight. Racing from March to December caters for all levels. The Club is an RYA training centre with established cadet section. Open events are held annually including a Junior Regatta and Cowes Dinghy Week, with races for dinghies and catamarans.

ISLAND SAILING CLUB

Photo: Steve Sleight

The Island Sailing Club is the largest sailing club in Cowes, and is best known for organising the J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race. The Club operates a fleet of Sonar dayboats, which can be hired by Club members and non-members. ISC Tuesday evening racing throughout the summer is very popular.

KEYHAVEN YACHT CLUB Keyhaven Yacht Club is situated in one of the most beautiful harbours on the Solent. The harbour is shielded by the massive shingle bar that leads to Hurst Castle. With its easy access to the Solent the harbour is a perfect haven for small yachts and dinghies.

LYMINGTON TOWN SAILING CLUB Lymington Town Sailing Club - established in 1946 - has an enviable record of winning world and national championships. The Club has lively keelboat, dinghy racing, and cruising sections, and organises the Classic Series and autumn Solent Circuit as well as motorboat section cruises around the south coast and beyond.

MARCHWOOD YACHT CLUB Situated on the left bank of the River Test, near the military base, MYC is the hidden gem of the Solent with comprehensive facilities entirely operated by volunteers. These include clubhouse, parking, pontoons, moorings, scrub off, and winter layup, with a secure yard. Visitors are welcome. Contact the Secretary for details.

ROYAL AIRFORCE YACHT CLUB Formed in 1932 at RAF Calshott, the Club moved to the Hamble in 1957 and opened to non-service membership. The friendly clubhouse is situated adjacent to MDL Port Hamble Marina and welcomes visiting yachtsmen. Cruising and rallies are the club’s main activities and visiting rallies are welcome.

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SOLENT YACHT CLUBS

SOLENT YACHT CLUBS ROYAL CORINTHIAN YACHT CLUB

Photo: Louise Morton

The Royal Corinthian Yacht Club, established in 1872, is set in attractive gardens in Cowes and its terrace enjoys panoramic Solent views. The Club actively organises high-quality racing events and on-site facilities include accommodation, comfortable bar and dining area serving excellent food. New members and visiting yachtsmen are always very welcome.

ROYAL LONDON YACHT CLUB Founded in 1838 - with a clubhouse enjoying stunning views across the Solent - the Royal London Yacht Club on Cowes Parade provides members with excellent facilities, accommodation and catering throughout the year. The RLYC has an enviable reputation for quality race management – including being the Organising Authority for Charles Stanley Cowes Classics Week.

ROYAL LYMINGTON YACHT CLUB Successful on the water, friendly and welcoming ashore, the Royal Lymington encourages and promotes yachting of all aspects, and maintains a clubhouse with a bustling social programme. The Club has excellent facilities including a bar, river-room, and a balcony terrace overlooking the river and the Solent beyond.

ROYAL OCEAN RACING CLUB RORC’s London Clubhouse

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The Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) was founded in 1925 in Plymouth following the first Fastnet Race. With over 3,300 members around the world, the RORC is one of the largest offshore racing clubs and is a national authority for the measurement, rating and racing of offshore yachts.

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SOLENT YACHT CLUBS

ROYAL SOLENT YACHT CLUB The Royal Solent Yacht Club, established in 1878, is located on the seafront next to Yarmouth Pier. Regattas are organised in the Solent and Christchurch Bay. The Club enjoys unrivalled views across the western Solent. With excellent bar and catering facilities; new members, visiting yachtsmen, and visitors from affiliated clubs are always welcome.

ROYAL SOUTHAMPTON YACHT CLUB Providing year round racing and cruising, including the popular Double Handed series, sailing is complemented by an RYA training and cadet programme. With restaurants, bars and moorings at both clubhouses - one at Ocean Village and one on the tranquil Beaulieu River the RSYC offers attractive venues for social and corporate events.

ROYAL SOUTHERN YACHT CLUB The Royal Southern Yacht Club, Hamble, was established in 1837. The Club hosts national and world championships, cruises extensively by motor and sail, and hosts regattas for yachts large and small. The clubhouse boasts wellappointed accommodation, a bar, restaurant, and moorings.

ROYAL THAMES YACHT CLUB Founded in 1775 as the Cumberland Fleet, the Royal Thames Yacht Club is the world’s oldest continuously operating yacht club. In Cowes, the Royal Thames operates primarily from the Royal London Yacht Club, with which it has full reciprocal arrangements. The Royal Thames’ Clubhouse is at 60 Knightsbridge, London.

ROYAL VICTORIA YACHT CLUB The Club was founded in 1845 by Prince Albert to give Queen Victoria a yacht club she was entitled to enter as a mere female. RVYC has racing for dinghies, Squibs, and cruisers, offers RYA training, and holds many social functions. Facilities include a bar and restaurant, and 54m of pontoon moorings for visitors.

ROYAL YACHT SQUADRON Founded in St James’s, London, in 1815, the Club took up residence in Cowes Castle - built by Henry VIII – in 1858. The Club’s start line has seen many great yacht and powerboat races. An active interest in yachting or yacht racing remains a prime requirement for those invited to become a Squadron member.

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SOLENT YACHT CLUBS

SOLENT YACHT CLUBS SEA VIEW YACHT CLUB Sea View Yacht Club enjoys a unique location on the northeast tip of the Isle of Wight with stunning views over the Solent. The Club provides members with comprehensive RYA training. Offering full bar and catering facilities to visiting yachtsmen with access to the water at all states of tide.

WARSASH SAILING CLUB Warsash Sailing Club, founded in 1957, has a well-appointed clubhouse on a magnificent site at the mouth of the Hamble. Its Spring Series is the UK’s premier early season regatta. The Club offers racing for dinghies and cruisers, training for juniors, and a full social programme. The Club welcomes visitors by water.

YARMOUTH SAILING CLUB Yarmouth Sailing Club is a small, friendly and informal club with over 900 members and run entirely on a volunteer basis. It offers training, racing, and recreational sailing events for Scows, Optimists, and other classes. The Club runs a full winter social programme. A warm welcome is always extended to visiting yachtsmen.

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SOLENT RACING SOLENT RACING

SPONSORED BY SAILS CAFÉ

A few people claim to dislike racing in the Solent, because it’s such a tricky place. It’s true that it has strong tides, complex wind patterns, lots of leisure and commercial traffic, choppy water, and ever-changing conditions - but, for many sailors, it’s the complexity that makes Solent racing such a rewarding challenge.

Photo: Paul Wyeth

Windward-leeward courses set in areas of no tide and with steady winds may create a ‘fairer’ race course but they can become repetitive and limited in their challenge. Boat speed and tactics are highlighted but strategy, navigation, and boat handling get much more of a test around Solent courses. The ideal, of course, is to enjoy and learn from both. Fortunately, the Solent offers plenty of locations that allow a variety of courses, even windward-leeward courses in areas that enjoy some tidal shelter. Consequently, this wonderful, sheltered area is home to a rich mixture of events, including racing for dinghies, small keelboats, cruiser-racers, and handicap and level-racing for larger racing yachts. Most racing from Cowes for example, and there is a huge amount of it in all types of boats, takes place in the central Solent but courses can also be set in the eastern and western Solent, depending on conditions. The Hill Head Plateau, just to the east of the Brambles Bank, is a favourite place for race officers to set windward-leeward courses as it benefits from shallow water for easy mark laying and the tidal shadow of the bank to its west. Sometimes, though, race officers forget that there are other areas in the central Solent that can be even better for windward-leeward courses in some combinations of wind and tide. The area inshore and to the northwest of the Thorn channel, and the area to the east of Osborne Bay under the Isle of Wight shore, can both be good alternatives, as can close under the mainland shore, inshore of the north channel around the Brambles. In this section of the Solent Handbook you’ll find some general information on Solent racing, including types of courses, how racing is organised, getting involved, finding crew, and preparing for racing. For more information ask at your local club and check www.SolentHandbook.com.

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Types of racing

SOLENT RACING

Many people think of the Solent as mainly suitable for day racing keelboats and cruiser-racers rather than dinghy racing. In fact, there is plenty of opportunity for dinghy racing despite the tidal rates in much of the area, which are not ideal for small boat racing.

Dinghies

The most popular area for dinghy racing is just outside the Solent, at Hayling Island Sailing club. Tidal conditions in Hayling Bay are easier than in the Solent and traffic near the racing areas is considerably less. Within the Solent, however, there is still plenty of dinghy racing. Just west of Cowes is Gurnard Sailing club which is the main dinghy club on the Isle of Wight. Elsewhere, there is dinghy racing out of clubs in Lymington and Yarmouth, the Hamble River, Southampton Water, the area between Hill Head and Stokes Bay, which has three dinghy clubs in close proximity, and at Wootton on the Isle of Wight.

Small keelboats

The small keelboat classes are, for many people, the heart of Solent racing. Classes which race most weekends throughout the season include the classic Daring class, Dragons, Etchells, Flying Fifteens, Sonars, X One Designs, and Laser SB3s. All these fleets have class starts in Cowes Week with the SB3s and XoDs being the two largest classes in the Week.

Cruising racing and big boat racing

If you’re into yacht racing there really is plenty of choice with most Solent yacht clubs running their own evening race series plus summer weekend race series. Then there is the racing run by JOG and RORC. JOG - the Junior Offshore Group - runs both an inshore and offshore series for yachts racing under IRC with both series proving very popular. RORC - the Royal Ocean Racing Club - organises a series of offshore races from Cowes, which count towards the season’s championship. RORC also runs the Fastnet Race and Commodores’ Cup, both biennial events that alternate with each other. This year it is the turn of the Commodores’ Cup, which starts on 19 July. For those who prefer yacht racing on windward-leeward courses, there are ample opportunities for that too. And, if you prefer racing classic yachts even that is catered for, with The Metre & Classic Keelboat Regatta, and Panerai British Classic Week which is steadily growing in popularity and attracting some truly gorgeous yachts.

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SOLENT RACING

SOLENT RACING On the race course

Even if you are an expert racer and a Solent regular it is really important to remind yourself of the basics well before heading out for the start. These include the type and location of the course, the starting sequence and race signals, and the other important information in the Notice of Race and Sailing Instructions.

Types of course

The spreader mark, When racing in the Solent the two 1A, may not be used most usual types of courses you’ll encounter are windward1 1A leeward courses from a committee boat start line or round-the-cans courses, Typically Start line may be 1-2 miles to leeward of the usually from one of the clubs’ leeward mark shore lines or occasionally from a committee boat start. A Start/Finish line committee-boat start can be If two buoys set up in several locations in form a leeward gate pass and around the central Solent 2 between them but the most used location is on the Hill Head Plateau to the north of the main channel and east of the Brambles Bank. On busy weekends several courses may be set in this area so it is important to find out the approximate location of the committee boat before heading out. A windward-leeward course may have the start line between the windward and leeward marks, or to leeward of the leeward mark. Also, there may be a leeward gate rather than a single mark.

Starting sequence

The Racing Rules of Sailing standard start sequence is often used, especially for racing on windward-leeward courses. Signal Flag and sound Warning signal Class flag; 1 sound

Minutes before starting signal 5

Preparatory signal

P, I, Z, Z with I, or black flag; 1 sound

4

One-minute signal

Preparatory flag removed; 1 long sound

1

Starting signal

Class flag removed; 1 sound

0

The standard sequence (rrS 26) can be changed in the Sailing Instructions (SIs) and for shore line starts from Cowes, for example, it may be changed to give a longer period between the Warning and Preparatory signals. In these cases the Warning signal is given 10 minutes before the start, with the Preparatory signal hoisted at 5 minutes before the start, and lowered at 1 minute before the start.

Racing rules

All racers should familiarise themselves with the latest Racing Rules of Sailing (RRS) 2013-2016. They are revised and published every four years by the International Sailing Federation and a copy of the current RRS, highlighted to show changes, can be downloaded from www.sailing.org/documents/racingrules/index.php. Make sure that you read and understand the rules - it will help keep you out of trouble and give you an advantage on the race course. 18

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SOLENT RACING

SOLENT RACING Signals

Racing is governed by the use of flag signals - often with accompanying sound signals. The flag is always the primary system; if the sound signal fails it is disregarded. Visual signals - flags or shapes - are used to control races and the attention of competitors is drawn to the visual signals by sound signals. When a visual signal is displayed over a class flag, the signal applies only to that class. POSTPONEMENT SIGNALS

AP (Answering Pennant) - Races that have not started are postponed. The warning signal will be made one minute after removal of the AP unless at that time the race is postponed again or abandoned. AP over H - Races not started are postponed. Further signals ashore.

AP over A - Races not started are postponed. No more racing today. AP over a numeral pennant 1-6 - Races are postponed by 1-6 hours from the scheduled starting time. Note: In Cowes, it is common for clubs to use an AP over AP with two sound signals to indicate racing is postponed and competitors are requested not to leave harbour. ABANDONMENT SIGNALS

N - All races that have started are abandoned. The warning signal will be made one minute after the signal is removed, unless the race is again abandoned or postponed.

PREPARATORY SIGNALS CONT.

Z - 20% Penalty rule, rule 30.2 is in force.

Black flag - Black flag rule, rule 30.3 is in force. RECALL SIGNALS

X - Individual recall.

First Substitute - General recall. The warning signal will be made one minute after the signal is removed. COURSE CHANGE SIGNALS

S - Rule 32.2 is in force. The course has been shortened.

C - The position of the next mark has been changed. OTHER SIGNALS

F - Optional Attention Signal: The warning signal will be displayed five minutes after this signal. This signal will be removed one minute before the next signal. Not used for classes which use Flag F as their class flag.

N over H - All races are abandoned. Further signals will be made ashore. L - Flown afloat : Come within hail or follow this boat. Flown ashore: A notice to competitors has been posted. N over A - All races are abandoned. No more racing today. PREPARATORY SIGNALS

M - The object displaying this signal replaces a missing mark.

Y - Personal buoyancy must be worn. P - Preparatory signal.

I - Round-an-End rule, rule 30.1 is in force.

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Blue flag or shape - This race committee boat is in position at the finishing line.


SOLENT RACING

SOLENT RACING

Photo: Paul Wyeth

Race preparation, crew, and equipment

You may think that when you line up to start you’ve got as good a chance as most of the fleet for a good place in the race. You’d be wrong! Most races are won before the start thanks to the work the skipper and crew put in to prepare themselves and the boat to do well on the race course. Some of that preparation may begin months or years beforehand in preparing the boat so it has the speed and reliability to win, and preparing the crew so that they can handle the boat efficiently in all conditions and circumstances. Other preparation takes place just before the race when the skipper and crew learn the SIs, check the weather and tide, arrive at the course early, and make the strategic decisions.

Getting crew

Having a good crew is always important and it often takes weeks or months to develop a crew’s skills and ability to work together. Finding crew can be difficult - although the more successful you are on the race course the easier it is! A good place to start is your local yacht club and others in the area. Post a note on their message boards and websites, and look around for online forums. The bigger events, such as the J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race and Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week, have forums on their websites where you can advertise for crew and crew can advertise for a boat. Once you’ve found a crew, make sure you sail, and preferably race, with them before the big event. Training should cover the boat layout and its gear, safety procedures, and boat handling in all the important manoeuvres and sail changes. 22

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SOLENT RACING Photo: Paul Wyeth

Skipper’s check list

Your actual check list will depend on the type of boat, length of race, and course location but for a typical Solent race make sure you consider the following points: • Have sufficient crew, all the sails you’ll need, with all the gear in working order, including safety equipment, and get afloat well ahead of start time with plenty of time to sail to the course area. • If you keep your boat afloat, has the bottom been scrubbed within the last two weeks? It’s amazing how many boats you see racing which have dirty hulls. • Race information - Make sure you have a copy of the sailing instructions (SIs), an up-to-date racing chart of the area (Solent buoys may change position and/or name from one year to the next so get a 2014 racing chart now), and the times of High Water for the day, with a good tidal stream chart for the area - the more detailed the better. • Bottled water and something to snack on, and the right sailing clothing for the conditions. Don’t forget a hat and sunscreen. Watch the weather trends for 3-5 days ahead of the event, and start studying it in detail in the 24 hours ahead of the event. Go afloat with an up-to-date forecast and study how any changes expected during the day may affect the strategy for the race.

Preparing for offshore racing

If you’re heading offshore you’ll need more food and drink, and more clothing plus more detailed weather and route planning ahead of the race. You may also need to add safety equipment, depending on the category of the race. Offshore races can be tough on both boat and crew so make sure the boat and its equipment is in top class order and always sail with a crew that has sufficient experience among it to deal with a long race or with bad conditions.

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OFFSHORE RACING

OFFSHORE RACING CONTRIBUTED BY CRAIG NUTTER • SPONSORED BY MEDINA YARD Craig has an awesome sailing CV, which includes competing in two British America’s Cup teams and working to win two Olympic Medals. He gets special pleasure spending time on the water with his family.

Photo: Paul Wyeth

It had been a long day. The sun set shortly after 8.30pm following 15 hours of daylight. We had sailed on the wind throughout and tacked six or eight times as Skipper and tactician worked small shifts in the wind to move us along the course. We were racing in an average 16 knots of breeze, so the No. 2 Jib was getting a good workout. The coast had occasionally been visible off to the right in the summer haze. Now, as evening drew in, daylight dimmed and temperatures dropped, a steady procession began. One at a time the on-deck crew slithered down below to don extra layers and lifejackets, before re-appearing to resume our adventure. There is a love-hate relationship with the lifejacket. We all know the benefits but they only work when they are on and fitted properly. Often harness lines get tangled and they restrict movement. But they do provide an extra two kilos per man as we sit on the rail and should keep us alive long enough to get found and picked up should we go overboard. In accordance with the racing rules and collision regulations at sea, we turn Nav lights on and check to see they are working. I like to do this half an hour before sunset to allow time to effect repairs if necessary. We are a crew of 15 sailors on a 52-foot race boat in an offshore race. We are in it together, committed to the contest with a real appreciation that the faster the boat goes the shorter the race will be. Going offshore sees you enter a different place that alters your values. Here a tepid coffee tastes great and being able to lie resting

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on a wet sail for your allotted hour or so is refreshing. I state the term ‘rest’ deliberately, because sleep is not always possible. Most yachts are capable of going offshore and doing long passages. But it is the unrelenting effort of pushing a performance race boat that provides the sense that the boat and the sails above are pulling you towards the finish making the most from the elements, which are so vital. That feeling of salt water spray drying on your face and clothes as a crust; the wind and varying nature of the sea surface; the motion this transfers to the yacht travelling across the fluid surface; it affects everything. We have instruments that take measurements every fraction of a second - hull speed through the water, its temperature, wind speed true, apparent and the angle from the bow. We know the position of the boat to within a few metres. But are we racing in the right place? Are we heading the right way? This huge picture is completely opposite to the sharp intense focus required to pour hot water into several mugs, dissolve the granules or powder within, and then get these on deck to outstretched, clutching hands. Daylight finally recedes over the horizon, leaving just a floating red amber ribbon to herald night.

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OFFSHORE RACING

OFFSHORE RACING


OFFSHORE RACING

OFFSHORE RACING Now there is a task to do. On the rail we had been aware that it might be coming. Two of us jump into action. I am inside the boat below deck; my back is rubbing against the cold, black, carbon skin of the underside of the deck, as I try to pull the headsail bag forward. There is lots of noise and it is dark apart from the glowing back-up chart plotter screen and the lashing beam from a head torch at the other end of the sail bag. It is being worn by the enthusiastic nipper who dashed forward, keen to lend me a helping hand. We hurry to get the sail because we are down to leeward of the heeling race boat - not the best place for our weight to be. The next sail is needed on deck ready for a change if the building breeze holds. The water rushes past the hull, whooshing as everything rises and bucks while moving through the waves. At least being down this side we are not disturbing the off watch who are in four bunks pulled up against the hull on the weather side. Moving around brings a welcome break from the wind and damp chill outside. Decked out in foul weather gear and thermal layers, we quickly heat up. It is not a long job and we are back on deck within minutes. We free the sail from its bag and turn off the head torches to avoid damaging the on-deck night vision. Finishing the task, I go forward and grab pre-packed bags of muesli bars and chocolate from the ‘goodies locker’ for the night watch. We share the treats out along the rail. Harness leashes are retrieved and reconnected to our lifejackets as we resume our position - hiking out with legs over the side and heads under the top lifelines. Slowly the boat settles down again and we await the call to change headsails. It doesn’t feel too bad and the dull light from instruments numbers show the wind has eased slightly. We are attempting to get past a crucial tidal gate of the nearby headland. The decision was made earlier to delay the preparation and distribution of dinner until after we get round. It was going to be tight but the advantage would be worth it, so the goodie bag was essential. The meal will require a crewmember down below to heat up individual pre-packed portions of ‘splodge’ that can be eaten using a

Photo: Paul Wyeth

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spoon straight out of the bag it was heated up in.These being dished out, eaten and the empties returned always cause a little disruption in the rhythm of the boat. The food itself is like Marmite - you either love it or accept the evil necessity the calories provide. The race is going into the second night. It seems a long time ago since we undid the dock lines from the boat and left them alongside the fenders and assorted equipment we decided was not essential. It always feels different from going out to ‘race around the cans’. Offshore by its very definition means going away from the land, venturing out for long enough for the weather and other things to change and long enough to possibly miss being ashore. The process invokes an element of uncertainty and a release from the shackles of shore side life. It highlights preparation, experience and the abilities of those competing together. Around the yacht everything and everyone is doing a job. The crew comes together or is chosen to maximise the yachts potential, meshing the components of rig, foils, sails, hull, controls and each other on board. It offers the antithesis of the modern age, where the quick fix or the immediate gratification is cast aside. Here you are; you sit, leaning out for hour after hour playing your small part in helping the boat go fast to a destination - a long way over the horizon.

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OFFSHORE RACING

OFFSHORE RACING


SOLENT CRUISING

SOLENT CRUISING CONTRIBUTED BY STEVE SLEIGHT • SPONSORED BY MARCO MARINE The Solent is renowned as one of the most popular recreational boating areas in the world - but it’s much more than that. Formed around 7,000 years ago, when the Solent river estuary gradually flooded at the end of the last ice age, the Isle of Wight became separated from the mainland as the chalk ridge between The Needles and Old Harry Rocks on the mainland eroded. The Solent has more small estuaries in close proximity than anywhere else in Great Britain and is located in one of the most sheltered channels in Europe. It is unique in Europe for its complex tides and the long periods of stand at High and Low Waters. The wide range of marine habitats makes the Solent of international significance for wildlife, and one of the most important sites on the bird migration routes from the Arctic to Africa. With its huge diversity of wildlife and habitats, along with its heritage and archaeological importance, much of the coastline has protected status and is recognised as being of national and international importance. The Solent’s unique characteristics have made Southampton the leading cruise port and one of the main commercial ports in the country and enabled Portsmouth’s maritime heritage and naval importance. Consequently, the Solent has a high level of shipping movements with vessels of all types being seen. The huge diversity of the area, together with the close proximity of many ports, harbours, and anchorages, makes the Solent a wonderful cruising ground for sailors and powerboaters. The choice in number, size, and atmosphere of the many destinations in the Solent make it perfect for weekending or holiday cruising, especially when family cruising as there is much to satisfy all tastes. While mid-sized and large yachts and powerboats tend to congregate in the larger yachting centres such as Lymington, Cowes, Hamble, and Portsmouth, there are many other destinations and anchorages available to smaller craft and those who don’t wish to follow the well-ploughed wakes of the majority. The double high tides of the Solent add to its cruising benefits but the strength and complexities of the tidal streams must be taken into account when planning and making passages in the Solent. See Cowes Tide Tables and Portsmouth Tide Tables. Good weather information is readily available in this area, both actual and forecast (refer to ‘Weather’ and ‘Useful Contacts’ sections elsewhere in the Handbook), but make allowance for the fact that the geography of the area impacts on the wind as it does for the tides and many weather models do not accurately predict local Solent variations. In summer, especially when the morning’s gradient wind is northwest, look for a sea breeze from late morning, building through the afternoon when it can deliver a fresh southwesterly. If this is blowing against an ebb tide conditions can become quite choppy before calming down again as the sea breeze loses its power.

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SOLENT CRUISING

SOLENT CRUISING Approaches to the Solent The Solent can be entered from the west or east. At the western end, the eroded chalk cliffs of The Needles, together with its iconic lighthouse, have been a welcome sight to many returning sailors over the centuries, while to the east, the more protected entrance is through the Forts, where Portsmouth and Spithead, with all their maritime heritage, greet the sailor’s arrival.

Photo: Hamo Thornycroft

From the west Heading for the Solent from Poole or further west the obvious choice is to enter through the Needles channel. In light to moderate conditions with a favourable tide the main channel south of the notorious Shingles bank is benign, but if the ebb is running expect a more turbulent entry and if a west or southwest wind of more than Force 5-6 is fighting a strong ebb tide this is definitely a place to avoid. Breaking seas over The Bridge, rough water in the channel, and overfalls in Hurst Narrows all await the incautious. A far less vigorous option, which is much under-used, is the North channel which is approached to the north of the Shingles and is much safer in rough weather. Stay to the north of the Shingles and leave North Head buoy to starboard, turning into the channel which runs parallel to Hurst beach. When entering Hurst Narrows take care to avoid The Trap which is a steep-sided shingle spit extending out from the beach near the round fort. Once past, the shingle bank runs northeast and is fairly steep-sided with room to anchor for shelter or a lunch stop.  From the east Arriving from the east, the main entrance is between Horse Sand Fort to the north and No Man’s Land Fort to the south. If coming from Langstone or Chichester harbours there is a shorter route using the Main Passage in the submerged barrier between Horse Sand Fort and the mainland, or the Boat Passage close to the shore is available for small craft. Since the submerged barrier between No Man’s Land Fort was removed, passage can be made inshore of the fort with a least depth of 2m over foul ground between the Fort and the red post to the southwest, which is useful when approaching from the south. Once past the fort make sure to avoid the extensive Ryde Sands by staying

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SOLENT CRUISING

far enough north to clear the red post at the northeastern extremity of the Sands by a decent margin. Note that the Sands to the west of the post extend slightly north of it so don’t cut the corner near Low Water. The western Solent The western Solent offers two different but attractive coastlines, varied wildlife habitats and less commercial traffic than the central or eastern parts. It has a wide area of navigable water for most yachts and motor cruisers, is well buoyed, and offers a great choice of harbours and anchorages within 8 miles. With Keyhaven, Lymington, Beaulieu, Yarmouth, and Newtown all within easy reach the western Solent offers the choice between anchoring among beautiful scenery and wildlife, or picking a pontoon or mooring in attractive towns with good facilities and attractions. At the western end, Keyhaven is often missed but is good to explore near High Water or for a lunch-stop anchorage in the shelter of Hurst Spit. Lymington or Yarmouth are very popular stopping points in the western Solent while Beaulieu and Newtown are favourite haunts for peace and wildlife. The volume of boats, both power and sail, during busy summer weekends and holidays mean that it can be difficult finding a berth in the popular areas and it is sensible to book ahead if possible or risk being unable to find a vacant berth or mooring, or even space to anchor. Solent tidal streams always make it worthwhile working the tide in small boats, especially near Springs, but the location of the western Solent harbours makes them convenient for cross-tide visits. So if the tide doesn’t serve for a passage from Lymington to Beaulieu, Newtown, or Cowes, a trip across to Yarmouth for lunch until the tide turns is an attractive detour. When punching tide along the Solent, the greatest tidal relief is found to the north of the channel where the bottom is less steep-to than on the Island shore. When fighting tide along the Island shore beware Gurnard, Salt Mead, and Hamstead Ledges and make sure that you calculate the height of tide carefully if you choose to stay close to the shore. Tidal streams in excess of 3.5 knots are experienced around Spring tides, particularly between Gurnard Ledge and Cowes, and between Yarmouth and Hurst Narrows. In strong wind against tide conditions, most commonly when an ebb stream meets a strong west or southwesterly wind, the seas in the western Solent can be steep and breaking, uncomfortable conditions for small to medium sized yachts or motor cruisers. Conditions are likely to be less rough north of the channel, in shallower water and out of the strongest tide. When heading for Cowes from the western Solent in rough conditions stay in mid-Solent or further north until level with Egypt Point before heading for Cowes to avoid the roughest water off Gurnard Bay. If heading for the eastern Solent or Southampton Water stay slightly south of Lepe Spit to avoid the roughest water in the strong stream that flows around the Spit.

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SOLENT CRUISING

SOLENT CRUISING The central Solent The central Solent is a busy place with commercial traffic from east and west converging to head up the Thorn Channel and into Southampton Water, along with ferries heading in and out of Cowes. The most important feature to avoid is the Brambles Bank, which lies at the western end of the Hill Head Plateau and borders the Thorn Channel to the east. This shallow patch claims many an unwary yacht or powerboat each season. Much yacht racing takes place on the Hill Head Plateau because of the tidal relief obtained here and considerate cruising sailors and powerboaters should avoid passing through the fleets of race boats. Very large ships approach the Thorn Channel from the east, making the tight turn to starboard off Cowes to enter the channel. When the ebb is running vessels start their turn off Cowes while on the flood they turn later, near Gurnard cardinal buoy. The size and density of the commercial traffic in this area, together with their speed, makes it imperative to keep a good lookout. remember that there is a Precautionary Area between Calshot and Cowes where all vessels over 150m are given a Moving Prohibited Zone of 1,000 metres ahead and 100 metres to either side. All vessels under 20m must stay clear of this moving zone. To the north of the Brambles Bank, the North channel provides access to Southampton Water for small commercial craft coming from the west, saving them the extra distance needed to round the Brambles to the south and the passage up the Thorn Channel. To the north of this channel the Hill Head and Lee-on-Solent shorelines are popular areas for dinghy sailing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, and jet skiing. Small recreational fishing boats are also found throughout the central Solent, often anchored on the plateau or near the shorelines. The Solent’s most famous port, Cowes, lies at the centre of the Solent and its convenient geographical position, plus its easy entry, make it a popular destination for yachts and powerboats of all types. As it is also the home of passenger and car ferry operations, plus commercial traffic headed up the River Medina, the entrance is often crowded and care should be taken when entering or leaving. The tide off Cowes runs very strongly and due allowance for the strong east or west going stream should be made when entering or leaving as the stream changes direction in the harbour entrance. When a strong wind meets a strong tide off Cowes the seas on Prince Consort Shoal can get quite lumpy. This can be avoided if coming from the east by staying inshore but beware of The Shrape mud which, at low tide, extends almost as far as the racing buoys, and do not be tempted to cut through the extensive mooring buoys which line the east side of the harbour. Round No. 2 red can at the entrance before heading upriver. The other main yachting harbour in the central Solent is the Hamble River with its many marinas and yachting facilities. Southampton Water has much commercial traffic but there are still places for the leisure sailor to explore including Ashlett Creek on the west side below the Fawley Marine Terminal jetties. Further up Southampton Water is Hythe Marina Village on the west side, while

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Ocean Village Marina is just beyond Southampton Dockhead up the River Itchen with Shamrock Quay and Saxon Wharf a bit further on beyond the Itchen Bridge. Small boats have plenty of exploration available to them in both the rivers Test and Itchen. The eastern Solent The eastern Solent has a different character to the western arm and the mainland shore is more developed. The sand and gravel sea bed, which predominates to the west, gives way to a greater proportion of mud in the east. Cross-Solent ferry traffic is high with car ferries operating between Portsmouth and Fishbourne at the entrance to Wootton Creek. Fast passenger catamarans run between Portsmouth and Ryde Pier head while the last remaining passenger hovercraft service runs between Southsea and Ryde. The major deep water shipping channel is south of Ryde Middle bank and very large ships regularly transit the area, with outgoing and incoming vessels often passing in the eastern Solent. Yachts and powerboats using this area should try to avoid the main channel, either staying to the south of the channel in ample water off the Island shore, or passing over Ryde Middle bank to the north of the main channel. The North channel runs to the north of Ryde Middle bank and is used by smaller commercial and military craft. The eastern Solent is also often busy at weekends and in high summer with yachts racing.

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SOLENT CRUISING

SOLENT CRUISING On the Island shore, Osborne Bay, just to the east of Cowes, is a popular day-time or overnight anchorage as it is well sheltered from west or southwest winds and has an attractive shoreline. Just to the east, Wootton Creek is nice to explore in a small boat and when the tide serves but the entrance is dominated by the car ferry terminal and caution is needed when ferries are arriving and leaving. Further east is Ryde Pier and, beyond, the small Ryde Harbour which is accessible only around high tide and by small to medium sized shallow draft boats. Ryde Sands is the major obstacle in this area and this extensive sandbank catches out many unwary craft. To the north, the coastline turns northeast at Gilkicker Point and runs to the narrow entrance to Portsmouth Harbour. Portsmouth has much to offer the sailor or powerboater looking for exploration with a variety of marinas and opportunities for anchoring. Beyond the forts to the east lie Langstone and Chichester harbours, both of which have bars at their entrances which make it unsafe to enter or leave in rough conditions, such as when a strong southerly wind opposes a strong ebb tide. Both harbours are superb boating areas that are particularly appealing to owners of small yachts and powerboats who enjoy exploring, creek crawling, and wildlife watching. Together with the varied ports, harbours, and anchorages within the Solent, Langstone and Chichester make up the most compact yet varied cruising ground in Europe, a real treasure to be enjoyed and protected.

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Photo: Paul Wyeth


WEATHER WEATHER

CONTRIBUTED BY SIMON ROWELL • ROWELL YACHTING SERVICES

Planning and Using Weather for Offshore Racing

The great thing about modern weather forecasts and the way they are disseminated over the Internet means that you can easily get a forecast for what’s going to happen every three hours for the next week, and you can get this in text, graphics or gridded binary data (GRIB data) format. So, with all this we can head out to sea, safe and happy in the knowledge that there are no weather surprises in store. Well, that’s the idea.

Photo: Peter Mumford - Beken of Cowes

Weather forecasting has come a long way, with a three-day forecast now being about as good as a 24-hour forecast a dozen years ago. But it is still nowhere near perfect. Let’s go through a good way to try and minimise the chances of getting it horribly wrong, and maximise the chances of really understanding what you actually get offshore.

Preparation: The first step is understanding your sources of weather information. It’s best to start looking at what’s happening at least a week before a race so as to get your head around what systems are coming in and how they may move around. Synoptic charts are by far the best thing for this as they give you a picture of what’s going on and have been looked at by the forecasters at whatever national agency you are using. For UK waters, the Met Office outputs are in my opinion the best ones to use.

The model the Met Office uses has a 4km resolution over UK waters and a 12km one over the entire North Atlantic which is usually the breeding ground for our weather. This compares favourably with the half degree resolution (30 nautical miles north to south, 19 nautical miles east to west at 50°N) available on GRIB data or GRIB-derived data. If you can print off and save the forecast charts each day this is also a good way of seeing how stable the forecast is - a 96-hour chart printed on Monday should in theory show exactly the same weather as a 48-hour chart printed on Wednesday.

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WEATHER

WEATHER There will of course be a difference, and if this difference is small then the forecast is probably a good, stable one. If it bears no relation then think hard! In UK waters our weather is often driven by the progression of depressions moving from the west to the east, and over a forecast period this general order will be maintained, but the speed of systems passing over may vary. What this means is that while you will probably get the “front, clear spell, front” weather forecast originally given, it may come in faster or slower than you initially expected. The 48 hours up to the start is a good time to get the more detailed information, with specific GRIB files and location forecasts easily available on line.

Photo: Paul Wyeth

During the Race: Weather forecasts do not stop coming in just because you want to do the fun stuff on deck. There are many available sources of weather at sea, and not all of them involve having a huge communications budget. The most important one is you - by religiously noting down weather conditions in the log every hour and comparing them to your pre-start forecasts you can quickly get an idea of whether things are coming through faster or slower than expected. The Marine Safety Information (MSI) broadcasts on VHF by the Coastguard are invaluable; they are based on the Met Office forecast, and so you can take the information given here (location of highs and lows in the General Synopsis and all the actual weather data) and draw them on to the Met Office synoptic charts that you printed off before the race started for a direct comparison of “what you thought before” with “what’s happening now”. A good weather eye is essential - by looking to windward regularly you can see new features coming in (high cirrus clouds ahead of a warm front, for example) and mentally tick them off against what you were expecting. Depending on what communications kit you have onboard and how far offshore you are, you may be able to get actual weather charts and up-to-date GRIB data, all of which is a good thing. With all of these different sources, however, it’s really important to look at what’s actually happening and how the conditions are changing and think about how this compares to what the forecasts

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WEATHER

say. One thing that rarely gets captured by the weather forecasts from whatever source is the effect of land on the wind, particularly the effect of large lumps of it sticking either out or up into it. As you sail around headlands or between islands there will almost certainly be an acceleration effect as the wind is pushed around the land. An effective way of trying to get a decent handle on this is to look at the wind direction and draw it on the chart next to anything that may get in the way. This will show you where the acceleration zones will be, and equally important where the lee zones around the corners are. A similar effect happens with wind getting funnelled down valleys when an offshore breeze is blowing (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: Acceleration, lee and funnelling zones around the Isle of Wight

How to get a Weather Brain: Now this doesn’t mean ending

up looking like an extra from an old Star Trek episode. It’s more about how to become more instinctive in your understanding and interpretation of weather information. As with all things, and especially all things sailing-related, it’s a question of practice making perfect. This isn’t as onerous as it sounds either. Probably the easiest and best way to practise weather is to look at the Met Office’s synoptic charts every morning as you’re settling down to look at emails, and tell yourself what you think the weather’s going to be doing the following morning, what direction the wind is, whether it’ll be raining, and anything else of significance. The following morning wander outside with a mug of tea and stand looking all-knowing, staring out at the sky. Does it look like you thought it would 24 hours before? Very soon you’ll find that it does, and you’ll get more fresh air as well.

Photo: Peter Mumford - Beken of Cowes

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‘IT IS ALWAYS BETTER TO BE SAFE THAN SORRY’

Photo: Paul Wyeth


SAFETY AFLOAT

Boating is enjoyable and as a rule, relatively safe. But water and weather can be unpredictable so we need to ensure we have the appropriate safety equipment with us at all times. Basic items such as flares, lifejackets and VHF radios should always be carried. But if they have not been checked or maintained, you could be in for a nasty shock. Let us take the hand held VHF. It needs to be charged and for there to be a supply of spare batteries. Check the batteries are new and unused – and not ones you found rolling around in a drawer. You may have a waterproof box with your new shiny flares in but are your old flares still in the box too? Many people don’t like to dispose of their old flares as they look new and it seems a waste of money to throw them away. But in the confusion of an emergency you need to be sure you are reaching for a new flare which will function correctly. A flare has an expiry date for a reason. Lifejackets may still be in the original bag they came in but have they been used and put back in the bag to be dealt with later? Have they been on the boat for years and have undetected holes or hiding all sorts of defects? If your lifejackets have not been serviced and maintained annually they might let you down. Don’t take a chance; take them to a recognised service centre for inspection. It is always better to be safe than sorry. Happy boating from Mr Safety.

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SAFETY AFLOAT

IN ASSOCIATION WITH SEASAFE SYSTEMS


SOLENT EVENTS DIARY SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

SPONSORED BY DRIFT

INTERNATIONAL ETCHELLS March – October The Etchells is a fast, sleek, stable racing sloop. Predominantly owner-driven by enthusiastic and loyal supporters of the class association, the fleet has strict one-design credentials and is a highly competitive class. The Cowes fleet has grown over the past two years to over 20 competitors and the Worlds will be held in Weymouth in 2016. The fleet has an active race programme as well as several loaner boats available for anyone to try. Contact Fleet Captain davidfranks80@gmail.com or 07768 063868. The inaugural Etchells Invitational Cup is to be held from 26-31 July 2014 in Cowes where 15 countries and 29 boats, each with new sails will compete. Several World Champions are competing, including John Bertrand. www.etchellsukfleet.co.uk ROYAL OCEAN RACING CLUB April - September The Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) was established in 1925, as the Ocean Racing Club, following the finish of the first Fastnet Race. The founding goals of the club continue to be ‘to encourage long distance yacht racing and the design, building and navigation in which speed and seaworthiness are combined.’ The 2014 RORC calendar of offshore races and inshore regattas can be found on the website. www.rorc.org

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DRAGON CLASS SOLENT DIVISION April - October The Dragon is a beautiful 29 foot keelboat, which has a 3 or 4 person crew and is raced throughout the world. There has been an active fleet established in Cowes ever since the class first appeared in the UK in the 30s. The class are active participants in the Cowes Keelboat Solent Series and the Cowes Keelboat Championship, with occasional “stand-alone” championship weekends for appropriate silverware. The UK National Championships (Edinburgh Cup) are in Christchurch Bay this year, on 6 - 11 July, raced under the flag of the Royal Lymington Yacht Club. The South Coasts are in Cowes, from the 19 – 21 July, organised by the RCYC. For more information please go to www.solent-dragons.org X ONE DESIGN CLASS April - October The XOD Class has six active fleets around the Solent area, at Cowes, Hamble, Itchenor, Lymington, Parkstone and Yarmouth. XODs attract many experienced helms and crew and the standard of racing at the front of the fleets is very high. XODs are traditionally the largest entry in Cowes Week, with over half the entire fleet, in excess of 80 boats, sailing from home ports to participate each year. In 2011, the Centenary of the first XOD race was celebrated by 145 XODs competing during the Week, a record entry for the regatta. www.xonedesign.org.uk

Photo: Beken of Cowes

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SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

DARING CLASS April - October The Daring was designed as a One Design by Arthur Robb based on his successful 5.5 metre yacht Vision, the silver medal winner in the 1956 Olympics. The classic design has proved popular and enduring, offering great value for money for this type of One Design racing. Darings race in the Solent off Cowes every weekend from the middle of April to the middle of October. www.daring.org.uk


SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

SOLENT EVENTS DIARY JOG CHAMPIONSHIP 5 April - 11 October The Junior Offshore Group (JOG) was established in 1950 to allow smaller yachts to compete offshore; it organises highly competitive races for IRC rated yachts. JOG runs a full programme every season grouped into an Inshore and Offshore Series. Competitors enjoy a high standard of racing and a similarly high level of camaraderie at the parties which are held at the end of almost every race in a host port. Most JOG races start in the Solent from the club’s fixed line and distinctive starting box just east of Egypt Point, Cowes. www.jog.org.uk RSYC DOUBLE HANDED RACING 12 April – 4 October The Royal Southampton Yacht Club is the UK’s home of Double Handed racing. The 2014 series comprises 12 races: 4 Inshore, 4 Offshore & 4 Alongshore, open to all comers in IRC, RSYC & Multihull classes. This includes the ever-popular Island Double on Saturday 19 July, which regularly attracts upwards of 120 boats. This year, for the first time in its 34 year history, the DH series includes the Double Handed IRC National Championships over the weekend of 28 - 29 June. For full details of the complete RSYC race schedule visit www.rsyc.org.uk ISLAND SAILING CLUB EVENING RACE SERIES 22 April - 2 September - Tuesday Nights The Island Sailing Club’s ever-popular Evening Race Series provides races for all sizes of boat on Tuesday evenings, with the exception of Cowes Week, through to 2 September when the traditional Bang & Go Back Race marks the end of the evening season. www.islandsc.org.uk/isctuesday.aspx VICE ADMIRAL’S CUP 9 - 11 May The Club’s annual Vice Admiral’s Cup regatta takes place from Friday 9 to Sunday 11 May. Since it’s introduction the event has gone from strength to strength with its simple close racing format making it enjoyable for the competitors. This year there will be racing for the following classes: Half Ton Classics, Quarter Tonners, and SB20s along with the J/109 fleet. The other classes will be the J/111s, the 45ft class and the 39 to 43 footers. The event will once again provide the inshore element for the 2014 GBR Team trials for the British Commodore’s Cup Team for the Brewin Dolphin Commodores’ Cup. Full details can be found on www.rcyc.co.uk YARMOUTH OLD GAFFERS FESTIVAL 30 May - 1 June The 18th annual Old Gaffers Festival will be ‘Celebrating Yarmouth’ and there will be fun for the whole family. The harbour will be filled with visiting gaff-rigged vessels and some will race on Friday. There will be a Continental market, food and craft stalls, children’s rides, classic vehicle display, non-stop free daytime entertainment, flower festival and real ale bar. On Friday and Saturday evenings (ticket required) there will be dancing to live music in the marquee on The Quay. www.yarmoutholdgaffersfestival.co.uk

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J.P. MORGAN ASSET MANAGEMENT ROUND THE ISLAND RACE 21 June The annual J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race, organised by the Island Sailing Club, is a one-day yacht race around the Isle of Wight. The race regularly attracts over 1,700 boats and around 16,000 sailors, making it one of the largest yacht races in the world and the fourth largest participation sporting event in the UK. Competitors come from all over the UK, other parts of Europe and as far away as the USA to follow the 50 nautical mile course round the Isle of Wight. Starting on the famous Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, the fleet races westabout, to The Needles, round St Catherine’s Point and Bembridge Ledge buoy, and back to the Solent to the finish line at Cowes. The race is a great opportunity for families and first timers to race against world-renowned sailors. This year the organisers are delighted to have Sir Ben Ainslie competing and he has also accepted an invitation to present the prizes at the race prize giving on Sunday. Standard entries close at midnight on Saturday 7 June and then late entries will be accepted until midday on Wednesday 18 June. For those not competing there are many vantage points both on the Island and the south coast from which to watch the race, such as Hurst Castle, The Needles and the Spinnaker Tower. You can keep up to date with race news and share your stories on both Twitter and Facebook. If you tweet and use the hashtag #raceforall J.P. Morgan will donate £1 to the official race charity, the Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust, up to the target of £3,000. The race website has a forum page where you can advertise or seek crew and have other general race discussions. www.roundtheisland.org.uk

Photo: Ian Roman

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SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

IRC SOLENT REGION CHAMPIONSHIP31 May - 28 September 31 May - 28 September Spanning the full length of the Solent, from the Nab Tower race in the east to the Royal Solent Regatta off Yarmouth, this series aims to encourage larger fleets of IRC-rated yachts in a wide range of competitive racing. Post-race hospitality at each host club provides the opportunity to experience the unique atmosphere of each, and socialise with fellow competitors. Boats can enter any combination of events of the whole series. www.solentirc.org.uk


SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

SOLENT EVENTS DIARY COUTTS QUARTER TON CUP 25 - 27 June The 2013 Coutts Quarter Ton Cup will be hosted by the Royal Corinthian Yacht Club, Cowes, from 25 - 27 June. Now in its tenth year, the event will once again be open to Quarter Tonners built under all three iterations of the Quarter Ton Rule and will be raced under IRC. This year’s event will follow the well-established and muchloved formula of lots of fast and furious racing afloat, followed by lots of informal and fun après sailing ashore. Once again there will be a Corinthian Division for the all-amateur crews which has proved very popular. With upwards of 30 teams expected to race, including a number of new crews, competition will be fierce and the old guard can expect to have the young pretenders snapping at their heels. Full details at www.rcyc.co.uk PANERAI BRITISH CLASSIC WEEK 12 - 19 July As one of the highlight events during an exceptional summer of sailing regattas in the UK, the Panerai British Classic Week, organised by the British Classic Yacht Club, takes place in Cowes. More than 70 of the world’s most iconic classic and vintage yachts are expected to compete, once again providing a magnificent spectacle of classic yacht racing in the exciting waters of the Solent. There will be a six-race series, plus a race around the Isle of Wight following the original clockwise course of the first America’s Cup. Racing will be demanding and competitive but will still retain that Corinthian spirit synonymous with classic boat racing. www.britishclassicyachtclub.org/regatta

Photo: Guido Cantini/Panerai

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SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

BREWIN DOLPHIN COMMODORES’ CUP 19-26 July In 2014 the Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC) will run a full calendar of offshore races and inshore regattas, including the biennial Brewin Dolphin Commodores’ Cup. Established in 1992, the 12th edition of the Brewin Dolphin Commodores’ Cup will take place from 19-26 July in Cowes. The Brewin Dolphin Commodores’ Cup is the premier Corinthian international offshore regatta and is open to three-boat national teams racing under IRC (Endorsed). The full 2014 RORC calendar can be found on the website www.rorc.org COWES CLASSICS WEEK 21 - 25 July Cowes Classics Week, run by the Royal London Yacht Club, offers class racing for all metre boats, classic racing keelboats and one designs including, but not restricted to,12mR, 8mR, 6mR (classic and modern), 5.5mR, Daring, Dragon (classic and modern), Solent Sunbeam, Bembridge Redwing, Seaview Mermaid, Squib, XOD, Folkboat, Victory, Bembridge, Loch Long and Yarmouth One Designs, Flying Fifteen, SCOD and Swallow. There are also classes for Classic Cruisers, Classic/Revival Day Boats and Old Gaffers. Racing from Committee Boats will be on a mix of laid and roundthe-cans courses. The social programme includes dining/partying at each of the major Yacht Clubs in Cowes. www.cowesclassicsweek.org

Photo: Peter Mumford - Beken of Cowes

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SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

SOLENT EVENTS DIARY THE ETCHELLS INVITATIONAL CUP 26 - 31 July Jointly hosted by the Royal Thames and the Royal London Yacht Clubs, teams from around the world will be sailing to win the International Etchells Invitational Regatta, for the 140 year old Gertrude Cup Trophy. Twenty identical boats will be supplied by the Cowes Etchells Fleet so that no competitor has an equipment advantage, and racing will take place over four days in the waters of the Solent. www.etchellsukfleet.co.uk COWES DINGHY WEEK 26 - 30 July Cowes Dinghy Week regatta is hosted by Gurnard Sailing Club in the waters of the western Solent. Dinghy Week is a friendly but fiercely contested regatta, attracting around 150 entries from sailors of all ages, in a range of class with social events most evenings. There will be class racing for classes with eight or more entries a catamaran handicap class and three monohull handicap classes. www.gurnardsc.org.uk ABERDEEN ASSET MANAGEMENT COWES WEEK 2 - 9 August Since 1826 Cowes Week has played a key part in the British sporting summer calendar and is one of the UK’s longest running and most successful sporting events. The eight day regatta now stages around 40 daily races for between 800 and 1,000 boats and has a varied race programme to suit the most competitively campaigned boats, cruiser racers, and everything in between; there’s something for everyone at this, the world’s best-known sailing regatta. Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week, as the event is now known, attracts up to 8,000 competitors ranging from Olympic and worldclass professionals to weekend sailors, and in excess of 100,000 spectators come to watch the sailing, enjoy the social scene, and to experience the unique atmosphere. www.aamcowesweek.co.uk

Photo: Paul Wyeth

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SOUTHAMPTON MARITIME FESTIVAL 22 - 23 August The Festival once again takes over the docks and water within Dock Gate 4 at Ocean Terminal to bring a whole host of activities and attractions that hark back to Southampton’s past. Visitors will enjoy a plethora of historic ships and vessels and see what life was like living and working on board. Wartime history will come alive with the arrival of the HMS Medusa and a variety of Dunkirk Little Ships. Resident ship the SS Shieldhall will be moored at the quayside and offering the chance of a trip around the Solent. On land, the quayside will be packed with exhibits including historic cars, steam exhibits, heritage trams whilst Southampton’s Ocean Terminal will house many heritage and art exhibits, craft fairs and traders. www.southamptonmaritimefestival.com

Photo: Peter Taylor

COWES -TORQUAY - COWES POWERBOAT RACE 30 - 31 August The Cowes-Torquay-Cowes powerboat race, organised by the British Powerboat Racing Club, is the longest-running offshore powerboat race in the world. This year’s fleet will assemble at the Royal Yacht Squadron on Saturday 30 August, and the public are welcome to watch from The Parade, Cowes, as the crews complete their last-minute preparations. The race starts at 0900am on Sunday 31 August and the best viewing for the start is at Hurst Castle on the mainland and Gurnard or Fort Albert on the Isle of Wight. The boats will be returning from 1430 onwards. www.cowestorquaycowes.co.uk

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CHICHESTER HARBOUR FEDERATION REGATTA WEEK 11 -15 August Hayling Island Sailing Club - 3 race areas Series A -  RS 400, Merlin, Flying Fifteen, Finn, Laser, Artemis classes plus Fast Asymmetric with Foils, Medium Asymmetric and Fast Handicap fleets Series B -  RS 200, Laser, Radial, 4.7, Solo, RS Feva classes and Medium Handicap Series C -  Topper, RS Tera, Optimist classes and Slow Handicap Series A & B have one race a day with 3 to count and Series C has 9 races with 6 to count. www.chifed.org


SOLENT EVENTS DIARY

SOLENT EVENTS DIARY LITTLE BRITAIN CHALLENGE CUP 5 - 7 September The Little Britain Challenge Cup is the premier construction and property industry event. First started in 1988, 2014 is the 27th regatta. Taking place in Cowes, with racing run by the Royal Yacht Squadron, the action-packed three day regatta attracts a large cross-section of organisations and individuals who are involved in the building world. www.littlebritain.co.uk

Photo: Paul Wyeth

DUBARRY WOMEN’S OPEN KEELBOAT CHAMPIONSHIPS 6 - 7 September The Women’s Open Keelboat Championship is a weekend for sailors with 100% female crew. WOKC focuses on high quality, competitive keelboat racing, accommodating a range of experience and age groups across key one design and handicap fleets. Hosted by Hamble River Sailing Club. www.wokc.co.uk PSP SOUTHAMPTON BOAT SHOW 12 - 21 September The PSP Southampton Boat Show - Britain’s best-loved on-water Boat Show - is a much anticipated event, providing a fun-filled day out for boaters, families and friends to see thousands of boats, brands, products and suppliers. www.southamptonboatshow.com

DOYLE SAILS HAMBLE ONE DESIGN CHAMPIONSHIPS 4 - 5 October & 18 - 19 October The Solent’s Autumn Championship for one design yachts: J/111, J/109, J/80, J/70, SB20 etc. Top class competitive racing and a great welcome back at host Hamble River Sailing Club’s Clubhouse. www.hamblewinterseries.com 50

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SOLENT EVENTS DIARY Photo: Paul Wyeth

GARMIN HAMBLE WINTER SERIES 5 October - 30 November The Garmin Hamble Winter Series provides the best winter sailing in the UK for IRC0-4, J/111, J/70, J/80,  J/109 and SB20 one designs and sportboats. The Series provides top class, competitive racing and a great welcome back at host Hamble River Sailing Club’s Clubhouse. www.hamblewinterseries.com MDL HAMBLE BIG BOAT CHAMPIONSHIPS 11 - 12 October & 25 - 26 October An annual top class Solent event for yachts of 40ft and over. Competitive racing and a great welcome back at host Hamble River Sailing Club’s Clubhouse. www.hamblewinterseries.com

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SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

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Bembridge SC BHYC BCYC BPRC CCYC CWL ECSC Gurnard SC Hamble River SC HDYC ISC Itchenor SC JOG LTSC OGA PHYC PSC RAFSA RAFYC RAYC RHCC RCYC RLYC RLymYC RORC Royal Solent YC RSYC RSrnYC RTYC RVYC RYS SBSC SVYC SORC SWSA Warsash SC YSC

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Bembridge Sailing Club Brading Haven Yacht Club British Classic Yacht Club British Powerboat Racing Club Cowes Corinthian Yacht Club Cowes Week Limited East Cowes Sailing Club Gurnard Sailing Club Hamble River Sailing Club Household Division Yacht Club Island Sailing Club Itchenor Sailing Club Junior Offshore Group Lymington Town Sailing Club Old Gaffers Association Portsmouth Harbour Yacht Club Portsmouth Sailing Club RAF Sailing Association Royal Airforce Yacht Club Royal Albert Yacht Club River Hamble Combined Clubs Royal Corinthian Yacht Club Royal London Yacht Club Royal Lymington Yacht Club Royal Ocean Racing Club Royal Solent Yacht Club Royal Southampton Yacht Club Royal Southern Yacht Club Royal Thames Yacht Club Royal Victoria Yacht Club Royal Yacht Squadron Stokes Bay Sailing Club Sea View Yacht Club Solo Offshore Racing Club Southampton Water Sailing Association Warsash Sailing Club Yarmouth Sailing Club

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CCYC RSYC RVYC JOG PSC PHYC SORC RLymYC Warsash SC RLYC Warsash SC Bembridge SC PSC RSYC RSYC RLymYC ISC Warsash SC Warsash SC ECSC JOG RORC PHYC RLYC Bembridge SC RLYC JOG ISC ISC ECSC Royal Solent YC ISC ISC RLymYC CCYC Bembridge SC PSC SORC RTYC Warsash SC RSYC Bembridge SC RLymYC ISC Warsash SC ISC Royal Solent YC ISC

MAY Thu 1st Evening 1 Thu 1st Spring Series 2 Thu 1st Thursday Night Racing Early 1 Fri 2nd Sharps Doom Bar Cherbourg Double Fri 2nd St Vaast Race Fri 2nd - Sun 4th X Yachts Regatta Sat 3rd Cervantes Trophy Race Sat 3rd - Mon 5th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series Sat 3rd - Mon 5th Etchells Bedrock Challenge Cup Sat 3rd GORT MOB Race Sat 3rd - Mon 5th Sir Henry Chisholm Trophy Sat 3rd - Sun 4th Spring Regatta Sun 4th Spring Series Day 4 Tue 6th Evening Race Series Race 3 Wed 7th Club Racing Thu 8th Evening 2 Thu 8th Spring Series 3 Thu 8th Thursday Night Racing Early 2 Fri 9th Friday Evening Racing Fri 9th - Sun 11th Vice Admiral’s Cup Sat 10th Castex Cup Regatta Sat 10th - Sun 11th Contessa 32 Class Inshore Points Series Sat 10th - Sun 11th Cowes Keelboat Championship 1 Sat 10th Cruiser Racer Saturday Series 1 Sun 11th Spring Series Day 5 Tue 13th Evening Race Series Race 4 Wed 14th Club Racing Thu 15th Evening 3 Thu 15th Spring Series 4 Thu 15th Thursday Night Racing Early 3 Fri 16th Friday Evening Racing Fri 16th - Sun 18th Sunsail Sailing Challenge Sat 17th City Livery YC Regatta Sat 17th - Sun 18th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series

RSYC ECSC RLymYC RSYC JOG RYS RORC RLYC CCYC ECSC Itchenor SC RVYC ISC ISC Royal Solent YC RSYC ECSC RLymYC RSrnYC RCYC ISC RAFYC CCYC RLymYC ISC ISC Royal Solent YC RSYC ECSC RLymYC RSrnYC PHYC RCYC RTYC

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SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

APRIL Sat 5th - Sun 6th Etchells Spring Series 1 Sat 5th Harken Spring Series 5 & 6 Sat 5th Laser South Coast Grand Prix Sat 5th Nab Tower Race Sat 5th Parhelion Spring Series 3 Sat 5th - Sun 6th Sunsail Racing Series Round 3 Sun 6th Solent Shakedown Sun 6th Spring Series 2 Sun 6th Warsash Spring Series 4 Fri 11th - Sat 12th Cannonball Trophy Sat 12th - Sun 13th Brooks Macdonald Warsash Spring Championship 1 Sat 12th - Sun 13th Illusions Spring Plate Sat 12th Parhelion Spring Series 4 Sat 12th Sharps Doom Bar Spring Solent Double Sun 13th Harken Spring Series 7 & 8 Sun 13th Spring Series 3 Sun 13th Spring Series Day 1 Sun 13th Warsash Spring Series 5 Tue 15th Pursuit Race 1 Thu 17th Mass Start and Ladies Series 1 Fri 18th Cowes to Cherbourg Fri 18th - Sun 20th Easter Challenge Fri 18th - Mon 21st Easter Rally Sat 19th - Mon 21st Daring Spring Challenge Sat 19th - Sun 20th Illusions Vernons Easter Cup Sat 19th - Sun 20th Warm up Regatta Sun 20th Cherbourg to Cowes Sun 20th Spring Series Day 2 Tue 22nd Evening Series Race 1 Thu 24th Spring Series 1 Fri 25th - Sun 27th St Georges Day Trophy Sat 26th - Sun 27th 2K Spring Team Racing Regatta Sat 26th - Sun 27th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series Sat 26th Duo Series 1 Sat 26th - Sun 27th Etchells Spring Series 2 Sat 26th Illusions St Georges Day Trophy Sat 26th Parhelion Spring Series 5 Sat 26th RIOW Solo Sat 26th - Sun 27th Spring Excuse - Cumberland Fleet Sat 26th - Sun 27th Warsash Spring Championship 2 Sun 27th Harken Spring Series 9 & 10 Sun 27th Illusions Woodford Long Distance Race Sun 27th Spring Series 4 Sun 27th Spring Series Day 3 Sun 27th Warsash Spring Series 6 Tue 29th Evening Race Series Race 2 Wed 30th Club Racing Wed 30th IOW Businesses Sonar Evening Regatta Day 1

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SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR Sat 17th Cowes to Yarmouth Race JOG Sat 17th - Sun 18th Harken UK May Regatta RSrnYC Sat 17th - Sun 18th Legal Cup Britannia Corporate Events Sat 17th Sharps Doom Bar West Princessa Double RSYC Sat 17th Solent Sunbeam Champions Invitation Regatta Itchenor SC Sun 18th Spring Series Day 6 ISC Sun 18th Yarmouth to Cowes Race JOG Tue 20th Evening Race Series Race 5 ISC Wed 21st Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 21st IOW Business Sonar Evening Regatta Day 2 ISC Thu 22nd Evening 4 RSYC Thu 22nd - Sun 25th Fecamp Triangle - Solent - Brighton - Fecamp - Solent SORC Thu 22nd Spring Series 5 ECSC Thu 22nd Thursday Night Racing Early 4 RLymYC Fri 23rd - Mon 26th Aveva Deauville Race and Rally RSrnYC, RLYC, JOG Fri 23rd Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 23rd - Mon 26th Sigma 38 National Championships Sat 24th - Sun 25th Bank of England Regatta RCYC Sat 24th - Mon 26th Chittagong Trophy Itchenor SC Sat 24th - Mon 26th Christchurch Bay Regatta RLymYC Sat 24th - Mon 26th Cowes Keelboat Series RCYC Sat 24th - Mon 26th May Cross Channel Rally PHYC Sat 24th Myth of Malham Race RORC Sat 24th - Sun 25th Sir Kenneth Preston Trophy RYS Mon 26th Inshore Series Day 1 - Christchurch Bay Race ISC Tue 27th Evening Race Series Race 6 ISC Wed 28th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 29th Evening 5 RSYC Thu 29th Pursuit Race 2 Warsash SC Thu 29th Spring Series 6 ECSC Thu 29th Thursday Night Racing Early 5 RLymYC Fri 30th Friday Evening Race RSrnYC Fri 30th - Sun 1st Yarmouth Old Gaffers Festival Royal Solent YC Fri 30th - Sat 31st Yarmouth Old Gaffers Festival OGA Sat 31st Clarkson Cup - IRC Solent Region Championship Day 1 RSYC Sat 31st - Sun 1st Contessa 32 and 26 Regatta RLYC Sat 31st - Sun 1st Cowes Keelboat Championship 2 and Mid Summer Regatta RTYC Sat 31st Duo Series 2 RLymYC Sat 31st East Cowes SC Regatta ECSC Sat 31st - Sun 1st Hamble - Yarmouth RSrnYC

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SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

JUNE Mon 2nd - Tue 3rd Profile Cup Britannia Corporate Events Tue 3rd Evening Race Series Race 7 ISC Wed 4th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 4th Co-operation Ireland Regatta Britannia Corporate Events Thu 5th Evening 6 RSYC Thu 5th Midsummer Series 1 ECSC Thu 5th Pursuit Race 3 Warsash SC Thu 5th Thursday Night Racing Early 6 RLymYC Fri 6th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 6th - Sun 8th Portland SORC Sat 7th - Sun 8th Cowes Keelboats Championship 3 & Mid Summer Regatta RLYC Sat 7th De Guingand Bowl Race RORC Sat 7th Folkboat Nationals RLymYC Sat 7th - Sun 8th Itchenor Keelboat Weekend Itchenor SC Sat 7th - Sun 8th Mount Gay June Regatta RSrnYC Sat 7th Sharps Doom Bar Weymouth Double Leg 1 RSYC Sat 7th Weymouth JOG Sun 8th Sharps Doom Bar Weymouth Double Leg 2 RSYC Mon 9th - Fri 13th IDOR Regatta ISC Tue 10th Evening Race Series Race 8 ISC Wed 11th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 11th IOW Businesses Sonar Evening Regatta Day 3 ISC Thu 12th Evening 7 RSYC Thu 12th - Fri 13th Lutine Lineslip Regatta Britannia Corporate Events Thu 12th - Sun 15th Match Cup ISAF Grade 2 Event RSrnYC Thu 12th Midsummer Series 2 ECSC Thu 12th Pursuit Race 4 Warsash SC Thu 12th Thursday Night Racing Early 8 & XOD Lym Week 2 RLymYC Fri 13th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 13th - Sun 15th IRC National Championships RORC Sat 14th - Sun 15th BMPI Cup Regatta ISC Sat 14th - Sun 15th Cowes Keelboat Solent Series CCYC Sat 14th - Sun 15th Poole and back Race RSrnYC Sat 14th - Sun 15th Summer Keelboat Regatta RLymYC Mon 16th - Fri 20th Points Week for Itchenor XOD & Solent Sunbeams Itchenor SC Tue 17th Evening Race Series Race 9 ISC Wed 18th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 19th Evening 8 RSYC Thu 19th Midsummer Series 3 ECSC Thu 19th Pursuit Race 5 Warsash SC Thu 19th Thursday Night Racing Early 8 RLymYC Fri 20th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Sat 21st J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race ISC Sun 22nd David Thomas Regatta RLYC Tue 24th Evening Race Series Race 10 ISC Wed 25th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 25th - Fri 27th Quarter Ton Cup RCYC Thu 26th Evening 9 RSYC Thu 26th Midsummer Series 4 ECSC Thu 26th Pursuit Race 6 Warsash SC Thu 26th Thursday Night Racing Early 9 RLymYC Fri 27th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 27th Morgan Cup Race RORC Fri 27th Transversal Charity Cup RCYC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Britannia Weekend RLYC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Cowes Keelboat Solent Series RYS Sat 28th - Sun 29th Cumberland Regatta RTYC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Energy Regatta Britannia Corporate Events Sat 28th IRC Solent Region Championship Day 2 PSC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Portcullis Regatta RCYC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Portsmouth Regatta PSC Sat 28th Prince Consort Race Royal Solent YC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Sharps Doom Bar Laid Marks/ Summer Solent Double & IRC 2H Nationals RSYC Sat 28th - Sun 29th Victory Class - Portsmouth SC - Portsmouth Regatta RAYC Sun 29th Club Pursuit Race RSrnYC Mon 30th - Tue 1st Sirmoor Regatta RCYC JULY Tue 1st Evening Race Series Race 11 Wed 2nd Club Racing Wed 2nd IOW Businesses Sonar Evening Regatta Day 4 Thu 3rd Evening 10 Thu 3rd Midsummer Series 5 Thu 3rd Pursuit Race 7 Thu 3rd Temple Legal Regatta Thu 3rd Thursday Night Racing Late 1 Fri 4th Friday Evening Racing Sat 5th - Sun 6th 125th Anniversary Regatta Sat 5th Bembridge Rally Sat 5th - Mon 7th Contessa 32 Class Inshore Points Series Sat 5th - Sun 6th Cowes Keelboat Series Sat 5th Dartmouth and JOG Offshore Week Sat 5th Duo Series 3 Sat 5th - Sun 6th Etchells Southern Area Championship

ISC Royal Solent YC ISC RSYC ECSC Warsash SC Britannia Corporate Events RLymYC RSrnYC ISC OGA PSC RCYC JOG RLymYC RCYC

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SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR Sat 5th - Sun 6th FS Feva GP SBSC Sat 5th - Sun 6th IRC Small Boat Regatta RAFYC Sat 5th Inshore Series Day 2 - Solent Race ISC Sat 5th Inter-Club Laser Team Racing Royal Solent YC Sat 5th - Tue 8th International Dragon Class South Coast Championship RLymYC Sat 5th Ladies Lollypop RSYC Sat 5th - Sun 6th Stug Perry Trophy RCYC Tue 8th Evening Race Series Race 12 ISC Wed 9th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 9th - Sat 12th International Dragon Class Edinburgh Cup RLymYC Thu 10th Evening 11 RSYC Thu 10th Midsummer Series 6 Points Series Trophy ECSC Thu 10th Pursuit Race 8 Warsash SC Thu 10th Thursday Night Racing Late 2 RLymYC Fri 11th Cowes - Dinard - St Malo RORC Fri 11th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Sat 12th - Sun 13th Champagne Joseph Perrier July Regatta RSrnYC Sat 12th - Sun 13th Cowes Keelboat Solent Series ISC Sat 12th Cruiser Racer Saturday Series 2 RLymYC Sat 12th IRC Solent Region Championship Day 3 RSrnYC Sat 12th - Sat 19th Panerai British Classic Week BCYC Sat 12th Sail the Wight ECSC Sat 12th - Sun 13th Sunsail Racing Series Round 4 PHYC Tue 15th Evening Race Series Race 13 ISC Wed 16th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 17th Evening 12 RSYC Thu 17th Late Summer Series 1 ECSC Thu 17th Pursuit Ladies Race Warsash SC Thu 17th Thursday Night Racing Late 3 RLymYC Fri 18th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Sat 19th - Sat 26th Brewin Dolphin Commodores Cup RORC Sat 19th Britannia Events Round Island Circumnavigation Race ISC Sat 19th - Sun 27th Channel Family Race & Rally RSrnYC Sat 19th - Sun 20th Cowes Keelboat Championship 4 RYS Sat 19th - Mon 21st Dragons South Coast Championships RCYC Sat 19th - Sun 20th Lymington Dinghy Regatta RLymYC Sat 19th - Sun 20th National Swallow Class Championships RYS Sat 19th Sharps Doom Bar Island Double RSYC Sat 19th - Sun 20th XOD Telegraph Trophy RCYC Sun 20th Lymington - Falmouth SORC Mon 21st - Fri 25th Charles Stanley Cowes Classics Week RLYC, RCYC, RVYC, ISC and CCYC Tue 22nd Evening Race Series Race 14 ISC Wed 23rd Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 23rd - Sat 26th J Cup RSrnYC Thu 24th Evening 13 RSYC Thu 24th Late Summer Series 2 ECSC Thu 24th Pursuit Charity Race Warsash SC Thu 24th Thursday Night Racing Late 4 RLymYC Fri 25th Fecamp JOG Fri 25th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 25th - Mon 28th Taittinger Regatta Royal Solent YC Sat 26th - Wed 30th 40th Cowes Dinghy Week Gurnard SC Sat 26th Annual Regatta HDYC Sat 26th Bembridge Village Regatta Bembridge SC (EWCC) Sat 26th Channel Race RORC Sat 26th IRC Solent Region Championship Day 4 Royal Solent YC Sat 26th - Sun 27th RS Elite Southern Elite Championship RYS Sat 26th - Sun 27th Solent Weekend RYS Mon 28th - Thu 31st International Invitational Etchells Regatta RTYC & RLYC Mon 28th - Sat 2nd Scows Week YSC Mon 28th - Thu 31st Sunset Series Royal Solent YC Tue 29th Evening Race Series Race 15 ISC Wed 30th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 31st Late Summer Series 3 ECSC Thu 31st Thursday Night Racing Late 5 RLymYC AUGUST Sat 2nd - Sat 9th Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week Sat 2nd - Sun 3rd Cruiser Race Rally to Bembridge Sat 2nd Dinghy Regatta Wed 6th Club Racing Thu 7th Thursday Night Racing Late 6 Sun 10th - Sun 17th Channel Triangle Sun 10th Sevenstar Round Britain & Ireland Sun 10th - Fri 15th Youth Week Mon 11th - Thu 14th Dinghy Week Tue 12th Evening Race Series Race 16 Wed 13th Club Racing Thu 14th Late Summer Series 4 Thu 14th - Sun 17th Musto Skiff Nationals Thu 14th Thursday Night Racing Late 7 Fri 15th - Sat 16th Annual Regatta Fri 15th - Sun 17th Cherbourg Fri 15th Friday Evening Racing Sat 16th Cruiser Racer Saturday Series 3 Sat 16th Mini Tonner Regatta Sat 16th - Sun 17th Sunsail Racing Series Round 5 Sun 17th - Sat 23rd Folkboat Week

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CWL RSrnYC Bembridge SC (EWCC) Royal Solent YC RLymYC RSrnYC RORC RLymYC Royal Solent YC ISC Royal Solent YC ECSC SBSC RLymYC Bembridge SC SORC RSrnYC RLymYC ISC PHYC Royal Solent YC


SEPTEMBER Tue 2nd Bang and Go Back Race Wed 3rd Club Racing

ISC Royal Solent YC

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Sun 17th Solent Scow Championships Bembridge SC (EWCC) Mon 18th - Sat 23rd J/111 World Championships RYS Mon 18th - Thu 21st Solent Scows - Lifeboat Pennant Bembridge SC Tue 19th Evening Race Series Race 17 ISC Wed 20th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 21st Evening 14 RSYC Thu 21st Late Summer Series 5 ECSC Thu 21st Thursday Night Racing Late 8 RLymYC Fri 22nd Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Fri 22nd Sharps Doom Bar St Peter Port Double RSYC Fri 22nd - Sat 23rd Southampton Maritime Festival - Ocean Terminal, Dock Gate 4 Fri 22nd The Channel Race - Cowes to St Peter Port JOG Sat 23rd - Mon 25th 18’ Skiff National Championships RLYC Sat 23rd - Mon 25th August Bank Holiday Regatta RLYC & RCYC Sat 23rd - Mon 25th August Cross Channel Rally PHYC Sat 23rd - Sun 24th BHYC Regatta BHYC Sat 23rd Duo Series 4 RLymYC Sat 23rd Marlowe Cup ECSC Sat 23rd - Sun 24th YSC Regatta YSC Mon 25th BHYC Cadet Regatta BHYC Tue 26th Evening Race Series Race 18 ISC Wed 27th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Thu 28th Evening 15 RSYC Thu 28th Mass Start and Ladies Series 2 ECSC Thu 28th Thursday Night Racing Late 9 RLymYC Fri 29th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Sat 30th - Sun 31st 2K Summer Team Racing Regatta ISC Sat 30th - Sun 31st Cowes Keelboat Championship 5 ISC Sat 30th - Sun 31st Gaastra August Regatta RSrnYC Sat 30th - Sun 31st Spread Eagle Regatta RCYC Sat 30th - Sun 31st Summer Regatta RVYC Sat 30th - Sun 31st Swanwick, Bursledon and Warsash Regatta Sun 31st Autumn Series Day 1 ISC Sun 31st Cowes-Torquay-Cowes Powerboat Race BPRC


SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

Photo: Hamo Thornycroft Thu 4th Late Summer Series 6 Points Series Trophy ECSC Thu 4th - Sun 7th Little Britain Challenge Cup RYS Fri 5th Cherbourg Race RORC Fri 5th Friday Evening Racing RSrnYC Sat 6th Annual Race & Rally OGA Sat 6th - Sun 7th Contessa 32 Class Inshore Points Series CCYC Sat 6th - Sun 7th Cowes Keelboat Championship RCYC Sat 6th to Sun 7th Dubarry Women’s Keelboat Championships Hamble River SC Sat 6th - Sun 7th J/105 Nationals & J/109 Western Solent Championship RLymYC Sat 6th - Sun 7th Poole and Back SORC Sat 6th - Sun 7th Vortex Nationals & Cat Open SBSC Sat 6th Windsor Cup RLYC Sun 7th Autumn Series Day 2 ISC Mon 8th - Fri 12th RAFSA Regatta RAF Sailing Asssociation Wed 10th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 10th IOW Businesses Sonar Evening Regatta - Day 5 Grand Finale ISC Thu 11th - Fri 12th EMC Silicon Cup Britannia Corporate Events Thu 11th Mass Start and Ladies Series 3 ECSC Fri 12th - Sun 21st PSP Southampton Boat Show - Mayflower Park Sat 13th - Sun 14th Battle of Britain Regatta RAFYC Sat 13th - Sun 14th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series CCYC Sat 13th Cowes to Poole via back of the Wight JOG Sat 13th IRC Solent Region Championship Day 5 RAFYC Sat 13th Ladies Race RSrnYC Sat 13th - Sun 14th Lymington Classic Regatta RLymYC & BCYC Sat 13th - Sun 14th National Squib South Coast Regatta RVYC Sat 13th - Sun 14th Royal Artillery Yacht Club Regatta Royal Solent YC Sun 14th Ancient Mariners’ Race RSrnYC Sun 14th Autumn Series 5 & 6 RSYC Sun 14th Autumn Series Day 3 ISC Sun 14th Poole to Cowes JOG Wed 17th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Wed 17th - Thu 18th O2 Think Big Regatta Britannia Corporate Events Fri 19th - Sun 21st Contessa 32 and 26 Class Nationals Royal Solent YC Sat 20th - Sun 21st AVEVA September Regatta RSrnYC Sat 20th Centenary Chase Royal Solent YC Sat 20th - Sun 21st Cowes Keelboats Solent Series RTYC Sat 20th Laser Traveller SBSC Sat 20th Long Race West for Keelboats - XOD Saturday Series 20 - Cruiser racer Saturday Series 4 RLymYC Sat 20th - Sun 21st MOCRA Bembridge Regatta Bembridge SC (EWCC) Sat 20th - Sun 21st RS 200 Open SBSC Sat 20th - Sun 21st Sunsail Racing Series Round 6 PHYC Sun 21st Autumn Series 7 & 8 RSYC Sun 21st Autumn Series Day 4 ISC Wed 24th Club Racing Royal Solent YC Fri 26th Cherbourg II JOG Sat 27th - Sun 28th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series RLYC Sat 27th Duo Series 5 RLymYC Sat 27th - Sun 28th Hamble Scramble RSrnYC Sat 27th Nab Tower Race - Inshore Series Day 3 - IRC Solent Region Championship Day 6 ISC Sat 27th Parhelion Autumn Series 1 PSC Sun 28th Autumn Series Day 5 ISC Sun 28th Tiny Mitchell Trophy - IRC Solent Region Championship Day 7 RCYC OCTOBER Sat 4th ASTO Small Ships Race Sat 4th - Sun 5th Arrow Trophy Sat 4th Autumn Solent Double Sat 4th - Sun 5th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series Sat 4th - Sun 5th Etchells Autumn Series 1 Sat 4th Hamble One Design Championship 1 Sat 4th Nab Laying up Race Sat 4th Parhelion Autumn Series 2 Sat 4th Potter Ship Race Sat 4th - Sun 5th Solent Weekend Sun 5th Autumn Series Day 6 Sun 5th Hamble One Design Championship 2 Sun 5th Hamble Winter Series 1 Sun 5th Turkey Cup Sat 11th Champion of Champions Race

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RLYC RCYC RSYC RYS CCYC Hamble River SC SORC PSC RLymYC RYS ISC Hamble River SC Hamble River SC Royal Solent YC RLymYC


Sat 11th - Sun 12th Cowes Keelboats Solent Series Sat 11th Hamble Big Boat Series 1 Sat 11th - Sun 12th John Lewis Partnership Sailing Cub Regatta Sat 11th Owers Sat 11th Parhelion Autumn Series 3 Sat 11th - Sun 12th Sunsail Racing Series Round 7 Sun 12th Hamble Big Boat Series 2 Sun 12th Hamble Winter Series 2 Sun 12th Solent Circuit Series 1 Sun 12th Winter Series Sun 12th Winter Series 1 & 2 Sat 18th - Sun 19th Autumn Excuse - Cumberland Fleet Sat 18th - Sun 19th Etchells Autumn Series 2 Sat 18th Hamble One Design Championship 3 Sat 18th Jenny Anne Memorial Trophy Sat 18th Parhelion Autumn Series 4 Sat 18th Trafalgar Regatta inc Members Race 3 Sun 19th Frostbite Series 1 Sun 19th Hamble One Design Championship 4 Sun 19th Hamble Winter Series 3 Sun 19th Solent Circuit Series 2 Sun 19th Winter Series Sun 19th Winter Series 3 & 4 Sat 25th Hamble Big Boat Series 3 Sat 25th - Sun 26th Illusions Trafalgar Trophy Sat 25th Parhelion Autumn Series 5 Sat 25th - Sun 26th Sunsail Racing Series Round 8 Sun 26th Hamble Big Boat Series 4 Sun 26th Hamble Winter Series 4 Sun 26th Solent Circuit Series 3 Sun 26th Winter Series

RLYC Hamble River SC ISC JOG PSC PHYC Hamble River SC Hamble River SC LTSC Royal Solent YC RSYC RTYC CCYC Hamble River SC RLYC PSC RCYC PSC Hamble River SC Hamble River SC LTSC Royal Solent YC RSYC Hamble River SC Bembridge SC PSC PHYC Hamble River SC Hamble River SC LTSC Royal Solent YC

NOVEMBER Sat 1st Parhelion Autumn Series 6 Sun 2nd Frostbite Regatta Sun 2nd Frostbite Series 2 Sun 2nd Solent Circuit Series 4 Sun 2nd Winter Series Sun 2nd Winter Series 5 & 6 Sat 8th - Sun 9th Illusions Guy Fawkes Trophy Sun 9th Frostbite Series 3 Sun 9th Hamble Winter Series 5 Sun 9th Solent Circuit Series 5 Sun 9th Winter Series Sun 9th Winter Series 7 & 8 Sat 15th Sunsail Racing Series Final Sun 16th Frostbite Series 4 Sun 16th Hamble Winter Series 6 Sun 16th Solent Circuit Series 6 Sun 16th Winter Series Sun 16th Winter Series 9 & 10 Sat 22nd - Sun 23rd Illusions Bailey Bowl Sun 23rd Frostbite Series 5 Sun 23rd Hamble Winter Series 7 Sun 23rd Solent Circuit Series 7 Sun 23rd Winter Series 11 & 12 Sun 23rd Winter Series Sun 30th Charity Pursuit Race Sun 30th Frostbite Series 6 Sun 30th Hamble Winter Series 8 Sun 30th Winter Series

PSC RVYC PSC LTSC Royal Solent YC RSYC Bembridge SC PSC Hamble River SC LTSC Royal Solent YC RSYC PHYC PSC Hamble River SC LTSC Royal Solent YC RSYC Bembridge SC PSC Hamble River SC LTSC RSYC Royal Solent YC RSYC PSC Hamble River SC Royal Solent YC

DECEMBER Sat 6th - Sun 7th Illusions Inter Club Team Racing Sun 7th Frostbite Series Reserve Day Sun 7th Winter Series Sat 13th Needles Relief Sun 14th Winter Series Sat 20th - Sun 21st Illusions Picnic Hamper Thu 25th Second Annual Hot Turkey Race Fri 26th - Sat 27th Illusions Christmas Cracker

SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

SOLENT EVENTS CALENDAR

Bembridge SC PSC Royal Solent YC RLymYC Royal Solent YC Bembridge SC PSC Bembridge SC

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USEFUL CONTACTS

USEFUL CONTACTS

Photo: Paul Wyeth

HM Coastguard (Lee-on-Solent) 02392 552100 HM Customs (24 hour yacht reporting) 0845 723 1110 HM Customs National Advice Service 0300 200 3700 Emergency Services (Coastguard, Police, Ambulance, Fire) 999 Non-Emergency Calls 101 NHS Direct 111 Sea Start 02380 458000 The National Coastwatch Institution: Gosport NCI, Portsmouth Harbour Entrance 02392 765194 Lee NCI, Lee-on-Solent beach 02392 556758 Calshot NCI, Radar Tower Calshot Spit 02380 893562 Needles NCI, Lookout Station, The Needles 01983 754231 Blue Funnel Cruises 02380 223278 Brittany Ferries (Portsmouth) 0871 244 1402 Brittany Ferries (Poole) 0871 244 1403 Gosport Ferry 02392 524551 Hamble Ferry 02380 454512 Hovertravel 08434 878887 Hythe Ferry 02380 840722 Red Funnel 0844 844 9988 Solent & Wightline Cruises 01983 564602 Wightlink 0871 376 1000 Hayling Ferry 07702 928154 P&O Ferries 08716 642121 LD Lines 0844 576 8836 Southampton Airport 0844 481 7777 Bournemouth Airport 01202 364000 Gatwick Airport 0844 892 0322 Heathrow Airport 0844 335 1801 National Express 08717 818178 Greyhound 0900 096 0000 National Rail Enquiries 08457 484950 Transport for London 0343 222 1234 Traveline 0871 200 2233

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SPONSORED BY MDL MARINAS A Solent handbook wouldn’t be complete without revealing some of the hidden delights to be found in the area and so this section introduces the reader to the wonderful diversity of harbours, ports, and rivers to be found around the Solent. The Solent has many harbours ranging from quaint creeks to some of the busiest ports in the world. Whether you want to have a relaxing cruise or a challenging race the Solent has got it all. There are plenty of bays and rivers to explore where you can drop your anchor for lunch and maybe take a swim, or if it’s the exhilaration of racing you are after, then why not take part in one of the hundreds of sailing regattas offered here during the season, and in fact over the winter too if you are the hardy type! If you’re after some retail therapy, or fancy a night out, there is something for everyone; the Solent plays host to some of the best restaurants in the UK offering fresh, local produce. We hope you enjoy browsing through our guides to some of the most popular destinations in the Solent - and that your stay here is a memorable one.

DISTANCE TABLE Bembridge Hbr 13 Chichester Hbr 17 8 Cowes 2 10 15 Fareham

14 10 12 10

R. Hamble (ent) 6 15 18 6 14 Keyhaven

8 20 25 12 22 13

Langstone Hbr 14 6

5 12 10 18 25

Lymington Hbr 7 8 23 10 20 12 3 21 Newtown

4 14 19 5 16 9 6 17 4

Portsmouth Hbr 12 5 8 10 3 13 18 5 19 12 Ryde Hbr

8 4 8 5 6 8 16 7 14 10 3

Southampton 9 18 23 9 16 5 16 21 16 12 18 12 Wootton

6 5 10 4 9 8 16 10 12 9 5 2 10

Yarmouth Hbr 7 19 24 9 18 13 3 21 2 2 19 13 16 12 Ventnor Haven 22 12 18 22 18 23 33 17 28 25 15 14 25 15 28

Ventnor Haven

Yarmouth Hbr

Wootton

Southampton

Ryde Hbr

Portsmouth Hbr

Newtown

Lymington Hbr

Langstone Hbr

Keyhaven

R. Hamble (ent)

Fareham

Cowes

Chichester Hbr

Bembridge Hbr

27 42 49 29 40 32 20 39 22 24 37 35 35 32 20 30 Beaulieu R. (ent)

Poole

Approximate distances in nautical miles. To be used as a guide only and not for navigation.

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SOLENT PORTS & HARBOURS

SOLENT PORTS & HARBOURS


YARMOUTH HARBOUR YARMOUTH HARBOUR

50º42’.42N, 01º30’.00W (ENT)

The most westerly harbour on the Isle of Wight, picturesque Yarmouth welcomes more than 500,000 visitors a year by car ferry from Lymington, Hampshire, and 100,000 visitors by boat, many from elsewhere in the Solent, but also from the West Country, Ireland, the Channel Islands, France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, and Scandinavia.

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

Yarmouth Harbour is accessible at all states of the tide being dredged 2 metres below chart datum. Its close proximity to the Needles and the English Channel makes it ideal for those entering or leaving the Solent. The harbour entrance can become very congested especially on summer weekends. Great caution is to be taken entering and leaving the harbour and vessels must adhere to the speed limit of 4 knots within the harbour and Western Yar River, and 6 knots from the entrance Dolphin at the breakwater to the outer harbour limits. If the “Harbour full” sign and signal (flag R) is displayed (the Harbour Full sign on the Eastern side of the Harbour Entrance is illuminated at night), you should not attempt to enter the harbour. When approaching from the east, leave East Fairway buoy to port, turn onto a bearing of 187° and follow the leading light. When approaching from the west, leave the Poole Belle buoy to starboard, turn onto a bearing of 187° and again, follow the leading light. On spring tides the last hour of the flood and ebb can see strong tidal movement in the harbour entrance and in various parts of the harbour. There can be a double high tide or a long stand at Spring tides. Yarmouth Harbour operates on VHF Ch 68, Call Sign ‘Yarmouth Harbour’, monitored by the Harbour Office and Berthing Masters on the water. The water taxi operates on VHF Ch. 15, Call Sign ‘Harbour Taxi’ and can also be called on 07969 840173. Yarmouth Harbour Commissioners were granted the powers of general and special direction and new General Directions came into force on 1 March 2012 replacing the harbour’s previous Byelaws. Users of the harbour are asked to familiarise themselves with these new directions which can be downloaded from the harbour website www.yarmouth-harbour.co.uk. Yarmouth is shared by yachtsmen, fishermen, and ferry operators. At times the entrance can become very busy and special vigilance is required when navigating in this area. Visitors are particularly

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Yarmouth Harbour Commissioners have completed Phases 2 and 3 of the planned harbour development creating more walk ashore pontoons and finger berths with power and water, making best use of the water space, constructing a new quay wall and installing a new crane with an environmentally friendly washdown facility. Previous phases also saw the redesigned layout with the initial walk ashore pontoons and a pontoon area, near the RNLI lifeboat berth and adjacent to the emergency slipway, that will be used for RIBs and small craft at lunchtimes and overnight walk ashore pontoon berths for yachts. A small extension to the pink pontoons is set to have been completed by Easter 2014. Yarmouth Harbour has a range of facilities including a crane on South Quay, maximum load 5 tonnes, showers and toilets, a launderette, gas, Wi-Fi, night watchpersons, waste disposal facilities, and a power washer. There are several slipways that the public may use in Yarmouth. The largest slipway is on the corner between the South Quay and the Town Quay; accessed via the Wightlink marshalling area. At the western end of the South Quay there is another small but steep slipway, close to the Harbour Office. South of the swing bridge across the Western Yar River, on the east bank of the river, adjacent to the dinghy park there is a small slipway. Other slipways are located at Harold Hayles boatyard and at Yarmouth Sailing Club. If intending to pass through the Yar Swing Bridge into the river during the summer season, boat owners are requested to co-operate by synchronising their bridge use around a schedule of fixed opening times, as published on www.yarmouth-harbour.co.uk. For winter operation, a minimum of a half hour’s notice is required, and by arrangement with the Harbour Office on VHF Ch 68 or by phone on 01983 760321. The punctuality of boat arrivals to a close but safe proximity to the bridge is essential to prevent road traffic congestion. Contact: Yarmouth Harbour Office, The Quay, Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, PO41 0NT. Tel: 01983 760321.  www.yarmouth-harbour.co.uk Please note, information in this publication is to be used as a guide only and not for navigation.

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requested to give the Wightlink ferry a wide berth as it enters and leaves the harbour.


NEWTOWN HARBOUR NEWTOWN HARBOUR

50º43’.45N, 01º24’.66W. (ENT)

Newtown Harbour, on the Isle of Wight, lies to the west of Newport and east of Yarmouth. Administered by the National Trust, it is a fragile area for wildlife and a low-key, quiet, unspoilt location. The estuary is probably the best example of an undisturbed natural harbour on the south coast. The winding estuary at Newtown has provided shelter for boats for centuries. These days, many visitors - attracted by the beautiful scenery and peaceful setting - arrive by small boats and use the National Trustmanaged moorings. When approaching from either east or west, keep to the north Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell of the west cardinal fairway buoy. Upon approaching the buoy, keep to the west of the buoy and then proceed inbound keeping the leading marks in alignment. The minimum draft in the entrance at Low Water Springs is approximately 2m. However, vessels should navigate with caution at this time. Arrival on rising tide makes sense. The leading marks are on a bearing of 130°. The speed limit is a maximum of 5 knots. Depths vary throughout the estuary. Anchoring is free, with visitors encouraged to make a voluntary donation to the National Trust. Charges apply to visitor moorings in the estuary. The Harbour Master can be contacted by phone, but not VHF. Water is available on the landward end of the footbridge at Newtown Quay; waste facilities at Shalfleet Quay. There is a landing place at Shalfleet Quay which is the main point of access to reach the New Inn. There is a National Trust visitor point, with toilet and refreshment facilities located in nearby villages. Contact: Newtown Harbour Master. Tel: 01983 531424. Extracts from ‘Discovering Newtown’ are reproduced with the permission of the National Trust. Visit www.nationaltrust.org.uk to find out more.

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA COWES & RIVER MEDINA

50º46’.08N, 01º17’.95W

Cowes is fortunate to enjoy the benefits of its geography and history. Its position at the centre of the Solent, with a harbour that’s easily accessible and a river navigable as far as Newport, has made it the Isle of Wight’s main port as well as a popular destination harbour and event centre for sailing and powerboating.

Photo: Rick Tomlinson

Cowes’ history is steeped in yachting tradition. Even before the 1815 founding in London of The Yacht Club, which went on to become the Royal Yacht Squadron, Cowes was a fashionable watering place. The Cowes Regatta, which was based on the annual licensing of the local pilot vessels and races between them, was a popular spectator sport for visitors even before the advent of Cowes Week. When Queen Victoria’s court was at Osborne House the town became famous for yachting and social events. Today, Cowes has evolved to meet the demands of a growing leisure marine audience and tourist visitors. The harbour and river offer easy access and a choice of mooring types, either close to the town or in the more tranquil stretches of the River Medina. In addition to leisure craft the harbour and river see a large number of commercial movements including Red Funnel car ferries, high-speed Red Jet ferries, and cargo vessels up to 100m.   The approach to Cowes is fairly straightforward by day or night but caution is always advised especially at or near Springs when strong tides run across Cowes Roads which can easily set you off course. Hazards include the numerous mooring buoys to the east of Cowes entrance and areas of foul ground and drying banks to the west

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA

COWES & RIVER MEDINA (rocks); you need to constantly monitor your position. The Red Jet ferries often approach and depart the No. 1 and 2 fairway buoys at high speed and the Red Funnel car ferries should not be obstructed; rule 9 applies in the fairway which extends approximately 500m to the north of the No. 1 and No. 2 buoys. Small craft may opt to use the small craft channel that connects the eastern approaches to Cowes with the main fairway opposite Town Quay, enabling small vessels to avoid the main harbour entrance when approaching/ departing Cowes from/to the north and east. The depth in the small craft channel may be as little as 0.2m below chart datum. As a rule of thumb, if your draught is more than the current tide height you should avoid using the channel. The current tide height can be found on the cowes.co.uk home page or on the tide boards located at Town Quay and the Shrape Beacon. Vessels using the channel should stay below 6 knots and pass to seaward of the Shrape Beacon and between the three pairs of red and green buoys and also the two pairs of yellow marks.   The best approach is from the north cardinal buoy Prince Consort, approximately 4 cables due north of the entrance and keeping close to the starboard-hand marker No.1, following the starboard side of the channel. Once past No. 4 port-hand buoy the cross tide is considerably reduced and the entrance is easier. There is a 6 knot through the water speed limit within Cowes Harbour. All sailing vessels with engines shall have their engines ready for immediate use when sailing south of No 4 buoy. The Town Quay basin and surrounding area are often busy and vessels must keep watch for Red Funnel car ferry and Red Jet catamaran movements. The Cowes Chain Ferry or Floating Bridge as it is also known, operates throughout the year for around 18 hours each day and takes passengers and vehicles across the narrow mouth of the River Medina estuary between Cowes and East Cowes. Depending on the tide and position of the Chain Ferry in the river, the depth of navigable water above the level of the chains does vary being deepest in the centre of the fairway and steadily decreasing towards the banks of the River Medina and at the bow of the ferry. With the Chain Ferry berthed on either the Cowes or East Cowes side, the depth of navigable water above the chains is a minimum of 1.7m

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below chart datum in the centre of the fairway. Beware of strong tides in the vicinity of the Chain Ferry, especially to the east of the fairway over Spring tides during the ebb when the tidal rate can be over 4 knots. For further information contact the Ferry Manager on 01983 293041. Cowes owes much of its popularity to its location in the centre of the Solent and its position midway between Weymouth (46 nautical miles) and Brighton (53 nautical miles), in the centre of the most popular sailing area in the country. As a result, during the summer season there are lots of recreational craft moored on buoys, pontoons, and pile moorings within Cowes Harbour and along the River Medina. A large number of yacht races start and/or finish in Cowes, and the harbour is also popular with visiting cruisers and powerboaters. The main sailing season runs from April to October with the busiest period during July and August. Cowes Week, which is held in the first half of August, sees the approaches to Cowes Harbour and the fairway become extremely crowded. To contact the afloat Cowes Harbour Master call on VHF Ch 69 Call Sign ‘HM1’ or ‘Cowes Harbour Radio’ for the Harbour Master’s Office. Contact: Harbour Office, Town Quay, Cowes, PO31 7AS. Tel: 01983 293952. www.cowesharbourcommission.co.uk   Scrubbing berths can be found at Town Quay next to the Harbour Office, or an efficient cleaning service is available at Sealift on the eastern banks of the River Medina. Petrol and red diesel are available from Lallow’s Boatyard (50m south of Cowes Yacht Haven on the western side of the fairway) as well as at Cowes Harbour Fuels which also supplies calor gas and oils and is suitable for deep draught vessels. Fresh water is available at Trinity Landing and Town Quay, Whitegates walk ashore pontoon and Thetis pontoon (both in West Cowes). There are several public landing places and slipways. In Cowes there is the Whitegates pontoon suitable for tenders, a slipway between Thetis Wharf and Shepards Wharf Marina, Town Quay adjacent to the Red Jet terminal, the Sun Slip by HSBC Bank, the Market Slip by the Waterside Pub, the Watch House slip next to the old HM Customs, the south end of Trinity Landing, and at Egypt Point there is a slipway east of the Point. Also in East Cowes at the Medina slipway just north of Cowes waterfront hangar, the White Hart slip south of the Red Funnel ferry terminal, the pontoon south of Trinity Wharf, and the Folly slip.  

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA Vessels up to 7m LOA can moor at Town Quay, next to the Red Jet ferry terminal from where there is direct access to the High Street. The pontoon at Trinity Landing also offers walk ashore access. Whitegates visitor pontoons are situated on both sides of the main fairway, south of the Chain Ferry. In addition, from March to October M Row, off The Green, provides heavy duty deep water moorings, max LOA 25m. Cowes Yacht Haven - Cowes Yacht Haven is centrally located giving visitors instant access to Cowes town centre. The marina is accessible at all states of the tide and has 260 fully serviced berths, max LOA 50m. There is a 30 ton hoist and 15 ton mobile crane, WiFi, winter berthing and dry sailing, on-site engineers, electricians and boat repairers, laundry, showers and toilets. Cowes Yacht Haven Events Centre is an ideal location for rallies or other events. with room to seat up to 400 guests and 3000sq/m of outdoor exhibition space. Call VHF 80 ‘Cowes Yacht Haven’ for berthing instructions. Contact: Cowes Yacht Haven, Vectis Yard, High Street, Cowes PO31 7BD. Tel: 01983 299975. www.cowesyachthaven.com Shepards Wharf Marina - Shepards Wharf is a small marina just minutes walk from the bustling centre of Cowes. There is capacity for up to 100 visitors, 35 residents and a basin for the exclusive use of dry sailing clients. Shepards is popular with many organised rallies and regattas. VHF Ch 80 Call Sign ‘Shepards Wharf Marina’. Shepards Wharf Marina services include boat lifting, dry sailing, electricity and water, free WIFI, free showers and toilets, a pump out and waste facility, cctv, a restaurant, sail maker, annual moorings, as well as visitor and winter berths. At peak times in the season rafting up may be necessary and individual berths cannot be reserved in the summer but space can be reserved for rallies of six or more boats.  Contact: Shepards Wharf Marina; Medina Road, Cowes, PO31 7HT. Tel: 01983 297821. www.shepardswharfmarina.co.uk East Cowes Marina - East Cowes Marina is situated in a sheltered location on the eastern bank of the Medina River, just upstream of the Chain Ferry linking Cowes with East Cowes. VHF 80 Call Sign ‘East Cowes Marina’. The marina provides 240 annual berths and over 140 visitors’ berths. Visitor berths can be booked in advance, and are all ‘walk-ashore’ with free electricity and fresh water. Shore side facilities include high quality washrooms and showers, a laundry room, car parking, and yacht stores. Free WiFi and internet stations are available in the marina reception. Next to the marina office the ever popular ‘Lifeboat’ pub with its sunny decking area overlooking the river, serves quality food all day,

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA

every day. The marina is a great base for all the Isle of Wight’s major events, including the Round the Island Race, Cowes Week, and the music festivals. East Cowes town has a Waitrose and Co-op, a post office, cash machine, restaurants, cafés and takeaways. There are lovely Medina river walks, and Osborne House and the Classic Boat Museum are just a few minutes stroll away. Cowes is easily accessible by Chain Ferry or the friendly and efficient Sally Water Taxi service operating from the marina. The marina welcomes rallies and a marquee and BBQ area are available for hire. Contact: East Cowes Marina, Britannia Way, East Cowes, PO32 6UB. Tel: 01983 293 983.  www.deanreddyhoff.co.uk/east-cowes-marina

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA Folly Inn - If you wish to travel from East Cowes or Cowes to the Folly Inn, the Folly Waterbus is available on VHF Ch 77 or tel. 07974 864627. There are three visitor pontoons up the Medina River near the Folly Inn, one is a walk ashore and the other two are in mid-river. All are run by the Folly Berthing Master. The walk ashore pontoon has water and electricity, showers and toilets are accessible 24 hours a day at the Folly Inn. There is also a scrubbing berth available nearby. Call on VHF Ch 72 Call Sign ‘Folly Launch’ as you are passing port hand marker No. 10 for berthing instructions. Contact: Folly Moorings, River Medina, Isle of Wight. Tel: 07884 400046. www.follymoorings.co.uk

Island Harbour - Set in one of the most picturesque riverside locations, in an area of outstanding natural beauty, Island Harbour is situated just over a mile south of Cowes. This peaceful friendly marina, ideally suited to couples and families, offers over 200 pontoon walk ashore berths, as well as many amenities including a fully refurbished bar and restaurant that is now under the marina’s management. Showers, a laundry room, car parking, and free WiFi are also available. Other facilities include a well stocked chandlery, winter hard standing, on site boat repairers, a 50 ton travel hoist and a slipway. Call Sign ‘Island Harbour’ on VHF Ch 80. Notify the Marina of your arrival when entering the Folly Reach, to enter Island Harbour, continue up the main channel until you reach the five red lane markers on your port side (if approaching from Cowes), then make your turn as directed by the duty Lock Keeper.

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA


COWES & RIVER MEDINA

COWES & RIVER MEDINA There is a ‘waiting pontoon’ opposite the lane markers for waiting craft or if directed there by the Marina staff. Access is approximately 4 hours either side of HW depending on your draft, although there is a 2.5 metre draft restriction into the marina over the lock seal. Marina staff are always on hand to help you through the lock as well as assist you onto your berth in inclement weather. Contact: Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Binfield, Newport, PO30 2LA. Tel: 01983 539994. www.island-harbour.co.uk

Photo: Donna Woodward Taylor

Newport Harbour - Newport Harbour is a small leisure harbour situated at the navigable head of the River Medina, some 5 miles south from the port of Cowes. The harbour is close to the centre of Newport, county town of the Isle of Wight, and a broad range of facilities are available nearby. The harbour dries out completely at LW. Public transport is readily available to other parts of the Isle of Wight, making Newport Harbour a great destination for the sailing family. To reach Newport Harbour from Cowes, a beacon at the Folly displays a rapid flashing green light. This is located 1.5 cables south of the Folly Inn Point at the end of the row of yacht moorings. Moving south, two pairs of fixed green lights are located on the west bank, at the northern and southern ends of the Cement Mills site. At Dodnor, a further pair of fixed green lights mark the end of a small jetty extending from the west bank. Shallow points upstream are marked by red buoys on the port side and green buoys on the starboard. On the east bank, the approach to Newport Harbour is identified by large white beacons with pairs of horizontal red lights showing at night. When lined up, these beacons bear a course of 192º T and show the approach channel to the harbour. HW Spring tides give an average 2.5m depth in the approach channel and at the visitors’ pontoons, but this may increase depending on weather conditions. The Neap high tide depth is 1.8m. The harbour dries out at LW, around 5 hours after HW, revealing a firm level bottom. It is advised that fin keeled boats should lie against the quay walls south of the visitors’ pontoons.

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COWES & RIVER MEDINA

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

Newport Harbour has showers and toilets, water and electricity on the pontoons, waste facilities, two slipways, and dry berth storage for around 50 boats. Boat repairs and gas available from Odessa Marine boatyard on the west bank and a chandlery is next door at Little London. Contact: Newport Harbour Office, Town Quay, Newport, PO30 2ED. Tel: 01983 525994. www.iwight.com

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WOOTTON CREEK WOOTTON CREEK

50º44’.09N, 01º12’.77W (ENT)

Wootton Creek is one of the lovelier creeks in the Solent, with wooded valleys sweeping down to a winding creek. Midway between Cowes and Ryde, it was once used by trading sailing vessels visiting the brickworks at Ash Lake, and the tide mill at the head of the creek where the Sloop Inn now stands.

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

Today, there is little left apart from the old names. If trading barges could navigate to the head of the creek, then visiting yachts should easily make their way at least as far as the pontoons of the Royal Victoria Yacht Club (RVYC) at the entrance to the creek. It should be remembered that those skippers worked their tides, and even today 70 foot ketches drawing over 8 foot have laid alongside the RVYC pontoons, but have swiftly departed once the tide is on the ebb. An ideal time to visit is when High Water is over a lunchtime, meaning a good height of tide, and time to sample the RVYC hospitality at its bar and dining room. It is well-liked by visitors, and popular with rallies, and as a destination for passage races. Be aware that the direction of buoyage in the eastern Solent is from east to west. Pilotage is straightforward with a compass, dependable echo sounder, and a good lookout.

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WOOTTON CREEK

The entrance to Wootton Creek is beset by hazards to the east and west. It is a busy car ferry port, with regular Wightlink sailings throughout the day and night. To the east, are drying gravel banks that have been known to embarrass a passing ferry. To the west are rock ledges coming out from the shore, and the dangerous Wootton Rocks themselves. Yachts close inshore may have local knowledge and lifting keels. The entrance to Wootton Creek is best taken from the north cardinal, Wootton Beacon. It lies approximately 3.5nm from Cowes and only 1.5nm from Ryde Pier. It is best approached an hour or so either side of High Water on the first attempt. The ferry fairway is lit, with an occulting sectored light, and there is plenty of shore lighting on the link-span. No matter from which point of the compass you’re approaching, it is best to stay to the north of Wootton Beacon for your approach. Once at Wootton Beacon, if safe from entering and departing ferries, turn southwest and run down the western side of the ferry channel, staying outside of the channel itself. Keep an eye on the echo sounder, there should be plenty of water, if there isn’t, then you won’t get very far into the creek! Be aware that you may find ferries waiting to dock at the ferry terminal to the west of the fairway. By the time you come to No. 7 dolphin, you’ll see the ferry link-span on your port hand, and the Wootton Creek port and starboard buoys ahead of you; these are maintained and positioned as needed by the Queen’s Harbour Master (QHM) at Portsmouth. Head through them, and if heading further up the Creek you will see the leading marks off to starboard on the opposite bank. If calling at the RVYC, you will see their pontoons ahead of you. Berthing is straightforward, but be aware that at some states of tide there will be some flow across the pontoons. Do not approach through the private RVYC moorings, or indeed try to pick up one, as there are countless pick-up buoys and lines. If vessels are already berthed alongside hail and ask to raft up. The RVYC Manager may

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WOOTTON CREEK

WOOTTON CREEK ask you to move your boat to accommodate other visitors. (Pontoon fees can be paid at the RVYC bar, or if the club is closed, dropped through the letterbox by the club entrance.) There is fresh water on the pontoons, showers and toilets in the clubhouse, a slipway, waste facilities, and an excellent bar and restaurant. The creek alongside the pontoons will dry, so unless you are prepared to take the ground, you must depart once the ebb starts to make. The water will seem to empty quite slowly for the first couple of hours, but be aware that around the third hour the tide goes away very quickly; do not linger over that last pint at the bar! The bottom is irregular in shape and consistency, and careful fendering, tending of lines, and a watchful eye is needed as your vessel takes the ground. The speed limit in the creek is 5 knots. The tidal current is relatively benign, seldom reaching above 4 knots although just after High Water at Springs, the sluice gates under Wootton Bridge are opened considerably increasing the flow in the upper reaches. There are no visitor moorings in the creek and anchoring in the channel is prohibited. Anchoring outside the channel is not recommended due to the proliferation of abandoned ground chains and other mooring tackle. There is a Council owned public slipway suitable for small vessels between the Sloop Inn and the bridge at the head of the creek. The village of Wootton Bridge offers a full range of facilities; Post Office, take-aways, launderette, doctor and vet, butcher, supermarket and wine warehouse; just outside the village is a garage. It’s about 30 minutes walk from the RVYC, or take the dinghy up the creek on the tide and land on the public slipway on the west bank at the head of the creek, right by the Sloop Inn. Contact: Royal Victoria Yacht Club, 91 Fishbourne Lane, Fishbourne, Isle of Wight, PO33 4EU. Tel: 01983 882325. www.rvyc.org.uk

Photo: Donna Woodward Taylor

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RYDE HARBOUR Ryde Harbour is located on the northeast coast of the Isle of Wight and enjoys excellent views across the Solent towards Portsmouth. The well situated harbour is protected from adverse weather conditions from most directions.

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

Known as ‘the gateway to the Island’ and a popular destination for families, Ryde Harbour lies next to long sandy beaches and is only minutes away from restaurants, a bowling alley, swimming pool, funfair, skating rink, and a boating lake. Ryde Esplanade runs the full length of the seafront, followed by the sea wall promenade which passes the Canoe Lake and reaches as far as Puckpool Park to the east. Ferry connections to Portsmouth and Southsea are within walking distance.

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RYDE HARBOUR

50º43’.98N, 01º09’.31W (ENT)


RYDE HARBOUR

RYDE HARBOUR

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

The harbour dries and is only accessible to small craft approximately 2.5 hours before and 2 hours after High Water Portsmouth for a boat with 1m draught. Depth available is up to 2m on Springs. Ryde Harbour Master can be contacted on VHF Ch 80 Call Sign ‘Ryde Harbour’. Approaching Ryde Harbour from the east, beware Ryde Sands (dries), either pass north of No Man’s Land Fort or use the inshore passage between it and Ryde Sands beacons (lit port hand markers). The drying channel at 197 o across Ryde Sands is marked by three starboard hand markers and three port hand marker unlit buoys. Keep well clear of the hovercraft manoeuvring between Ryde Pier and the harbour, and the Wightlink high-speed ferries from and to Ryde Pier Head. The harbour entrance is lit after sunset by two fixed red lights (vertical) on the port side of the Harbour entrance, and one flashing green light on the starboard side of the harbour entrance. There is pontoon berthing for up to 100 visiting boats, the majority of which are family sailing and motor cruisers, varying in length from 5-10m. There are public slipways, showers and toilets close by, water on all pontoons, waste and recycling facilities, gas can be obtained from a local shop, and diesel is available from local garages. Boats may scrub alongside harbour breakwater. Contact: Ryde Harbour, The Esplanade, Ryde, Isle of Wight, PO33 1JA. Tel: 01983 613879 or 07970 009899. Email: ryde.harbour@iow.gov.uk. www.rydeharbour.com Please note, information in this publication is to be used as a guide only and not for navigation.

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BEMBRIDGE HARBOUR Bembridge Harbour lies on the eastern tip of the Isle of Wight, just a short sail from many Solent harbours with Chichester, Langstone, and Portsmouth all within a 10 mile radius. For yachtsmen embarking on a Channel crossing Bembridge Harbour has the added attraction that it is at least an hour closer to the continent than the mainland marinas at the same end of the Solent.

Photo: Donna Woodward Taylor

The Harbour is designated a ‘Site of Special Scientific Interest’ in recognition of its significance as a habitat for wildlife. The harbour’s European importance is confirmed by its status as a ‘Special Protection Area’ and it is designated a ‘wetland of international importance’ under the Ramsar Convention. The harbour has an area of saltmarsh as well as other important habitats such as sand dunes, vegetated shingle, and saline lagoons. The harbour’s saltmarsh and inter-tidal mud provide feeding grounds for wintering and migratory waterfowl and the Island’s only RSPB site edges onto the harbour. Bembridge is a large, picturesque and sheltered harbour with beautiful beaches, and although the entrance is tidally restricted, once inside its shelter a warm welcome awaits visiting yachts whatever the weather. It has the two villages of Bembridge and St. Helens surrounding it, and the small town of Brading is a few miles away. The entrance is due south of Portsmouth Harbour entrance and is marked by a tide gauge topped with a yellow cross. As you pass the tide gauge you will see the village of Seaview to starboard and the St Helens Fort to port. Vessels should leave the tide gauge to their port side on the approach and this will line them up with the

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BEMBRIDGE HARBOUR

50º41’.62N, 01º06’.40W (ENT)


BEMBRIDGE HARBOUR

channel markers which are in pairs, the first pair being buoys 1 and 2 which are lit at night - all other buoys are marked with reflective tape. On passing buoys 6a and 7a you will be running parallel to the shore with the harbour entrance appearing in the distance. On big Spring tides beware the current which can be strong through into the harbour. A pictorial guide to the entrance channel is available to download from the harbour website and there is also a Navionics chart showing depths. Once inside the harbour there is a drying beach anchorage on your port side adjacent to Bembridge Sailing Club. Approximately half way down the harbour on your starboard side you will come to the Duver Marina visitors’ pontoon which give access to the shore on the north side of the harbour. Rafting may be necessary at peak times. Visitors are advised to call on VHF Ch 80 Call Sign ‘Bembridge Harbour’ for berthing instructions on entering the harbour.  Berths are allocated strictly on a first-come, first-served basis. Harbour staff are on duty ±3 hours HW at weekends and 0800-1800 weekdays.   Rallies are very welcome - five or more boats receive a 5% discount, with a larger discount for rallies in excess of 10 boats. As a general rule of thumb, access to the harbour for a vessel drawing 1.5m is ±3 hours HW Portsmouth, Neaps or Springs. In recent years an extensive dredging programme has been completed, re-establishing depths of 2m LWMS. An extension to the visitors’ pontoon has increased the available berthing space, and shoreside facilities refurbished and extended. There is a water taxi service, VHF Ch 80 Call sign ‘Bembridge Water Taxi’, tel: 07582 806017. The taxi is based at the Duver Pontoon and operates between various pick-up and drop-off points (subject to tidal access). There are showers and toilets, a laundry (at Bembridge Marina), water, electricity, and waste removal facilities. An undercover dry stack service for RIBs and powerboats up to 10m and 5T is available within the harbour at Bembridge Boat Storage located adjacent to the Harbour Office. www.bembridgeboatstorage.co.uk. Contact: Bembridge Harbour Authority, Harbour Office, The Duver, St Helens, Isle of Wight, PO33 1YB. Tel: 01983 872828. www.bembridgeharbour.co.uk

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VENTNOR HAVEN Ventnor, on the south coast of the Isle of Wight, is sheltered by high cliffs. A steep road winds down from the terraced town past the famous cascade gardens to the seafront.

Photo: Island Visions, Jamie Russell

This fair weather haven provides the only stopping-off point along the south coast of the Isle of Wight, as well as an access facility for local boat owners, anglers, and other interest groups. You will find a harbour-side café and coffee shop, boat builders, boat charter, a fish landing stage with fishery outlet, and fish and chip shop. Navigating the Haven entrance is suitable only in certain weather conditions and tides. However, on a clear calm day it is one of the best runs round from the Solent. On approach, beware of races which occur south of St Catherine’s Point to the west and Dunnose Point to the east. Consult almanacs in advance for information on each race depending on the state of tide. The Haven mouth is approached from the east and is lit after sunset by two fixed navigation lights (vertical). Entry and exit are recommended 2 hours either side of High Water only with draught of less than 50cm. Stay close to the southerly markers to avoid sandbanks which form on the northern side of the mouth. Do not attempt to approach in easterly to southerly conditions as swell may occur at the entrance. The Haven is not suitable for sailing boats or motorboats which cannot dry out. The entrance dries completely at Spring Low Water and is very shallow during Neap Lows. The depth is variable, dependent on sediment movement and duration since the last dredge. Beware of the two rock arms - the largest extending seaward (south) from the site of the old pier before curving to the southeast. The smaller arm, some 58m to the east, extends seaward towards the first arm with a 24m gap.

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VENTNOR HAVEN

50º35’.53N, 01º12’.50W (ENT)


VENTNOR HAVEN

VENTNOR HAVEN Shelter is reasonable in the lee of the rock arms during southwest through to northeasterly winds, and extremely vulnerable in east through to south-southeasterlies when swells can enter. Caution should be exercised as the Haven is exposed to strong winds from all directions except northwest to northeast. Cheetah Marine currently manage the Harbour. Contact them on 01983 852398 or 07974 126378 two to three days prior to arrival for all information. Limited space is available within the Haven on a first come first served basis. There is a 4 knot speed limit in the Haven. If harbour dues are not collected on arrival, report to the cafĂŠ at OceanBlue Quay above the Haven. No anchoring is permitted except in an emergency and no anchoring or mooring in the Haven entrance. Visiting boats should be aware of bathers and snorkelers swimming alongside the Haven rock arms. Fuel is not available at Ventnor, but can be obtained at the nearby villages of Whitwell (3 miles) and Sandford (5 miles).

Photo: Donna Woodward Taylor

Do not pump out oily bilges into the Haven or surrounding area. Yachtsmen and all navigators are requested not to release washing water or to pump WC or bilge effluent into the Haven. This is particularly important in a drying harbour. Ask the Harbour Master for details of refuse disposal. The slipway is available free of charge for launch and recovery. Please exercise great care when manoeuvring your vehicle at the top of the slipway and on the slipway itself as it coincides with a pedestrian right of way. Contact: Ventnor Haven, OceanBlue Quay, PO38 1JR. Tel. 01983 852398 or 07974 126378. www.oceanbluequay.co.uk/haven

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POOLE HARBOUR POOLE HARBOUR

50°43’.50N, 001°59’.00W (ENT)

Poole is the second largest natural harbour in the world, with an interior coastline of over 100 miles and covering nearly 10,000 acres. It is a very shallow harbour and mariners are advised to stay within the marked channels, indicated by the red and green lateral posts or buoys, at all times within the Harbour to avoid running aground.

Photo: Poole Harbour Commission

When approaching from the east, the high cliffs of ‘Anvil Point’ will be clearly visible. As you get closer the white chalk cliffs of ‘Handfast Point’, also known as ‘Old Harry Rocks’, come into view. The main Swash Channel into Poole is well marked and is usable day and night in all conditions. In very strong winds from the south or southeast it can become dangerous on the ebb in the vicinity of Poole Bar. The channel itself runs between the ‘training bank’ on the western side and ‘Hook Sands’ on the eastern side. A small craft channel runs along the western side of the Swash Channel and is the recommended entrance for leisure vessels. It is marked on its western side by a series of lit and unlit red piles on the training bank and bounded on the eastern side by the red can buoys of the Main Swash Channel. Vessels using this channel should re-join the main Swash channel between Number 8 buoy and Number 10 ready to traverse the Harbour Entrance. A handy alternative to the main Swash Channel, for those coming along the cost from the east, is to head straight for the entrance via the East Looe Channel. This is well marked with port and starboard hand buoys and runs west over the sands before dog-legging round to the southwest close along the shore. It is quite shallow and should be navigated with caution and avoided by deeper draught vessels. The Harbour Entrance is only 300m wide causing tides up to 5kn on an ebbing spring. Consult the tidal stream atlas and plan your entrance accordingly. A Chain Ferry runs across the Harbour Entrance taking vehicles and passengers been Sandbanks and Shell Bay. The ferry has right of way over all vessels. When the ferry is about to cross a black ball is hoisted in the rigging and a white strobe light will flash on the mast. After entering the harbour, the striking façade of Brownsea Castle will be clearly visible. There are many options available with regard to an overnight stop. Poole Quay Boat Haven is easily reached by following the Middle Ship Channel round to the north and then west until you reach the south cardinal Stakes buoy (Number 29). Follow the ‘Little Channel’ towards town quay and the entrance to the Marina is clearly visible on the right hand side. 90

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MDL MARINAS

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POOLE HARBOUR

Cobb’s Quay Marina

mdlmarinas.co.uk

Alternatively take the North Channel, leave the main ship channel at the ‘Bell’ Southerly Cardinal and proceed along the channel heading Banner 1.indd 4 northeast and then bearing round to northwest. From this 20/03/2014 initially channel Royal Motor Yacht Club, Salterns Marina, Parkstone Yacht Club, Parkstone Bay Marina are easily accessible. South Deep offers a sheltered spot for a quiet night at anchor. After passing through the entrance make a sharp turn to port between port hand buoy No. 14 and the east cardinal Brownsea and venture down the marked channel southeast of Brownsea Island. You can’t anchor in the channel but with care you should find deep water just outside it. Navigational Hints: See Admiralty Chart 2611 or Imray Chart Y23. Please note: Be aware of the chain ferry in the entrance to the harbour and a byelaw which states that all vessels must give way to the chain and use a motor if fitted when transiting the harbour entrance. Contact: Poole Harbour Commissioners, 20 New Quay Road, Hanworthy, Poole, Dorset BH15 4AF. Tel: 01202 440200. www.phc.co.uk Poole Harbour Control: Tel: 01202 440230. VHF Channel 14 (vessels should maintain a listening watch from Bar Buoy inbound) Call Sign ‘Poole Harbour Control’. Poole Quay Boat Haven: Tel: 01202 649488 (Option 1). VHF Channel 80. Call Sign ‘Poole Quay Boat Haven’. Cobb’s Quay Marina - With its lively, seafaring atmosphere, this 1,090 berth marina is a favourite with yachtsmen and motor cruisers alike. It is situated at Hamworthy in Holes Bay within Poole Harbour, the world’s second largest natural harbour. Much of the shoreline is undeveloped and there are many inlets and small islands to explore by boat. To reach Cobb’s Quay Marina, enter Poole Harbour by the main Swash Channel from Poole Bar buoy; or from the east via the shallower East Looe Channel. Go up-harbour via the North Channel or Middle Ship Channel. Pass Poole Quay and transit the lifting bridges. Follow the buoyed channel to the marina. Cobb’s Quay offers 850 marina berths (max LOA: 25m) and 240 dry stack berths (max LOA: 10m); fuel (petrol/diesel); gas; boat lifting and storage ashore; slipway; laundry facilities; restaurant and bar; brokerage; chandlery; convenience store; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Cobb’s Quay Marina, Hamworthy, Poole, Dorset, BH15 4EL. VHF Ch 80. Tel: 01202 674299. www.cobbsquaymarina.co.uk Salterns Marina - Located within the beautiful, sheltered waters of Poole Harbour, this award-winning 5 Gold Anchor marina offers permanent and visitor berths, swinging moorings, Versadock and storage ashore. On-site car parking and full marina and boatyard facilities including 24-hour manned security, 24-hour fuel, slipway, on-site hotel, bar and restaurant. Call on VHF Ch 80 or 37, call sign ‘Salterns Marina’. Contact: Salterns Marina, 40 Salterns Way, Lilliput, Poole, Dorset, BH14 8JR. Tel: 01202 709971. www.salterns.co.uk

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KEYHAVEN KEYHAVEN

50º42’.85N, 01º33’.26W (ENT) Keyhaven is an attractive harbour at the western tip of the Solent lying within an area of unspoilt Hampshire coast. The harbour is shielded by the massive shingle bar that leads to the famous Hurst Castle situated at its strategic position, guarding the western approaches to the Solent and originally built by Henry VIII.

Photo: New Forest District Council

Keyhaven has many qualities ranging from the extent of sheltered water, which makes it so suitable for teaching youngsters sailing and canoeing, to the great wealth of nature conservation and landscape interest. To approach Keyhaven from the west, enter the Solent by Hurst Point and beware of The Trap if coming in via the north channel. Be aware of strong tidal cross streams. The entrance is approximately 0.5m north-northwest of Hurst Point. There are two unlit buoys, one red and one green near the entrance at North Point. The depth between these buoys is virtually at chart datum so whatever height of tide is shown at that time is how much water there is. Normally, entry is restricted to 2 hours each side of HW. Red and white hooped transit posts line up at a bearing of 308º. Proceed through the buoys until a red buoy is abeam on your port side. Enter the river around this buoy. Note the first of many starboard hand laterals for the channel. When entering from the east, and when Port Albert is abeam turn to starboard and head towards the red and green buoys. Then follow the directions above. It is not advisable to to attempt entering Keyhaven in strong easterly winds. There is a 4 knot speed limit once inside the River. Anchorage is close to the spit on your port side. The deepest water is always where the mooring buoys are. There are no dedicated visitor moorings. Pick up any spare buoy and contact the River Warden on VHF 37/M1 or P1 or phone 01590 645695. Charges for both mooring and anchoring apply. The West Solent Boat Builders yard is situated immediately behind the quay providing a full range of boatyard facilities, including cranage. On the north side of the quay, a slipway with a cradle is used to haul out vessels too heavy to be lifted by crane. Contact: Keyhaven River Warden, The Observation Tower, Keyhaven Quay, Keyhaven, SO41 0TR. Tel: 01590 645695. www.newforest.gov.uk Please note, information in this publication is to be used as a guide only and not for navigation. 94

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LYMINGTON HARBOUR 50º45’.10N, 01º31’.40W (ENT)

LYMINGTON HARBOUR

Lymington Harbour is located within an attractive estuary on the Hampshire coast at the western end of the Solent. The estuary is 2 miles long with the entrance channel lying between salt marshes. It is shared by yachtsmen, fishermen, and the Isle of Wight ferry.

Photo: Ryan Willegers

Lymington River is well sheltered and access is available at all states of tide making it a popular destination for visiting yachtsmen. The speed limit is 6 knots with an advisory limit of 4 knots upstream of the wave screens near the entrance to the Lymington Yacht Haven. There is a double High Water at Springs which gives a stand of 3 hours. At Neaps there is a stand of 2 hours. However, wind direction and force and barometric pressure can materially alter these conditions. The tidal range at Springs is 2.5m and at Neaps 1.5m. On approach the first thing you see is the yacht club starting platform with a distant backdrop of masts in the Yacht Haven marina. Leave the platform well to starboard. Jack in the Basket is a single red pile with a basket top-mark to the southwest of the entrance. Water depth in much of the marked channel is in excess of -2.0m below chart datum. However, on the marked channel margins the depth of water is shallower in some locations. Please give way to the Wightlink ferries which run every 30 minutes at peak times. For guidance refer to ‘Small craft beware ferries’ section on www.lymingtonharbour.co.uk. At night, the main channel piles are lit, green to starboard and red to port, all flashing every two seconds. Leading lights for entering the river are fixed red on 319°T. In Short Reach (as the river bends to the right) there are two red and white transit posts lit by fixed white directional lights to the west of the river at the south end and two black and white posts similarly lit on the east side of the Reach at the north end. These are to assist the ferries to line up and pass in the river. Ferries may wait here for one coming from the opposite direction.

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LYMINGTON HARBOUR To the west of the marked navigation channel in Short Reach in the vicinity of the No. 10 and Cocked Hat port-side beacons there is a 100m long rock breakwater. The northeastern end, nearest the channel, is marked by a beacon displaying two fixed red lights vertically disposed. The wave screens mark the beginning of the inner harbour. Beyond these you pass to port in quick succession the entrance to the Yacht Haven marina, Dan Bran visitors’ pontoon, the Harbour Master’s pontoon and the Harbour Office, public slipway, the two yacht clubs and finally Berthon Lymington Marina which faces the ferry terminal on the opposite bank. Above the ferry terminal the channel narrows and turns to port between two lines of piles forming moorings. This part of the channel has a maintained depth of 1.7m up to the Town Quay where there are visitors’ mooring buoys and pontoons for visitors. At the Town Quay there is room for up to 75 visiting boats within two minutes walk of the town centre. Harbour staff can be contacted on 01590 672014. An out-of-hours messaging service operates. The Harbour Master does not offer a VHF service. Visitors are invited to go directly to the Town Quay where walk ashore and fore and aft moorings are available on a first come first served basis. Mooring areas are maintained to 1.7m below chart datum.

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LYMINGTON HARBOUR

LYMINGTON HARBOUR There is a separate walk-ashore facility further downstream, the Dan Bran pontoon, which is available on a pre-booked basis for visiting boats. Newly upgraded with electricity, the Dan Bran Pontoon can accommodate rallies of up to fifty (10m) boats moored together. Mooring areas are maintained to a minimum of 1.7m below chart datum. There are also six bookable berths for small boats up to 8m in length on the inside of the Harbour Master’s Pontoon. There are showers open for visitors all year round adjacent to the visitors’ moorings on the Town Quay. Separate shower facilities are available for users of the Dan Bran pontoon. Two scrubbing areas are available at the Town Quay slipway and three areas immediately north of the Royal Lymington Yacht Club. Reservations and payment must be made through the Harbour Office first. Water may be obtained on the two public pontoons at the Town Quay and at the Harbour Master’s pontoon by the slipway in Bath Road. There is a public slipway from the Bath Road car park; a charge is made for launching. Please pay the Harbour staff or at the nearby Harbour Office. Public pontoons can be found at the Town Quay and off the car park in Bath Road. Boats must not be left unattended in the yellow hatched designated emergency services area at the HM pontoon except by prior arrangement with the Harbour Master. Contact: Lymington Harbour Commissioners, Harbour Office, Bath Road, Lymington SO41 3SE. Tel: 01590 672014. www.lymingtonharbour.co.uk Both marinas at Lymington may be contacted on VHF Ch 80 for berth availability.

Photo: Ryan Willegers

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Lymington Yacht Haven - Lymington Yacht Haven is the first marina that comes into sight as you make your way up the Lymington River. The Yacht Haven offers 24-hour security, on-the-water fuel 24/7 (except Christmas Day), showers, Wi-Fi, and a bar and restaurant with panoramic views across the Solent to the Isle of Wight. Lymington Yacht Haven boasts a comprehensive range of marine services on-site, including full hoists and wash off facilities, engine servicing and repairs, rigging specialists, and a chandlery. Out-ofhours haul outs are available in emergencies. Contact: Lymington Yacht Haven, Kings Saltern Road, Lymington, Hampshire, SO41 3QD. Tel: 01590 677071. www.yachthavens.com/lymington Berthon Lymington Marina - Lymington Marina is located on the west bank of the Lymington River opposite Lymington Pier railway station and the Wightlink ferry terminal. One of the longest established marinas in the UK, Lymington Marina offers 280 deep water, well-protected berths for yachts up to 45m (150ft) LOA. Full marina facilities are available, including shore power, water, fuel, gas, deluxe washrooms, a launderette, and ice. Call Sign ‘Berthon Lymington Marina’. Contact: Berthon Lymington Marina, The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, Hampshire, SO41 3YL. Tel: 01590 673312. www.berthon.co.uk

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LYMINGTON HARBOUR

LYMINGTON HARBOUR


BEAULIEU RIVER BEAULIEU RIVER

50º46’.89N, 01º21’.72W (ENT)

The Beaulieu River is centrally located on the Solent, and one of the most picturesque rivers in the south. Forming part of the Beaulieu Estate, Beaulieu River is one of the few privately owned rivers in the world and is largely unspoilt, both in terms of its landscape and as a haven for wildlife. The banks play host to an exceptional variety of habitat with an equally varied display of flora and fauna.

Photo: Laura Boynton

When approaching Beaulieu River from the east, keep the lit south cardinal to starboard off Stone Point and steer to the vicinity of a lit, yellow spherical racing buoy close to the transit which should be 324° with the leading marks aligned with the front port No. 2 beacon and the eastern edge of Lepe House. To approach from the west, keep well off the mud banks of Warren Flat and Beaulieu Spit and again steer a course towards the racing buoy and transit as above. The Beaulieu Spit dolphin marks the entrance, a large port hand tripod. It is recommended to avoid the entrance 2 hours either side of LW to avoid the bar 0.8m depth at LW Springs. If your boat draws 5 feet, you can enter the river 1½ hours after LW Springs. The navigation channel at the mouth of the river is defined with red and green piles and further upstream, branches of willow painted red and green known as ‘withies’ are used. The river benefits from a double tide, and a secondary high water. The flood tide takes 6 hours coming in; then, after a gentle fall, there is a second high tide some 2 hours later followed by a period of slack water for about an hour. Then the ebb sets in, and LW is reached in just 3½ hours.

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Buckler’s Hard village and its marina are 3.5m upstream from the entrance to Beaulieu River. Set within the heart of the New Forest National Park, Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour offers a unique location for short stays and welcomes visiting vessels. The masters of vessels arriving inside the limits of the river are expected to report to the Harbour Master within 24 hours. The harbour does not listen on a Channel; please phone the Harbour Office on 01590 616200. The harbour speed limit is 5 knots from the entrance and for the entire length of the river. Visitors are welcome to enter the marina at any time, day or night. Berths for overnight visitors can be reserved in advance, subject to availability. Alternatively, you may be offered a visitor pontoon or mooring upstream of the marina but a dinghy will be required to get ashore. The marina is dredged to 6 feet below Mean Low Water Springs. Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour is a member of TransEurope Marinas, and in 2013 was awarded the top rating of 5 Gold Anchors by The Yacht Harbour Association. It has full marine services and facilities available including a boatyard, chandlery, fuel waste disposal facilities, scrubbing grid, yacht valet service, security, toilets, showers, and a launderette. Diesel, petrol, and fresh water are available from the fuel jetty. A small selection of grocery items including fresh milk, bread, newspapers (weekends only) confectionery, soft drinks and ice may be obtained from the Harbour Master’s Office. A Water Taxi will be available from Easter to September, contact them on VHF Ch 77, Call Sign ‘Beaulieu River Taxi’. Telephone the Harbour Office for more details. Contact: Harbour Master’s Office, Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour, Beaulieu, Hampshire, SO42 7XB. Tel: 01590 616200. www.beaulieuriver.com

Photo: Laura Boynton

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SOUTHAMPTON WATER SOUTHAMPTON WATER

50º49’.00N, 001º17’.5W (ENT)

Southampton Water is an extremely popular area for yachtsmen because it offers sheltered cruising in nearly all weather conditions, while the Hamble and Itchen Rivers are perfect for leisurely exploration.

As one of the country’s busiest and most successful deep-water ports, Southampton is a natural choice for a wide range of customers and trades, with facilities to handle virtually any type of cargo. Its natural deep-water harbour and unique double tide allow unrestricted access for the world’s largest vessels. ABP Southampton, in its role as the Statutory Harbour Authority for Southampton Water, has a strong commitment to protecting the local environment and plays an active role in ensuring that a balance of activities can be maintained, allowing port operations, recreational sailing, and wildlife to co-exist. In addition to its varied commercial activities Southampton Water is a haven for yachts and leisure craft, and ABP strives to preserve the safety of all users including recreational boat owners as they sail the waters of the Solent. Contact: ABP Southampton, Vessel Traffic Services Centre, 37 Berth, Eastern Docks, Southampton, SO14 3GG. Tel: 02380 608208. www.southamptonvts.co.uk. Before contacting VTS by telephone, please consider whether the answer to your question can be found on the website.

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MDL SOLENT MARINAS

(023) 8020 7073 (023) 8022 9385 (023) 8033 9490 (023) 8022 9461

mdlmarinas.co.uk

SOUTHAMPTON WATER

Hythe Marina Village Ocean Village Marina Saxon Wharf Shamrock Quay

Keep your VHF tuned to Ch 12, the Port working frequency, and listen for traffic information from the Harbour Master’s Operations Room, Call Sign ‘Southampton VTS’ (Vessel Traffic Services). The Banner 1.indd 2 20/03/2014 VTS Centre guards Ch 9, 12, 14, 16, 20 and monitors Ch 71 and 74. The following extracts from the Yachtsman’s Guide to Southampton Water and its Approaches, and Southampton Notice to Mariners No. 2 and No. 3 of 2014, are reproduced with the permission of ABP Southampton. Facts to keep in mind: The number of large commercial ships serving the Port of Southampton and the number of recreational craft afloat in local waters is increasing. Most commercial vessels you meet will have a ABP Southampton Pilot on board regardless of the ship’s flag. They will be working on and listening to VHF Ch 12. Most large ships travel at a speed of between 10-15 knots whilst in the Solent and Southampton Water. The lower limit will vary from ship to ship and is ‘as safe navigation permits’. For various reasons, ships travel faster than you might think, even in congested areas. Light, partially loaded or unevenly trimmed ships may require to maintain a higher ‘as safe navigation permits’ speed in order to remain under full control. It takes less than 10 minutes for a fast ship to reach you from the visible horizon in clear weather, and in hazy conditions it takes a lot less. At 10 knots, a ship travels 1 nautical mile in six minutes; at 15 knots it takes only four minutes. Large deep draught ships cannot easily avoid small craft in narrow channels; it is up to you to stay clear. A ship that is slowing down does not steer well; it needs the propeller action on the rudder to respond. When the ship’s engines are put ‘full astern’, its manoeuvrability will be affected. Remember that it takes time and considerable distance for a ship to stop. There are numerous other small vessels operating within the Port of Southampton. Watch out for ferries, hydrofoils, tugs towing barges, especially at night, when unlit barges may remain invisible. What can you do? Avoid sailing in the main navigational channels and fairways, especially in poor visibility. Obey Rule 9 of the ColRegs for conduct in narrow channels by keeping to the starboard side of the channel and crossing only when this does not impede the passage of a large vessel that can safely navigate only within the narrow channel. Do not underestimate the speed of ships. If your boat is slow, allow sufficient time to take effective evasive action in the vicinity of large ships. Be visible. At night make sure your navigation lights can be seen. If you see the navigation lights of a vessel and you think you haven’t been seen, get out of the way. Remember, from the bridge of a loaded container ship or large tanker, the Master or Pilot will lose sight of you a third of a mile ahead, although you can see the ship at all times.

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SOUTHAMPTON WATER Keep watch at night. Even on a clear night you will have difficulty seeing a big ship approach. Remember that your lights will not be easily spotted from the ship. Watch the ship’s lights. If you see both sidelights, you are dead ahead - move out fast! Be aware that ships alter course at West Bramble and Calshot. Know whistle signals. Five or more short blasts on the whistle is the ‘Keep Clear’ signal. Check and see if it is for you - and if it is - give way. Three short blasts means ‘My engines are going astern’. Know flag signals and shapes. A large ship displaying a cylinder on her yardarm during the day or three red lights in a vertical line at night indicates the ship is severely restricted in her manoeuvrability so give her a wide berth. If you believe you have not been seen or you are unsure of a ship’s intentions, call them on Ch 12, then shift to a working frequency (6 or an alternative) for inter-ship safety messages. Safety in small vessels: A speed limit of 6 knots (over the ground) applies to all craft proceeding north of the imaginary line drawn from Hythe Pier through the Weston Shelf buoy to the Weston Shore unless granted an exemption by the Harbour Master. Although considered to be sheltered waters, Southampton Water and the Solent can be extremely hazardous. The six mile stretch of Southampton Water is exceedingly busy and has, on average, 70,000 commercial vessel and ferry movements per year. Mariners in ‘small vessels’ are therefore reminded of the following requirements: If not confined to the fairway, they should not use the fairway so as to obstruct other vessels which can only navigate within the fairway. When crossing the fairway, they should do so at right angles and not diagonally. When crossing a fairway or turning they should not stop or slow down so as to cause obstruction/damage to any other vessel. As a general principle, they should navigate on the correct side of the fairway. Southampton VTS makes succinct Traffic Information Broadcasts as follows: • 0610 to 2210 daily all year round The broadcasts will be made every 2 hours from 0610 until 2210 (inclusive), on VHF Ch 14, subject to operational requirements, and will be preceded by a broadcast made on VHF Ch 12. Information given in these broadcasts will include: • Current and expected movements of significant vessels in the area. • Weather and tide readings with current trends at Dock Head, Southampton. • Navigational Warning in force. • Any other information relevant to navigational safety. The Southampton VTS website at www.southamptonvts.co.uk contains much useful information for mariners in small vessels and regular use is recommended.

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Port of Southampton - Precautionary Area (Thorn Channel) Notice to Mariners No. 03 of 2014 1. Notice is hereby given that all vessels navigating within the Port of Southampton shall ensure that a vessel greater than 220 metres in length overall shall be given a ‘clear channel’ in the area between the Hook Buoy and the Prince Consort Buoy (hereinafter referred to as ‘The Precautionary Area’ - (see Chartlet 1)). The term ‘clear channel’ is defined as: ‘a clear and unimpeded passage ahead of a vessel when transiting the Precautionary Area’. The term ‘clear channel’ vessel is defined as: ‘a vessel greater than 220 metres in length overall which requires a clear and unimpeded passage ahead when transiting the Precautionary Area’. Vessels may enter ‘The Precautionary Area’ maintaining a safe distance astern of a ‘clear channel’ vessel. 2. Two vessels each having a length greater than 180 metres length overall shall not pass or overtake each other between Hook Buoy and a line drawn due south of West Bramble Buoy. 3. Moving Prohibited Zone (MPZ) (See Chartlet) Southampton Harbour Byelaws 2003 (Byelaw No 11) enforces the requirement that all vessels over 150 metres in length overall when navigating within ‘The Precautionary Area’ referred to in this notice are automatically allocated a ‘Moving Prohibited Zone’ (MPZ). The MPZ is defined as an area extending 1000 metres ahead of the bow and 100 metres from the ship’s side on both sides of any vessel of over 150 metres in length overall whilst it is navigating within ‘The Precautionary Area’ (See Chartlet).

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SOUTHAMPTON WATER

SOUTHAMPTON WATER


SOUTHAMPTON WATER

SOUTHAMPTON WATER The master of a small vessel (defined in Southampton Harbour Byelaws 2003 (Byelaw No 3) as any vessel of less than 20 metres in length or a sailing vessel) shall ensure that the vessel does not enter an MPZ. For the purpose of indicating the presence of the MPZ the master of any vessel of over 150 metres length overall shall display on the vessel, where it can best be seen, by day, a black cylinder, and by night, 3 all round red lights in a vertical line. To reach any of the following marinas, proceed up Southampton Water keeping clear of all commercial shipping and beware of frequent cross Solent Hi-Speed and Ro-Ro ferries. Hythe Marina Village - Located on the western shore of Southampton Water, Hythe Marina Village also has waterside homes and shops close by. The marina entrance is controlled by lock gates, operated 24/7 all year round. There is a regular ferry service which runs from Hythe into the centre of Southampton. On nearing Hythe Knock red buoy, at the junction of the Rivers Itchen and Test, Hythe Marina Village is conspicuous to port just beyond Hythe Pier. Call on VHF Ch 80 or by mobile for clearance to lock-in and for a berth. Enter via a short channel aligned 220° and marked by beacons. Hythe Marina has 206 berths; max LOA: 20m; fuel (petrol/diesel); gas; boat lifting and storage ashore; 40 ton boat hoist; slipway; boat repairs; laundry facilities; bars and restaurants; brokerage; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Hythe Marina Village, Shamrock Way, Hythe, Southampton, SO45 6DY. Tel: 023 8020 7073. www.hythemarinavillage.co.uk

Ocean Village Marina - Ocean Village is in the heart of Southampton and has a wide range of facilities. Overlooking the marina is the Royal Southampton YC which, although a members’ club, offers berth holders and visitors a warm welcome. The basin is deep enough to offer mooring facilities for tall ships and large yachts. It has also become famous for hosting the start and/or finish of around the world yacht races.

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To approach Ocean Village Marina, at Weston Shelf green buoy, near the junction of the Rivers Itchen and Test, keep to starboard up the Itchen. Ocean Village is about 1 mile further north to port, opposite the old Vosper Thorneycroft yard and just short of the Itchen Bridge. Call on VHF Ch 80 or by mobile for a vacant berth. Ocean Village has 375 berths, max LOA: 90m; laundry facilities; cinemas, bars and restaurants; yacht brokerage; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Ocean Village Marina, 2 Channel Way, Southampton, SO14 3TG. VHF Ch 80. Tel: 023 8022 9385. www.oceanvillagemarina.co.uk Shamrock Quay - Shamrock Quay is a marina steeped in history, taking its name from the famous J-class yacht, Shamrock V, which was built on this site in 1931 to challenge for the America’s Cup. This 255 berth marina is still a major centre for refit and boat building with many specialist trades on site, as well as a bar, restaurants, cafÊ and shops. To reach the marina, proceed up Southampton Water keeping clear of all commercial shipping. At Weston Shelf green buoy, near the junction of the Rivers Itchen and Test, keep to starboard up the Itchen and observe the 6 knot speed limit. Shamrock Quay is 1300m beyond the Itchen Bridge on the port side, opposite No 5 green beacon.

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SOUTHAMPTON WATER


SOUTHAMPTON WATER

SOUTHAMPTON WATER Shamrock Quay has 255 berths; max LOA: 70m; summer sports boat package; boat lifting and storage ashore; 75 ton travel hoist with a 3 ton jib crane; 47 ton boat mover; extensive marine trades and services; chandlery; laundry facilities; shops; bars and restaurants; cafĂŠ; yacht brokerage; yacht charters; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Shamrock Quay, William Street, Northam, Southampton, SO14 5QL. Tel: 023 8022 9461. www.shamrockquay.co.uk Saxon Wharf - Situated north of Shamrock Quay, Saxon Wharf is a marine service centre offering outstanding facilities for superyachts and other large craft. Located near the centre of Southampton, with easy access to the motorway network, Saxon Wharf is the ideal location for big boats in need of secure, quick turnaround lift-outs, repair work or full scale refits. To reach Saxon Wharf, go past the Itchen Bridge and Shamrock Quay and follow the left bend past No. 9 green beacon. Saxon Wharf is to port, opposite Kemps Marina. Call on VHF Ch 80 or by mobile for a vacant berth. Saxon Wharf offers marina berths (max LOA: 80m) and 86 dry stack berths (max LOA: 13m); 200 ton boat hoist; storage ashore; fully serviced heavy-duty pontoons with electricity; extensive marine trades and services; fresh water; CCTV coverage; showers and toilets; car parking; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Saxon Wharf, Lower York Street, Northam, Southampton, SO14 5QF. VHF Ch 80. Tel: 023 8033 9490. www.saxonwharf.co.uk

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Kemp’s Quay - Kemps Quay has been established for over 35 years. The marina is situated on the east bank of the River Itchen, 2 miles north of the river mouth. Of the 260 berths available at the marina, 50 are non-tidal and afloat at all times, the remainder are semi-tidal. Hours afloat on these tidal berths vary in direct proportion to their proximity to the shore and are priced accordingly. The river bed is soft mud and affords stable berths for most craft when the tide is away. A landing/loading berth, afloat at all times is available for boat owners who cannot leave or land within the tide window. Kemps Quay has single point security access; lift out and storage ashore; travel hoist with an 8 ton capacity; power washing; hard standing - 12 weeks for up to 80 craft - included in the mooring fee; fresh water to all pontoons; electricity at selected points; toilets and shower block; owners’ store. Contact: Kemps Shipyard Limited, Quayside Road, Southampton, SO18 1BZ. Tel: 02380 632323. www.kempsquay.com Town Quay Marina - Town Quay Marina, located on the eastern shores of Southampton Water, has 130 berths and a dedicated visitors’ pontoon. In the heart of Southampton, the marina is within walking distance of the city’s shopping centre, restaurants, bars and theatres. The marina is well served by transport links to the Isle of Wight, the New Forest and London and lies next to the PSP Southampton Boat Show. Entrance to the marina is via a dogleg between two floating wave breaks that appear continuous from seaward. Beware of the adjacent Red Jet hi-speed ferry. The marina offers 24/7 berthing assistance; contact them on VHF Ch 80 or by phone. The marina is an RYA Active Marina and part of the TransEurope Marinas group. It has a berth holders’ reception, open 24/7 with free drinks, and is an official Ocean Safety drop off / collection point and a SeaSafe service point for life jackets. There is a chill-out deck with free use of gas barbecue, free bicycle hire for all customers, a slipway, car parking, laundry room, top quality shower rooms, free Wi-Fi, water and electric on all berths. Contact: Town Quay Marina, Associated British Ports, Management Office, Town Quay, Southampton, SO14 2AQ. Tel: 07764 293588 or 02380 234397. www.townquay.com

Photo: www.townquay.com

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SOUTHAMPTON WATER


RIVER HAMBLE & WARSASH RIVER HAMBLE & WARSASH

50°50’.40N, 01°18’.50W (ENT) Internationally famous as a first class sailing centre, the River Hamble is also renowned for the excellence of its servicing and repair facilities offered in a variety of marinas and boatyards. Whether your interest is racing, power-boating or blue water cruising, the Hamble has the facilities you need; deep water, easy access to the Solent at all states of tide.

Popular with locals and visitors alike, the Hamble is perfect for weekend excursions or as a departure point for destinations further afield. It is used extensively by yachtsmen; competitors in Cowes Week and the Round the Island Race use the harbour as a base and, closer to home, local yacht clubs host the Hamble Winter Series, Warsash Spring Series, Bursledon Regatta, national, European and World championships. The river is not just a sailing Mecca, it is a nationally and internationally important site for nature conservation and a bird watchers’ paradise. Riverside walks or simply watching the world go by are popular pastimes.  It also offers a safe location for rowing, canoeing and kayaking, and for the up-coming sport of paddleboarding. The river is a constant hive of activity during the summer season and therefore care should always be taken. Access to the River Hamble is available at all states of tide, although waves can build up at the entrance in a southwesterly wind combined with an ebb tide. By day, from the vicinity of Hamble Point Buoy, follow the main channel which is clearly marked with lit port and starboard-hand piles. From the Warsash Maritime Academy Jetty, the starboard side of the channel is clearly marked by four lit starboard-hand buoys. A ‘preferred channel’ mark (pile) is at the southern end of the first pontoon encountered; leave it to port for the main channel. Thereafter, the main channel is clearly marked with lit port and starboard-hand piles. At night, follow Hamble Common Directional light on a bearing of 352°, then Sailing Club Directional light on a bearing of 029° and then follow the lit buoys and piles as above. Depths obviously vary. Most marinas are dredged to 1.5m. Depths in the main channel vary from at least 4m in the approaches, to 2.2m at Bursledon Bend. Tidal streams can be very strong, particularly on the ebb. Mariners are advised to keep to the centre line or to starboard of the centre line and not too close to the entrance piles, especially at Low Water. Walk ashore facilities are available for visitors at the Harbour Master’s jetty at Warsash and Hamble. There are also mid-stream visitors’ pontoons available between piles B1 and B6. For berth allocation, call the Harbour Master on VHF Ch 68 Call Sign ‘Hamble Harbour Radio’. There is a 6 knot ‘through the water’ speed limit from No. 1 pile and wash limit on all vessels whilst within the River Hamble 110

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MDL HAMBLE MARINAS

(023) 8045 2464 (023) 8045 2741 (023) 8045 5994

RIVER HAMBLE & WARSASH

Hamble Point Marina Port Hamble Marina Mercury Yacht Harbour mdlmarinas.co.uk

harbour limits. No anchoring is allowed in the river, except in the Upper Hamble, above Manor Farm Country Park Jetty, where anchored boats must not be left unattended. Access to the Upper Banner 1.indd 3 20/03/2014 Hamble is through three bridges, the lowest of which (A27) has a clearance of 3.5 metres at Highest Astronomical Tide (HAT). Contact: River Hamble Harbour Authority, Harbour Office, Shore Road, Warsash, SO31 9FR. Tel: 01489 576387. www.hants.gov.uk/hambleharbour Marinas may be contacted on VHF Ch 80 for berth availability. Hamble Point Marina - For sheer location alone, Hamble Point Marina is hard to beat. Situated right at the mouth of the River Hamble, with easy access to the world famous waters of the Solent, the marina is a magnet for competitive sailors from around the globe. It’s a favourite with racers and cruising yachtsmen alike. When approaching Hamble Point, please keep clear of commercial shipping in Southampton Water. From abeam Calshot Castle head for Hamble Pt South Cardinal buoy at the mouth of the well-marked river. From here the channel is narrow between drying banks, so be sure to leave the No 2 East Cardinal beacon to port. At night two directional lights lead to Warsash Jetty on the east bank. The entrance to Hamble Point Marina is 500m further north on the west bank. The marina has 230 berths (max LOA: 30m) and 121 dry stack berths (max LOA: 10m). There is boat lifting and storage ashore; a 75 ton boat hoist; a 4 ton crane for masts / engines; slipway; boat repairs; electronic services; storage; chandlery; bar and restaurant; yacht brokerage; dry sailing facility; trailer sailing; Wi-Fi; laundry and recycling facilities. Contact: Hamble Point Marina, School Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4NB. Tel: 023 8045 2464. www.hamblepointmarina.co.uk Port Hamble Marina - Port Hamble Marina is situated on the River Hamble right in the heart of the South Coast’s sailing scene. With thousands of visitors every year, this busy marina is popular with racing enthusiasts and cruising vessels looking for a vibrant atmosphere. The picturesque Hamble Village, with its inviting pubs and restaurants, is only a few minutes’ walk away. When approaching Port Hamble, please keep clear of commercial shipping in Southampton Water. From abeam Calshot Castle head for Hamble Pt South Cardinal buoy at the mouth of the well-marked river. From here the channel is narrow between drying banks, so be sure to leave the No 2 East Cardinal beacon to port. At night two directional lights lead to Warsash Jetty on the east bank. Port Hamble Marina is about 0.75 miles north, the second marina on the west bank. The marina has 310 berths, max LOA: 24m; fuel (petrol/diesel) seven days a week; boat lifting and storage ashore; electronic services; chandlery; laundry facilities; bar and restaurant; yacht brokerage; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Port Hamble Marina, Satchell Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4QD. Tel: 023 8045 2741. www.porthamblemarina.co.uk

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RIVER HAMBLE & WARSASH Mercury Yacht Harbour - Originally built by Sir Robin Knox Johnston, Mercury is situated in a sheltered wooded site where the shallow waters of Badnam Creek join the River Hamble. Just a twenty minute walk from Hamble village, the marina offers berthing for 360 boats and enjoys deep water at all states of tide. Among its excellent facilities are a chandlery as well as a bar and restaurant with waterfront views. When approaching the marina, please keep clear of commercial shipping in Southampton Water. From abeam Calshot Castle head for Hamble Pt South Cardinal buoy at the mouth of the well-marked river. From here the channel is narrow between drying banks, so be sure to leave the No 2 East Cardinal beacon to port. At night two directional lights lead to Warsash Jetty on the east bank. About 1.35 miles north, Mercury Yacht Harbour is the third marina on the west bank. The marina has 360 berths, max LOA: 24m; boat lifting and storage ashore; electronic services; towing; chandlery; laundry facilities; bar and restaurant; yacht brokerage; sailing schools; yacht charters; and Wi-Fi. Contact: Mercury Yacht Harbour, Satchell Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4HQ. Tel: 023 8045 5994. www.mercuryyachtharbour.co.uk Universal Marina - Universal Marina is an independent family run marina set adjacent to 68 acres of tranquil, wooded riverbank, just minutes from the M27 and 15 minutes from the Solent. Renowned for its friendly staff and secure facilities, complimented by full yard services and ample free car parking. Berths range from 7.5m - 26m, deep water, semi-tidal, dinghy, and RIBs. Contact: Universal Marina, Crableck Lane, Sarisbury Green, Southampton, SO31 7ZN. Tel: 01489 574272. www.universalmarina.co.uk Swanwick Marina - Swanwick Marina is situated on the picturesque eastern bank of the River Hamble, approximately two miles upriver from the entrance to Southampton Water. On approaching Swanwick Marina please contact the marina by phone or VHF channel 80 for directions to a berth. At Swanwick Marina yachtsmen can look forward to quality facilities including a launderette, electricity, and water on pontoons, 24-hour security, car parking, and a CafĂŠ Bistro, The Boat House CafĂŠ. Contact: Swanwick Marina, Swanwick, Southampton, SO31 1ZL. Tel: 01489 884081. www.premiermarinas.com/swanwick Mariners Quay - Outboard powerboat dealer, expertise in rigging and servicing of outboard engines at Mariners Quay in Warsash close to the mouth of the Hamble River. Services include sales of outboard boats and custom built Atlanta ribs, sales of spares and parts for both Yamaha and Suzuki. Contact: Solent and Warsash Marine, Mariners Quay, Shore Road, Warsash SO31 9FR. Tel: 01489 583813 Email: info@sandwmarine.co.uk Please note, information in this publication is to be used as a guide only and not for navigation. 112

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PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT Portsmouth is Britain’s premier naval base and one of the busiest harbours in the country. It is a very large natural harbour, almost completely landlocked except for the narrow entrance, with the approaches themselves well sheltered by the Isle of Wight.

The Queen’s Harbour Master (QHM) Portsmouth is the regulatory authority of the Dockyard Port of Portsmouth, an area of approximately 55 square miles that encompasses not only Portsmouth Harbour itself, but includes all the waters from Cowes in the west to Hayling Island down to Sandown Bay in the east, with the single exception of Bembridge Harbour. Traffic co-ordination for shipping entering and leaving Portsmouth Harbour is performed by Harbour Control which is manned 24 hours a day. The QHM and his staff have to ensure that the 117,000 yearly shipping movements under their control are safely carried out and with the minimum impact to the surrounding area. To facilitate the safe passage of small craft to and from Portsmouth Harbour, a ‘Small Boat Channel’ exists for vessels less than 20m in length on the western side of the harbour entrance. The northern and southern extremities of the Small Boat Channel are at Ballast beacon and No. 4 Bar buoy. Remember, small boats are extremely difficult to see and the harbour entrance is a blind bend to larger vessels. Enter and leave the harbour through the Small Boat Channel.

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50º47’.38N, 01º06’.67W (ENT)


PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT

PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT All craft fitted with engines, when navigating in the approach channel to Portsmouth Harbour, are to proceed under power between No. 4 Bar buoy and the Ballast beacon. Vessels are only to cross the main channel when they are to the north of Ballast beacon, and permission has been obtained from the QHM on VHF Ch 11. The Small Boat Channel may only be entered or exited by vessels approaching from the east at its northern or southern extremities. A traffic pattern is established around Ballast beacon; small boats entering the harbour are to pass close to the east of Ballast beacon and those exiting close to the west. If crossing the harbour entrance, do so to the north of Ballast beacon or to the south of No. 4 Bar buoy. Keep to the starboard side of the Small Boat Channel and adjust speed to remain within the channel rather than overtake and be forced into the main channel. Small boats may continue to use the Small Boat Channel when the main channel is closed for the passage of a large vessel. Do not underestimate the speed of ships. If your boat is slow, allow sufficient time to take evasive action in the vicinity of large ships. Be visible. At night make sure your navigation lights can be seen. If you see the navigation lights of a vessel and think you have not been seen, get out of the way. Carry a radar reflector high on your boat.

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Remember, from the bridge of a loaded container ship or large tanker, the captain or pilot will lose sight of you a third of a mile ahead, although you can see the ship at all times. Ships with deep draught may have less room for manoeuvre than is immediately apparent. At night be extra vigilant as, even on a clear night, you will have difficulty seeing a big ship approach. You might see it first as a black shadow against a background of shore lights, or as a growing shadow, at that point you are not far apart. Remember that your lights will not be easily spotted from the ship. It is essential that all mariners operating north of a line between Outer Spit Buoy and Gilkicker Point maintain a close watch on VHF Ch 11, for vessel traffic information from QHM Harbour Control. In an emergency, if you believe you have not been seen or you are unsure of a ship’s intentions, call them on VHF Ch 11 or 16, then shift to a working frequency for inter-ship safety messages. The Swashway is an important channel for shallow draught vessels approaching and leaving Portsmouth Harbour. It should be noted that hovercraft and high-speed catamaran ferries often transit the area en-route to and from Ryde at speeds in excess of 24 knots. As non-displacement craft, hovercraft usually navigate outside the Swashway in areas where depths are shallow. The Spitbank area, as a whole, is regularly used for yacht racing and regattas. Yachts and slow moving craft are advised to keep watch for the possible approach of high-speed ferries and other fast craft. High-speed craft are cautioned not to assume that other boats, particularly those whom they are overtaking, are aware of their presence, and are to give them a sufficiently wide berth. Extra caution is to be taken when operating in the vicinity of the harbour entrance to prevent small and less powerful boats being swept into mid-channel from the Small Boat Channel by the strong cross-tide. The speed limit within Portsmouth Harbour is 10 knots and the same within 0.5nm of the line of MLWS in any part of the Port of Portsmouth outside the harbour. The speed limit in each case is to be taken as ‘speed through the water’. When visibility in the harbour or approach channel is less than 0.25 of a nautical mile the QHM may declare the fog routine to be in force. Small boats may proceed with caution but must keep clear of the main navigable channels and the approach channel. The QHM will direct that the routine is in force, and when it has ended, by broadcasts on VHF Ch 11 or 13. Vessels without operational radars are advised not to proceed in such conditions, and in any event, should navigate with extreme caution in conditions of restricted visibility. Contact: Queen’s Harbour Master Portsmouth, Semaphore Tower, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth, PO1 3LT. Tel: 02392 723694. www.qhm.mod.uk/portsmouth/ for access to all QHM Portsmouth LNTM and General Directions.

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PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT


PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT

PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT Reference: QHM Portsmouth General Direction 07/10. Small Boat Channel and access to Gunwharf Quays and Town Camber. The Small Boat Channel, as displayed on Admiralty charts, is defined by Ballast Beacon at its northern extremity and No 4 Bar Buoy to the south. As the harbour entrance is a blind bend for large vessels, small boats operating near the harbour entrance are often difficult to detect, the following rules therefore apply to all small boats: 1. Small Boats must enter and leave the harbour through the Small Boat Channel. 2. All craft fitted with engines, when navigating in the Approach Channel to Portsmouth Harbour, are to proceed under power between No 4 Bar Buoy, Ballast Beacon and Gunwharf Quays/Town Camber. 3. The Small Boat Channel may only be entered or exited by vessels approaching from the vicinity of Gunwharf Quays/Town Camber north of Ballast Beacon. 4. A traffic pattern is established at Ballast Beacon; small boats entering the harbour are to pass close to the east of Ballast Beacon, those exiting close to the west. 5. Small boats, unless authorised by QHM, are not to loiter in the Small Boat Channel. 6. Small boats should remain on the Starboard side of the Small Boat Channel, adjusting their speed to remain within the Small Boat Channel to avoid overtaking or leaving the Channel. 7. Immediately prior to departure from Gunwharf Quays/Town Camber, small boats are to request permission from QHM on VHF Ch 11, to cross the harbour to Ballast Beacon before entering the Channel. Note - There are no visitor berths or moorings at Gunwharf Quays, and boats will only be permitted to cross the harbour to Gunwharf Quays if they have an assigned berth. The Gunwharf Berthing Manager can be contacted by VHF Ch 80 or 02392 836732.

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PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT Gunwharf Quays Marina - Located just 200m from the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour and situated on the East side of the Harbour, beneath the landmark Spinnaker Tower, is Gunwharf Quays Marina. Set against the vibrant backdrop of Portsmouth’s Historic Naval Dockyard, this specially designed marina can accommodate power and sail craft up to 79 metres, with a maximum depth of 5.5 metres. Boasting spacious marina berths with ample manoeuvring space and wide walk-ashore floating pontoons, this prime south coast marina prides itself on offering a raft of dedicated services and facilities. Not to mention a unique waterside experience with an excellent mix of retail, dining and leisure. All essential pontoon services include ample supplies of electricity and fresh water, free and unlimited Wi-Fi, a complimentary laundry service, 24-hour CCTV and a secure access control system. Marina visitors can also enjoy easy access to a nearby fuelling pontoon, as well as subsidised parking in Gunwharf Quays’ awardwinning car park. A worthy recipient of the Yacht Harbour Association’s four gold anchor award, this marina has quality shoreside facilities, including individual showers, basins and changing areas. Add a friendly and professional team who are dedicated to making your stay an enjoyable one, and you have the perfect destination marina. Contact - Gunwharf Quays Marina, Gunwharf Quays, Portsmouth, PO1 3TZ. Tel: 02392 836732. Email: marina@gunwharf-quays.com. www.gunwharf-quays.com/marina

Town Quay (Camber) - Set in the most historic part of the city, the Camber Dock is home to the Wightlink Isle of Wight ferry service, local fishing vessels, commercial barges and work boats, KB Boat Park dry stack, and private yachts and motor boats. Visitors are welcome at the Camber Dock and a number of marine related services are available. There is a slipway, trailer park, car park, and boat storage available. Contact: Camber Harbour Office, East Street, Camber Quay, Old Portsmouth, PO1 2JJ. Tel: 023 9283 3166. www.kb-boatpark.co.uk

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Haslar Marina - Haslar Marina is a modern purpose-built marina in Portsmouth Harbour just minutes from the waters of the Solent. Located in Haslar Creek, Gosport, and protected by a large wave screen, the marina offers sheltered berthing with no tidal restrictions. The marina has up to 120 dedicated visitors’ berths, catering for vessels up to 60m LOA. All berths are fully serviced with water, electricity, and Wi-Fi. Facilities include showers and washrooms, two laundries, bars and restaurants, 24-hour security, and car parking. Sealift 2 are now operating from Haslar Marina. Call Sign ‘Haslar Marina’ on VHF 80. Contact: Haslar Marina, Haslar Road, Gosport, PO12 1NU. Tel: 023 9260 1201. www.deanreddyhoff.co.uk//haslar-marina

Gosport Marina - Gosport Marina is situated 500m from Portsmouth Harbour. The marina is dredged to a minimum of 2m and a breakwater redevelopment ensures boats are protected from the wash created by passing ships. Gosport Marina can accommodate 500 boats on berths ranging up to 30m. The marina has excellent toilets and showers, a launderette, a quality Café Bistro, The Boat House Café, fuel berth, dry stack storage, on-site boat care and boat sales. There’s electricity and water on the pontoons, berth holder car parking, Wi-Fi and bottled gas available. Gosport High Street with a variety of shops is just two minutes away. Call VHF channel 80 to speak to Gosport Marina. Contact: Gosport Marina, Mumby Road, Gosport, PO12 1AH. Tel: 023 9252 4811. www.premiermarinas.com/gosport The Gosport Ferry provides fast shuttle services from nearby Gosport Ferry pontoon to the popular Gunwharf Quays with its designer outlets, bowling alley, cinema, restaurants and bars.

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PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT


PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT

PORTSMOUTH & GOSPORT Endeavour Quay - Endeavour Quay provides a comprehensive new build, refit, storage, maintenance and repair facility for sailing yachts and power craft up to 40 metres LOA or 180 tonnes. A range of independent on-site services is available, coupled with an open yard policy. Service and support of major yacht race projects, private and commercial vessel refits, alongside standard repair and maintenance work. The marina has easy access to the Solent and English Channel, with no air draft restriction. There is 90m of serviced waiting pontoons, a 30m long and 8.5m wide lifting dock, and a 180 tonne travel hoist. Tel: 02392 584 200. www.endeavourquay.co.uk

Royal Clarence Marina - Royal Clarence Marina lies within a deep water basin fronting the Royal Navy’s former victualling yard, is less than 10 minutes from the entrance to Portsmouth Harbour and close to Gosport town centre. The marina provides fully serviced pontoon berths ranging in length from 10.5 to 18m. There is also over 350 metres of alongside berthing available for international events and other maritime spectaculars. The marina enjoys one of the deepest water basins in southern England with the capacity to take vessels up to 5.25m draft. The ‘alongside berths’ are also ideal for club rallies and events as large numbers of vessels can be berthed. Royal Clarence Marina has 180 fully serviced berths as well as the heavy duty and deep water berths. VHF Ch 80, Call Sign ‘Royal Clarence Marina’.  Contact: Royal Clarence Marina, Weevil Lane, Gosport, PO12 1AX. Tel: 02392 523523. www.royalclarencemarina.org

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PORT SOLENT

Port Solent is located in the northeast corner of Portsmouth Harbour, near historic Portchester Castle. There are spectacular views over the Solent from the Castle’s towers.

Photo: Premier Marinas

The entrance to Portchester Lake lies about a mile north of Portsmouth Harbour entrance; it is marked to the west by pile 57 and to the east by pile 95. The whole channel is marked by red piles to the west and by green piles to the east. Twenty of the piles are lit by navigational lights. Although the channel in the south is wide, the best water is defined by a number of craft moored to large buoys, which are unlit, and should be left to port. At night this reach of the channel is defined by lit starboard hand piles. In the vicinity of lit pile 63 to port and lit pile 88 to starboard, the channel narrows and starts a long, slow lefthand bend. North of pile 86 the bend tightens and the best water lies close to the three lit port piles. On the right-hand side opposite these piles is Tipner Lake which is a cul-de-sac and should be avoided. The gates at lit piles no 68 to port and no 80 to starboard mark the sharp turn left into the final section of channel with Portchester Castle to port. There is a speed limit in Portsmouth Harbour of 10 knots and there is an advisory speed limit of 5 knots in the upper reaches of Portchester Channel past the Castle. It is not permitted to stop or linger in the safety arcs of Tipner Range. Anyone proceeding to Port Solent Marina, at pile 78 call Port Solent on VHF Ch 80 and request a lock in. In season the upper section is well marked by moored yachts. Off season beware of unlit boat moorings on both sides. From pile 80 turn almost due north to pile 79. At low tide keep to the port side of the channel to pile 72a, thereafter cross to the starboard pile 76. Pile 75 opens the channel between rows of piled yacht moorings. Proceed between the moorings steering on pile A and pile B. Once abeam of pile B, steer to follow a line leaving the outer pontoons to starboard. At pile B the lock entrance will be clearly visible. Do not proceed into the lock barrel unless three green entry lights show. If waiting for the lock, you can moor to the outer waiting pontoon, clear of the lock entrance. Port Solent Marina - Port Solent Marina is set against the vibrant backdrop of The Boardwalk’s restaurants, bars and shops. There is a fully serviced boatyard with storage ashore for 500 boats, 24-hour fuel, luxury showers, toilets, and car parking. Patrols, CCTV and the lock, which allows 24-hour access to the marina, provide security. Call on VHF channel 80. Contact: Premier Port Solent Marina, South Lockside, Port Solent, Portsmouth, PO6 4TJ. Tel: 023 9221 0765. www.premiermarinas.com/portsolent

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PORT SOLENT CHANNEL: 50º50’.10N, 01º06’.80W (ENT)


FAREHAM FAREHAM

FAREHAM CHANNEL: 50º50’.40N, 01º10’.40W (ENT) Fareham provides a unique opportunity to explore a rich heritage of both maritime and national history, peaceful woodland walks, conservation areas, plus an attractive safe coastline.

Photo: Fareham TIC

North of the marinas on your port side as you enter Portsmouth Harbour, and the docks on your starboard side, is Fareham Lake. Further north are Bomb Ketch Lake and Spider Lake on your starboard side, then a couple of southerly cardinal marks which need to be left to starboard. From now on the channel is marked by piles. Bedbenham Pier, on your port side, should not be approached closer than 12m. The channel is lit as far as Foxbury Point. Anyone planning to push on up to Fareham must take note of the overhead electricity cables, which cross the channel from Cams Hall Golf Course across to Fareham Reach, and only have a safe clearance of 16m at Mean High Water Springs. Close to Fareham depths rapidly shallow out in the channel. WicorMarine Yacht Haven - WicorMarine Yacht Haven, situated to the north of Bedenham Pier and only a half an hour from the harbour entrance, is a family-owned and operated marina offering a variety of deep water or tidal pontoon, swinging moorings, and storage, as well as competitive rates for a mid-season scrub and short-term storage. It boasts a wonderful licensed cafe SALT as well as a well-stocked chandlery and can offer own-boat sail training. A number of marine trades are on site to deal with repairs and maintenance and there is a well-equipped tool hire store. Visitors are welcome. Contact: WicorMarine Yacht Haven, Cranleigh Road, Portchester, Fareham, PO16 9DR. Tel: 01329 237112. www.wicormarine.co.uk Portsmouth Marine Engineering - Continuing onwards from WicorMarine Yacht Haven, and after the sailing club you will pass on your port side a yard run by Portsmouth Marine Engineering with around 130 pontoon berths, some with electricity, shower and toilet facilities. They can offer temporary visitors’ berths subject to availability. There is a 10 ton boat crane, and storage for 35 boats on dry land. Contact: Portsmouth Marine Engineering (VRS Holdings Ltd), Lower Quay, Fareham, PO16  0RJ. Tel: 01329 232854. email: info@ portsmouthmarine.co.uk www.portsmouthmarine.co.uk 122

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LANGSTONE HARBOUR 50º47’.01N, 01º01’.60W (ENT)

LANGSTONE HARBOUR

Langstone Harbour lies on Hampshire’s southeast coast, a large tidal bay between Portsmouth Harbour to the west and Chichester Harbour to the east. Commercial shipping, fishing, and recreational boating have been well established in the peaceful, sheltered waters of the harbour for many years.

Photo: Richard Barnes

There is abundant wildlife in Langstone Harbour which remains an area of real wilderness alongside the major city of Portsmouth. Sailors, boaters and other water sports enthusiasts share the harbour with the resident wildlife, and providing a little consideration is shown, all the different uses can coexist in harmony. Langstone Harbour contains a number of nesting islands and landing is not allowed. Visitors should avoid trampling the mud and saltmarsh plants to ensure their survival into the future. Langstone Harbour is a shallow, natural harbour with extensive mudflats which are exposed during low tide. The whole harbour is one of Hampshire’s several ‘Sites of Special Scientific Interest’ (SSSI) with international status. Together with neighbouring Chichester Harbour, it is a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance, and part of the Solent European Marine Site. The approach to Langstone Harbour is easy in most weather conditions, but best from High Water -3 to +1 hour. The entrance channel lies between the East and West Winner drying banks, which offer some protection. Once close to the Fairway Beacon, approximately 1 mile to the south of the harbour entrance, in line with a conspicuous chimney, steer 344º to just clear East Winner. The entrance itself deepens and favours the west side. The harbour speed limit is 10 knots and because of the environmental sensitivity of the area’s wildlife, there are also restrictions on certain activities. Chichester Harbour is accessible under the Hayling road bridge for vessels of low air draught at certain states of the tide. All vessels using Langstone Harbour are obliged to pay harbour dues; this includes vessels visiting Southsea Marina. All vessels on the water must display their daily or annual plaque.

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LANGSTONE HARBOUR

LANGSTONE HARBOUR Fuel, water, and waste reception facilities are available at the Hayling pontoon. Harbour Office call up is VHF Ch 12/16; the working frequency is Ch 12. There are three public slipways in Langstone Harbour; the Ferry Point slipway, Hayling Island; Eastney slipway, Portsmouth; and the Broadmarsh slipway. Contact: Langstone Harbour Board, Harbour Office, Ferry Road, Hayling Island, PO11 0DG. Tel: 02392 463419. www.langstoneharbour.org.uk Southsea Marina - Contact the marina on VHF channel 80 call sign ‘Southsea Marina’ when approaching Southsea Marina channel to be given berthing instructions. The speed limit in the marina channel is 5 knots. Southsea Marina has a cill gate which opens and closes automatically at certain states of the tide. The tides for Southsea Marina and the times of the cill gate opening and closing are available to download at www.premiermarinas.com/southsea The entrance to Southsea Marina Channel is just past the Hayling Ferry pontoon. Seven starboard-hand and nine port-hand markers mark the approach channel, the first of which are lit piles. Of the remaining eight port-hand markers, the fourth, sixth, and ninth are all lit. None of the starboard-hand markers - made up of two buoys and a further three piles - are lit. The Western waiting pontoon is marked with a starboard-hand light. The marina entrance is 7 metres wide and is dredged to 0.5m below chart datum. Southsea Marina has first-class facilities with a fully serviced boatyard. There are CCTV cameras and security patrols, an on-site bar and restaurant, refurbished toilet and shower blocks, and 24hour diesel and petrol. The marina also has a 24-hour launderette; post box and collection point; Premier Marinas WiFi; electricity; water; bottled gas. Eastney Convenience Store and a cashpoint are 10 minutes walk away. Contact: Premier Southsea Marina, Fort Cumberland Road, Portsmouth, PO4 9RJ. Tel: 023 9282 2719. www.premiermarinas.com/southsea

Photo: Premier Marinas

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CHICHESTER HARBOUR Chichester Harbour, with 11 square miles of water, 17 miles of well marked and lit channels and with easy access to the Solent, is an ideal water recreation centre. The sheltered waters are ideal for racing and day sailing and its channels offer secure moorings for cruising vessels. With up to 10,000 boats sharing this facility, at peak times the harbour can be congested. In addition the harbour is of national and international importance for nature conservation.

Photo: Jeff Coleman

The low lying entrance to Chichester Harbour, is not easily distinguished against the backdrop of the South Downs and is bordered on both sides by extensive drying banks; West Pole, Middle Pole and East Pole Sands, the latter extending more than a mile seaward. A deep-water channel running between these banks to the harbour entrance is interrupted by a bar joining West to Middle Pole and East Pole Sands, this mobile feature varies in position and height and is periodically dredged to maintain a charted depth of 1.5 metres. The width of the dredged channel across the Bar is a little less than 200 yards. Vessels approaching the harbour from the west are advised to shape a course for West Pole Beacon 50º45’.45N, 00º56’.59W. On rounding the Beacon aim to pass between Eastoke Buoy and West Winner Beacons leaving the Bar Beacon 50º46’.023N, 00º56’.380W, close to port. When approaching the harbour from the east, mariners are advised not to cross the 5 metre contour until West Pole Beacon bears 310º T. On reaching the beacon shape a course for the harbour entrance keeping the Bar Beacon close to port. Chichester Bar is normally dredged to approximately 1.5m below chart datum giving a depth of 2m, at MLWS. However, through gradual accretion and after severe gales the bottom can vary markedly and it is then prudent to assume a least depth of 0.8 metres below Chart Datum. Mariners should be aware that ebb tides in the entrance to the harbour can attain a rate of up to 6 knots on springs. With a falling tide and strong winds from a southerly sector a dangerous sea may be encountered. In these conditions it is advisable to exercise caution and cross the bar between three hours before and one hour after HW springs. In very strong winds entry should not be attempted. The speed limit throughout the harbour is 8 knots. Up-to-date tide and weather information at the Harbour Entrance is available at www.chimet.co.uk or from the Harbour Office. The Harbour Patrol maintain a VHF radio watch on Ch 14, Call Sign

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CHICHESTER HARBOUR

50º46’.86N, 00º56’.06W (ENT)


CHICHESTER HARBOUR

CHICHESTER HARBOUR

‘Chichester Harbour Radio’ or ‘Chichester Harbour Patrol’. The speed limit throughout the harbour is 8 knots. Visitors’ moorings and ferry services are available at Itchenor and Emsworth. Useful navigation information, including race start times and locations, is published each weekend as an eNewsletter, sign up at www.conservancy.co.uk to receive a copy. Contact: Chichester Harbour Conservancy, Harbour Office, Itchenor, Chichester, PO20 7AW. Tel: 01243 512301. www.conservancy.co.uk Sparkes Marina - Sparkes Marina is situated on the southeast tip of Hayling Island within Chichester Harbour. When approaching the marina, enter Chichester Harbour and proceed on the starboard side of the channel until the Hayling Island Sailing Club mast is bearing 240º M (236º T) on the portside. From this position you will see an East Cardinal Mark with tide gauge bearing approximately 290º M (286º T) and a jetty pontoon on the sailing club shore. Alter course to port onto a heading of 281º M (277º T). Adjust your course to pass midway between the cardinal mark and the pontoon. You will now see transit marks consisting of two dayglo orange St Andrews Crosses, bearing 281º M (277º T), adjusting your course to keep the transit in line. Proceed down the transit for approximately three cables, leaving the pile mooring to port. As you pass the last pile mooring you will see steel piles with red can top marks on your port bow (southwest). Follow these marks which will lead you into the marina. The approach channel from the Sailing Club to the Marina has been dredged to two metres below CD. Sparkes Marina has 150 berths; max LOA: 20m; fuel (diesel, petrol and marine gas); dry boat sailing for yachts and motorboats; swinging moorings; 15 ton mobile crane; storage ashore; full maintenance services; 24-hour showers and toilets; laundry facilities; restaurant and bar; yacht brokerage; sea school; and MDL Wi-Fi. Contact: Sparkes Marina, Wittering Road, Hayling Island, PO11 9SR. Tel: 023 9246 3572. www.sparkesmarina.co.uk

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MDL CHICHESTER MARINAS

(023) 9246 6321 (023) 9246 3572

CHICHESTER HARBOUR

Northney Marina Sparkes Marina

mdlmarinas.co.uk

Northney Marina - Northney Marina is situated on the north shore of Hayling Island within Chichester Harbour. The harbour’s sheltered waters to Banner 1.indd 1 provide safe cruising and there are plenty of anchorages 20/03/2014 explore within the area, such as Itchenor, with its quaint pubs, or Bosham village. When approaching Northney Marina, enter Chichester Harbour on the top half of the flood. Continue north up Emsworth Channel for three miles to Emsworth south cardinal light beacon. Here fork 45° to port up Sweare Deep. After 8 cables turn sharply port around the Northney red beacon. Enter the marina via a short channel dredged one metre; access H24. Northney Marina has 228 berths; max LOA: 24m; fuel (diesel); boat lifting and storage ashore; 35 ton boat hoist; slipway; car parking and trailer storage; boatyard services; yacht brokerage; laundry facilities; provisions shop; and MDL Wi-Fi. Contact: Northney Marina, Northney Road, Hayling Island, PO11 0NH. Tel: 023 9246 6321. www.northneymarina.co.uk Emsworth Yacht Harbour - Emsworth is a friendly, family owned marina within walking distance of the attractive village of Emsworth. There are limits on access due to the fixed sill and the marina is accessible ±2 HW. The marina has 220 fully serviced pontoon berths; hard-standing for 200 boats; and a visitor pontoon. There is a 50 tonne travel hoist, 10 tonne crane, and Wise W10 boat parker. Chandlery and boat broker on site; range of boat repair services; slipway and drying grid; diesel and Calor Gas sales; and free Wi-Fi. Contact: Emsworth Yacht Harbour, Thorney Road, Emsworth, Hants, PO10 8BP. Tel: 01243 377727. www.emsworth-marina.co.uk Thornham Marina - Thornham Marina is at the top of Prinsted Bay in Chichester Harbour. Visitors can moor on drying pontoon berths, on pontoon berths within a gated basin, or on swinging moorings. Access to pontoon berths is around ±2 HW, (swinging moorings is 2.5 hours), depending on tide height. To find Thornham Marina enter into Thorney Channel and proceed north, pass Thorney Island SC and church to port. Follow the moorings all the way to the entrance to Prinsted Bay. After entering the bay, follow the channel markers which will then guide you into the deep water pool or pontoon berths. Call Sign ‘Thornham Marina’, VHF Ch 80. There is storage for around 300 vessels; a 12 ton boat hoist; electricity and water; toilets and showers; and car parking. Contact: Thornham Marina, Thornham Lane, Prinsted, Nr. Emsworth, PO10 8DD. Tel: 01243 375335. www.thornhammarina.com

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CHICHESTER HARBOUR

CHICHESTER HARBOUR Birdham Pool Marina - The marina is situated on the southern edge of Chichester Harbour six miles from the entrance, in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The marina runs alongside a traditional working shipyard which provides excellent services. Birdham Pool can accommodate up to 265 vessels and berthing is mostly between piles, bow or stern to the shore or jetties. The approach channel to Birdham Pool Marina is approximately 10m in width. Please call on VHF Ch 80, Call Sign ‘Birdham Pool Marina’, or by mobile to the lock on 07831 466815. Entrance and exit via the lock is available ±3.5 hours HW. Contact: Birdham Pool Limited, Birdham, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7BG. Tel: 01243 512310. www.birdhampool.co.uk Chichester Marina - Chichester Marina is situated upstream from Birdham Pool on the starboard side of Chichester Harbour. Once inside the harbour you need to head northeast past East Head and towards Itchenor to arrive at the Marina. The channel to the marina is marked by the Chichester Marina starboard pile. Maximum speed 6 knots. There are five starboard markers each with a green top mark in the approach channel. Chichester Marina operates on VHF Ch 80, 24/7 all year. On arrival, moor your vessel on the outer waiting pontoon and go to marina office for locking instructions, or contact the marina for a berth allocation prior to your arrival. During busy periods a queuing procedure may be in operation. The duty lock-keeper can advise on current locking arrangements. The lock allows 24-hour access to the marina with excellent security provided around the clock. The marina has luxury toilets and showers; a launderette; convenience store; a new Café Bistro overlooking the water; Wi-Fi; free parking; post collection; waste and recycling facilities; a new boatyard facility with a wide variety of marine tenants and an undercover boatshed. Contact: Premier Chichester Marina, Birdham, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7EJ. Tel: 01243 512731. www.premiermarinas.com/chichester Haines Boatyard - Haines Boatyard is synonymous with the shipwright and painting expertise required to restore and maintain a varied range of classic and modern keelboats, yachts and motor craft. They are proud of their long heritage offering a wide range of services for boats up to 34ft and 6 tonnes, including hauling, launching, pressure washing and anti-fouling. Indoor and outdoor summer and winter storage is available for all types of boat up to 28ft. Facilities include a fully-equipped shipwright, painting and rigging workshop with a 10 ton gantry. Contact: Haines Boatyard, Itchenor, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7AN. Tel: 01243 512228. Email: admin@hainesboatyard.com www.hainesboatyard.com

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quatix

THE GPS MARINE WATCH quatix combines advanced sail racing tools for unparalleled awareness and a competitive edge during competition. Use independently or stream data from your fitted Garmin system, such as wind, bearing to waypoint, depth and more – straight to your wrist. To learn more visit Garmin.com

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SOLENT DIRECTORY

SOLENT DIRECTORY INDEX


SOLENT DIRECTORY

SOLENT DIRECTORY ACCOMMODATION - AGENTS Quay Management The first port of call for self-catering accommodation in Cowes 01983 291369 EMAIL: sarah@quaymanagement.co.uk WEB SITE: www.quaymanagement.co.uk ACCOMMODATION - BED & BREAKFAST / GUEST HOUSES 2 The Pippins off Bellevue Road, Cowes, PO31 7UU EMAIL: countergirl2000@aol.com WEB SITE: www.pippinsbnb.co.uk

01983 281270

22 Castle Road, Oak Cottage, Cowes, PO31 7QZ 01983 200986 / 07792 672707 EMAIL: info@oakcottagecowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.oakcottagecowes.co.uk Anchorage Guest House 23 Mill Hill Road, Cowes, PO31 7EE 01983 247975 EMAIL: peter@anchoragecowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.anchoragecowes.co.uk Britannia House Station Street, Lymington, Hampshire, SO41 3BA 01590 672091 EMAIL: enquiries@britannia-house.com WEB SITE: www.britannia-house.com Endeavour House 47 Mill Hill Road, Cowes, PO31 7EG 01983 297406 / 07850 205994 enquiries@endeavourhousecowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.endeavourhousecowes.co.uk

EMAIL:

Lisburne - JOG Startline 61 Queen’s Road, Cowes, PO31 8BW 01983 282551 EMAIL: philipthwaites123@btinternet.com WEB SITE: www.cowesbandb.com Quentin House 62 High Street, Cowes, PO31 7RL 01983 291111 / 07454 941096 EMAIL: primefood@aol.com WEB SITE: www.primefood.co.uk ACCOMMODATION - HOTELS / INNS The Duke of York Inn Mill Hill Road, Cowes, PO31 7BT 01983 295171 EMAIL: bookings@dukeofyorkcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.dukeofyorkcowes.co.uk The Fountain Inn High Street, Cowes, PO31 7AW EMAIL: 6447@greeneking.co.uk WEB SITE: www.fountaininn.cowes.co.uk ACCOMMODATION - SELF CATERING

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01983 292397


22 Castle Road, Oak Cottage, Cowes, PO31 7QZ 01983 200986 / 07792 672707 EMAIL: info@oakcottagecowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.oakcottagecowes.co.uk Country Cottages 17 Fennfields Road, South Woodham Ferrers, CM3 5RZ 01245 425718 EMAIL: info@countrycottagesonline.com WEB SITE: www.countrycottagesonline.com Isle of Wight Holidays 17 Fennfields Road, South Woodham Ferrers, CM3 5RZ 01245 425718 EMAIL: hello@holidays-in-the-isle-of-wight.co.uk WEB SITE: www.holidays-in-the-isle-of-wight.co.uk Quay Management The first port of call for self-catering accommodation in Cowes 01983 291369 EMAIL: sarah@quaymanagement.co.uk WEB SITE: www.quaymanagement.co.uk BEAUTY & COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES / CHIROPRACTORS COMPANY ADDRESS

TELEPHONE WEB SITE EMAIL SERVICES

COWES CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 83 Mill Hill Road, Cowes, PO31 7EQ 01983 282810 www.coweschiropracticclinic.co.uk info@coweschiropracticclinic.co.uk

McTimoney Chiropractic, Diversified Chiropractic, Remedial Massage, Five Element Acupuncture, Skincare, Reiki, Homeopathy, 1 to 1 Pilates, NLP Coaching & Personal Development, Addiction Therapy & Counselling. Call 01983 282810 to book a FREE 15 minute chiropractic assessment. Reception opening hours: 0830-1730 Monday to Friday, 0830 - 1430 Saturday.

BOAT CLEANING / CARE & MAINTENANCE Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111

EMAIL:

ProMo Marine Yacht Management Netley, Southampton, SO31 5FW info@promomarine.com WEB SITE: www.promomarine.com 07971 858938

EMAIL:

Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095

EMAIL:

BOAT GRAPHICS & HULL STRIPES Naughty Gull Marine Graphics Craglyn, Rock Lane, Corley,CV7 8BD 01676 540769 EMAIL: sales@naughtygull.com WEB SITE: www.naughtygull.com 07841 641232 BOAT SALES / BROKERS Ancasta International Boat Sales Port Hamble Marina, Hamble, SO31 4QD EMAIL: enquiries@Ancasta.com WEB SITE: www.ancasta.com 02380 450 000 Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Marco Marine Hamble Point Marina, School Lane, Hamble, SO31 4JD 02380 453245 info@marcomarine.co.uk WEB SITE: www.marcomarine.co.uk

EMAIL:

Salterns Brokerage Salterns Marina, 40 Salterns Way, Lilliput, Poole, BH14 8JR EMAIL: info@salterns.co.uk WEB SITE: www.salternsbrokerage.co.uk 01202 707222 BOAT TRANSPORT / YACHT DELIVERY Boat Transport Ltd The Mainstay, 7 Fairview Drive, Southampton, SO45 5GX EMAIL: info@boattransport.co.uk WEB SITE: www.boattransport.co.uk 07831 486710 Shoreline Yacht Transport Chichester 01243 785370 / 07836 789083 terry@boat-trans.co.uk WEB SITE: www.boattransportservices.co.uk

EMAIL:

BOATYARDS / BOATBUILDERS / REPAIRERS / MARINE SURVEYORS Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL 01590 673312 Cowes Commercial Craft Coding SCV2 Compliance - Insurance/Tonnage Surveys commercialcraftcoding@gmail.com 01983 212997 / 07813 609725

EMAIL:

Haines Boatyard Ferryside, Itchenor, Chichester, PO20 7AN admin@hainesboatyard.com WEB SITE: www.hainesboatyard.com

EMAIL:

01243 512228

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Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN EMAIL: info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111 Medina Yard Arctic Road, Cowes, PO31 7PG info@medinayard.co.uk WEB SITE: www.medinayard.co.uk

01983 203872

EMAIL:

Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095

EMAIL:

Salterns Marina & Boatyard 40 Salterns Way, Lilliput, Poole, BH14 8JR EMAIL: reception@salterns.co.uk WEB SITE: www.salterns.co.uk 01202 709971 Will Squibb Ltd Attrills Yard, The Duver, St Helens, PO33 1YB will@willsquibb.net WEB SITE: www.willsquibb.net

01983 874629

EMAIL:

CHANDLERS / CHARTS & PILOTAGE Fynn Marine Cowes Yacht Haven, Vectis Yard, Marina Walk, Cowes, PO31 7BD EMAIL: don@fynnmarine.co.uk WEB SITE: www.fynnmarine.co.uk 01983 297500 CHARTER BOATS / BOAT CRUISES Bembridge Powerboat Training & Charter The Duver, Bembridge, PO33 1YB EMAIL: mail@powerboat-training.com WEB SITE: www.powerboat-training.com 01983 778077 Hamble Point Yacht Charters Hamble Point Marina, SO31 4JD info@yacht-charter.co.uk WEB SITE: www.yacht-charter.co.uk

02380 457110

EMAIL:

ProMo Marine Yacht Management Netley, Southampton, SO31 5FW 07971 858938 EMAIL: info@promomarine.com WEB SITE: www.promomarine.com Solent Boat Charters Enterprise House, Ocean Village, SO14 3XB 02380 658790 EMAIL: admin@solentboatcharters.co.uk WEB SITE: www.solentboatcharters.co.uk CLOTHING / LEISUREWEAR & FOOTWEAR Sailing Clothing Store 75-76 High Street, Cowes, PO31 7AJ 01983 247890 EMAIL: sales@sailingclothingstore.co.uk WEB SITE: www.sailingclothingstore.co.uk CORPORATE HOSPITALITY Bembridge Powerboat Training & Charter The Duver, Bembridge, PO33 1YB EMAIL: mail@powerboat-training.com WEB SITE: www.powerboat-training.com 01983 778077 Hamble Point Yacht Charters Hamble Point Marina, SO31 4JD EMAIL: info@yacht-charter.co.uk WEB SITE: www.yacht-charter.co.uk

02380 457110

Solent Boat Charters Enterprise House, Ocean Village, SO14 3XB 02380 658790 EMAIL: admin@solentboatcharters.co.uk WEB SITE: www.solentboatcharters.co.uk Solent Forts Royal Clarence Marina, Gosport, PO12 1FX EMAIL: hello@solentforts.com WEB SITE: www.solentforts.com

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02392 513887


CRANES / BOAT LIFTS / SLIPWAYS / HOISTS Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Haines Boatyard Ferryside, Itchenor, Chichester, PO20 7AN 01243 512228 admin@hainesboatyard.com WEB SITE: www.hainesboatyard.com

EMAIL:

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN EMAIL: info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111 Lymington Yacht Haven Kings Saltern Road, Lymington, SO41 3QD 01590 677071 havenmasters@lymingtonyachthaven.com WEB SITE: www.lymingtonyachthaven.com

EMAIL:

Medina Yard Arctic Road, Cowes, PO31 7PG EMAIL: info@medinayard.co.uk WEB SITE: www.medinayard.co.uk

01983 203872

Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA EMAIL: info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095 ELECTRICAL / ELECTRONICS Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Greenham Regis Marine Electronics Southampton WEB SITE: www.greenham-regis.com

02380 636555

Greenham Regis Marine Electronics Itchenor EMAIL: sales@greenham-regis.com WEB SITE: www.greenham-regis.com

01243 511070

EMAIL: sales@greenham-regis.com

Greenham Regis Marine Electronics Lymington 01590 671144 EMAIL: lymington@greenham-regis.com WEB SITE: www.greenham-regis.com Greenham Regis Marine Electronics Poole 01202 676363 poole@greenham-regis.com WEB SITE: www.greenham-regis.com

EMAIL:

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SOLENT DIRECTORY

ENGINES / OUTBOARDS / MARINE ENGINEERS Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Golden Arrow Marine Chichester Plot 4 Chichester Marina, Birdham, PO20 7EJ chichester@goldenarrow.co.uk WEB SITE: www.goldenarrow.co.uk 01243 512313

EMAIL:

Golden Arrow Marine Poole 27 West Quay Road, Poole, BH15 1HX 01202 677387 WEB SITE: www.goldenarrow.co.uk

EMAIL: poole@goldenarrow.co.uk

Golden Arrow Marine Portsmouth 4-5 The Slipway, Port Solent, PO6 4TR portsmouth@goldenarrow.co.uk WEB SITE: www.goldenarrow.co.uk 0 2392 201171

EMAIL:

Golden Arrow Marine Southampton Unit 17 Shamrock Quay, William St, SO14 5QH EMAIL: southampton@goldenarrow.co.uk WEB SITE: www.goldenarrow.co.uk 02380 710371

Quality Marine Engineering Service and Support SUPPLY • INSTALLATION • DYNAMOMETER TESTS SERVICE • REFIT • REPAIR • PARTS

Service, Overhaul and Sales • Anchors • Control systems • Day boats • Engines • Gearboxes • Generators • Hydraulic systems • Outboards • RIBS & Inflatables • Stabilizers • Thrusters • Windlass & capstans

Now with 4 branches along the South Coast

Chichester

Portsmouth

01243 512313

02392 201171

Approved official dealer and centre for: Volvo Penta, Honda, Perkins, ZF

Approved official dealer and centre for: Volvo Penta, Honda, Perkins, ZF

Poole

Southampton

Chichester@goldenarrow.co.uk

Poole@goldenarrow.co.uk

01202 677387 Approved official dealer and centre for: Volvo Penta, Honda, Yanmar, Yamaha, Evinrude, AMT, Avon, Zodiac, Orkney

www.goldenarrow.co.uk

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Portsmouth@goldenarrow.co.uk

Southampton@goldenarrow.co.uk

02380 710371 Approved official distributor and dealer for: ABT-TRAC, Perkins, Baudouin, MAN, Kohler, Northern Lights, Ultra, ZF, PRM, Maxwell


Haines Boatyard Ferryside, Itchenor, Chichester, PO20 7AN EMAIL: admin@hainesboatyard.com WEB SITE: www.hainesboatyard.com

01243 512228

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN EMAIL: info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111 Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095

EMAIL:

Sea Start Ltd Unit 13, Hamble Point Marina, Hamble, SO31 4JD EMAIL: sales@seastart.co.uk WEB SITE: www.seastart.co.uk

02380 458000

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SOLENT DIRECTORY ESTATE AGENTS Lancasters Estate Agents 65 High Street, Cowes, PO31 7RL EMAIL: homes@boblancaster.co.uk WEB SITE: www.boblancaster.co.uk

01983 209020

Wootton Estate Agents 41 High Street, Wootton Bridge, PO33 4LU 01983 883333 sales@woottonestateagents.co.uk WEB SITE: www.woottonestateagents.co.uk

EMAIL:

EVENT MANAGEMENT Bembridge Powerboat Training & Charter The Duver, Bembridge, PO33 1YB EMAIL: mail@powerboat-training.com WEB SITE: www.powerboat-training.com 01983 778077 MSJ Events Regatta House, Bath Road, Cowes, PO31 7QN info@msjevents.co.uk

EMAIL:

01983 245100

Solent Boat Charters Enterprise House, Ocean Village, SO14 3XB 02380 658790 EMAIL: admin@solentboatcharters.co.uk WEB SITE: www.solentboatcharters.co.uk Solent Events Unit 6, Dell Bldgs, Milford Rd, Lymington, SO41 0ED 01590 674900 admin@solent-events.co.uk WEB SITE: www.solent-events.co.uk

EMAIL:

INSURANCE

Haven Knox-Johnston 11 Tower View, Kings Hill, West Malling, Kent, ME19 4UY haven@amlin.co.uk WEB SITE: www.boatinsure.co.uk 01732 223650

EMAIL:

MARINE SERVICES Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

MASTS / RIGGING / ROPE SYSTEMS Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111

EMAIL:

Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095

EMAIL:

MOORINGS / BERTHS / BOAT STORAGE / DRY STACK Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL Birdham Pool Marina Birdham, Chichester, PO20 7BG info@castlemarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.castlemarinas.co.uk

EMAIL:

01590 673312 01243 512310

Cobb’s Quay Marina Hamworthy, Poole, Dorset, BH15 4EL 01202 674299 EMAIL: cobbsquay@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.cobbsquaymarina.co.uk COMPANY DESCRIPTION ADDRESS TELEPHONE WEB SITE EMAIL

SERVICES

COMPANY DESCRIPTION ADDRESS CONTACT TELEPHONE WEB SITE EMAIL SERVICES

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Marina, Boatyard & Events Centre Vectis Yard, High Street, Cowes, PO31 7BD 01983 299975 www.cowesyachthaven.com info@cowesyachthaven.com

The Yacht Haven offers access to the town centre. With 260 fully serviced berths, 24/7 access, a 30 ton hoist, 15 ton mobile crane and a 2 ton HIAB. Facilities include Wi-Fi, showers, toilets, launderette, on-site engineers, electricians and boat repairers. The Yacht Haven also has one of the largest major events and conference centres on the Island.

DOVER MARINA

Award-winning Marina located on England’s South Coast Harbour House, Marine Parade, Dover, CT17 9BU Chris Windsor 01304 241663 www.doverport.co.uk/marina marina@doverport.co.uk

Providing facilities for both residents and visitors, Dover Marina offers 400 berths in three berthing areas in a quiet and sheltered corner of the famous harbour. Services include boat lifting and boat cradling, a fresh water supply and metered electricity to all berths, toilet and shower facilities and laundry services.

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SOLENT DIRECTORY Drivers Dry Berthing Ltd Drivers Wharf, Southampton, SO14 0PF 023 8023 3302 EMAIL: mail@dryberthing.com WEB SITE: www.dryberthing.com Folly Moorings River Medina, Isle of Wight EMAIL: follymoorings@hotmail.com WEB SITE: www.follymoorings.co.uk

07884 400046

Haines Boatyard Ferryside, Itchenor, Chichester, PO20 7AN EMAIL: admin@hainesboatyard.com WEB SITE: www.hainesboatyard.com

01243 512228

Hamble Point Marina School Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4NB 02380 452464 hamblepoint@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hamblepointmarina.co.uk

EMAIL:

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN EMAIL: info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111 Hythe Marina Village Shamrock Way, Hythe, Southampton, SO45 6DY 02380 207073 hythe@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hythemarinavillage.co.uk

EMAIL:

Island Harbour Marina Mill Lane, Newport, Isle of Wight, PO30 2LA 01983 539994 info@island-harbour.co.uk WEB SITE: www.island-harbour.co.uk

EMAIL:

Lymington Yacht Haven Kings Saltern Road, Lymington, SO41 3QD 01590 677071 EMAIL: havenmasters@lymingtonyachthaven.com WEB SITE: www.lymingtonyachthaven.com Medina Yard Arctic Road, Cowes, PO31 7PG EMAIL: info@medinayard.co.uk WEB SITE: www.medinayard.co.uk

01983 203872

Mercury Yacht Harbour Satchell Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4HQ mercury@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.mercuryyachtharbour.co.uk 02380 455994

EMAIL:

Northney Marina Hayling Island, PO11 0NH EMAIL: northney@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.northneymarina.co.uk

02392 466321

Ocean Village Marina 2 Channel Way, Southampton, SO14 3TG 02380 229385 EMAIL: oceanvillage@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.oceanvillagemarina.co.uk Port Hamble Marina Satchell Lane, Hamble, Southampton, SO31 4QD 02380 452741 WEB SITE: www.porthamblemarina.co.uk

EMAIL: porthamble@mdlmarinas.co.uk

Royal Clarence Marina Weevil Lane, Gosport, PO12 1AX 02392 523523 EMAIL: info@royalclarencemarina.org WEB SITE: www.castlemarinas.co.uk Ryde Harbour The Esplanade, Ryde, PO33 1JA 01983 613879 / 07970 009899 EMAIL: ryde.harbour@iow.gov.uk WEB SITE: www.rydeharbour.com

Salterns Marina & Boatyard 40 Salterns Way, Lilliput, Poole, BH14 8JR EMAIL: reception@salterns.co.uk WEB SITE: www.salterns.co.uk 01202 709971 Saxon Wharf Lower York Street, Northam, Southampton, SO14 5QF 02380 339490 WEB SITE: www.saxonwharf.co.uk

EMAIL: saxonwharf@mdlmarinas.co.uk

Shamrock Quay William Street, Northam, Southampton, SO14 5QL 02380 229461 EMAIL: shamrockquay@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.shamrockquay.co.uk Southampton Dry Stack Drivers Wharf, 146 Millbank Street, SO14 5QN 02380 238084 EMAIL: enquiries@southamptondrystack.co.uk WEB SITE: www.southamptondrystack.co.uk Sparkes Marina Hayling Island, PO11 9SR 02392 463572 EMAIL: sparkesmarina@mdlmarinas.co.uk WEB SITE: www.sparkesmarina.co.uk PAINT / SPRAYING Berthon The Shipyard, Bath Road, Lymington, SO41 3YL

01590 673312

Richardsons Yacht Services Island Harbour, Mill Lane, Newport, PO30 2LA WEB SITE: www.richardsonsyacht.co.uk 01983 821095

EMAIL: info@richardsonsyacht.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPHERS / PHOTOGRAPHIC SERVICES

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Island Visions Photography Stunning imagery from the Isle of Wight EMAIL: info@islandvisions.co.uk WEB SITE: www.islandvisions.co.uk

07794 222929

PROVISIONS Stowaway Foods c/o Holmesterne Foods, Brompton on Swale, Richmond, DL10 7JQ EMAIL: hello@stowawayfoods.com WEB SITE: www.stowawayfoods.com 01748 818283 PUBS & BARS The Anchor High Street, Cowes, Isle of Wight, PO31 7SA 01983 292823 EMAIL: manager@theanchorcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.theanchorcowes.co.uk The Duke of York Inn Mill Hill Road, Cowes, Isle of Wight, PO31 7BT 01983 295171 EMAIL: bookings@dukeofyorkcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.dukeofyorkcowes.co.uk The Fishbourne Fishbourne Lane, Fishbourne, PO33 4EU

01983 882823

The Fountain Inn High Street, Cowes, PO31 7AW WEB SITE: www.fountaininn.cowes.co.uk

01983 292397

EMAIL: 6447@greeneking.co.uk

The Grapes 41-43 Oxford Street, Southampton, SO14 3DP 02380 333220 EMAIL: manager@thegrapessouthampton.co.uk WEB SITE: www.thegrapessouthampton.co.uk The Jolly Roger 156 Priory Road, Gosport, Hampshire, PO12 4LQ 02392 582584 EMAIL: enquiries@thejollyrogergosport.co.uk WEB SITE: www.thejollyrogergosport.co.uk The Lifeboat Britannia Way, East Cowes Marina, PO32 6EG 01983 292711 EMAIL: manager@thelifeboatcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.thelifeboatcowes.co.uk The Mayflower King’s Saltern Road, Lymington, SO41 3QD 01590 672160 manager@themayflowerlymington.co.uk WEB SITE: www.themayflowerlymington.co.uk

EMAIL:

The New Inn Main Road, Shalfleet, Isle of Wight, PO30 4NS

01983 531314

The Pier View 25 High Street, Cowes, PO31 7RY EMAIL: suepierview@gmail.com

01983 294929

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SOLENT DIRECTORY RESTAURANTS / CAFÉS / TAKEAWAYS Sails Café 1 Shooters Hill, Cowes

01983 289758

Shed 4 High Street, Bembridge, Isle of Wight, PO35 5SD 01983 873555 EMAIL: shedbembridge@gmail.com WEB SITE: www.facebook.com/Shed.bembridge The Anchor High Street, Cowes, Isle of Wight, PO31 7SA 01983 292823 manager@theanchorcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.theanchorcowes.co.uk

EMAIL:

The Grapes 41-43 Oxford Street, Southampton, SO14 3DP 02380 333220 manager@thegrapessouthampton.co.uk WEB SITE: www.thegrapessouthampton.co.uk

EMAIL:

The Lifeboat Britannia Way, East Cowes Marina, IOW, PO32 6EG 01983 292711 EMAIL: manager@thelifeboatcowes.co.uk WEB SITE: www.thelifeboatcowes.co.uk The Mayflower King’s Saltern Road, Lymington, SO41 3QD 01590 672160 EMAIL: manager@themayflowerlymington.co.uk WEB SITE: www.themayflowerlymington.co.uk RIB HIRE, REPAIRS, CHARTER & SALES Bembridge Powerboat Training & Charter The Duver, Bembridge, PO33 1YB EMAIL: mail@powerboat-training.com WEB SITE: www.powerboat-training.com 01983 778077

Fynn Marine Cowes Yacht Haven, Vectis Yard, Marina Walk, Cowes, PO31 7BD don@fynnmarine.co.uk WEB SITE: www.fynnmarine.co.uk 01983 297500

EMAIL:

Ribeye Ltd Collingwood Road, Dartmouth, TQ6 9JY EMAIL: info@ribeye.co.uk WEB SITE: www.ribeye.co.uk

01803 832060

Solent Rib Hire & Charter Unit 6 Dell Buildings, Milford Rd, Lymington, SO41 0ED EMAIL: admin@solentribcharter.co.uk WEB SITE: www.solentribcharter.co.uk 07887 635000 SAFETY EQUIPMENT Seasafe Systems Ltd Mariners Way, Somerton, Cowes, PO31 8PB 01983 282388 EMAIL: factory@seasafe.co.uk WEB SITE: www.seasafe.co.uk SAILING & POWER SCHOOLS Bembridge Powerboat Training & Charter The Duver, Bembridge, PO33 1YB EMAIL: mail@powerboat-training.com WEB SITE: www.powerboat-training.com 01983 778077 Hamble Point Yacht Charters Hamble Point Marina, SO31 4JD info@yacht-charter.co.uk WEB SITE: www.yacht-charter.co.uk

EMAIL:

SAILMAKERS Crusader Sails Unit 1 at 56 Hatch Pond Road, Poole,BH17 0JZ EMAIL: info@crusadersails.com WEB SITE: www.crusadersails.com 140

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02380 457110

01202 670580 0800 252226


Kemp Sails Unit 16, Sandford Lane Industrial Estate, Wareham, BH20 4DY 01929 554308 EMAIL: info@kempsails.com WEB SITE: www.kempsails.com Kemp Sails Endeavour Quay, Mumby Road, Gosport, PO12 1AH sales@kempsails.com WEB SITE: www.kempsails.com

EMAIL:

02392 808717

Paul Newell Sails 6 Redwing Quay, The Embankment, Bembridge, PO35 5PB newellsails@gmail.com WEB SITE: www.paulnewellsails.com 01983 872834

EMAIL:

Rolly Tasker Sails UK Ocean Village Innovation Centre, Ocean Way, Southampton, SO14 3JZ uk@rollytasker.com WEB SITE: www.rollytasker.com 02380 381985

EMAIL:

WATER TAXIS Folly Launch VHF Ch 72 Call Sign “Folly Launch” follymoorings@hotmail.com WEB SITE: www.follymoorings.co.uk

EMAIL:

Folly Waterbus VHF Ch 77 Call Sign “Folly Waterbus” EMAIL: follywaterbus@msn.com WEB SITE: www.follymoorings.co.uk

07884 400046 07974 864627

WEATHER / ASTRO / TRAINING & OCEAN SAILING SCHOOLS Rowell Yachting Services St Just-in-Roseland, Cornwall, TR2 5HY 01326 279131 EMAIL: simon_rowell@rowellyachtingservices.com WEB SITE: www.rowellyachtingservices.com YACHT & RACE MANAGEMENT / MAINTENANCE, CARE & REFIT COMPANY DESCRIPTION ADDRESS CONTACT TELEPHONE WEB SITE EMAIL SERVICES

B A YACHT SERVICES

Racing Yacht Management & Refit Services Medina Yard, Arctic Road, Cowes, PO31 7PG Brett Aarons 07976 715338 www.bayachtservices.com brett@bayachtservices.com

Racing Yacht Management and general yacht services, re-fit, spray painting and repairs, ropes and rigging, project management and logistics, container fit outs, custom fittings, etc, etc.

Hamble Yacht Services and HYS Rigging Port Hamble Marina, SO31 4NN EMAIL: info@hambleyachtservices.co.uk WEB SITE: www.hambleyachtservices.co.uk 02380 454111 ProMo Marine Yacht Management Netley, Southampton, SO31 5FW info@promomarine.com WEB SITE: www.promomarine.com 07971 858938

EMAIL:

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YACHT CLUBS & ASSOCIATIONS Keyhaven Yacht Club Ltd The Clubhouse, Keyhaven, Lymington, SO41 0TR EMAIL: admin@keyhavenyacht.co.uk WEB SITE: www.keyhavenyachtclub.co.uk 01590 642165 Marchwood Yacht Club Marchwood, Southampton, SO40 4UX 02380 666141 EMAIL: secretary@marchwoodyc.org.uk WEB SITE: www.marchwoodyc.org.uk 07742 946755 Royal Air Force Yacht Club Rope Walk, Hamble, SO31 4HD EMAIL: office@rafyc.co.uk WEB SITE: www.rafyc.co.uk

02380 452208

Royal Corinthian Yacht Club The Parade, Cowes, PO31 7QU EMAIL: donna@rcyc.co.uk WEB SITE: www.rcyc.co.uk

01983 293581

Royal Ocean Racing Club 20 St James’s Place, London, SW1A 1NN info@rorc.org WEB SITE: www.rorc.org 0207 4932248

EMAIL:

Royal Ocean Racing Club 82 High Street, Cowes, PO31 7AJ EMAIL: info@rorc.org WEB SITE: www.rorc.org

01983 295144

Royal Thames Yacht Club 60 Knightsbridge, London, SW1X 7LF 0207 2352121 EMAIL: sailing@royalthames.com WEB SITE: www.royalthames.com Royal Victoria Yacht Club 91 Fishbourne Lane, Ryde, PO33 4EU 01983 882325 EMAIL: office@rvyc.org.uk WEB SITE: www.rvyc.org.uk

ENHANCE YOUR EVENT Indoor and outdoor • Large format LED screens Low cost mobile pop-up solutions • 40 - 50” plasmas - Unicol stands available rentals@bigscreenmedia.co.uk

Tel: + 44 (0) 1983 898983 • www.bigscreenmedia.co.uk 144

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2014-15

RISE & FALL OF THE TIDE AT COWES Metres

Mean

4-0

gs

Sprin

Mean

3-0

s

Neap

2-0 Heights g are e in metres t above o Chart a Datum u

1-0 4

3

2

Times s are referred f to LOW O WATER A at P Portsmouth o 1

LW

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

C.D.

Hours before LW

Hours after LW

TIDAL LEVELS REFERRED TO DATUM OF SOUNDINGS Place

Lat Long N W

Heights in metres above datum

Datum and remarks

MHWS MHWN MLWN MLWS

Cowes 50˚ 46’ 1˚ 18’ 4.2 Folly Inn 50˚ 44’ 1˚ 17’ 4.1 Newport 50˚ 42’ 1˚ 17’ 4.1

3.5 3.4 3.4

1.8 1.8 2.0

0.8 1.0 1.6

2.59m below Ordnance Datum (Newlyn) 2.59m below Ordnance Datum (Newlyn) 2.59m below Ordnance Datum (Newlyn)

© Crown Copyright and/or database rights. Reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office and the UK Hydrographic Office (www.ukho.gov.uk)

COAST PROTECTION WORKS, NEWBIGGIN-BY-THE-SEA

COWES TIDE TABLES

COWES TIDE TABLES

MEETING YOUR EVERY CHALLENGE

Boskalis Westminster has over 75 years experience providing innovative and competitive solutions in the UK. Meeting your every challenge from feasibility study, design and execution to maintenance and operational services.

We are leading UK experts in: ∙ Design, construction, and maintenance of Ports and Waterways ∙ Land reclamation ∙ Coastal defence and river protection ∙ Terminal and harbour towage services ∙ Heavy lifting, subsea services and

www.boskalis.co.uk 146

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marine towage ∙ Salvage


COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15 COWES TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MARCH 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

APRIL 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MAY 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

JUNE 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15 COWES TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

JULY 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

AUG 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

SEPT 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

OCT 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15 COWES TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

NOV 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

DEC 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 29 March to 25 October 2015 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

JAN 2015 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

FEB 2015

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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COWES TIDE TABLES

2014-15 COWES TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 29 March to 25 October 2015 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, COWES. LAT 50046’N LONG 1018’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MARCH 2015 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

APRIL 2015

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

DREDGING AND MARINE CONSTRUCTION Westminster House, Crompton Way, Segensworth West, Fareham, PO15 5SS T: 01489 889533 E: bwl@boskalis.com

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PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15

+5 h

MEAN RANGES Springs 3·9m Neaps 1·9m

Mean

gs

Sprin

s

Neap

–1 h

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

Factor

HW

+1 h

+2 h

Mean

+3 h

+4 h

+5 h

–2 h

+2 h

5

–4 h

–3 h

W

–6 h

4

–5 h

MHWS

HW Hts m 0

1

1

MLW N

2

2

3

3 LW

MHWN

MLW S

CHART DATUM

0 LW Hts m

h

RISE & FALL OF THE TIDE AT PORTSMOUTH

+4 h

ll Moon

+3 h

PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

VES

© Crown Copyright and/or database rights. Reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office and the UK Hydrographic Office (www.ukho.gov.uk)

Your Sailmaker since 1949

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PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MARCH 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

APRIL 2014 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

E uk@rollytasker.com T +44 2380 381 985 www.SolentHandbook.com

155


PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MAY 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

JUNE 2014 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

• Premium sail-cloths from the world’s leading manufacturers

156

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PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

JULY 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

AUG 2014

TIME  m

TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

• All sails individually designed and constructed

www.SolentHandbook.com

157


PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

SEPT 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

OCT 2014 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

• 2.2 million sails delivered globally 158

www.SolentHandbook.com


PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 30 March to 26 October 2014 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

NOV 2014 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

DEC 2014 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

Fast delivery times worldwide

www.SolentHandbook.com

159


PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 29 March to 25 October 2015 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

JAN 2015 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

FEB 2015 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

• 5 year cruising sail guarantee 160

www.SolentHandbook.com


PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES 2014-15 PORTSMOUTH TIDE TABLES

All times GMT - add 1 hour for BST from 29 March to 25 October 2015 ENGLAND, SOUTH COAST, PORTSMOUTH. LAT 50048’N LONG 1007’W TIME ZONE UT (GMT). TIMES & HEIGHTS OF HIGH & LOW WATER

MARCH 2015 TIME  m

KEY:

Full Moon New Moon

TIME  m

APRIL 2015 TIME  m

BST add one hour

TIME  m

E uk@rollytasker.com T +44 2380 381 985 www.SolentHandbook.com

161


ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX 2 The Pippins

130

22 Castle Road

130, 131

A H Parker & Sons (GB) Ltd

141

Amabi Restaurant & Tapas Bar

71

International Ocean Services Island Harbour Marina Island Visions

139

Isle of Wight Holidays

131

Ancasta International Boat Sales 7, 131

Isle of Wight Motorhomes

Anchorage Guest House

James Spence & Colleagues

130

Anne Toms Yarmouth Gallery

140 77, 138

67

65

Dental Practice

83

B A Yacht Services

143

Kemp Sails Ltd

114, 143

Beken of Cowes

138

Kemps Quay

108

Bembridge Power Boat Training

Keyhaven Yacht Club

144

& Charter

Lancasters Estate Agents 70, 129, 136

85, 132, 136, 140

Berthon 97, 131, 133, 134, 136, 138

Lewmar Ltd

Big Screen Media

144

Lisburne - JOG Startline

54

Birdham Pool Marina

136

Lugleys of Cowes

Boat Transport Ltd

131

Lymington Yacht Haven 96, 133, 138

Boatson.tv 51

Marchwood Yacht Club

Boskalis Westminster

Marco Marine Ltd

130 19 144 29, 131

146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153

MDL Management PLC

Britannia House

130

C2 Ribs

140

Medina Yard 13, 132, 133, 137, 138

Chatham Marine

167

Mercury Yacht Harbour

Cobb’s Quay Marina

136

Mike’s School of Motoring

Country Cottages

131

MSJ Events Ltd

Cowes Chiropractic Clinic

131

Naughty Gull Marine Graphics 17, 131

62-63, 81,103, 111, 127 138 84 47, 136

Cowes Commercial Craft Coding 131

Northney Marina

138

Cowes Week Ltd

Norwest Marine Ltd

145

Ocean Village Marina

138

15

Cowes Yacht Haven

69, 72, 136

Craftinsure 33

Panerai 168

Crusader Sails

Paul Newell Sails

31, 140

Dover Marina Drift

136 42, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51

Drivers Dry Berthing Ltd

143

Paul Wyeth Marine Photography 139 Poole Quay Boat Haven

92-93

102, 138

Port Hamble Marina

138

Endeavour House

130

Port of Poole Marina

92-93

Everard Insurance Brokers Ltd

136

Premier Marinas

Fisherman’s Cottage Folly Launch

12 68, 143

Folly Moorings

138

Folly Waterbus II

68, 143

Fynn Marine

132, 140

Garmin

9, 129, 166

117

PSP Worldwide Logistics

21

ProMo Marine Yacht Management

131, 132, 143

Quay Management

130, 131

Quentin House

130

R K Marine

135

Golden Arrow Marine

134

Rapanui 27

Gosport Ferry

116

Ribeye Ltd

Greenham Regis Marine Electronics 133

Richardsons Yacht Services

Haines Boatyard 132, 133, 135, 138

Hamble Point Marina

Rolly Tasker Sails UK

138

2, 140

76, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 138

Hamble Point Yacht Charters 132, 140

143, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161

Hamble Yacht Services & HYS Rigging

Rowell Yachting Services

7, 131, 132, 133, 135, 136, 138, 143

Royal Air Force Yacht Club

144

Hamo Thornycroft

Royal Clarence Marina

138

Haven Knox-Johnston

Royal Corinthian Yacht Club

144

Royal Ocean Racing Club

144

139 52, 53, 55, 57, 136

Hythe Marina Village

138

Inspired Media & Events Ltd 34, 72, 144

162

www.SolentHandbook.com

39, 143

Royal Thames Yacht Club

144

Royal Victoria Yacht Club

81, 144


Ryde Harbour

138

Stowaway Foods

Sailing Clothing Store

132

Swift Sails

Sails Café Salterns Brokerage

57, 140 131

23, 139 143

TAG Design Agency

33

The Anchor

71, 139, 140

Salterns Marina & Boatyard 132, 138

The Boat House Cafe, Chichester 126

Sapphire Yachting

The Chequers Inn

Savills plc

142 11

96

The Duke of York Inn

130, 139

Saxon Wharf

138

The Fishbourne

81, 139

Sea Start Ltd

60, 135

The Fountain Inn

130, 139

SeaSafe Systems Ltd

41, 140

The Grapes

Shamrock Quay

138

Shanklin Chine

12

Shed

86, 140

75, 139, 140

The Mayflower

99, 139, 140

131

The New Inn

Solent and Warsash Marine

135

The Pier View

Solent Events Solent Forts

132, 136 136 5, 132

113, 139

The Lifeboat

Shoreline Yacht Transport Solent Boat Charters

107, 139, 140

The Jolly Roger

66, 139 139

The Price is Wight

89

Timex Group UK

37

Town Quay Marina

137

Solent Rib Hire & Charter

140

VecWash 74

Songbird Villa

130

Will Squibb Ltd

86, 132

Southampton Dry Stack

138

Wootton Estate Agents

80, 136

Southern Vectis

73

Sparkes Marina

138

Spinlock Ltd

Wroath Marine Electrical Zen Hair & Beauty

134 79

25

Photo: Paul Wyeth

www.SolentHandbook.com

163

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS There are many people to thank for their help with this fourth edition of the Solent Handbook & Directory. Firstly, we are very lucky to have the use of so many outstanding images from marine photographers Paul Wyeth, Peter Mumford - Beken of Cowes and Hamo Thornycroft, plus Jamie Russell of Island Visions. A special thank you to everyone who contributed photographs. To all our advertisers we wish you a very prosperous season, and to our readers we say, do remember to tell people that you’ve seen their adverts in the Solent Handbook. Tidal data for Cowes and Portsmouth, and the background chart of the Racing Marks Map and Location Map are reproduced by permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office and the UK Hydrographic Office (www.ukho.gov.uk). We have received help of one sort or another from numerous others including: Shirley Robertson OBE, Tom Cunliffe FRIN, Steve Sleight, Craig Nutter, Simon Rowell, Brian Williams, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, Poole Quay Boat Haven, Yarmouth Harbour Master, The National Trust, Newtown Harbour Master, Cowes Harbour Commission, the Royal Victoria Yacht Club, Ryde Harbour Master, Bembridge Harbour Master, Bembridge Sailing Club, Cheetah Marine, the Isle of Wight Council (www.iwight.com), the Official Site of Isle of Wight Tourism (www.islandbreaks.co.uk), Keyhaven River Warden, New Forest District Council, Lymington Harbour Master, Hampshire County Council (www.visit-hampshire. co.uk), Beaulieu Estate, Buckler’s Hard Yacht Harbour, ABP Southampton, Southampton City Council, MDL Marinas, Premier Marinas, Dean & Reddyhoff, River Hamble Harbour Authority, QHM Portsmouth, Portsmouth City Council, Fareham Tourist Information, Tudor Sailing Club, Visit my Harbour (www.visitmyharbour.com), Chichester Harbour Conservancy.

Photo: Paul Wyeth

Produced and published by Inspired Media & Events Ltd. Printed by Trident Design & Print of Hinckley, Leicestershire. While every care has been taken in compiling this book the publishers do not accept any liability or provide any guarantee that the information is accurate, complete, or up-to-date. Inspired Media & Events Ltd and its employees and contractors have used their best efforts in preparing these pages and this publication. Inspired Media & Events Ltd and its employees and contractors make no warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, with regard to the information supplied. Inspired Media & Events Ltd and its employees and contractors shall not be liable in the event of incidental or consequential damages in connection with, or arising out of, the providing of the information offered here.

164

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AN EPILOGUE BY TOM CUNLIFFE FRIN

AN EPILOGUE

Back in 1969, when I first sailed the sparkling Solent, it was a different world to today. Marinas were rare and the majority of boats were wooden. The mudberths on the Hamble River have been overtaken by clean pontoons. Down in Portsmouth, yacht harbours have proliferated, and even traditional Yarmouth has succumbed to progress - with walk-ashore berths where once yachts were secured to mid-stream piles with a wet-bottomed row ashore guaranteed for their crews. Another vital element of cruising here which has altered without sacrificing its integrity is ‘The Shell Channel Pilot’. When I bought my first copy of this venerable work it came as a dumpy volume written by the redoubtable Adlard Coles. A dozen years later it was run by Captain John (Johnnie) Coote RN, one of yacht racing’s great characters. If you’d told me when I signed on as a cruising instructor in Hamble in 1973 that 20 years later I would be the third compiler of this now much-expanded work, you could have knocked me down with a yard of tarry marline. But the sea has ways of bringing wheels full circle. The Solent has always been the heart of English yachting. Times have changed dramatically since the schooner ‘America’ arrived in 1851 to heist the cup that has borne her name ever since. As the Yankee’s cotton sails came into view down the summer afternoon, a young Queen Victoria asked, ‘Who is second?’, to be greeted with the grim reply, ‘Madam, there is no second!’. Such scenes are gone beyond recall, yet in 2014 much is the same. The water inside the Wight still answers the call of the moon. The stream will always rumble out at Hurst so fast that strangers can’t credit it, while the eddy off Cowes Green has never failed to swish westwards an hour before the tide turns in the deep water. So let’s rejoice in our good fortune to sail into the future in waters that have made so much history. Enjoy this year’s handbook, and fair winds to us, one and all! Tom Cunliffe has been a mate on a coasting merchant ship and run yachts for gentlemen. He has operated charter boats, delivered all sorts of vessels, raced at quite high levels and been teaching sailing for 30-plus years. He became a Yachtmaster Examiner in 1978. Nowadays, Tom lectures, writes books, appears on TV, speaks at afterdinner events and likes to keep motorcycles, grow roses and sneak time out to go cruising in his Mason 44. To find out more go to: www.tomcunliffe.com

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165


Cruise. Race. Win. In 2012, Nexus became part of the Garmin family, bringing expertise and passion for sailing to the world leader in satellite navigation. In 2014, Garmin and Nexus become one, introducing instrumentation and navigation solutions to all sailors for both cruising and racing. Display laylines, tidal flow, true/apparent wind, VMG and much more with Garmin’s new plotter range that completes this ultimate sailing system. That’s the power of simple. To learn more visit Garmin.com


INSPIRED MEDIA

SOLENT HANDBOOK & DIRECTORY 2014 - 2015

Solent handbook 2014 15  

The Handbook contains a unique blend of interesting articles, together with a calendar of Solent sailing events, tide tables, maps, a Solent...

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