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Country Culture Lab


No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without written permission from cited contributors. This is designated for personal, educational, non-commercial use. Studio course drafted and led by Dimitri Papatheodorou Book designed and compiled by Sophie Twarog and Liane Werdina Edited by Dimitri Papatheodorou, Sophie Twarog, and Liane Werdina © All cited authors 2021

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This book represents the three months of aggregate research, thinking and creative design by Ryerson’s students of architecture during the winter of 2021. With contributions by...

Natalie Chan Saijeeni Elangko Elijah Ju Jordan Lau Semeen Mahbub Erin Pang Vanessa Paningbatan-Cerezo Samantha Stein Laveena Sureshkumar Nuvaira Tahir Kristen Tsoukas Sophie Twarog Kayla Veloso Liane Werdina Clare Zhang Gloria Zhou

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Contents

Foreword

6

By David Lieberman

Hastings

Introduction

Three Small Towns Studio Intention

8 12

Preface

Site Index Territorial History Typologies Demographics + Economy Social Data

14 16 18 20 22

History Built Form Typology Linkages Infrastructure Natural Infrastructure

24 26 28 30 32 34 36

Textile Studio Dance Studio Plant House Pastry Shop Tea House

38 40 42 44 46 48

Index Boat Shop Hotel + Plaza Fishing Lodge + Restaurant Floating Theatre Wellness Centre

50 52 56 58 62 66

Town Profile

Dwelling

Public Works

4


Campbellford

Town Profile

History Built Form Typology Linkages Infrastructure Natural Infrastructure

Dwelling

Writer’s Residence Music House Ecofeminist Farmhouse Bee House Artist Studio Potter’s Residence

Public Works

Warkworth

Index Farm (co)Housing Mental Health Retreat Recreation Lodge Campbellford Market Agricultural Training Centre Cemetery Park

Town Profile

Public Works

References

98 100 104 108 112 116 120

Music Dwelling Warkworth Saloon Culinary Art Artists Inn Community Farm + Greenhouse

124 126 128 130 132 134 136 138 140 142 144 146 148

Index Sculpture Garden Town Centre for Performing Arts Warkworth Architecture School Maker’s Market Bike Repair Shop

150 152 156 160 164 168

History Built Form Typology Linkages Infrastructure Natural Infrastructure

Dwelling

70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96

172

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Foreword

By David Lieberman

I’m goin’ up the country, don’t you wanna go … I’m goin’ to some place where I’ve never been before … Canned Heat Woodstock 1969 from Bull Doze Blues Henry Thomas 1928

It is early morning, the fields are damp with a heavy mist and I can hear the sound of my footsteps in the wet soil, and yes there is a fragrance to the mud, fresh and filled with new life. The impetus to the New Ruralism and the retreat to the country is a fulfillment of the dream of the sixties, a movement not so much of politics and ideology but one of social and environmental responsibility, perhaps naïve and idealistic in its ambition; no doubt many of the newcomers to the Trent Hills, whether or not they participated in the Hippie dreams, were very much affected by the conditions of their times. The New Ruralism is not a romantic and nostalgic return to the land and a life of farming, but seeks to engage the edge, the threshold between the natural and the manmade as described by Vincent Scully in his text of the same name. How is that we occupy and dwell in the constructed landscape of the periphery, with an appreciation for its amenities and its opportunities, and perhaps a moment of pause to reflect on the pleasures of life, not necessarily driven by neo liberal late capitalism and a relentless pursuit of wealth, a life of self indulgence, of avarice and greed. origins of community as an extended family, a collective and cooperative social structure around a village square, a central meeting hall, and each morning going out to till the shared fields.

Three communities, Campbellford, Hastings, and Warkworth in Northumberland County each offering a nuanced take on the village, the town, and the hamlet. Joseph Rykwert in The Idea of A Town speaks to the well as the point of origin, the necessity of water as a shared resource. In Town Planning in Frontier America, John W. Reps clearly articulates the origins of community as an extended family, a collective and cooperative social structure around a village square, a central meeting hall, and each morning going out to till the shared fields. Campbellford: the seat of government and services, homesteaded 1834, village 1876, town 1906, a river crossing Hastings: leisure and cottage country and fishing from the bridge, lock on the Trent Severn Waterway 1838 Warkworth: arts and culture, a village incorporated in 1857 In addressing building in the country, the work of the studio did reflect contemporary concerns and began to experiment with materials and techniques of fabrication and assembly. It would have been too easy to simply address Thomas Stevens idea of the noble savage and the primitive hut, rooted in considerations of the Abbe Laugier’s Essai 6


sur l’Architecture and with a debt to the speculative meditations of Joseph Rykwert’s On Adam’s House in Paradise. Remarkably the projects, demonstrated a desire to participate in and to enrich the communities, not simply to provide satisfaction to a desire to retreat. It is this commitment that gives an optimistic poignancy to the prospects for the future of not only these three sites, but to the development of our treasured Canadian landscape and its all important water resources.

write as the importance of images and photography, of cinema and the passage of time, and simple stories as a novelist and poet. John Berger never forgot the City, nor did he reject it; he did, however, understand its challenges, its successes, and its failures. Trained as a painter, a pursuit he did not continue, although his sketches and drawings were in a ongoing dialogue with his sparse and articulate texts. In A Fortunate Man, he elucidates the passions and compassions of a country doctor, his involvement and commitment to his neighbours.

There is German word that is used in Austria to describe the threshold, the blurred territory of landscape and architecture, and the spirit of its engagement kunstlandschaften, a word that does not translate well but is indicative of a cultural landscape in its breadth. And in turn, the energies and positive speculations of the work of the students, whether consciously or intuitively, mirrors the traditions of the First Nations in the conceptual framework of custodianship rather than ownership, communities of shared responsibility and inclusivity rather than the dominant forces of ownership and exclusivity.

In Sustainable Rural Strategies: Country Culture Lab, Dimitri Papatheodorou has provoked and inspired his students at Ryerson University to projects, that will, no doubt, continue to be reflected in their future work as architects and builders. Although most of the work did not reach a level of technical resolution, questions were asked, and most importantly there was a demonstrated desire to participate in the craft of making, not stopping with a rendering image of the proposition. It must also be said that the projects showed not only a facility with drawing, often employing digital tools to produce beautiful images, but began to ask how to build. The desire to participate in conversations with the current residents and imagined future residents suggests architects with a contributory desire and motivation with a professional integrity made manifest through creative composition.

This is perhaps a post Marxist critique, but again, a critique looking forward. There is a marvelous film, four short films made by Tilda Swinton of her conversations with the late John Berger, The Seasons in Quincy, a film that all who read this text should watch. Berger spent most of his life in a small village in the French Alps, and in doing so articulately and eloquently investigated the issues that matter, be it climate change, the environment, friendships, and the value of thoughts and ideas. From his somewhat primitive country retreat, he continued to

It was a privilege to participate in the reviews of the studio. I look forward to the pleasure of the buildings of these young architects.

Gonna move up to the country, paint my mailbox blue … Paint some flowers on it honey, paint some trailin’ vines and dew Taj Mahal Mailbox Blues

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Three Small Towns Sixteen Students, One Architect-instructor Advisors Community Members at Large Three Months A Pandemic

8


Trent Hills, Ontario, Canada

Take sixteen urban students from the Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University in Toronto, and introduce them to a new experience, the Countryside. This cohort represents the immense diversity of urban Canadians, with cultural roots spanning the Globe. Living within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), they are completing studies this academic year, graduating with a Bachelors, Architectural Science (BArchSC).

Over three Canadian winter months, the students and instructor collaborated on three sequential projects. The first exercise was steeped in analysis and research. Working remotely by necessity, the students created a series of rural maps focussed on systems that have guided growth in these communities since they were founded in the 19th Century. The second project was a collaborative design project that asked the students to consider the ideology of dwelling, specifically through a re-thinking of geo-regionalism, issues of social and ecological justice, and resources (natural and human). The final project was similar to the second but focussed on public works, building on existing infrastructures and again considering relationships between projects.

Then, introduce the students to the current literature on issues of the Countryside, focussing on placemaking, economic and cultural conditions, history and myths, and assess in relation to predicted local growth (by the Province of Ontario). This growth of population is primarily migratory from urban to rural and is heightened by changes brought on by the Pandemic, Covid-19; at the time of this writing, we are fourteen months in.

Dimitri Papatheodorou, 2021 9


Hastings

Three Small Towns 10


Campbellford

Warkworth

Within Trent Hills (Ontario), the Lab focuses on several distinct sites with a program dependent on existing conditions and proposed futures, including but not limited to: housing, mercantile, food production, live-work, cultural landscapes and place. 11


Studio Intention

There are many ways to explore and learn about architecture. The formal path to architecture, institutional learning, is traditionally an intensive liberal education with areas of study seeking to balance binary distinctions between science and art. This path is a long haul, with the intended goal of professional practice. However, architectural literacy is not just for architects. There is also a collective desire for learning architecture, if only to appreciate the vast subject; the degree to which people have access to this knowledge is determined by cultural factors, including but not only access to formal education. It is general architectural knowledge, as it relates to rural communities, that my students at Ryerson University were interested in exploring through their final design studio in 2021. The question we sought to answer is how to stimulate and grow public interest in local architecture, how to activate architectural discourse especially when our culture can be dominated by economic interests independent of placemaking. In this regard, architecture is not just practiced by architects; it is primarily a cultural manifestation, with values that rely on general public knowledge of the immediate built environment and some awareness of architectural ideas.

In the Canadian countryside, folks want to hold onto existing patterns of beauty; they want to preserve natural and cultural history as represented in their towns and landscapes. Since moving to the countryside eight years ago, I have witnessed the desire and passion that locals have for the land, for small town main streets and for real connections with other people. Volunteerism represents a kind of post-professional life in these places, especially for those who care about cohesive communities. The alienation experienced by citizens in the contemporary city is somewhat distant and remote to the rural dweller. There is however a threat to the Canadian countryside: a risk of losing those qualities that make it attractive to newcomers. This is in part due to the newness of roaming culture, an awakening to the new freedom brought on by the digital revolution. If the automobile delivered the suburb, the internet has placed the countryside at a crossroad. At this moment we are witnessing the kind of growth in the countryside previously reserved for the immediate periphery of the city. Assuming conventional (suburban) development growth, this force places the countryside at immediate risk. Action requires vision and planning. This is what my students of architecture are concerned with at this time. 12


Defining Position

Country Culture Lab will look at the near future of rural development examining both architectural and planning issues. In this studio we will study embodied rural components, their relationships to each other and to the environment. The intent is to develop prototypes and principles governing future growth in the country.

The Pandemic has influenced migration from urban to rural, from the City of Toronto to the near Country. While Torontonians with cottages and secondary homes can weigh the cost/benefits of isolation in the City or retreat to the Country, essential workers and folks with ‘less’ may not have the luxury of choice. Concurrently, work is shifting to digital space and the possibility of rural life is on the horizon for reasons of affordability, more space and access to nature. The Countryside is increasingly viewed as an alternative to urban dwelling. Options for new housing in Toronto are less diverse; the proliferation of the condominium typology is the new norm, and the detached dwelling is out of reach for most families.

financial rewards of development of lands that may not be efficiently cultivatable but may otherwise be home to natural or historic heritage. Newcomers love the quaintness of small-town main street, and its traditional housing infrastructure. These towns were built at a different time and somewhat spared the costs associated with the automobile. But when we see development around rural communities around Ontario and elsewhere in North America, the default form adopted is the subdivision, the cul-de-sac, the estate lot. This is the norm.

With the extension of the ‘407’, a privatized highway, the prospect of suburban development is real and literally on the horizon, from the west. Northumberland County is a (drumlin) landscape with evidence of the last ice-age in its very structure. The primary economy is farming. As conservationists campaign to protect farmland, others see the

Dimitri Papatheodorou, 2021 13


Site Index

01 Hastings

14


Country Culture Lab looks at the three towns of Trent Hills, including Hastings, Campbellford and Warkworth.

02 Campbellford

03 Warkworth

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Territorial History

Treaty 20, also known as the Rice Lake Purchase, was signed on November 5, 1818 by representatives of the Crown and certain Anishinaabe peoples. This is the last of three Upper Canadian treaties signed with Anishinaabe peoples in what is now central southern Ontario, in October and November of 1818. A fourth, Treaty 27, was signed in the spring of 1819. These treaties enabled the northward expansion of settlement in Upper Canada.

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Preface

Building on Turtle Island always involves, fundamentally, property relations. The parcelization of ceded or unceded territories into private or state ownership is a form of violence. Country Culture Labacknowledges that our exploratory worksits on traditionalterritoriesof the Anishinabewaki, WendakeNionwentisio, Hodenosauneega and Mississauga people. Today, Trent Hills is home to a diverse population. We respect the continued connections with the past, present and future in our ongoing relationships with Indigenous and other peoples within the community.

Treaty 20: Rice Lake Purchase Omamiwinniwag (Algonquin) Anishinabewaki

Mississauga Trent Hills

WendakeNionwentsio

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Typologies

1850

1855

1860

1870

Potter Block This building is referred to as the town’s grandest commercial building. Potter block showcases a prime example of mid 19th century Ontario main street architecture.

Saltbox House

Montreal House

Built in a common housing typology used throughout the development of Trent Hills. The facade is symmetrical with its centered arched window under the gable, located in the centre line of the main entrance door.

Built on the site of where the original Lumber Mill once stood. This “downtown building” ground floor was once used to cater to Montreal Textile businesses.

Our Lady of Mount Carmel A Roman Catholic Church located in Hastings. The church is constructed with high quality masonry exemplified with a limestone bell tower with quoined edges.

Warkworth

Hastings

Hastings

18

Hastings


Towards A Settler Society

The Province of Ontario predicts growth in peripheral communities outside of the GTA. In Trent Hills Ontario, an amalgamated municipality of 12,600, one and a half hours east of Toronto, growth is inevitable. Trent Hills is comprised of three small towns with agricultural lands differentiating the ‘urban’ settlements from each other. There is no substantial suburban sprawl, yet.

1880

1890

1910

1935

Warkworth Town Hall Centre The Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Arts is maintained and supported by volunteers from the Warkworth Business Association alongside the Municipality of Trent Hills. Built in the late 19th Century, it is known for serving as a historic venue for the Town’s events.

Warkworth

Campbellford-Seymour Public Library Funded by the Carnegie Foundation, the architecture resembles classical elements such as a portico supported with a pediment. The bottom portion of the façade is composed of local multi-coloured granite and the upper level is cladded in red brick.

Campbellford-Seymour Fire Department

Campbellford Cultural Centre

Constructed to be better equipped for future fires. In the early 1870’s the Britannia Fire brigade was formed and they are remembered on the bell situated adjacent to the building and marked, “Britannia Fire Co. Campbellford 1877.

First opened in 1936 as the town Post Office. It later transitioned into a community resource centre and Town Hall. The building now functions as a culture and art centre for the Trent Hill region, and serves as a Municipal Council Chamber.

Campbellford

Campbellford

19

Campbellford


Demographics

fishing

biodiversity

tourism

industry

farming

Trent Hills is home to an agrarian community, with newcomers from all of the world arriving through the portal of Canada’s nearby largest city, Toronto. The economy is made up of forestry, farming, fishing, industry, and tourism with goals to expand towards a creative, knowledge-based economy (1). They seek a diverse population reflecting all age groups with a focus on attracting youth families and retaining their youth.

20


Trent Hills

21


Social Data As with other rural communities in Canada, Trent Hills has recently experienced growth in population and commercialization. This is in part due to the decrease of affordability in the City of Toronto, and an aging population seeking access to green space and the benefits of rural life. With this comes complex social issues that affect existing populations. Housing instability is rising in the three town centres, as housing prices increase due to demand.

Residential Instability

Highest

Lowest

Ethnic Concentration

Highest

Lowest

Employment Rates

Highest

Lowest

Density of Residential Instability

22


Trent Hills

Density of Employment Rates

Ethnic Concentration

23


Hastings

24


Trent Hills

The village of Hastings is located on the Trent River, halfway between Lake Seymour and Rice Lake. This town, primarily known for its fishing, has become a hub for tourism due to its quite country living and picturesque landscape. Home to the only bridge in Ontario where fishing is permitted, Hastings takes great pride in winning their title as “The Ultimate Fishing Town Canada” in 2012. This town has a strong focus on community and their connection to the river as a basis for the town identity.Various community events take place yearly near the water such as the Midnight Madness Fishing Contest, Hastings Waterfront Festival, and the Rice Lake Charity Run. The Trans Canada Trail moves through the town, offering a lovely walking and biking trail that leads to Peterbourough and the Town 25 of Campbellford. [Image (1)]


History

Pre-settlement

Hastings was established by James Crooks in 1810; he named the area “Crook’s Rapids.” In 1851, the village was sold to Scott Henry Fowlds, who would rename it to Hastings, after a boyhood acquaintance. The Fowlds family, along with several after families, settled in Hastings and began to develop the area, introducing several new industries, foundries, retail, woolen mills, railroad and more. The population rapidly grew over these years and Hastings quickly became a successful village for both residents and businesses. Hastings was officially incorporated as a village in 1874. In 1882, Fires destroyed a large portion of the downtown core, however it was slowly rebuilt throughout the 1880’s and 1890’s. Hastings was amalgamated into the Municipality of Trent Hills in 2001.

Settlement Development

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands Future Development Wetlands Forests

Forests

Conservation Area Forests

Waterways

Conservation Waterways Area Waterways

A: Trent Valley Lodge (4)

Author: Semeen Mahbub

B: The Tannery (5)

26

C: Bridge Street (8)


Hastings

1874 (2)

1931 (3)

B

B C

C

D

D F

F

F

D: Lock 18 on Trent Canal (9)

E: Grand Trunk Railway Station (10)

27

F: Bridge (11)

Mapping the Countryside


Built Form Present-day Hastings has its central core north of the town’s main bridge. This downtown core has been consistently the heart of the community since its establishment, and the expanding residential areas radiate from this core outwards and up/down the river. The commercial areas mainly run along Bridge Street, which connects Hastings to the rest of Northumberland County. There are several larger commercial areas around the borders of the town. (12)

Commercial Institutional Residential Urban Green Space Forest

Author: Xiao Zhang

28


Figure Ground (13)

29

Hastings


Typologies Hastings’ architectural history is rich with several important heritage buildings largely constructed of brick. The town’s inventory of traditional residential housing coupled with a quaint downtown promenade along the riverfront, have largely been retained.

(a) 19 Albert Street East “Grand Maple Event Centre”

(d) 3 Albert Street West “Trinity United Church”

(b) 51 Albert Street East “Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church”

(c) 89 Albert Street East “Saltbox House”

(e) 6 Albert Street East “Hastings Civic Centre” (f) 9 Front Street West “Canada Post”

(g) 49 Front Street West “Toad Hall” or “Bayview Manor”

(j) 30 Bridge Street South “Ashfield House”

Author: Vanessa Paningbatan-Cerezo

(h) 2-6 Front Street East “The Montreal House”

(k) 38 Bridge Street South “St George’s Anglican Church”

30

(i) 29 Front Street East “The Albion Hotel”

(l) 60 Bridge Street South “Doxcee Brothers’ House”


Downtown Key Plan (14)

25 31

Hastings


Linkages

Author: Kayla Veloso

32


Hastings

Plan of Downtown

Hastings’s downtown region contains various types of local businesses, community-based activities, and historical landmarks. This town, known for its fishing, has become a hub for tourism due to its picturesque landscapes and quiet country living. The Trent River divides the town into a Northern and Southern portion connected by Bridge Street to allow easy passage across the river.

a

Hastings Pisces Park

d

Murray Fenton Gazebo

g

Public Park

j

The Tannery Power House

b

Hastings Village Marina

e

Hastings Field House

h

Heritage Memorial Arena

k

Hastings Civic Center

Local Walking/ Cycling Routes

c

Trent-Severn Waterway, Lock 18

f

Hastings Cenotaph

i

Hastings Community Edible Garden

l

Water Tower

National Cycling Route (The Great Trail)

m

a

c

d

e

i

j

33

Trent River Cottages


Infrastructure

Author: Saijeeni Elangko

34


Hastings

Road Hierarchies

Hastings has three different levels of streets: highways, collector roads, and local roads. The main way to access Hastings is through the county roads that connect to Albert and Bridge Street. Albert Street, Front Street, and Bridge Street are the main roads in Hastings. The other roads in the town are mostly residential local roads. Along these streets, there are water, sanitary, and storm lines to service the various buildings. The majority of the light pollution is concentrated in the rural development zone in town and decreases in intensity the further out. (9)

35


Natural Infrastructure

Author: Saijeeni Elangko

36


Hastings

Natural Woodlands

Wetlands Map

37

Conservation Reserves


The Ideology of Dwelling

Tren

t Ri

ver

CR 45

Tren t

Rive

r

CR 2

Site Plan 38


Hastings

studio gallery

dance studio pastry shop

plant store

tea shop

In approaching development within the town of Hastings, five students collaborated on an existing parcel of land that is municipally owned, and ready for a project that seeks to balance the very local with an emerging regional identity. Part of the problem for all three groups (Hastings-CampbellfordWarkworth) was to design new housing that explored placemaking and complexity, spatially, in contrast to conventional housing development models. The ‘parcelization’ of land in the traditional sense was revoked in favour of developing concepts of collective multi-dimensional arrangement. Proximity yields relationships in stark contrast to fragmentation issued by the global interests, further manifest through the digital divide. All five students agreed to develop housing designs in close proximity and in relation to one another. The students also looked to develop designs that invited community into the site. Therefore, design challenges arose, namely how to differentiate private from public and improve the way we normally think about dwelling in the North American setting. These ideas and inventions are not original, but perhaps new to the patterns of housing development generally available to people in North America. 39


Textile Studio

By Vanessa Paningbatan-Cerezo

a

b

c

40


Ideology of Dwelling

Dwelling as interpreted in this concept of a house integrates the art of weaving (textile art) with architectural techtonics. A clear language of post and beam construction, individualized structural members, and layered programmatic distribution, combine to create a seamless transition between live and work areas within the dwelling.

Each room of the house is organized in a layered manner, creating a sequence of volume changes and modulated roof profiles. By varying interior and exterior heights the weaver-artists can display their work in a way that frames and gives narrative structure to the experience. The studio however is a double height space with windows affording ample natural light. The residential portion is separated into two floors providing the live-inartists sufficient areas to live in. The residential spaces have access to the studio programming through a door and visual connection from the office space.

The roofs are layered and offset from the structure of the wall to create a floating appearance. The roof joists extend outwards with the roof overhangs to create shaded areas and to further empasize the profile of the roofs. The timber structure also follows a layering organization where the beams wrap around the column and stack on top of eachother. This provides the possibility to create a movable panel system in between the spaces of the beams. This panneling system includes slots on the floor aligned with the spacing of the beams that are incoporated throughout the gallery and studio space. This allows for slide panels to fit into the slots and slide to create temporary separation or opportunities to display artwork.

a b c d

exterior perspective exploded axonometric ground floor plan sectional perspective

Interior Views b

c

d

e

f

41

Hastings

e f g h

studio perspective transition perspective studio perspective residential perspective


Dance Studio

By Kayla Veloso

a

b

42


Ideology of Dwelling

This house includes a live-work element consisting of a dance studio on the first floor, and a residential unit above. The house expresses the architectural body, by peeling away areas to expose the structure of the home and expressing the various tectonic layers used throughout. The form creates moments of connection between the live-work programs through its double height spaces as well as connections with the exterior through its outdoor patios and performance space. a b c d e f

exterior perspective sectional perspective commercial perspective ground floor plan second floor plan residential perspective c

e

d

f

43

Hastings


Plant House

By Semen Mahbub

a

b

a b c d e f

c

perspective ground floor plan second floor plan plant nursery persepective residence hallway perspective section perspective

d 44


Ideology of Dwelling

Ideology of dwelling in this design combines several ideas such as: integrating food production with living, the growing of food, and social-spatial relationships with other dwellings. The south side has louvers that act as a trellis for plants to grow on. In the hotter months, plants grow on the louvers, providing shading from the southern eposure. During the colder months, the leaves are shed to allow the sun to come into the space.

f

f

f 45

Hastings


Pastry Shop

By Saijeeni Elangko

a

b

46


Ideology of Dwelling

This house contains a pastry shop on the first floor with living space above. Linked together with its immediate neighbours through a greenhouse, the building’s extruded form takes inspiration from its position as connector of public spaces, while simultaneously defining private residential spaces. The expressive roof extends to grade forming an exterior walkway.

a b c d e f

perspective sectional perspective commercial perspective first floor plan second floor plan residential perspective

e

d

f

47

Hastings


Tea House

By Xiao Yue (Clare) Zhang

b

48


Ideology of Dwelling

The Hastings tea house contains a tea shop/cafe, a residence, and a productive greenhouse. The tea house’s form follows an L-shape framing a courtyard. In the summer, the cafe’s seating area opens up to this courtyard. The productive greenhouse shares a back wall with the cafe space, providing the greenhouse with heating in the winter. The residence is situated above the cafe, connected with double-height spaces. The wood louvers on the building’s facade both provide shading a b c

perspective interior perspective ground floor plan

d residence e interior perspective f sectional perspective

e

e

f

49

Hastings


Public Works, Architectural Acupuncture

50


CR 45

Hastings

boat shop hotel and plaza fishing lodge + restaurant floating theatre wellness center

Tren

t Ri

ver

a b c d e

e CR 2

d c b

Tren

t Rive

r

a

Shifting away from the ideology of dwelling, we delved into the question of economic development within the existing serviced areas of Trent Hills. This presented an opportunity to examine small public-oriented projects, building on existing patterns of rural architecture, without resorting to mimicry or copying historical architecture. Both Hastings and Campbellford are located along the Trent Severn Waterway, a 386 kilometre canal route comprised of several rivers connecting Lake Ontario with Lake Huron. The Province of Ontario has implemented a tourism strategy to for the Waterway that includes both Hastings and Campbellford in this system. In Hastings, students decided to focus on the heritage of the Trent River, acknowledging the watercourse as the original highway and commercial activity zone for the town. Hastings is experiencing some residential growth, with concern, we see this new growth not necessarily related to the existing patterns of historical development along either streets or water system. Therefore, the five projects presented here seek to connect with local traditions (fishing/recreation) and offer additional amenities like lodging, entertainment and other services. CR 45

51

CR 25


Boat Shop

By Saijeeni Elangko

A proposed Boat Shop is divided into two related forms sheltered by a canoe-shaped structure. Boat making is an important craft to the Trent River and the indigenous communities. The intent is to teach the craft of boat making and allowing for more use and access of the Trent River for the Hastings community. The canoe form and the internal spaces support one another becoming a symbol of how the old interacts with the new.

The two interior spaces are broken up into a commercial space and a workshop space. The commercial space allows for boat rental and a rooftop canoe garden. The workshop space is two stories in height with an administrative second floor, and a seasonal rooftop workspace. The boat shop is situated for easy access to the Trent River and neighbours the Hotel/Plaza.

a

b 52


Public Works

a b c d e

exterior perspective exploded form diagram workshop interior first floor plan second floor plan

f g h i j

evening perspective sectional perspective rooftop perspective north elevation south elevation

c

d 53

Hastings


a

a b c d

elevations sectional perspective exterior perspective rooftop perspective

b

54

Saijeeni Elangko


Public Works

Boat Shop

c

d

55

Hastings


Hotel + Plaza

By Semeen Mahbub

A proposed hotel and public plaza can be utilized for a variety of existing public events in Hastings and greater Trent Hills, such as the Hastings Waterfront Festival, and Farmer’s Market. Situated above the ammenity spaces is the temporary lodging, a small hotelAn elevated walkway gives a vantage point of the plaza and waterfront area. Beneath the walkway a sequence of moveable pavillions can be adjusted and placed in the plaza for additional vendor/activity spaces. The walkway above appears as

a boardwalk and gives access to the stacked lodging units. The walkway also gives access to the stacked hotel units. There are different unit layouts, all with views towards the plaza and the waterfront. The hotel units are stacked and grouped together to create 3 groupings with spaces between and around the rental units that can be used as outdoor recreation or lounging spaces for people to enjoy.

a

a b c d e f

exterior perspective unit layouts sectional perspective bird’s eye view multipurpose space perspective hotel unit perspective

b

56


Public Works

c

d

e

f 57

Hastings


Fishing Lodge + Restaurant Due to the Hasting’s reputation for its fishing, a fishing lodge and seafood restaurant is raised on stilts along the river. The form was inspired by a ship and uses fishing rods as inspiration for its steel and wire canopy that encapsulates the building. The two story building provides panoramic views of the river as it protrudes out, offering clear views. The restaurant becomes a wonderful exterior lookout point and connects to the boardwalk proposed along the Trent river waterfront.

By Kayla Veloso

Dispersed around the site are four fishing lodges, consisting of two units each. These small lodges add much needed temporary housing for visitors to the area. Each lodge consists of a two story, two bedroom unit and a one story, one bedroom unit connected by an exterior terrace. The overall form and tectonic expression of the lodges match that of the restaurant, creating a cohesive style. Each lodge is connected to the boardwalk by a winding path and surrounded by nature.

a

b

c 58


Public Works

d a b c d e f

exterior view elevation section diagram exterior perspective site plan

e

f 59

Hastings


a b c d e

a

b

b

c 60

Kayla Veloso

ground floor plan second floor plan elevation exterior perspective sectional perspective


Public Works

Fishing Lodge + Restaurant

d

e 61

Hastings


Floating Theatre

By Clare Zhang

The Floating Theatre is a semi-permanent structure situated on the banks of the Trent River. The theater is flexible - its form and function changes based on seasonality and programming. It is made up of three main components - the theatre, the observation tower, and the floating stage. All spaces have dual functions - the theatre remains open in the summer toward the stage area, but can be closed off as an indoor cinema in the winter.

The tower allows visitors to have scenic views over the Trent River, but also provides space for tents as temporary accommodation for visitors during festivals. The theatre and tower are permanent constructions while the stage is a temporary structure that can break away. This mobility allows the stage to be set up at any point on the riverbank, encouraging cultural crosspollination along the Trent River.

a

b 62


Public Works

a b c d

exterior view section ground floor bridge view

c

d 63

Hastings


e f g h

isometric diagrams exterior perspective interior perspective elevation

a

b 64

Clare Zhang


Public Works

Floating Theatre

c

d 65

Hastings


Wellness Centre

By Vanessa Paningbatan-Cerezo

This Wellness Centre is situated on the island that acts as an in-between space between downtown Hastings and the river. As an “in between space”, this island provides an opportunity to introduce more residential spaces and programming that better connects Hasting’s people to the water front. The island organization focuses on the spacing out the residential parcels to maintain views from downtown hastings to the bodies of water. The circulation follows the natural formation of the island and incorporates an extended boardwalk.

In terms of the Wellness Centre, this building bridges both sides of the water together and acts as a gateway to the lush nature of the island’s tip. The design focuses on the relationships of layering with programming, where the dry activities are grade level, and the wet activities are on the lowest level. The building is anchored onto the island with lightwells that bring natural light to the programs on all levels. Some activities that are supported by the building include a gym, juice bar, massage therapy, steam rooms, saunas, pools, and a bathing experience.

a

b 66


Public Works

a b c d e

Heading

exterior perspective section house diagrams ground floor plan site axonometric

c

d

e 67

Hastings


a b c d e

diagrams ground floor plan underground floor plan gym perspective pool perspective

a

b

c 68

Vanessa Paningbatan-Cerezo


Public Works

Wellness Centre

d

e 69

Hastings


Campbellford

70


Trent Hills

As the heart of Trent Hills industry and commerce, Campbellford is the largest commercial zone in the area, divided by the Trent River in the centre of the downtown district. With a strong residential and commercial mix, the town of Campbellford invites community and tourism with small businesses and unique commercial attractions. With the Trent River Suspension Bridge, hotels, various trails, and natural landscapes, the town offers room for pedestrian and cycling activity for tourists and residents alike. Rich in history, the town embraces its industrial heritage as historic buildings and features are preserved as the town continues to expand its commercial and residential appeal, bringing a bit of density into a very rural area. (1)

71


History

Settlement began in Campbellford, formerly the Seymour Township, in the early 1830s. In the 1840s the first bridge was built connecting both east and west communities together. New mills, factories, stores, and hotels were built along the river, with new housing developments being planned and built around these new economies. The agricultural lands abut the perimeter of Campbellford’s rural development zone.

Pre-settlement

In 1886 the Trent Valley Wooden Mill, The Rathburn Lumber Mill, and the Smith Flour Mill were the largest businesses in Campbellford. As the community grew, many new developments also grew, such as new churches, a schoolhouse, blacksmiths, and copper space. Campbellford was officially inaugurated as a town in 1906. By the 1930s, agricultural land has moved out further beyond the outskirts of town, as more settlements of churches and new single-family homes were built in land formerly devoted to agriculture. (2)

Settlement Development

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands Future Development Wetlands Forests

Forests

Conservation Area Forests

Waterways

Conservation Waterways Area Waterways

0m

A: Smith Flour Mill 1883 (3)

Author: Kristen Tsoukas

B: Trent Valley Wooden Mill 1890 (4)

500

C: River Block West 1902 (5)

72

D: Front Street 1906 (6)


Campbellford

The town of Campbellford is located in the heart of the Peterborough drumlin field, known for its beautiful rolling hills and valleys. The Trent Severn Waterway (386-kilometre-long canal route connecting Lake Ontario at Trenton to Georgian Bay, Lake Huron, at Port Severn) runs central through the town, and has played a significant role in the settlements and developments over the past 200 years.

1878

1933

D B

A

C G

H

E

F

E: Fire Brigade 1907 (7)

F: Railway Bridge 1917 (8)

G: The Lift Bridge 1920 (9)

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H: Saint Mary’s Roman Catholic Church 1950 (10)


Built Form Campbellford is one of the larger towns located within Northumberland County. It’s urban planning is unique to the natural features that define it; the core radiates out from the central waterway that runs through the middle of the town. Many local businesses, commercial buildings and government buildings can be found closer to the water way and residential blocks are generally located further away from the water way along with institutional buildings such as schools. Farms and other agricultural allotments are located towards the outskirts of town (11).

Beyond Boundary

Commercial Institutional Residential Urban Green Space Forest

Author: Laveena Sureshkumar

74


Campbellford

Figure Ground (12)

75


Typologies Composed of heritage buildings, Campbellford’s charm is conveyed through its architectural identity. There are many heritage buildings that still remain and have been refurbished to facilitate their current usage. These buildings range in typology including a church, the public library, a commercial facility, a cultural centre, the fire station and various homes throughout the neighborhood. The heritage facades are cladded in brick or limestone and are designed using classical and gothic elements. The earliest building illustrated below is the Campbellford-Seymour Heritage Centre, which dates back to 1857.

(a) 50 Bridge Street West “St. John’s United Church”

(b) 98 Bridge Street East “Campbellford-Seymour Public Library”

(c) 95 Doxsee Avenue South “Dinwoodie House”

(d) 131 Queen Street “Tice House”

(e) 17 Queen Street “Linton Brothers”

(f)74 Inkerman Street “Ashton House”

(g) 113 Front Street North “Campbellford-Seymour Heritage Centre”

(h) 51 Front Street North “Bogart House”

(i) 36 Front Street South “Campbellford Cultural Centre”

(j) 58 Saskatoon Avenue “Campbellford-Seymour Fire Department”

(k) 37 Saskatoon Avenue “Classic Ontario House”

(l) 113 Centre Street “Elphick House”

Author: Samantha Stein

76


Campbellford (13)

39 77


Linkages

(18)

Author: Gloria Zhou

78


Campbellford

Campbellford Memorial Hospital

a

Campbellford Fair

d

Kennedy Park (15)

g

War Memorial

j

Trent Dr. Linkage

b

Campbellford Community Park

e

Old Mill Park and the Giant Toonie (16)

h

Bridge St. Linkage (West and East)

k

Ranney Gorge Suspension Bridge

Local Walking/ Cycling Routes

c

Campbellford Pool and Library (14)

f

City Hall and the Farmers’ Market (17)

i

Dooher’s Bakery

l

Ranney Falls G.S.

National Cycling Route (The Great Trail)

c

d

f

k

m

e

Campbellford’s core down-town region contains many different types of services ranging from healthcare, libraries, local businesses to grocery stores. It is also where the Municipality of Trent Hills is located. Many visitors of Campbellford, as well as its residents, travel through the downtown core to obtain food and access to services. The Trent River divides the town into the Western and Eastern regions connected by the Bridge St. linkage (for cars and walking).

1:1000 Plan of Downtown Campbellford

Public spaces such as Kennedy Park are located all around Campbellford to provide residents with access to playgrounds, soccer fields, skate parks and many more. Public Parks are typically connected by main roads (such as Bridge St.) and frequent within the development region. This promotes intergenerational connection and provides opportunities for social sustainability within the town.

1:500 Plan of Kennedy Park

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Infrastructure

Author: Liane Werdina

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Campbellford

Road Hierarchies (19) Similar to many existing rural settlements, Campbellford, dating back 200 years, has developed its infrastructure off its main waterway and natural resource, the Trent River. This driving force that splits the town enforces a density and contentration of resources and built infrastructure, ultimately defining the town’s grid of infrastructures. Residual light pollution, although minimum in a rural area is densified around the defining river. The connection resources of infrastructure of the Trent Severn Waterway Dams and Bridge St. Bridge connect the existing infrastructures and roadways of the town. The defining road infrastructure defines a hiearchy of circulation and ultimately services such as water, sanitary, lighting and hydro-electrical infrastructures. The main highways that connect the town to Trent Hills adjacencies, Bridge St. and Front St. and Queen St. define major circulation and drive economic, tourism and resource transportation to the town. The tertiary street infrastructures of collector and local roads are mainly utilized by local residents and connect commercial, residential, industrial and agricultural resources.

81


Natural Infrastructure

Author: Liane Werdina

82


Campbellford

Water and Flood Zones

The town of Cambellford’s constructed infrastructure is largely defined by the natural land forms, most specifically, the South to North crossover of the Trent River which divides the town into East and West halfs. The town’s waterways are controlled by the Trent Severn Dam and Greenlands system to control flooding as many residencies and commercial zones hug the river and extract hydro resources. Tertiary streams and ravines scatter over the evolution of the town and provide ecological infrastructure within concentrated communities. The town’s agricultural and natural resource infrastructure is its most notable, with various commerical agricultural lands fencing the denser residential developments. Resource Quarries are utilized for industrial mineral extraction and provide economic value to the flat natural landscape.

Protected Lands and Resources

83

Forestry and Agriculture


The Ideology of Dwelling

CR 38

Tre

nt

Riv er

CR 50

Trent Rive

r

CR 30

Site Plan 84

CR 8


Campbellford

bee house

farm co-housing artist studio

music house potters residence

writers studio

For the students working in the town of Campbellford, ‘ideology of dwelling’ took a different approach based on the specificities of the site. The students worked on a parcel of municipally owned land that contained a unique feature. Dividing and flowing through the site is the Trans-Canada Trail (The Great Trail) which spans across Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The local trail itself was the starting point for a spatial arrangement of six dwellings. The Pandemic points toward a near rural future where homes are also unique places of work and commerce. The farmhouse is a local typology that is very familiar; farming families generally live and work in one setting. Their economic activity is intertwined with dwelling on the land. Although the proposed dwellings are within Campbellford’s established development zone, and therefore not farms in the conventional sense, the designs do however point to a different kind of harvest - harvesting through shared values and activities, delivered to the site using various design strategies. The insertion of economic development activity within a residential enclave is in stark contrast to the patterns of the sub-division. We decided to think of the possibilities of multiplication rather than division. 85


Writer’s Residence

By Sophie Twarog

a

a b c d e f

reading ritual by the water dwelling sequence wake up early to write commute to morning walk cloister morning contemplation community reading club

Garden 3

4

Reading Room/ Library

Cloister-

2 6

5

Refectory

b

86

1

Refection pond

7


Ideology of Dwelling

Our closest living models evolved from the 20th century ideas of existenzminimuim based on minimum bodily requirements to generate more units (and income) with less area. Today we imagine the dwelling to be a place of constant labour and solitude. Monks were to first to experience a single cell, which paradoxically forced a type of communal living in its organized function.

Here, the cloister is used as a place for people to meet but it also connects the public function of the library/ reading saloon to the private living quarters of the writer’s residence. Built of stone provided by the local Nicholson’s brothers, its linear plan creates a spine to expand from the cloisters or additional upper levels to accommodate future use.

Order of the Cloister, Saint Gall Monastery *what is the significance of a ritual today?

Existenzminimum, Co-Op Interieur by Hannes Meyer

c

d

e

f

87

Campbellford

Modern Living


Music House

By Laveena Sureshkumar

a

b

c

88


Ideology of Dwelling

The Music House, located in a small community development in Cambellford aims to unify the community through music. It balances both public and private use, fitted with a permanent residence and a guest house for travelling musicians. The house is divided into two parts and connected by an outdoor intimate performance space, with enough area for a small audience. The circuitous public trail links this house with neighbouring dwelings, flowing through the outdoor performance space. Within the house itself, one side is accommadation and work space for visiting artists and the other side is houses private quarters.

a b c d e

interior living area south elevation north building south elevation ground floor plan view from path d

e

89

Campbellford


Ecofeminist Farmhouse By Kristen Tsoukas

a

b

90


Ideology of Dwelling

In order to ensure that our world is viable for future generations, architects must address the power structures that exacerbate the repercussions of climate change. The capitalist-patriarchal structure of our society impedes the discipline of architecture from being used as a positive force in the quest for gender equality and fight against climate change. There is a potential for the architect to address these interlinked issues. This project explores the potential to bring concepts of ecofeminism to the forefront of the green architecture movement, and set a precedent for the Campbellford community. There are limits to implementing sustainable practices in architecture without addressing feminism. The suppression of women and the worsening issue of climate change are undoubtedly linked to the capitalistpatriarchal ideas of the suburban single-family household, which is especially prevalent in North America and must be re-examined. The ecofeminist farmhouse seeks to end the oppressive nature of kitchens and decommodify the process of food. The public aspect of the house is a teaching kitchen, dining room, farm, and greenhouse. Each of these programmatic functions are designed to teach the public about food production, the sustainable aspects of growing local, and to promote the egalitarian process of cooking. a b c d

exterior perspective from Trans Canada Trail S-W view of dwelling and teaching kitchen site plan perspective section c

d

91

Campbellford


Bee House

By Gloria Zhou

a

b

c

d 92


Ideology of Dwelling

The Bee House draws on the relationship between bees and the agricultural context of Campbellford. The design provides an example of a pollinator space within a residential environment, demonstrating and promoting bee ecology and culture. The Great Trail gives access to the apiaries, the beekepper’s co-op within the dwelling enclave. Agriculture is the main economic sector in Trent Hills and Campbellford serves this activity. The Bee House demonstrates how dwelling and economy can be related and re-addresses the conventional and sometimes unecessary divisions between live and work. Food production and culture can be beautiful integrated in small town life, within both existing and serviced rural development zones.

a b c d e f

ground floor plan green roof composition interior reading space south elevation interior living area perspective section e

f 93

Campbellford


Artist Studio

By Samantha Stein

a

b

c 94


Ideology of Dwelling

The design intent for the Artist Studio-Home is a sequence of spaces for both creative practice and living, while affording clear relationships between public and private activities. The dwelling design is inspired by local agrarian architectural forms and materials. The dwelling design is divided into two barn like structures connected via a small link. Through a division of massing, individual areas for work, interaction and relaxation emerge. The artist’s studio takes up one of the forms, and is connected to both exterior spaces and the residential components of the home. The dwelling as a whole is also an exhibition space for the artist. Through strategic placement of views, the interior environment is carefully integrated with the exterior garden and public areas beyond.

a b c d e f g h

exterior perspective ground floor plan second floor plan aerial view south elevation east elevation section AA section BB d

e

f

g

h

95

Campbellford


Potter’s Residence

By Liane Werdina

a

b 96


Ideology of Dwelling

The Potter’s Residence provides a specialized environment for the creation of clay work through traditional practices; it is also a home and gallery. Linked to other dwellings through the Trans-Canadian Trail, the dwelling is sequentially divided into distinct volumes each housing various private and semi-public spaces, such as a separate studio and kiln. Tradition and innovation are twin aesthetic pillars in the conceptualization of this design. The dwelling forms are inspired by traditional bottle-neck kilns. The production areas are designed to be both open to the public and in close relation to dwelling areas, through outdoor connective spaces. It is imagined that students could arrive through the public trail and and study art and technique of ceramic art from an established artist.

c

e

a b c

d

garden view ground floor plan exterior night view

f 97

Campbellford

d e f

exterior entry material elements perspective section


Public Works, Architectural Acupuncture

98


Campbellford

a b c d e f

farm (co)-housing mental health retreat recreation lodge campbellford market agricultural training centre cemetery park

CR 38

b

Tre

nt

Riv

er

CR 50

a

d

e

c

Trent Rive

r

CR 30

f

CR 8

The town of Campbellford is the largest of the three towns and hosts Trent Hills municipal government plus a variety of services and jobs for residents. As with Hastings, the river plays a significant role in the identity of Campbellford. Divided by the river, economic (industrial/commercial) activities thrive on both sides, asymmetrically. Mainstreet Campbellford is on the east side; the traditional architectural typologies and spatial relationships remain more or less intact here. The west side also contains residential areas but is more closely identified by late commercial architecture – these areas feel more ‘global’ in character, less characteristic of a small Ontario town. Six proposed projects are divided accordingly, toward the left (west) and right (east) banks. Building on the qualities that make Campbellford, the anchor town of the three communities, these projects appear a little larger, commercially and institutionally more intensive than the other two towns. The students imagined designs that build on existing economies like farming, food, boating, education, personal services and accommodation. Ranney Falls

Ferris Provincial Park

99

CR 8


Farm (co)Housing

By Kristen Tsoukas

The suppression of women and the worsening issue of climate change can be linked to the capitalistpatriarchal idea of the single-family household, which is especially prevalent in North America. This idea must be re-examined. In the 19 th century, communitarian feminists, Alice Constance Austin and Marie Howland developed plans for utopian cities that would completely free women from domestic work. They planned for egalitarian communities in isolated locations, where everyone would be compensated for the work they do. One of the major problems of all these models is the

were either too large to ever actually build, or they were implemented into small apartment complexes and didn’t offer a range of unit designs. The Farm (co) house offers a wide range of different units ranging from studio apartments to 4 bedroom family units. Located on the north west of cambellford on Windsor avenue, this farm community coop takes the ideals presented by the commutarian feminists and brings them to a rural setting. The site takes up an existing farm features a barn a series of greenhouses, agricultural land and a residence.

a

a b c d

garden perspective ground floor plan aerial farm view pespective section

b 100


Public Works

c

d 101

Campbellford


a b c d e f

barn perspective co-housing section barn section typical green house section exterior perspective interior greenhouse perspective

a

c

b

c

d 102

Kristen Tsoukas


Public Works

e

f 103

Campbellford


Mental Health Retreat The development of a small Mental Health Retreat is proposed on the periphery of Campbellford’s rural development area. The design offers ample area for group therapy, individual theraphy, yoga practice, dining and also a unique boat equiped for therapeutic group sessions along the River. The retreat also is designed to offer twelve individual cabins for extended stays.

By Laveena Sureshkumar

Each individual cabin is afforded a private garden. The cabins are strategically placed across the small site between the main building and the river’s edge to afford connections with nature, seclusion and proximity. The residential units also dubble as much needed temporary accommodation in in Trent HIlls.

a

b 104


Public Works

c a c b c d e

pond view at dusk north elevation site plan interior yoga studio ground floor plan

d

e 105

Campbellford


a b c d e

cabin 3 south elevation south section perspective perspective

a

c

b

c 106

Laveena Sureshkumar


Public Works

Mental Health Retreat

d

e 107

Campbellford


Recreation Lodge

By Samantha Stein

The proposed Campbellford Recreation Lodge builds on lexisting eisure and torusim economies, for both visitors and local people alike. The river defines and represents the identity of Campbellford, and also the potential for creating beautiful, localized small-scale economic activity.

The design takes advantage of a kink in the river, creating partial protection for the placement of the structure on the water. Situated close to town and in proximity with the Ferris Provincial Park, a major local attraction, the development proposes to better link the life and cultural activities of the town with natural heritage.

a

b 108


Public Works

a b c d

exterior view section site plan terrasse view c

d 109

Campbellford


a b c d

a

b

b 110

Samantha Stein

ground floor plan aerial view dock view water bridge view


Public Works

Recreation Lodge

c

d 111

Campbellford


Campbellford Market The proposed Campellford Market complex responds to a given but somewhat ignored opportunity for greater connection with the Trent River. The structure contains many related functions. The design is unique in that it doubles as a boat storage facility for both fishing and liesure communities. The conjunction of infrastructre and culture allows for visitors and residents alike to interact with each other in ways that were previously and traditionally separate.

The boats act as canopies and design elements that are suspended over outdoor seating areas and circulation paths. The playful nature of the project allows for the community to have agency over a multiplicity of smallscale interventions. The structure can host playgrounds, entertainment, music, and community activities. The project proposes a new typology for the rural community to connect through food and encourage the local boating industry.

a a b c d e

By Liane Werdina

interior market garden longitudinal section boat unit assembly exterior entry view ground floor plan

b 112


Public Works

c

d

e 113

Campbellford


a b c d e

intervening elements aerial view transverse section roof view interior market entrance

a

c

b

c 114

Liane Werdina


Public Works

Campbellford Market

d

e 115

Campbellford


Agricultural Training Centre The Agriculture Training Centre considers the site and its building as a single living ecosystem. Building on parts of land in the worst conditions rather than within a natural landscape adds quality and beauty were there was none before. The parking lot as an infill project not only draws farmers and agriculturalists to the centre of the periphery, but its leaves those areas that are the most precious and healthy as they are. Facing backs of buildings on all sides, this proposal attempts to bring

By Sophie Twarog

order and attention to the revitalization of existing urban conditions. The training centre allows for the study of alternative learning methods that combine both academic and practical skills in one campus. Organized around a pedestrian street to draw citizens from major streets, it draws citizens towards a large machine garage, classrooms, an assembly hall, a seed library and a communal greenhouse to form an active learning approach for the students.

a

Agricultural Training Centre

Clock Towe r Cultu ral Centr e

Front Street S

Sa

ska too

nA ve

Ca m Ma pbellf rke o t H rd all

Campbellford/Seymour Fire Department

b 116


S Front Street

Clock Tower

Doxsee Ave S

Sa ska too nA ve

Public Works

Fire Department

Dorothy Caldwell, Fjord, 2008, Photo: Dorothy Caldwell

River Street

c

a b c d

d

e

f

g 117

Doxsee ave community necklace existing site plan classroom

Campbellford

e f g

greenhouse garage seed library


assembly hall greenhouse

Fire Station

River St library

garage workshop

a assembly hall

classrooms

Antonia’s Bistro

Cafe Grindhouse

Front St S

b

a b c d e

Doxsee Ave site section pedestrian street section activity pockets Front street view River street view

Do xs e

eA ve n

ue

et

tre ns

tria es

stair seats

on nti

s rai

ed

d pe

hidden garden

nd

po

e ret

small public square

et

tre ns

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gre

Fr on tS

et tre

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c 118

Sophie Twarog


Public Works

Agricultural Training Centre

d

e 119

Campbellford


Cemetery Park

By Gloria Zhou

This projects aims to reposition architecture and planning for the dead into spaces for the living as well. The project proposes a facility for two main types of natural deathcare (aquamation and biodegradable burials). Moreover, its connection to national conservation areas are integral to its linkage to reforesting rural areas.

5

The conceptual framework draws on the stages of grief and its symbolic highs and lows. The use of the columbarium planes on the face and the grade change fosters an experience of remembering loved ones through the formal journey of the spaces.

1 2 3 4. 5.

3

2

1

120

reception lobby courtyard tower seed library


Public Works

a b c d e

site plan recompose cycle isometric diagram perspective ground floor plan

Main Building Parking

e b

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Campbellford

Tree Nursery Pathways for public park/ forest expansion


4

a

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3

1 2 3 4. 5.

1

b

c 122

Gloria Zhou

funeral hall lobby cold room tower family room


Public Works

Cemetary Park

a b c d e f g

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Campbellford

tower plan underground plan section perspective elevation perspective perspective


Warkworth

124


Trent Hills Nestled in the rolling hills of Northumberland County about 150km east of Toronto, Warkworth is a small farming community that is home to many annual events and community initiatives. The village has a strong cultural life including theatre music, theatre, specialty shops and it is home to many artists and makers. The smallest of the three towns comprising the Municipality of Trent Hills, Warkworth is not on major water course or transportation route. It exists as a destination on its own, and is known beyond Northumberland County for its arts related activity and commercial activity. [Image (1)]

125


History

Warkworth was first incorporated in 1857 and later amalgamated in the late 20th century with Hastings and Campbellford forming the Municipality of Trent HIlls. One of the rist settlers, Major Humphries ascribed the name of Warkworth to the community after the village of Warkworth in Northumberland England. The community thrived as travel station and farming centre peaking with development in the late 19th century. The town contains several architecturally interesting buldings including various churches, the Potter Block, Percy Municipal Building and main street commercial buildings.

Pre-settlement

One of the finer commercial buildings, known as the Potter block, was built in 1877 and contained various uses throughout the years including general store, post office, funeral services and housing. The Percy Municipal Building, now the Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Performing Arts, contains the public library and hosts many seasonal community events.

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands Forests Conservation Area Waterways

A: Methodist Church (2)

Author: Jordan Lau

Settlement Development Future Development Wetlands Forests Conservation Area Waterways

B: Main Street (3)

126

C: Main Street (4)


Warkworth

1880

D: Main Street (5)

2021

E: Potter Block (6)

127

F: Percy Municipal Building (7)


Built Form Warkwork is a small town where the downtown is right in the middle along Main street filled with small businesses and other commercial/retail. The arts and heritage centre at the intersection of Main and Church Street is where the downtown street begins. Expanding outwards from Main street is mostly residential areas with pockets of employment and institutional areas. Mixed use areas, which are mostly used for farming, are along the east and west edges of Warkworth (8).

Commercial Institutional Residential Urban Green Space Forest

Author: Elijah Ju

128


Warkworth

Figure Ground (9)

129


Typologies Warkworth’s architecture is vibrant, whether it is historic or recent. With extremely detailed ornamentation, varying materials and colors, asymmetrical elements, as well as intricate brickwork, the buildings in the town feature unique characteristics that tell them apart, no two being particularly similar. It’s styles range from Queen Anne Revival, to Arts and Crafts to mid 19th century Ontario main street architecture, allowing for a captivating built landscape.

(a) 35 Church Street “Arts + Heritage Centre”

Author: Nuvaira Tahir

(b) 20 Main Street “Warkworth Post”

(c) 31-33 Main Street “Potter Block”

(d) 40 Main Street “Warkworth Town Hall”

(e) 45 Main Street “Private Residence”

(f) 52 Main Street “Private Residence”

(g) 58 Saskatoon Avenue “Private Residence”

(h) 62 Main Street “St Paul’s United Church”

(i) 65 Church Street “Private Residence”

130


Warkworth (10)

i

a c

b d e

131

f

g

h


Linkages

(16)

Author: Lee Ying Natalie Chan

132


Warkworth

Plan of Downtown

Warkworth down-town region consists of different types of cultural, artistic and natural linkages, and most of the important landmarks within Warkworth are located along Mill Street, Church Street and Main Street. The town is known for various festivals and fairs, such as, Maple Syrup Festival at Sandy Flat Sugar Bush in March, Lilac Festival at the Millennium Trail in May and the Percy Agricultural Fall Fair at Percy Township Arena in September. The two major cultural linkages that fosters the artistic culture of the town are Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Arts and the Ah! Arts and Heritage Centre of Warkworth.

a

Percy Park / Mill Creek Park (11)

b

Warkworth Free Methodist Church

c

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

d

Ah! Arts and Heritage Centre of Warkwowrth (12)

e

Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Arts / Warkworth Public Library (13)

a

d

g

i

f

St. Paul’s United

i

Percy Township Arena (15)

g

Centre & Main Chocolate Co. (14)

j

St. Jerome’s Catholic Church

h

Millennium Trail

k

Percy Centennial Public School Ground

e

Sandy Flat Sugar Bush

133

Local Walking/ Cycling Routes


Infrastructure

Author: Erin Pang

134


Warkworth

Road Hierarchies (17)

Warkworth’s main infrastructure systems are located in the core community area where services are most needed for residential, institutional, and commercial use. It is also where parks and public facilities are used to host festivals and events, attracting tourists annually. County roads 25 and 29 serve as the main transportation linkage between other counties as well as collector roads used for circulation within the core area. Footpaths at Mill Pond and Millennium Trail, as well as major sidewalks along Church Street and Main Street support Warkworth’s economic and socially significant areas. To serve the outskirts of Warkworth and surrounding buildings where many residents rely on septic systems, waste stabilization ponds located in the East are part of Warkworth’s Wastewater System to treat wastewater by natural means, discharging into nearby Mill Creek seasonally (18).

Infrastructures

Natural Infrastructures

Street Light Pollution Density

Greenland Systems

Water/Sanitary/Storm Infrastructure

Commercial Agricultural Land Uses

Pedestrian Routes

Natural Water Ways

Trails

Protected Natural Resource Zones Forestry Zones and Parks

135


Natural Infrastructure

Author: Erin Pang

136


re

Warkworth

Water Infrastructure

The development and placement of Warkworth’s roads, parks, and trails are largely defined by Mill Pond and Mill Creek which runs through the town from West to East, within the Trent River Watershed. Warkworth Dam at Mill Pond controls flooding along this waterway, adjacent to vital residential and commercial zones. This protected area is part of the Warkworth Conservation Area and next to Conservation Area Lands owned by the Province of Ontario (19).

Natural Infrastructures Greenland Systems Commercial Agricultural Land Uses Natural Water Ways Protected Natural Resource Zones Forestry Zones and Parks

Parks and Resources

137

Vegetation and Conservation Areas


The Ideology of Dwelling

Site Plan 138


Warkworth

The smallest of the three towns, Warkworth, is quite different from its siblings of Hastings and Campbellford. Warkworth is much smaller, and not directly on a rural arterial road. In addition to its farming roots, Warkworth is now a designated arts community. Recently, LGBTQ2S+ people have found Warkworth quite welcoming. Hastings and Campbellford are connected to greater urban centres more directly, and traffic flows through these two towns toward cottage country and the natural environment beyond, with greater opportunity for tourism and commercial activity. Warkworth on the other hand is primarily identified by its economic activities through its agrarian and arts culture, which also make it an interesting place to live and visit. To explore the ideology of future dwelling in Warkworth, five students selected a small parcel of land currently within the rural development zone. In a similar manner to the Hastings and Campbellford projects, the imagined dwellings of Warkworth were developed in relation to one another within the town. Property lines, divisions, were deemed secondary to the spatial sequences between dwellings. The students worked collectively and individually, exploring how to build a residential development that is rooted in place.

139


Music Dwelling

By Erin Pang

a

b

c

140


Ideology of Dwelling

To support the ongoing artisitc spirit of the Warkworth community, the music dwelling and performance hall will become the musical hub for this small scaled intimate community of five dwellings. The arrangement of buildings focuses on the performance hall as the central stage viewed by dwelling residents, visitors at the adjacent bar, and from the boardwalk across the pond. The dwelling also becomes its own musical stage as the two dwelling units unify at shared musical spaces. a b c d e

dwelling front view performance hall ground floor dwelling ground floor site orientation performance hall view

d

e

141

Warkworth


Warkworth Saloon

By Nuvaira Tahir

a

b 142 b


Ideology of Dwelling

This project supports the Warkworth community by providing a space for celebrating activities on site. The Saloon program includes such as a bar/distillery, outdoor patio spaces, a dance floor, event space, and the supporting program of residential lodge that can fit 12 visitors or employees of the Saloon. The program works in conjuction with the music hall North of the Saloon to create a space of celebration for the town.

c a b c d e

entrance view site aerial view interior living view site orientation ground floor plan

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e 143

Warkworth


Culinary Art

By Natalie Chan

a

b

144


Ideology of Dwelling

In contributing to the diversity of the Warkworth artistic community, this proposed mixed-use dwelling design transcribes culinary art as an art form into a gathering space where community members can come together through learning, eating and celebrating the making of food. The design encompasses two co-living units and a communal space which includes a café, dining area and small-scaled commercial kitchen.

a b c d e

exterior entrance view transverse site section aerial massings west elevation garden view

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145

Warkworth


Artists Inn

By Jordan Lau

a

b

146


Ideology of Dwelling

Continuing the artistic culture of Warkworth, the Visual Arts Dwelling is a proposed artists’ residence with coliving. Each unit within the dwelling is afforded a private studio space, loft style bedroom, and outdoor balcony. The shared spaces within the design include the public gallery on the ground floor and the shared living space (kitchen, dining room and living room) on the second floor. The arrangment of the site includes two L-shaped forms (visual arts dwelling & farming dwelling) which form a semi-private courtyard space with a sculpture garden. a b c d

exterior entrance view ground floor plan site plan garden view

c

d

147

Warkworth


Community Farm + Greenhouse By Elijah Ju

a

b

c

148


Ideology of Dwelling

The Warkworth community farm + greenhouse is a single family residence for a local farmer within the community. Taking inspiration from traditional Korean houses called Hanoks, the wood structure follows a similar structure of columns and stacked beams. As well as having a similar L shape floor plan layout where the main living, kitchen, and dining is open concept and has views to the courtyard and the greenhouses. The home also has a nanny’s suite for grandparents as it is common in Korea for a grandparent to live with one their offspring. The courtyard is shared between with the artist’s residence and relates with the neighbouring residents.

a b c d e

exterior garden view section B-B section A-A roof assembly ground floor plan

d

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149

Warkworth


Public Works, Architectural Acupuncture

150


Warkworth

a b c d e

sculpture garden town hall centre for the arts satellite architecture school maker’s market biker repair shop

d e

c

b

a

Access to housing is an issue in all three towns. Temporary lodging is also in short supply. Where possible, students explored integrating housing/lodging together with commercial activity. Two existing cultural institutions anchor Warkworth, namely the historic Town Hall (Performing Arts) and Memorial Hall (Arts & Heritage Centre). Both of these institutions were studied to see how they may be renovated for additional services with the existing rural development zone in town. As an arts-identified community, it was in Warkworth that the students chose to insert a satellite Architecture School, and a series of ‘maker-spaces’. It was also here that an existing popular trail and park was studied to see how it may be integrated with the arts-focused cultural identity of Warkworth.

151


Sculpture Garden

By Erin Pang

Warkworth’s vibrant community hosts many outdoor events throughout the year, including the Lilac Festival located along the Millennium Trail. As part of a largerscale effort to revitalize and support the spirit of the community, development of the existing trail as a sculpture garden will inspire creative usage of spaces surrounded by nature, supporting the artisic culture of the town. The proposed additions to Millennium Trail

consist of the Nature Pavilion and Nature Centre, in addition to other sculpture placement locations along the trail to be developed in the future. The Nature Pavilion located at the west end acts as the first sculptural piece and gateway to the trail. Chimes played by nature and suspended tree-like canopies immerse visitors from the built world into the natural world through the senses.

a

b

152


Public Works

a b c d

exterior view longitudinal section site plan waterfront view

c

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153

Warkworth


The proposed Nature Centre building bends along the curvature of Mill Creek and Millennium Trail. Located in a flood plain, the entire building is raised and connected to a bridge that leads to higher ground at Percy Township Arena. Its sculptural ramp allows visitors to experience nature from a higher perspective and also provides access to the mezzanine level. The structure embodies sustainable systems and methods such as rainwater collection and carbon sequestration. Blurring the interior and exterior, the Nature Centre serves the community by providing spaces for activities such as ArtWorth children’s art camp, nature education, weddings, and other events. a b c d e

nature centre site plan elevation longitudinal section interior view bridge entry

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154

Erin Pang


Sculpture Garden

Public Works

d

e

155

Warkworth


Town Hall Centre for the Performing Arts By Natalie Chan The Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Performing Arts situated along Main Street is an important cultural landmark that hosts many community events and celebrations annually. It is also home to the existing Warkworth library. This design proposal is to preserve and renovate the existing historical town hall, and construct an addition on the North end. Along with the proposed Ryerson satellite school of architecture in the neighbouring site, this development aims to honour the

artistic culture in Warkwork by introducing an element of design innovation and rural architectural development. In collaboration with the Ryerson satellite campus, an architectural library, study and research space, as well as exhibition space are added to the library. The existing town hall is renovated for better circulation and spatial organization with movable partitions. A digital fabrication lab is also introduced where students and community members can utilize a variety of digital tools.

a

b 156


Public Works

a b c d

exterior entrance view massing sequence east elevation site plan

c

d 157

Warkworth


a b c d

ground floor plan perspective section transverse section interior view

a

c 158

Natalie Chan


Public Works

Town Hall Centre for the Arts

d

e 159

Warkworth


Warkworth Architecture School To support Warkworth’s educational resources, Ryerson’s architecture satellite school was proposed for Project 3. The school branches off the existing arts culture of the town, while providing a setting for a discussion centered on city growth. The school is integrated into a complex connected to the Town Hall and library to facilitate all programs needed to attract students and professionals from external municipalities to study and interact with the town of Warkworth.

a

By Nuvaira Tahir

The complex school building fits one studio group of 16 students to be used as a multipurpose space. To support this, a lodge and cafeteria double as hotel space in off seasons. The school works with the Town Hall and library to provide a library for extra lecture spaces and offices. At the centre of the complex, there is a courtyard designed for events, presentations and general amusement for the town’s students and residents.

architecture school presentation space.

b 160


Public Works

a b c d e

c

school interior view longitudinal section massing diagram intimate courtyard view ground floor plan

d

e 161

Warkworth


a

b

a b c d

transverse section east elevation outdoor cafe view west elevation

162

Nuvaira Tahir


Satellite Architecture School

Public Works

h

c

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d 163

Warkworth


Maker’s Market

By Jordan Lau

Located at the intersection of Church Street and Main Street, the intent is to augment the existing entry to the town to better represent Warkworth and add additional employment. Building off the idea of Warkworth being a community which values art and many of its residents being artists themselves, the project reimagines the Arts and Heritage site with the addition of the Maker’s Market.

On the north side of the intersection, the historic Arts Centre building is given a much needed ramp for accessibility and public washrooms designed to serve the town. Adjacent the Centre are four new maker spaces. Across the intersection to the south, five additional small maker spaces and an intimate courtyard alter the appearance of the parking lot fronting the local liquor store (LCBO).

b 164


Public Works

a b c d

exterior view south elevation interior view ground floor

exterior perspective east elevation (north site) site plan section (north site) e

ritag nd He Arts a entre C

c

H ST

CHURC

N

AI

M ST

d 165

Warkworth


a b c d

a

b 166

Jordan Lau

west elevation (south site) section (south site) north elevation (south site) exterior square view


Maker’s Market

Public Works

c

d 167

Warkworth


Bike Repair Shop

By Elijah Ju

The Warkworth Stage Coach is a mixed-use building with a retail bike shop + repair on the ground floor and affordable apartment units above. The site was previously an old stage coach hotel, but had to be torn down due to tornado damage in 1995. The current owners and propriertors of the adjacent Frantic Farms Gallery utliize the parcel for commercial parking. Another notable building nearby on Main street is a café called Our Lucky Stars. Each spring, the Municipality of Trent

Hills installs bicycle parking directly in front of the Cafe, as an amenity for cycling culture; the hills of Northumberland attract many riders. While Warkworth was a stage coach town in the 19th century, an early transportation hub connecting urban to the south with remote communities to the north, this project proposes a hub for bicycle transportation complementing the local Cafe with a bike repair shop and much needed residential accommodation directly above.

a

b 168


Public Works

a b c d

exterior view site plan ground floor plan transverse section

c

d 169

Warkworth


a b c d

a

b 170

Elijah Ju

second floor plan perspective section exterior view from street interior view


Bike Repair Shop

Public Works

c

d 171

Warkworth


References Chapter 1: Hastings

1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

8. 9. 10.. 11. 12.

13.

14. 15. 16. 17.

18.

Trent River Lock 18 [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://marinas.com/view/lock/ z3hxe_Trent_River_Lock_18_Hastings_Campbellford_ON_Canada Village of Hastings [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://digital.library.mcgill.ca/ countyatlas/searchmapframes.php Campbellford, ON. 1:63,360. Map sheet 031C05, [ed. 1], 1933 [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://digitalarchive.mcmaster.ca/islandora/object/macrepo%3A87945 R. (Director). (2014). Old Views of Hastings, Norwood & Havelock Ontario [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTVCvHfdlf4&ab_ channel=ReelNostalgia Ibid. Bridge St Hastings Ont. [Digital image]. (2018). Retrieved from https://www.facebook. com/168567759867956/posts/memories-of-hastings-ontario-in-hastings-early-historylumber-from-the-northern-/2039344772790236/ Trent Severn Waterways [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http:// hastingshistoricalsociety.com/birth-of-a-village-reissued-and-2014-calendars-arehere/2014-calendar/ Grand Trunk Railway station [Digital image]. (2015). Retrieved from https://www. facebook.com/hastingshistoricalsocietyontario/photos/785967348160748 Ibid, 4. Zoning. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ic9.esolg.ca/11178429_TrentHills/en/building-anddevelopment/zoning.aspx#Area-maps Municipality of Trent Hills Community Map. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cgis.com/ cpal/Default.aspx?Map=Trent+Hills Municipality of Trent Hills. (2017). Hastings - An Architectural Walking Tour [Brochure]. Retrieved from https://www.trenthills.ca/en/recreation-and-culture/resources/Heritagebrochures/Hastings.pdf Trent Hills Chamber of Commerce. (n.d.). Capture Pisces Pete in your favourite selfie pose. Retrieved from Experience Trent Hills: https://www.visittrenthills.ca/ trentseverntrailtowns/hasting-pisces-pete/ The Wanderlust Group. (n.d.). Trent River Lock 18. Retrieved from Marinas: https:// marinas.com/view/lock/z3hxe_Trent_River_Lock_18_Hastings_Campbellford_ON_Canada Hastings Revitalization Association. (n.d.). About Hastings. Retrieved from Hastings Village: https://hastingsvillage.ca/ Atkinson, C. (n.d.). Hastings Field House. Retrieved from Municipality of Trent Hills: https://www.trenthills.ca/en/recreation-and-culture/hastings-field-house-1.aspx# Hastings Community Edible Garden. (2019, March 20). Hastings Community Edible Garden. Retrieved from Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ HastingsCommunityEdibleGarden/ 2 Old Guys Walking. (2017, August 30). Fowlds Mill, Hastings, Ontario. Retrieved from 2 Old Guys Walking: https://2oldguyswalking.wordpress.com/2017/08/30/fowlds-millhastings-ontario/ 172


Chapter 2: Campbellford

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10..

11.

12. 13. 14. 15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

Trent-Severn Towns & Villages [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https:// kawarthasnorthumberland.ca/resource/towns-and-villages-of-the-trent-severnwaterway/ Campbellford BIA. (2014, May 15). History of Campbellford. Retrieved February 22, 2021, from https://campbellfordbia.ca/history-of-campbellford/ Smith Flour Mill [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1883). Retrieved from https://www. ruralroutes.com/617.html Trent Valley Wooden Mill [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1883). Retrieved from https://www.ruralroutes.com/617.html River Block West [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1902). Retrieved from https:// www.ruralroutes.com/617.html Front Street [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1906). Retrieved from https://www. ruralroutes.com/617.html Fire Brigade [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1907). Retrieved from https://www. ruralroutes.com/617.html Railway Bridge [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1917). Retrieved from https://www. ruralroutes.com/617.html The Lift Bridge [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (1920). Retrieved from https://www. ruralroutes.com/617.html Municipality of Trent Hills. (2017). Campbellford - A Tour of Designated Heritage Properties. [Brochure]. Retrieved from https://www.trenthills.ca/en/recreation-andculture/resources/Heritage-brochures/Campbellford.pdf Today’s Northumberland. (n.d.). YMCA Northumberland [Photograph found in Campbellford]. Retrieved from https://todaysnorthumberland.ca/2018/05/24/gettingready-for-pool-season/ Ibid, Chapter 1 (10). Ibid, Chapter 1 (11). Campellford Skate park [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.skateboard.com.au/skateparks/canada/campellford-skate-park/ Toonie [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https:// www.tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g499255-d1825774-ReviewsToonie_Monument-Campbellford_Trent_Hills_Ontario.html#photos ;aggregationId=&albumid=&filter=7&ff=26202023 Farmers Market Campbellford [Photograph found in Campbellford]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.yelp.ca/biz/campbellford-farmers-market-campbellford Northumberland County. (n.d.). Ranney Gorge Suspension Bridge [Photograph found in Northumberland County]. Retrieved from https://kawarthasnorthumberland.ca/top-tipsfor-things-to-do-in-around-campbellford/ KawarthaNOW. (n.d.). Westben [Photograph found in Northumberland County]. Retrieved from https://kawarthanow.com/2020/05/02/westben-in-campbellford-cancelsconcerts-at-the-barn-summer-season/ 173 Municipality of Trent Hills Community Map. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cgis.com/ cpal/Default.aspx?CLIENT=Trent+Hills&MARKERS=44.2013+-77.8892


Chapter 3: Warkworth

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

19.

Weilandt, M. (n.d.). The Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Arts [Digital image]. Retrieved February 21, 2021 from https://warkworth.ca/town-hall/ Warkworth - Main Street. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://www. ontariogenealogy.com/ontarioimagesofthepast.html Ibid. Canada Post Warkworth. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2021, from http://www.ruralroutes. com/4233.html Ibid, 2. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://www.ruralroutes.com/617.html Ibid. Zoning. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://ic9.esolg.ca/11178429_TrentHills/en/building-anddevelopment/zoning.aspx#Area-maps Ibid, Chapter 1 (10). Ibid, Chapter 1 (11). Ah! Arts And Heritage Centre Of Warkworth [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://goo.gl/maps/ypveGBQBCUEJUW2D7 Ibid. Bremner, S. (2017, September). The Warkworth Town Hall Centre for the Arts [Digital image]. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://goo.gl/maps/gqiNmv2wZGsipGSMA P, J. (2019, August). Centre & Main Chocolate Co. [Digital image]. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://goo.gl/maps/PJhLFfF6MQ6xf3Qw7 Day, J. (2016, September). The Warkworh Fall Fair [Digital image]. Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https://goo.gl/maps/VjYKij3C1khMEUkJ7 Sandy Flat Sugar Bush. (2019, February 04). Retrieved February 21, 2021, from https:// warkworth.ca/sandy-flat-sugar-bush/ Ibid, 9. The Municipality of Trent Hills - Annual Report - Warkworth Wastewater System 2017 (Rep.). (2017). Retrieved https://www.trenthills.ca/en/living-here/resources/Wastewater/ Warkworth-Wastewater-System-Annual-Report-2017-003.pdf Warkworth Conservation Area Master Plan (Rep.). (2011). Retrieved http://www.ltc.on.ca/ cms_lib/Warkworth_Master%20Plan_2011-FINAL.pdf

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Country Culture Lab - 2021  

Take sixteen urban students from the Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University in Toronto, and introduce them to a new experie...

Country Culture Lab - 2021  

Take sixteen urban students from the Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University in Toronto, and introduce them to a new experie...

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