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May/June 2019

MICHIGAN

COUNTRY LINES Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association

UP IN THE AIR Michigan Sky Media’s Aerial Photography

Join Us! Annual Meeting Is June 15

May Is National Electrical Safety Month U.P Bakers Take The Cake


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In This Issue May 2019 || Vol. 39, No. 5

michigancountrylines

Michigan’s Electric Cooperatives

FEATURED PHOTO FROM

#micoopcommunity countrylines.com

Your photo could be featured here.

facebook.com/michigancountrylines michigancountrylines

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Executive Editor: Casey Clark Editor: Christine Dorr

Come share in the splendor of rural Michigan with us

Copy Editor: Heidi Spencer Design and Production: Karreen Bird Publisher: Michigan Electric Cooperative Association Michigan Country Lines, USPS-591-710, is published monthly, except August and December, with periodicals postage paid at Lansing, Mich., and additional offices. It is the official publication of the Michigan Electric Cooperative Association, 201 Townsend St., Suite 900, Lansing, MI 48933. Subscriptions are authorized for members of Alger Delta, Cherryland, Great Lakes, HomeWorks Tri-County, Midwest Energy & Communications, Ontonagon, Presque Isle, and Thumb electric cooperatives by their boards of directors. POSTMASTER: SEND ALL UAA TO CFS. Association officers are Robert Kran, Great Lakes Energy, chairman; Mark Kappler, HomeWorks Tri-County Electric, vice chairman; and Eric Baker, Wolverine Power Cooperative, secretarytreasurer. Craig Borr is president and CEO. CONTACT US/LETTERS TO EDITOR: Michigan Country Lines 201 Townsend St., Suite 900 Lansing, MI 48933 248-534-7358 editor@countrylines.com countrylines.com

CHANGE OF ADDRESS:

Please notify your electric cooperative. See page 4 for contact information.

The appearance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement of the products or services advertised.

michigancountrylines Pro tip: Water and electricity don’t mix...unless you are mother nature. #donttrythisathome #beautiful : @andrew_long_expo

ON THE COVER Tyler Leipprandt, photographer and owner of Michigan Sky Media, captures a dangling shot of Michigan’s most iconic landmark, the Mackinac Bridge. Read the full story about his spectacular aerial drone photography on page 14.

6 & 7 MI CO-OP COMMUNITY Guest Columns 62 Years Of Michigan Marriage Linda McCoy, Cherryland Electric Cooperative Michigan’s Fishery Is Nature’s School Rick Fowler, Great Lakes Energy 

10 MI CO-OP KITCHEN Breakfast And Brunch Recipes To Enjoy All Day Long

@michigancountrylines

Feature Guest Chef

Tyler Leipprandt of Michigan Sky Media, shares a family favorite Pudgy Pie campfire recipe. Enter Our Recipe Contest And Win A $50 Bill Credit!

14 FEATURE Up In The Air

Michigan Sky Media’s Aerial Photography Emily Haines Lloyd

18 SAFETY May Is Electrical Safety Month

Life-Saving Tips From Your Co-op Guess Our New Mystery Photo And Win A $50 Bill Credit!

Christin McKamey & Our Readers

Michigan Country Lines, Your Communications Partner For more than 38 years, our co-op members have received Michigan Country Lines because it is the most effective and economical way to share information with our members. An empowering communication tool, Michigan Country Lines keeps members up-to-date about everything going on within their electric co-op. Issues contain news about our services, director elections, member meetings and management decisions that members need to know about as owners of the co-op. The magazine also includes legal notices that would otherwise have to be placed in local media at a substantial cost. Sending Michigan Country Lines to you helps the co-op fulfill one of its essential principles——to educate and communicate openly with its members. The board of directors authorizes the co-op to subscribe to Michigan Country Lines on behalf of each member at an average cost of $3.90 per year, paid as part of members’ electric bills. The current magazine cost is 49 cents per copy. Michigan Country Lines is published for us, at cost, by the Michigan Electric Cooperative Association in Lansing. As always, we welcome and value your comments at editor@meca.coop.

MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES

3


KEWEENAW

Safety Starts With You

HOUGHTON

Spotting potential electrical hazards in your home

ONTONAGON BARAGA

500 J.K. Paul Street Ontonagon, MI 49953

906-884-4151 800-562-7128 ontonagon.coop After hours: 866-639-6098 OFFICERS & DIRECTORS Calvin Koski, President Aura District 906-524-6988 cgkoski@up.net

George Rajala, Vice-President Chassell/Keweenaw Bay District 906-370-0416 rajgeo50@yahoo.com James Moore, Director, Secretary/Treasurer Boston District 906-482-0465 district6.keweenaw@gmail.com Wayne Heikkinen, Director Pelkie/Herman/Aura District 906-353-6496 mustipuppy@gmail.com Paul Koski, Director Ewen/Trout Creek/Lake Mine District 906-988-2593 pkoski@jamadots.com Frances Wiideman, Director Green/Firesteel/Toivola District 906-288-3203 fwiideman@alphacomm.net William Hodges, Director Lake Linden District 906-934-3743 mistermich52@gmail.com

PERSONNEL

Debbie Miles, General Manager Fay Hauswirth, Billing Clerk Mark Urbis, Line Superintendent

OTHER INFORMATION

Date of Incorporation: Sept. 30, 1937 Fiscal year-end: Dec. 31 countrylines.com/coops/ontonagon Ontonagon County REA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Join us on Facebook. facebook.com/OntonagonCountyREA

4 MAY 2019

M

Debbie Miles, General Manager

ay is National Electrical Safety Month, and here at Ontonagon REA, we think it’s a great time to look around your home and check for potential safety hazards.

Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters

Outdoor outlets or those in potentially damp locations in a kitchen, bathroom or laundry room often include GFCI features. They are designed to sense abnormal current flows, breaking the circuit to prevent potential electric shocks from devices plugged into the outlets. The average GFCI outlet is designed to last about 10 years, but in areas prone to electrical storms or power surges, they can wear out in five years or less. Check them by pressing the red test button. Make sure you hit the black reset button when you are done. Contact a licensed electrician to replace any failing GFCI outlets.

Surge Protectors

Power strips with surge protectors can help safeguard expensive equipment like televisions, entertainment systems and computers from power spikes. Voltage spikes are measured in joules, and surge protectors are rated for the number of joules they can effectively absorb. That means if your surge protector is rated at 1,000 joules, it should be replaced when it hits or passes that limit. When the limit is reached, protection stops, and you’re left with a basic power strip. If your electrical system takes a major hit, or if you don’t remember when you bought your surge protector, replacement may be the best option.

Extension Cords

If you use extension cords regularly to connect devices and equipment to your wall outlets, you may live in an underwired home. With a growing number of electrical devices connecting your family to the electricity you get from Ontonagon REA, having enough outlets in just the right spots can be challenging. Remember, extension cords are designed for temporary, occasional or periodic use. If an extension cord gets noticeably warm when in use, it could be undersized for the intended use. If it shows any signs of frayed, cracked or heat-damaged insulation, it should be replaced. If the grounding prong is missing, crimped or loose, a grounded cord will not provide the protection designed into its performance. And always make sure that extension cords used in outdoor or potentially damp locations are rated for exterior use. Electricity is an essential necessity for modern living, and Ontonagon REA is committed to providing safe, reliable and affordable power to all of our members. We hope you’ll keep these electrical safety tips in mind so that you can note any potential hazards before damage occurs.


Ontonagon County REA/Dec. 31, 2018 & 2017 Financial Statement Balance Sheets Assets UTILITY PLANT: Electric plant in service Construction work in progress Less—Accumulated depreciation Net utility plant

2018

2017

$28,649,339 1,833,532 30,482,871 (9,464,820) 21,018,051

$28,290,693 943,884 29,234,577 (8,661,708) 20,572,869

997,859 997,859

913,308 913,308

298,109 615,829

62,830 671,447

109,098 227,783 30,672 1,281,491 173,060

137,085 217,687 8,110 1,137,159 171,887

$23,470,461

$22,795,223

$22,765 5,820,468 32,497 5,875,730

$22,950 5,047,938 32,497 5,103,385

INVESTMENTS & OTHER ASSETS Investments Total investments and other assets CURRENT ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable (less accumulated provision for uncollectibles of $40,000 in 2014) Accounts receivable—other Materials and supplies Prepayments Total current assets Deferred Charges TOTAL ASSETS

Members’ Equities and Liabilities EQUITIES: Memberships Patronage capital Other equities Total equities LONG-TERM LIABILITIES: Rural Utilities Service (RUS) mortgage notes FFB National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corporation (NRUFCFC) supplemental mortgage notes CoBank, ACB mortgage note Less current portion Post-retirement benefit obligation Total long-term liabilities

169,313 3,508,673

229,944 1,500,000

4,725,514

4,870,368

8,341,342 $16,744,842 (620,000) $16,124,842 156,813 $16,281,655

8,708,068 $15,308,380 (596,000) $14,712,380 145,900 $14,858,280

2018

2017

620,000 259,030 14,200 336,521

596,000 1,400,000 339,632 13,650 387,996

1,229,751

2,737,278

Members’ Equities and Liabilities (continued) CURRENT LIABILITIES: Current maturities of long-term liabilities Line of Credit notes payable Accounts payable Customer deposits Other current liabilities TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES Deferred credits TOTAL EQUITIES AND LIABILITIES

83,325

96,280

23,470,461

22,795,223

Statement of Revenue and Expenses Ending Dec. 31, 2018 & 2017 OPERATING REVENUES OPERATING EXPENSES: Cost of purchased power Distribution—Operations Distribution—Maintenance Consumer accounts Customer service and informational Sales expense Administrative and general Depreciation Taxes Other deduction Total operating expense Operating margins before interest expense Interest expense

$6,381,536

$6,139,962

2,258,962 372,015 563,274 222,932 124,926 523,967 827,214 300,171 20,188

2,332,389 310,796 599,186 202,945 120,168 567,229 768,683 264,620 20,404

$5,213,649

$5,186,420

$1,167,887

$953,542

700,759

722,272

$467,128

$231,270

Capital credits

58,093 93,522 $151,615 153,786

60,990 145,767 $206,757 110,704

NET (LOSS) MARGINS

$772,529

$548,731

Operating margins (loss) after interest expense NON-OPERATING MARGINS: Interest and investment income Other nonoperating income (expense)

Consumer Cooperative Act Disclosure Name

Address

Email

Title and District

Term *

Debbie Miles

500 James K Paul Street, Ontonagon, MI 49953

debbie@ontorea.com

General Manager

Calvin Koski

18338 Aura Road, L’anse, MI 49946

cgkoski@up.net

Director—President Aura

2018

George Rajala

PO Box 415, Chassell, MI 49916

rajgeo50@yahoo.com

Director—Vice President Chassell/Keweenaw Bay

2019

James Moore

PO Box 329, Hancock, MI 49930

district6.keweenaw@gmail.com

Director—Secretary/Treasurer Boston

2020

Wayne Heikkinen

16593 Grist Mill Road, Baraga, MI 49908

mustipuppy@gmail.com

Director Pelke/Herman/Aura

2019

Paul Koski

14783 N Cemetery Rd., Ewen, MI 49925

pkoski@jamadots.com

Director Ewen/Trout Creek/Lake Mine

2020

Frances Wiideman

4730 Charlie’s Road, Toivola, MI 49965

fwiideman@alphacomm.net

Director Green/Firesteel/Toivola

2019

William Hodges

5166 S. Big Traverse Bay Rd., Lake Linden, MI 49945

mistermich52@gmail.com

Director Lake Linden

2021

*All terms expire in June Board members are compensated $325 per board meeting (president $350). General Manager is compensated $100,000 annually.

MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES

5


GUEST COLUMNS

MI CO-OP Community

62 Years Of Michigan Marriage By Linda McCoy, Cherryland Electric Cooperative member

O

n July 7, 1957, as young newlyweds, we headed north from Indiana to see the sights.

and Spider Lake. The Driftwood Motel was our destination for many years. We stayed in condos after the Driftwood was no more. As a family of 17, we’ve experienced all the amenities the Traverse City area has to offer.

Our first stop was seven miles west of Kalkaska, Michigan into the Sand Lakes quiet area. Greatgrandpa McCoy was alone now at the nicknamed Visiting Underwood and Rennie orchards in “Bitzy” cabin where he and Great-grandma had July and mushroom hunting in the spring. Our spent many summers. It was a one-room log activities included climbing the dunes, rafting cabin with a hand pump on the porch and an down Crystal River, air shows on East Bay, outhouse out back. They fished the many area Parasailing, bicycling, marching lakes. I wondered how in the band concerts, horseback riding 1940s did they ever find this “Five families of at Ranch Rudolph, fishing and the secluded place? McCoys have an famous Cherry Festival parade. interest and still enjoy We again headed north to see Michigan vacations.” The “Bitzy” cabin was torn the great Mackinac Bridge. We down due to deteriorating logs marveled during the tour that and rebuilt in the ‘90s by the family as vacation took us under the bridge which had one span left to complete before joining Lower Michigan and the time permitted. It is now modern, which was a significant event, complete with power from Upper Peninsula. Cherryland Electric Cooperative. Five families of McCoys have an interest and still enjoy We had little money to spend, but we took in Michigan vacations. many first-time sights, and this would be the beginning of a lifetime of Michigan adventures. The once-newlyweds will celebrate over 62 years It was our home away from home. of marriage in July, and our lifetime memories of happy days with family throughout Michigan Our three children would know Michigan, as well bring us joy. as their spouses and our nine grandchildren. We camped in the early years at Interlochen and Glen Arbor. We rented cottages on Little Glen Linda has lived in Northeast Indiana for all of her 79 years. She is a retired beautician and enjoys caring for families in her community. and Big Glen, and years later at Lake Leelanau

6 MAY 2019


Michigan’s Fishery Is Nature’s School By Rick Fowler, Great Lakes Energy member

A

t 5 a.m. on any of the bodies of water I venture to, be it a lake, river, stream, or pond, I am inundated with a myriad of sounds. The slow, rhythmic lap of waves reaching the shore after a night of travel is indeed soothing early in the morning.

way toward the inlet. The rapid flow of water cascades down boulders forming a chaotic scene as it bubbles back up. My line remains steady in the calm water beyond the little falls. I remember not too many years ago bringing my two children here. Armed with fishing gear, Barbies and GI Joes, we had claimed our spot. Amid the yelps of lucky fishermen and those who weren’t so lucky, I heard the laughter of my kids. Today, even though both are now in their late twenties, I can still get them to “wet a line” with me.

The plop of fish on calm waters just before the sun breaks makes an angler’s heart race. The head turns quickly in an attempt to see what it was that raised so quickly and, like an Olympic diver, reenter with “The memories, the Every so often I feel like a little only splash rings remaining, stories, the sights that wave that thought his purpose spreading like oil on the water. a morning offers keep was gone when he reached In fact, when the boat engine is me trickling back to the sandy shore. However, the cut or the paddles raised, the Michigan waters to fish.” memories, the stories, the sights serenity of a moment like this is that a morning offers keep me spine-tingling. trickling back to Michigan waters to fish. I have this sense that if I don’t, it will be the end of something. With a headlamp, waders, rod, small tackle box, flies and other bait, I descend the muddy bank of my favorite river. The eastern sky is lit brightly with Rick taught high school English in Boyne City for 34 years. For the past an easel of colors, making my climb down to the 25 years, he has been an outdoor freelance writer. waters edge flashlight free. The squish and clomp of my wading boots seem to be twenty decibels higher than they need to be. As I approach, there is an eerie screech reverberating from the tree Win $150 for stories published! line. The Blue Herons’ hollering momentarily blocks out the roar of the rushing water. As I near, the finger pier is empty of anglers on this particular morning. Many fishermen will be approaching the mouth soon to test their skill against the steelhead that are now making their

Guest Column: Country Lines invites members to submit their fond memories and stories. For guidelines and to submit your guest column go to countrylines.com under the MI Co-op Community tab.

MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES

7


Recycle Old Appliances To Save Energy And Money!

D

o you have an old, working refrigerator or chest freezer taking up space in your basement or garage? While you may not think about these appliances often, they could be adding hundreds of dollars to your utility bill each year. Declutter your home and save money with the Energy Optimization program. You can earn $50 for removing and recycling a secondary refrigerator and freezer!*

Free Appliance Pick Up Made Easy: The Energy Optimization team will pick up and recycle your old refrigerator(s) and freezer(s) for FREE. You can choose to send along an old window air conditioner or dehumidifier for recycling as well. NOTE: All items must be in working condition.

How To Participate: Contact the Energy Optimization team at 877-296-4319 to schedule an appointment. A representative from our

Cash incentives are available for the following: Appliance Type

Pick up or Ride-Along Item

Incentive Amount

Refrigerator

Pick up

$50

Chest Freezer

Pick up

$50

Window Air Conditioner

Ride-Along

$15

Dehumidifier

Ride-Along

$15

*Limit two appliances per year, per residence. All items must be in working condition.

team will come to your home for the pick up, and a cash incentive will be mailed to you. It’s that simple!

More Ways To Save! Working on a remodeling project? Your electric utility’s Energy Optimization program provides cash incentives toward qualifying new ENERGY STAR® appliances, including refrigerators, washers and dryers, ceiling fans, room air conditioners, televisions, and more. Please visit michigan-energy.org for more information, or call 877-296-4319 with any questions.

Get $50 for your old refrigerator or freezer. Stop wasting energy and money! Recycle old, functioning appliances and earn cash incentives:

Recycle and

Save!

■ ■ ■ ■

Refrigerator = $50 Freezer = $50 Dehumidifier (ride along item) = $15 Window Air Conditioner (ride along item) = $15

Contact the Energy Optimization team to schedule a free pickup.

Shopping for new appliances? Receive cash incentives when you purchase ENERGY STAR® appliances. Visit our website for a complete list of savings opportunities.

ONLINE: michigan-energy.org PHONE: 877-296-4319

Energy Optimization programs and incentives are applicable to Michigan electric service locations only. Other restrictions may apply. For a complete list of participating utilities, visit michigan-energy.org. All items must be in working condition.


Photo Contest 1

2

Spring Flowers 1. A dandelion like the sun! Jill Rady, Ontonagon

2. Brunnera sibirica, the first perennial flower that blooms in my garden each spring. Lynda Graham, Ewen

3. Enjoying the beauty of nature! Karen Solberg, Ontonagon

4. Bloodroot flower back of Mass City. They look so delicate, but they’re tough as nails. With antifreeze in their veins, they can emerge and bloom as soon as the snow is gone, impervious to freezing nights. Dean Juntunen, Mass City

5. Wild Rose—their scent fills the air. Nancy Warren, Ewen 6. Trillium in late May near the town of Victoria. Mary Coleman, Ontonagon

4

3

5

6

Submit A Photo & Win A Bill Credit!

Ontonagon REA members whose photos we print in Michigan Country Lines will be entered in a drawing. One lucky member will win a credit up to $200 on their December 2019 energy bill!

Enter to win a

$200

energy bill credit!

Our upcoming topics and deadlines are: • Four–Legged Friends——due May 20 (July/August issue) • Sunrise/Sunset——due July 20 (September issue) To submit photos, and for details and instructions, go to http://bit.ly/countrylines We look forward to seeing your best photos! MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES

9


Breakfast & Brunch Start your day right with these savory and sweet recipes. Photos by Robert Bruce Photography

Winning Recipe!

Little Masterpieces (Homemade Doughnuts) Kris Hazeres, Alger Delta ½ 3 1¼ 1½

cup vegetable oil large eggs cups granulated sugar cups applesauce, mashed bananas, puréed strawberries, or puréed fruit of choice teaspoons vanilla extract teaspoon ground cinnamon, optional (good with apple or banana flavored doughnuts) teaspoons salt teaspoons baking powder cups + 2 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour granulated sugar or cinnamon-sugar, for coating

a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. If making muffins, bake for 20—23 minutes.

Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease two standard doughnut pans. Note: If you don’t have doughnut pans, you can bake these in a standard muffin tin.

Note: these store well in the freezer. When it’s time to serve, pop them in the microwave for a minute or so, then plate them and fill with ice cream, fruit, pie filling, etc., for an over-the-top looking treat in just a few minutes!

1½ 1 1½ 1½ 1¾ •

Beat together oil, eggs, sugar, puréed fruit, vanilla, cinnamon, salt, and baking powder until smooth. Add flour, stirring just until smooth. Fill wells of the doughnut pans nearly to the rim; use about ¼ cup of batter in each well. If using muffin pans, fill each well about ¾ full; the recipe makes about 15, so you’ll need to bake in two batches (unless you have two muffin pans). Bake doughnuts for 15—18 minutes, or until 10 MAY 2019

Remove doughnuts from oven, and loosen edges. After about 5 minutes, transfer to a rack. While doughnuts are still warm (but no longer fragile), gently shake them, 1 or 2 at a time, in a clean paper bag or baggie with sugar. If you’ve made muffins, sprinkle tops with sugar. Cool completely, and wrap airtight; store at room temperature for several days. To make fancy doughnuts: fill the hole in each doughnut with choice of ice cream, pudding, mousse, sliced fruit, etc. Top with sauce; add whipped cream if desired.

Watch a video of this month’s winning recipe at micoopkitchen.com/videos


Simple Savory Corn Cakes Deb Finedell, Great Lakes Energy 2 1 ½ 2 1 1 2 1 4 2 1 •

featured

cups all-purpose flour teaspoon baking powder teaspoon salt cups frozen corn, thawed cup (4 ounces) smoked cheddar cheese, shredded cup fat-free (skim) milk egg whites, beaten whole egg, beaten green onions, finely chopped cloves garlic, minced tablespoon chili powder salsa

GUEST CHEF As Tyler Leipprandt of Michigan Sky Media and his family spend their summers camping across Michigan, they know that yummy campfire food is all part of the memorymaking. And no campfire cuisine is complete without a Pudgy Pie.

Combine flour, baking powder and salt in large bowl with a wire whisk. Stir in corn, cheese, milk, egg whites, egg, green onions, garlic, and chili powder until well blended. Spray a large nonstick

skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Heat over medium-high heat. Drop batter by ¼ cupfuls into skillet. Cook 3 minutes per side or until golden brown. Serve with prepared salsa, if desired.

Sausage And Kale Frittata

3 ½ 2 1½ 4

Katie Schneider, Midwest Energy & Communications 8 ¼ ¼ ¹⁄ ³

large eggs teaspoon salt teaspoon black pepper cup milk

cups kale, stems removed, leaves chopped cup chopped red onion cloves garlic, finely chopped or crushed teaspoons olive oil ounces Italian turkey sausage, cooked and crumbled ½ cup chopped red bell pepper 2 tomatoes, ¼-inch round slices, cut in half

Combine eggs, salt, pepper, and milk; stir with a whisk. Heat a 9-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Sauté kale, red onion, and garlic in olive oil until tender. Layer in sausage and bell pepper. Carefully pour egg mixture over sausage and bell pepper. Preheat broiler to high. Place tomato slices on top of eggs in a single layer. Cook over medium heat, 5 to 6 minutes, or until eggs are partially set; then broil 5 inches from heat for 2 to 3 minutes or until browned and almost set. Let rest 10 minutes before serving.

Tailgating Favorites: due July 1 Venison: due August 1 Submit your favorite recipe for a chance to win a $50 bill credit and have your recipe featured in Country Lines with a photo and a video. Go to micoopkitchen.com for more information and to register.

Enter to win a

$50

energy bill credit!

Photo by Tyler Leipprandt

Pudgy Pies • • • •

Refrigerated tube biscuits Cooking spray Pudding or pie filling Wooden dowels

Use a 5-inch diameter wooden dowel attached to a roasting stick and spray wooden dowel with cooking spray. Flatten and stretch one biscuit over the end of the dowel. Roast over the fire slowly until biscuit cup is cooked through. Let cool and carefully remove from the dowel. Fill the biscuit cup with your favorite pudding or pie filling or make as a s’more with a roasted marshmallow and chocolate. Read the full story about Tyler Leipprandt on page 14, and find this recipe and others at micoopkitchen.com.

MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES

11


Michigan’s free & easy utility notification system. For your safety and for the protection of underground utility lines, always follow these steps before starting any digging project: 1. Contact MISS DIG at 811 or missdig.org. 2. Wait three business days for utility owners to mark their lines. 3. Respect the marks. 4. Dig with care.

Visit missdig.org for more information. 12 MAY 2019


Members To Vote On Bylaw Amendment

A

doption of new bylaws and modifications or amendments to the existing bylaws shall be considered at the cooperative’s Annual Meeting on Saturday, June 15, 2019, at the Chassell High School, 41585 U.S. Highway 41, Chassell, Mich. 49916. The meeting begins at 10 a.m. The change proposed below to your electric cooperative’s bylaws will be voted on at the Annual Meeting. Please review it and remember to vote. This serves as official notice of the board’s intent to modify or amend the existing bylaws as follows: ARTICLE III DIRECTORS Section 2. Election of Directors c) When nominating petitions containing the signatures of five (5) members of the cooperative residing in a given district, nominating a member, have been received, that member shall be deemed nominated, if he or she is a permanent, full-time resident of that district, as evidenced by either driver’s license, voter registration or homestead exemption with the district. In addition, no member shall be nominated unless he has attained the age of 18.

Notice Of 2019 Annual Meeting Of The Members Of Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association Please be advised that, pursuant to Article II, Section 3 and Article XIV of the Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association’s bylaws, the Annual Meeting of the members of the Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association is hereby called by the secretary of the association. The purpose of the Annual Meeting is to seat the new directors, pass reports covering the previous fiscal year, and transact any other business as may properly come before the meeting. The Annual Meeting of the members of the Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association shall occur at Chassell High School, 41585 U.S. Highway 41, Chassell, Mich. 49916, promptly at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 15, 2019. Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association May 16, 2019 James Moore, Secretary

Access To Rules And Rates Please be advised that the following information is available to Ontonagon County REA members: 1. Complete rate schedules; 2. Clear and concise explanation of all rates that the member may be eligible to receive;

Holiday Office Closings Cooperative offices will be closed on Monday, May 27, in observance of the Memorial Day holiday and Thursday, July 4, for Independence Day. Payments may be made at the drop box and will be posted on the next open business day. From our family to yours, enjoy the holidays!

3. Assistance from the cooperative in determining the most appropriate rate for a member when the member is eligible to receive service under more than one rate; 4. Clear and concise explanation of the members’ actual energy use for each billing period during the last 12 months. The information can be obtained by contacting Ontonagon County REA at 906-884-4151. MICHIGAN COUNTRY LINES 13


UP IN THE AIR Michigan Sky Media’s Aerial Photography By Emily Haines Lloyd

very artist finds a way to show others the world from a different perspective. For Tyler Leipprandt, photographer and owner of Michigan Sky Media, his perspective often comes from hundreds of feet in the air with his drone photography. Leipprandt never saw himself as an artist in his earlier life or even once he began working in drone photography for the commercial sector. An athlete growing up, Leipprandt spent most of his time in the gym and didn’t really see art as part of his future plans. Currently, he spends his days in education, instructing teachers how to integrate and use technology in the classroom. “It was my brother who got me interested in drone photography,” said Leipprandt. “No one in our area was really doing aerial shots for real estate, so that’s where I started. We did well in real estate, but I began to see how fun it was to use the drone in other ways.” Snapping cool photos around the state opened Leipprandt’s eyes to all sorts of opportunities; including a visit to the Port Austin Farmers Market where he saw some beautifully handcrafted cutting boards in the shape of Michigan that he noticed people admiring. The very next year, Leipprandt was back at the market, but in his own stall selling his photos that paid homage to

14 MAY 2019


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Top left: Lake of the Clouds at sunrise. Top Right: This photo named “Don’t Look Down,” placed in the Top 25 in his category at Grand Rapids’ Art Prize competition. Bottom Left: Tahquamenon Falls at twilight. This Page: Leipprandt in the midst of capturing one of his signature dangling shots.

If you want to see more of Tyler Leipprandt’s amazing photography, visit him Saturdays at the Port Austin Farmers Market from Memorial Day through Fall (9am–5pm) or check out his portfolio at michiganskymedia.com. He can also be found on Facebook and Instagram @michiganskymedia.

the Great Lakes state. Last year he made the Top 25 in his category at Grand Rapids’ Art Prize competition.

was flying 120mph with the doors off. I’ve never been so cold in my life.”

“These are the places that locals have spent their vacations and spare time exploring all their lives,” said Leipprandt. “Places that you’ve seen a million times, but captured in a totally different way.”

Not all of Leipprandt’s excursions are quite so daredevilish. He, his wife and their four kids spend a good part of their summers exploring Michigan based on year-long pins they’ve stuck in a map. Before dinner, during grace, the kids never forget to say an extra prayer for an RV they can take around the state to cover more ground and capture even more beautiful memories.

Leipprandt’s photos are stunning, from twilight shots of Tahquamenon Falls to aerial feats over The Mighty Mac and University of Michigan’s Big House. Including Leipprandt’s now-signature shots of his feet dangling over the edge of bridges or from the sides of helicopters. “The dangling shots started by accident when my brotherin-law and I went to the U.P. last fall and through some wild circumstances ended up being invited to the top of the Mackinac Bridge,” Leipprandt said. “The Big House pictures were for a marketing promo—it was almost Thanksgiving, about 30 degrees outside and the helicopter

It’s that sense of exploration and curiosity that Leipprandt brings to his photography. The joy of seeing something unique and beautiful that not everyone has an opportunity to experience for themselves. “I love making people excited about where they’re from and what’s around them,” explains Leipprandt. “I want to help folks find new places they can explore for themselves.”

MCL SOCIAL MEDIA TAKEOVER! Watch Tyler Leipprandt as he does a live takeover of Michigan Country Lines’ social accounts, May 6–10. He’ll bring you some amazing, neverbefore-seen shots of the 2019 Tulip Time Festival in Holland, Mich.

May 6–10

michigancountrylines facebook.com/MichiganCountryLines


U.P. BAKERS TAKE THE

Joe Heck & Marybeth Kurtz By Emily Haines Lloyd Photos by Daniele Carol Photography

J

oe Heck of Huron Mountain Bakery (Marquette and Ishpeming) and Marybeth Kurtz of Midtown Bakery & Café (Negaunee) are still fresh off the airing of their episode of “Winner Cakes All” on the Food Network, a show where pairs of bakers team up for a chance to win $10,000. The Upper Peninsula duo’s episode was fairy talethemed and led to baking a cake for host, Giada De Laurentiis, a panel of judges, and the actresses from Broadway Princess Party. It wasn’t all glitz and glam that led up to this point in the lives of either of the U.P. bakers. Both admit they needed their own fairy godmothers along the way to help kick start their culinary journeys.

Be sure to check out micoopkitchen.com for Joe and Marybeth’s chocolate peanut butter cake recipe from “Winner Cakes All” on the Food Network!

Joe Heck grew up in Wisconsin and eventually moved to New York City after high school. His first job was as a night shift baker, a gig that allowed him to practice decorating cakes. “Eventually, the baker who did our high-end cakes saw my work,” said Joe. “She made me a deal. She would pay for me to go to culinary school if I’d work for her for five years.” Joe took the deal, attended the Culinary Institute of America, and then worked for his fairy godmother for 13 years. But, like in all good fairy tales, twists and turns happen. A year later, Joe hit some very hard times. When he needed it, a “genie in a bottle” presented itself. Joe’s best friend invited him to visit Marquette, giving Joe his first glimpse of the U.P.—a place he ended up calling home. Meanwhile, Marybeth Kurtz was hustling in Detroit and, while traveling to open a new restaurant in Florida, she met a pastry chef. As if nudged by a magic wand, Marybeth ended up training with her and became a pastry chef herself.

16 MAY 2019


Something was missing for Marybeth too, as she and her husband began dreaming of owning a business somewhere with a little less hustle and bustle. As if on cue— bippity boppity boo—Negaunee, that is. “Everyone is very supportive and collaborative in the U.P. and small towns in general,” said Marybeth. “Everyone helps each other out.” That might sound like a well-crafted sound bite—except Marybeth was out shoveling her neighbor’s snow-packed driveway minutes before this interview. When a Food Network producer saw Joe on the local news and approached him about a possible show, Marybeth’s well-known spirit of generosity might have been exactly why Joe thought of her as a potential teammate. “I didn’t know what or when the opportunity would be,” said Joe. “Finally I got the call for ‘Winner Cakes All,’ and I called Marybeth.” Joe and Marybeth met years earlier through various charity events and have been working together ever since. “Actually, we really became friends when I stole a hexagon cake pan from her,” said Joe jokingly. The two chuckle, as you’d expect with old friends. Even though Food Network producers resisted the idea of two competing bakers on the same team, it only took one Skype call with the pair to put the producers’ worries at bay. “We’re hard to resist,” chimes in Marybeth and the two laugh again. Joe and Marybeth flew to California to film their episode with the final challenge to create a cake for the cast party of the Broadway Princess Party. While the judges loved the team’s chocolate cake with peanut buttercream and chocolate ganache, another team edged them out for the final win in the end. As the two get back to daily life, they have taken away great memories. “It was the experience of a lifetime. I’m so grateful we got to represent the U.P. well,” said Marybeth. Joe pauses from the jokes for a moment and offers up some advice. “Don’t be afraid to do something out of the box,” he reflected. “Don’t let fear stop you.” Marybeth quickly adds, “Yeah, that too!” And once again the two are in a fit of laughter. Their infectious joy, friendship and love of cake baking is a simple reminder that magic, and even fairy tales, are everywhere.

LOCATIONS Huron Mountain Bakery • 1301 S. Front St., Marquette  |  906-225-1301 • U.S. 41 W., Ishpeming  |  906-485-6848 Babycakes (part of the Huron Mountain family) • 223 W. Washington St., Marquette 906-226-7744 Midtown Bakery & Café • 317 Iron St., Negaunee  |  906-475-0064


Guess this photo and enter to win a

$50

energy bill credit!

May Is Electrical Safety Month

Electric cooperatives’ top priority is always to provide safe, reliable, and affordable energy to their members. Your well-being and that of the larger communities we serve are of paramount concern. This month, we share a few safety tips that we hope you never have to use. But if you do, they could save their life.

Where In Michigan Is This? Identify the correct location of the photo above by May 20 and be entered into a drawing to win a $50 electric bill credit. Enter your guess at countrylines.com or send by mail to: Country Lines Mystery Photo, 201 Townsend St., Suite 900, Lansing, MI 48933. Include the name on your account, address, phone number and the name of your co-op. Our Mystery Photo Contest winner from the March issue is Steven ZisslerHayes, a Thumb Electric Co-op member, who correctly identified the photo as Saint John Nepomucene Catholic Church Historical Marker. This church was established in 1885 and is located in East Jordan. Winners are announced in the following issues of Country Lines: January, March, May, July/August, September and November/December.

March 2019

Life-Saving Tips That Can Save Your Life • If a car hits a utility pole, the vehicle may be charged with electricity. Anyone exiting the car could come in contact with thousands of volts of electricity from the downed line. In essence, when you step out of the car, you become part of the electricity’s path to the ground and could be electrocuted. It’s critical for everyone to stay in the vehicle until emergency crews have told you it’s safe to exit the car. • If the vehicle is on fire or you must exit for other safety reasons, jump clear of the vehicle. Do not let any part of your body or clothing touch the vehicle and ground at the same time. Land with your feet together and shuffle away (in small steps with your feet still together) to avoid electric shock. Keep moving away until you are at least 40 feet from the vehicle. • If you come upon a car accident involving a utility pole and downed power lines, keep your distance. A downed power line can energize the ground up to 35 feet away. The best action you can take is to alert emergency officials. Also, never drive over a downed power line or through water that is touching a downed power line. • If you have a downed power line on your property as a result of a falling tree, storm or other circumstance, do not go near the power line. Assume that the downed line is energized and dangerous. Never try to move the power line even if you think it’s not energized or if you are using a non-conductive material. Please wait until an electric co-op crew or emergency officials have confirmed that it is safe to do so. Contact your local electric co-op for additional electrical safety tips or if you would like to request a safety demonstration at your school or community event. Safety is a top priority!

Photo by Thomas Mann

18 MAY 2019


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Ontonagon County Rural Electrification Association ontonagon.coop facebook.com/OntonagonCountyREA

Join Us O n - June 15

ING T E E M L A U N N A ’S P -O O C R U O Y D ATTEN Chassell, Mich. 49916 High School, 41585 Hwy US 41, assell

Saturday, June 15, 10 a.m., Ch

ployees of your electric The board of directors and em the 2019 Annual co-op invite you to join them at it with your neighbors Meeting. This is a chance to vis r seven-county service and friends from throughout ou -op’s affairs. There will be area and participate in your co continental breakfast and drawings for cash prizes and a lunch will be served.

Profile for Country Lines

May 2019 Ontonagon  

May 2019 Ontonagon