__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

DAVID WOJNAROWICZ & LUIS FRANGELLA / EN ARGENTINA IN

i a n e r i c k s o n-k e ry verรณnica flom


David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella / en Argentina in


David Wojnarowicz and Luis Frangella in Argentina By Ian Erickson-Kery and Verónica Flom

Introduction In June 1984, Argentinean artist Luis Frangella set out on a trip to Buenos Aires from New York together with David Wojnarowicz. Both artists played integral roles in the exuberant East Village scene of the eighties, and headed south carrying several of their peers’ works in their luggage for an exhibition at the CAyC (Center for Art and Communication), a hub for experimental art in Buenos Aires. For Luis, the trip also marked a visit to his family and a return to his home country; for David, it provided immersion in a new setting which made a lasting impact on his work. Luis was born to an upper-middle-class family in Buenos Aires in 1944. Trained as an architect, he later received a scholarship from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1973 to 1976, after which he moved to New York.1 While at MIT, he collaborated with the iconic multidisciplinary artist John Cage. After his move to New York, Luis began to exhibit drawings and paintings at galleries with increasing regularity.2 David was born in suburban New Jersey in 1954. His upbringing was marred from a young age by incidents of domestic violence. He moved to New York alone at the age of 16. In his early twenties, he became interested in writing and music, and soon after took on painting, compulsively expanding towards other media.3 David and Luis’s involvement in the East Village scene of the eighties was defined by constant participation in gallery shows,

1. Elena Oliveras, “La pittura è cosa mentale (Painting is a Mental Thing),” in Luis Frangella (exh. cat.), ed. Elena Oliveras (Buenos Aires: Centro Cultural Borges), 4. 2. Oliveras, Luis Frangella, 21. 3. Dan Cameron, “Passion in the Wilderness,” in Fever: The Art of David Wojnarowicz (exh. cat.), ed. Dan Cameron (New York: New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1999), 1.

3


underground nightlife, and crucially, the queer community that frequented the abandoned piers of lower Manhattan during the period. Piers 45 to 52 were known as spots for sexual encounter, as detailed in David’s journals. For both David and Luis, however, the piers also proved to be the ideal context for experimentation with painting. I In 1983, the Hudson waterfront assumed a more significant role among the East Village artists when David and his friend Mike Bidlo resolved to fully occupy Pier 34 with art. Transforming such a space into an art venue was partly an act of rebellion against a gallery system which, in their view, had become too commercialized. David and Mike released a press statement which declared the space to be one of unencumbered free expression; it was one where artists could “explore any image in any material on any surface they chose,” which was, in their words, “something that no gallery would tolerate.”4 Over 30 artists embraced their call, and for a short period of time before the pier was demolished in 1984, it was a vital hotbed of artistic activity in New York.5 While David’s early works had consisted mainly of photographs and stencils on paper, he began to work in a more impromptu style, and in larger scale, in wall paintings done at the piers. He simultaneously started to experiment with a cartoon-like aesthetic which would come to play an important role in his repertoire. One of his paintings depicted a perturbed cow with possessed eyes and its tongue spilling out from its mouth—in his words “exploding with fear” on its way to slaughter. The image has since become one of David’s most iconic.6 David and Luis became friends at this time. Luis’s contributions to Pier 34 were some of its most impressive. He was well-suited to respond to David and Mike’s cue: his deft painterly hand enabled him

4. Mike Bidlo and David Wojnarowicz,, “Statement,” David Wojnarowicz Papers at the Fales Library and Special Collections, New York University. Originally published in Benzene (Fall-Winter 1983-84), unpag. 5. Jonathan Weinberg, Pier 34: Something Possible Everywhere (New York: Hunter College Art Galleries, 2016), exh. cat. 6. Cynthia Carr, Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz. (New York: Fire in the Belly, Bloomsbury USA, 2012), 206.

4


to cover large surfaces with vivid and expressive forms, and to do so with apparent ease. For his largest works, he would maneuver a brush or roller at the end of a long stick.7 Luis’s murals are memorialized in photographs by Andreas Sterzing. In one of these murals, a parade of statuesque male and female torsos covered two walls, towering over anyone who entered the room. Another consisted of a serene and androgynous head of similarly imposing scale. Sterzing documented David and Mike relaxing on a bed of grass on the pier, with the painted head looming above, gracefully commanding the space. Luis’s dexterity in painting on large surfaces certainly had an influence on David. Likewise, David’s intensity impacted Luis. Carlo McCormick, an art critic who closely covered the East Village scene, writes, “they were so different from one another, yet somehow through their friendship and collaboration they attained a manner of creative symbiosis that added vast new dimensions to the work of both artists. David no doubt jolted Luis’s refined sensibilities into a kind of spontaneity, rawness, and primal, urgent energy that was at odds with the grace and grandeur of Luis’s classicism. But from Luis, David learned how to really paint.”8 Photographer Marisela La Grave, who also documented the piers, commented on how David admired Luis “for the control that he had of the line and how he managed the proportions and perspective.” She also saw David’s gagging cow head as a direct response to Luis: “He was saying, ‘OK, watch me do a bigger scale.’ ”9 II Between 1976 and 1983, Argentina underwent the most violent military dictatorship in its history. A military coup overthrew the democratically elected government of Isabel Martínez de Perón on March 24, 1976, which initiated what the regime called a “National Reorganization Process.” The military shuttered the legislature, banned political parties and social organizations, and repressed all

7. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 205. 8. Carlo McCormick in David Wojnarowicz: Brush Fires in the Social Landscape, ed. Melissa Harris (New York: Aperture, 2015), 117. 9. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 206.

5


opposition. With the premise of restoring order and eliminating the “subversive guerrilla movement,” the dictatorship committed countless crimes against humanity, including the kidnapping and murder of thousands of people, known as desaparecidos (the disappeared). In the midst of increasing internal opposition as a result of its repressiveness and its failed economic policies, the military regime looked to restore its legitimacy by reclaiming the Malvinas (Falkland) Islands from the United Kingdom. The military defeat in the ensuing war crippled the regime and accelerated the transition to democracy. In October 1983, Argentina’s democracy was restored with the election of Raúl Alfonsín, of the Radical Civic Union party, to the presidency. Alfonsín opened judicial trials of the military junta and embodied an optimistic outlook with the return to democracy, which also manifested itself in the art scene. During this period of redemocratization, an underground artistic culture emerged in Buenos Aires. The period was characterized by exchange and collaboration between disciplines and the blurring of boundaries between painting, music, theater and poetry. Non-traditional spaces, such as Café Einstein and the Parakultural were the primary incubators for these new tendencies. Painting played a pivotal role for 1980s Argentinean artists, as demonstrated by Ana María Battistozzi’s 2003 exhibition at Fundación Proa Escenas de los ‘80 (Scenes from the 80s).10 The relationship of these practices to Italian Transavantgarde and the German New Savages is the subject of ongoing inquiry. Luis had a strong sensibility for painting the human figure, particularly the torso and the head, which he executed in both classical and expressionistic styles. His practice incorporated elements of structure as well as chance. On the one hand, he made use of grids, drawing from his training as an architect. On the other, “he would often use the I-Ching to determine the size and shape of his canvases,” as artist Walter Robinson reminisced in a speech after Luis’s death.11

10. Ana María Battistozzi, Escenas de los 80 (Scenes from the 80s), (Buenos Aires: Fundación Proa, 2003), exh. cat. 11. Walter Robinson, unpublished speech presented on the occasion of World Aids Day 1993. Archive Hal Bromm.

6


A master of chiaroscuro and the use of black, Luis frequently incorporated rats, skeletons, skulls, candles, daggers and vanitas into his paintings. Even though his work did not directly address the socio-political context of Argentina, it certainly related to the prevailing return to figuration shared among artists working after the fall of the dictatorship. As art historian Viviana Usubiaga notes, Argentinean artists were preoccupied with depictions of the body in this period, which was part of confronting “the traumatic processes that society undergoes in times of transition.”12 David, furthermore, demonstrated an interest in the Argentinean context in his work beginning in 1983, the year prior to his visit. He alluded to political repression in the country in two collages, Chicken Legs and Sirloin Steak. In both, quotidian posters promoting bargain supermarket prices for meat serve as background supports for analogous pairs of unsettling images: first, a silkscreened black-and-white photograph of an armored police battalion; and second, a cartoon-figure head with its mouth sewn shut by a red string, which is woven through small holes puncturing the paper at the edges of the figure’s lips. The form of the head is pasted onto the supermarket poster with map clippings where Argentinean territory is clearly visible. Prior to the trip in 1984, David made a larger collage, expanding on the motifs presented in Chicken Legs and Sirloin Steak. Materiality and virtuosity come to the fore in the work’s title: I Use Maps Because I Don’t Know How to Paint. It is with irony, then, that a dismembered and decapitated cattle carcass appears in the bottom section of the collage in painterly brushstrokes. Painted by David, it has the stylistic mark of one of Luis’s fleshy, carnal torsos turned on its back, rendered bovine, and cut open. The self-effacing title of the work reads as a tart remark: David seems to be comparing his craft to that of Luis. David made several notable works during his stay in Buenos Aires. Those who encountered the artist during his visit commented on the voraciousness with which he worked, constantly drawing, painting, and photographing. For him, there was little distance

12. Viviana Usubiaga, “Imágenes argentinas en la postdictadura: el poder memorizar (Post-dictatorship Argentinean Images: the Power to Memorize),” Ramona 23 (2001): 19.

7


between observation of the new context and making art. Information about the recent history of dictatorship, in particular, not only spurred David to practice his mode of political commentary, but also provoked further experimentation with materials. In an interview with Sylvère Lotringer, he says, “in two weeks I painted twelve paintings and made a bunch of sculptures. They were very raw because it was such a small period of time. They dealt with people who were being kidnapped and murdered, with the new nuclear plant opening in Cordova [sic], and things about economics.”13 He made a number of small, colorful drawings of heads, each—again—with lips sewn shut with red string. The influence for this sewing technique can be found in the work of the Chilean artist Catalina Parra, to whose work he had been introduced in 1978. At that time, he sketched an image of her work Diariamente in his journal.14 The work consists of pages of a newspaper—obituaries and an advertisement for bread—that have been cut apart and stitched back together. The bread advertisement opens up onto a photograph of someone being seized, an allusion to the rampant political disappearances in Chile after general Augusto Pinochet rose to power in a 1973 coup. Parra’s stitching method clearly made an impression on David, and he employed a similar technique in his own work from 1983 onwards, typically to sew the mouths of drawn or painted figures shut. Additionally, he budgeted for a neon piece he never executed, and put together the sculpture An Altar for the People of Villa Miseria, a commentary on the extreme poverty of Buenos Aires shantytown dwellers that notably included a loaf of bread cut in half and sewn back together using red string. He also made a sculpture out of a horse’s skull muzzled by barbed wire. Maps of southern hemisphere countries are pasted on its snout, and Argentinean peso notes are pasted on its jaw. The notes are of two denominations, one peso and 10,000 pesos, referring to the drastic monetary revaluation of 1983, in

13. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz” in David Wojnarowicz: A Definitive History of Five or Six Years on the Lower East Side, ed. Giancarlo Ambrosino (New York: Semiotext(e), 2006), p. 190. 14. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 96.

8


which 10,000 of the older peso ley became convertible to one new peso argentino.15 This proved to be an unsustainable remedy, however, and signaled the start of a period of hyperinflation and constant currency adjustment that lasted until 1991. David’s commentary—his portrayal of currency as a sort of barbed entrapment—proved to be highly prescient in light of the economic experience of Argentina in the 1980s. His penchant for critique assumed a more global mantle through his work in and about Argentina, addressing not only economics and violence, but also the history of colonialism in works such as A Painting to Replace the British Monument in Buenos Aires. Here, David painted delicate acrylic strokes over an advertisement for a liquor popular in Argentina. A smoldering giant with American and British flags for eyes looms over a race of horses set on fire. The work captures the mixture of imaginativeness, emotional intensity, and sharp political commentary for which David would become well-known. III The CAyC, founded and directed by Jorge Glusberg in 1968, was the nexus for international conceptual art activity in Argentina during the 1970s, organizing exhibitions both domestically and abroad. Glusberg was particularly interested in integrating Argentinean artists and audiences into a broader international context. Luis had shown at the CAyC in 1979 as part of the exhibition Dibujo Argentino (Argentinean Drawing).16 He was one of numerous Argentinean artists working abroad in the period, and represented a natural conduit between the East Village scene and the activities of the center. While the CAyC was in the 1970s the key venue for “dematerialized” practices, by the beginning of the 1980s it began exhibiting neo-expressionist paintings consistent with emerging trends in New York and in Europe. By the time David and Luis visited Buenos Aires, they had already gained some recognition as artists in the United States. Their visit presented the ideal opportunity for Glusberg to showcase young

15. Central Bank of the Argentine Republic, Boletín Estadístico (Statistical Bulletin), No. 234.921, 1984. Print, www.bcra.gob.ar/Pdfs/PublicacionesEstadisticas/BoletinEstadistico/ boldat198409.pdf (accessed November 23, 2016) 16. Oliveras, Luis Frangella, 21.

9


artists working abroad. A promotional poster for David appeared almost like one for a concert. In large script sandwiched by star symbols, it read, “Desde New York...” (“From New York...”), foregrounding the artist’s fame and origins in a major cosmopolitan center. The poster also included several small images characteristic of David’s oeuvre—an exploding human head, a house split in two, a man set on fire, and the gagging cow which the artist first painted on the piers. The CAyC exhibition Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village (From New York: 37 East Village Painters) included both David and Luis, along with many of their friends and neighbors, including Bidlo, Sterzing, Keiko Bonk, Judith Glantzman, Russell Sharon, and Kiki Smith. Amidst a chaotic installation, which David and Luis largely carried out themselves, Glusberg sent some non-professionals to assist, who emphatically disagreed with the artists’ desire to paint the gallery walls and nearly walked out on the job.17 The opening did ultimately take place and was well-received by the local audience, according to David in his 1989 interview with Lotringer.18 However, due to the paucity of press coverage of art in Buenos Aires at the time, very little documentation of the exhibition remains apart from the promotional poster and a list of participating artists released by the CAyC. Informal documentation can be found in some photos that Luis’s friend Rafael Giménez took during the opening. Alejandro de Ilzarbe, an artist who visited the exhibition, draws a comparison between what he saw and the art being made in Buenos Aires at the moment: “it’s not as though we were here painting still lives and a new form of painting appeared all of the sudden. The spirit [of the latter] already existed here. We, or at least a certain group of people, were working in this register: the discos, ephemeral art, installations that were taken down the same night, these types of things...”19 Both scenes had a similar underground and collaborative ethos. In the exhibition at the CAyC, Luis painted a wall of the gallery with a large expressionistic mural of a human body, which stretched from the ground up to the second level of the building, dismembered

17. Rafael Giménez in discussion with the authors, November 2015. 18. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 190. 19. Alejandro de Ilzarbe in discussion with the authors, February 2015.

10


by the partition between floors. Luis’s CAyC mural closely resembled his torso mural at Pier 34 in its dramatic use of vertical space, overwhelming the scale of the viewer. David exhibited three sculptures made by altering the surface of purchased baby dolls: one painted mostly white, one painted with a cloud pattern, and another covered with pieces of maps like many of his other works. David had the opportunity to present his art to a new audience in Buenos Aires. In his interview with Lotringer, he describes the public reception as being very different from that to which he was accustomed to in New York: “... showing my work there was an entirely different kind of communication. It had nothing to do with economics. I mean I had people weeping in front of things I made in Argentina... I think the threat of death in daily life, the cycle of death with the disappeared people, the threat of death with expression is the same thing that I experienced growing up—fearing I would be killed or shocked. It was a very emotional experience for me to have my work seen outside, in an entirely different context, without connection to money, and realize that images can affect people.”20 David returned to New York in July 1984.21 However, on August 20th of that year, a group show opened in Buenos Aires at the former Café Einstein, reopened as the clandestine art gallery Babilonia, which belonged to Sergio Aisenstein.22 Works by David and Luis were shown together with others by Argentine artists: Guillermo Kuitca, Alfredo Prior, Juan José Cambre, Rafael Bueno, Alejandro De Ilzarbe, Ana Ekell, Gustavo Marrone, as well as Roberto Frangella, Luis’s brother. IV While in Buenos Aires, the artists spent time with Luis’s friends and family. One afternoon in his parents’ apartment, Luis made portraits of his mother and father on a cardboard surface folded in the middle to create a V-shaped formation. He titled these and other portraits in this series “masks.” David captured the intimate moment in

20. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 190. 21. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 264. 22. Sergio Aisenstein was a key figure in Buenos Aires’s counter-cultural scene in the eighties. He was the founder of Café Einstein, Babilonia and Nave Jungla.

11


black-and-white photographs. Luis made a similar cardboard portrait of David. They also spent time with Argentinean artists including Sergio Avello and his former roommate Alejandro De Ilzarbe. As Rafael Giménez recalls, they spent many nights on long walks through the city, once traveling approximately 20 miles from the central neighborhood of Recoleta to the suburb of El Tigre.23 In addition, David and Luis went on road trips to the interior of Buenos Aires province, and to Entre Ríos and Misiones provinces in the far northeast of the country, where they visited Iguazu Falls. Throughout these travels, both David and Luis kept notebooks full of diaristic watercolors. These provide glimpses of the moments they spent together: observing their surroundings, depicting the natural environment, and making portraits of each other. The notebooks reveal certain stylistic similarities and a sense of shared experience, but at the same time, two distinct vantage points and approaches. Taken together, they are a rich and intimate body of work. The artists never presented the notebooks to any public audiences, making them a highly personal record of what was certainly an intense and intrepid time for both of them.24 David also documented the trip in a series of photographs which is now part of the Fales Archive at New York University. Scenes found in the watercolor notebooks reappear regularly in the photos. A number of striking images can be found elsewhere in David’s oeuvre as well, such as those of cow skulls, remote highways, and road kill. Some of the photographs bear explicitly social and political content, for instance depicting shantytowns and the former Escuela Superior de Mecánica de la Armada (Higher School of Naval Mechanics), which was used as a detention and torture center during the dictatorship. Taken together, the images provide a poignant window into the rapport between David and Luis. In a letter to Peter Hujar, David relayed a terrifying moment swinging about on some vines at the water’s edge at Iguazu Falls, almost fatally tumbling into the rapids below.25 This scene, clearly exaggerated, is depicted more tamely in photographs taken by Luis with David’s camera.

23. Rafael Giménez in discussion with the authors, November 2015. 24. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 264. 25. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 263.

12


David’s recollections of the trip, to Hujar and other friends such as the gallerist Hal Bromm, were pervasively fond ones. To Hujar, he expressed a desire to return to the country and to learn Spanish. In a postcard to Bromm, he recalled his excitement at traveling by foot into the rainforest and his attraction to Argentinean men, again displaying his endearing penchant for exaggeration. On the picture side of the postcard, he drew his familiar gagging cow head over two stock images of Buenos Aires landmarks, the National Congress and the Planetarium. On the other side, he wrote: Greetings from an incredible country; not BA as much as the roads outside. We thrashed our way through steaming jungles, fought off mamba snakes and frenzied tarantulas, escaped from flash floods that threatened to carry us over 600 foot waterfalls, we scaled cliffs and swam the rapids of a river. The boys down here are beautiful, I had 300 count of mini heart attacks. But other than that, things have been great. We visited the famous balancing rock in Tandil, although it apparently lost its balance in 1920 and now there’s only signs attesting to the fact that it once perched on the cliffs 300 feet above. Hope all is fine. I did a wild one-man show with work here in BA. Luis is great to travel with. Bye — David Woj.26

Luis’s parents’ apartment in Buenos Aires was located along a major thoroughfare in the Recoleta neighborhood. It had an expansive view of Retiro train station and Italpark, a favorite destination for children and families in the eighties. In his notebook, beneath a colorful sketch of the view, David wrote: “something about the amusement park at sunset after I woke up, its early wintery yellow sky with neon lights and yellow turning sea green and lights flashing made me burst into tears. I was 5 years old again something like that.” Luis gave his notebook to David after the trip and wrote: “a souvenir of our travels through the northeast of Argentina. To David: the 1st American artist to love this land. To his feeling of a 5 yrs. old. Towards Iguazú. June 1984.”

26. David Wojnarowicz, postcard to Hal Broom, 1984.

13


David and Luis clearly had a strong personal and artistic connection, which manifested itself in their decision to travel together to Argentina. However, the two artists grew apart upon their return to New York. Carlo McCormick, who was a close friend of both artists, explains “while they always remained friends, they never seemed as close as they had been.” One reason had to do with David’s stomach: “David had this hyperactive metabolism. He would eat and eat many meals in the course of a day and remain perpetually skinny and undernourished… David needed to eat every few hours, he really needed to, he was hungry. Now, if David didn’t get enough to eat, he could sometimes get into a mood. The amazing balance he fought to keep between his extremely dark side and his profound sense of hope would slip out of whack. It seems that David and Luis were deep in the jungle in Argentina and David got hungry.”27 David’s hunger led his artistic work in many directions. Traces of his time in Argentina appeared regularly in the years following the trip. He collected printed matter in Argentina which are visible in a number of subsequent works. Posters for an event at the Casa de Salta comprise the backdrop for a collage, Untitled (1984), of two of David’s characteristic heads. The highly detailed 1987 collage Fire includes in its bottom right corner a car battery advertisement from the Argentine Automobile Club, along with other printed materials such as FBI wanted posters. Mementos from the trip were scattered about David’s domestic environs in New York. A photograph taken by Nan Goldin of David in his apartment in 1990 shows a collage partially made of a poster from the Radical Civic Union, the first party to democratically hold the Argentinean presidency after the dictatorship.28 V The AIDS crisis made a deep impact in the eighties, particularly within David and Luis’s New York community. In July 1981, a brief article in The New York Times described the mysterious appearance of a “rare cancer” in 41 gay men, primarily in New York and San

27. McCormick in Brush Fires, 118. 28. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 211.

14


Francisco.29 The cancer was Kaposi’s Sarcoma, which was soon thereafter discovered to be one of several life-threatening opportunistic infections found in AIDS patients. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention first used the term AIDS in September 1982, noting its prevalence among gay and bisexual men as well as other groups such as intravenous drug users.30 The increasing appearance of the virus among patients in New York was noted in 1983 by the key Downtown art publication The Village Eye.31 When David and Luis travelled to Argentina in June 1984, AIDS was still not widespread enough to perceived as a pervasive threat in everyday life. The causes of the disease remained unclear, and there was no information on how to control it. Within a few years, however, the East Village’s effervescent scene had become a community profoundly scarred by the illness, which prematurely took the lives of many of its members. In 1988 and 1989, respectively, David and Luis tested positive for HIV.32 David, at the time only 33 years old, confronted AIDS and the United States government’s systemic neglect of its victims head on. He became an engaged activist, most notably through the organization ACT UP, and remained committed to producing art. He passed his final years writing and working tirelessly. The disease was particularly devastating for Luis. It enfeebled him very quickly, to the point where he had difficulty speaking. His sister Lía Frangella remarked that he struggled to remember Spanish when he was sick.33 Russel Sharon, an East Village artist and former partner, took care of him in his Manhattan apartment. According to artist Keiko Bonk, one of Luis’s closest friends, he had wanted to die in Argentina but it proved impossible as there were no medical

29. Lawrence K. Altman, “Rare Cancer Seen in 48 Homosexuals,” The New York Times, July 3, 1981, accessed December 10, 2016, http://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/03/us/ rare-cancer-seen-in-41-homosexuals.html. 30. Centers for Disease Control Prevention, ”Update on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)--United States,” Atlanta: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 1984. Print, https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00001163.htm (accessed December 10, 2016) 31. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 228. 32. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 391 and 439. 33. Lía Frangella in discussion with the authors, July 2015.

15


facilities there to provide the necessary care.34 He passed away on December 7, 1990. David subsequently died on July 22, 1992. Luis was 46 at the time of his death, and David was 37. In 1999, David was the subject of a posthumous retrospective curated by Dan Cameron at the New Museum in New York. In 2003 and 2008, Elena Oliveras curated survey exhibitions of Luis in Buenos Aires. Although he has not received as much scholarly or institutional recognition as David, Luis has great relevance to the history of art in the East Village, both in terms of influence and companionship. David and Luis’s friendship and trip to Argentina occurred prior to the advent of the highly globalized art circuit pervasive today. For an American-born, New York-based artist to gain such intimate exposure to a Latin American context was unusual at the time, and certainly did not pass without making a mark on all involved. Their work and collaboration is inflected with an especially poignant vulnerability and fleetingness when viewed in hindsight. Yet, it also reminds us of the insoluble mark of friendship and community on the creation of art, even in the face of uncertainty and duress.

34. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 439.

16


Andreas Sterzing, Pier 34, Luis’ room with snow, 1983, C-print, Edition of 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. —— Andreas Sterzing, Muelle 34, Luis’ room with snow [Espacio de Luis Frangella con nieve], 1983, C-print, Edición de 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. Andreas Sterzing, Pier 34, Luis Frangella (head) & David Wojnarowicz (grass), 1983, C-print, Edition of 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. —— Andreas Sterzing, Muelle 34, Luis Frangella (head) & David Wojnarowicz (grass), [Luis Frangella (cabeza) & David Wojnarowicz (pasto)], 1983, C-print, Edición de 5. ©Andreas Sterzing.

17


Andreas Sterzing, Luis Frangella at Pier 34, 1983, C-print, Edition of 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. —— Andreas Sterzing, Luis Frangella at Pier 34 [Luis Frangella en el Muelle 34], 1983, C-print, Edición de 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. Andreas Sterzing, Pier 34, Gagging Cow mural by David Wojnarowicz, 1983, C-print, Edition of 5. ©Andreas Sterzing. —— Andreas Sterzing, Pier 34, Gagging Cow mural by David Wojnarowicz [Muelle 34, Vaca en ahorcamiento, mural de David Wojnarowicz], 1983, C-print, Edición de 5. ©Andreas Sterzing.

18


David Wojnarowicz, Chicken Legs, 1983, acrylic, map and string on found poster, 76 x 51 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Chicken Legs [Patas de pollo], 1983, acrílico, mapa y cuerda en afiche encontrado, 76 x 51 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

19


David Wojnarowicz, I Use Maps Because I Don’t Know How to Paint, 1984, acrylic, string, screen print on board, 123 X 123 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, I Use Maps Because I Don’t Know How to Paint [Uso mapas porque no sé pintar], 1984, acrílico, cuerda, serigrafía montada sobre tabla, 123 X 123 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

20


Luis Frangella, Untitled, c. 1984, acrylic on vinyl, 280 x 126 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella and Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, Sin título, c.1984, acrílico sobre tela vinílica, 280 x 126 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

21


Luis Frangella, Luis Frangella, Pinturas [Paintings], 1984, silkscreen, 101 x 75.5 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, and Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, Luis Frangella, Pinturas, 1984, afiche, 101 x 75.5 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

22


David Wojnarowicz, David Wojnarowicz, Pinturas y Esculturas [Paintings and Sculptures], 1984, silkscreen, 101 x 75.5 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, David Wojnarowicz, Pinturas y Esculturas, 1984, afiche, 101 x 75.5 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

23


David Wojnarowicz, A Painting to Replace the British Monument in Buenos Aires, 1984, acrylic on found poster, 114.3 x 147.3 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, A Painting to Replace the British Monument in Buenos Aires [Una pintura para reemplazar el Monumento Británico en Buenos Aires], 1984, acrílico en afiche encontrado, 114.3 x 147.3 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

24


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (two heads), 1984, acrylic on found poster, 104.14 x 146.05 cm. Ford Foundation Collection. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título (dos cabezas), 1984, acrílico sobre afiche encontrado, 104.14 x 146.05 cm. Colección Ford Foundation. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

25


26


David Wojnarowicz, An Altar for the People of the Villa Miseria, 1984, mixed media, 262 x 40 x 52 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, An Altar for the People of the Villa Miseria [Un altar para la gente de la Villa Miseria], 1984, técnica mixta, 262 x 40 x 52 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

27


28


CAyC, Invitation, Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village [From New York: 37 East Village Painters], CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984, 10 x 21 cm. Courtesy Rafael Giménez. —— CAyC, Invitación, Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village, CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984, 10 x 21 cm. Cortesía Rafael Giménez.

p. 28 Opening of Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village [From New York: 37 East Village Painters], CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984, photography, 9 x 13 cm. Courtesy Rafael Giménez. —— Inauguración de Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village, CAyC, 1984, fotografía, 9 x 13 cm. Cortesía Rafael Giménez. Opening of Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village [From New York: 37 East Village Painters], CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984, photography, 9 x 13 cm. Courtesy Rafael Giménez. —— Inauguración de Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village, CAyC, 1984, fotografía, 9 x 13 cm. Cortesía Rafael Giménez.

29


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled (two dolls), 1984, mixed media sculpture, 46 x 30 cm. (each). Courtesy Hal Bromm Gallery. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título (dos muñecos), 1984, escultura de técnica mixta, 46 x 30 cm. Cortesía Hal Bromm Gallery. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

30


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, mixed media sculpture, 46 x 30 cm. Courtesy Hal Bromm Gallery. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, escultura de técnica mixta, 46 x 30 cm. Cortesía Hal Bromm Gallery. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

31


Luis Frangella, Actuación Luis Frangella, Café Einstein [Performance Luis Frangella, Café Einstein], 1982, exhibition and performance poster, Buenos Aires, 30 x 24 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella and Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, Actuación, Café Einstein, 1982, afiche de performance y exhibición, Buenos Aires, 30 x 24 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

32


Announcement for Babilonia group show, Buenos Aires, 1984, 17,5 x 18,5 cm. Courtesy Alejandro de Ilzarbe. —— Anuncio para exposición grupal en Babilonia, Buenos Aires, 1984, 17,5 x 18,5 cm. Cortesía Alejandro de Ilzarbe.

33


Luis Frangella, Sigh, 1984, acrylic on canvas, 126 x 157 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, and Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, Sigh [Suspiro], 1984, acrílico sobre tela, 126 x 157 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

34


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, acrylic paint on found posters, 187 x 149 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, acrílico sobre afiches encontrados, 187 x 149 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

35


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, acrylic paint on found posters, 119 x 129 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, acrílico sobre afiches encontrados, 119 x 129 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

36


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, collage and acrylic paint on horse skull and barbed wire, 57 x 29 x 22 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, acrílico y collage sobre cráneo de caballo y alambre de púas, 57 x 29 x 22 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

37


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, acrylic on paper, 47,5 x 57,5 cm. Courtesy Sergio Aisenstein. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, acrílico sobre papel, 47,5 x 57,5 cm. Cortesía Sergio Asienstein. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

38


Luis Frangella, David Wojnarowicz (Triangle Head), 1984, acrylic on cardboard, 64 x 47 x 23 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella and Cosmocosa —— Luis Frangella, David Wojnarowicz (Cabeza triángulo), 1984, acrílico sobre cartón, 64 x 47 x 23 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

39


David Wojanrowicz, Untitled, Para Serjio [sic], muchas gracias, [For Serjio (sic), thank you], 1984, coffee, pencil and oil pastel on paper, 21.6 x 15,24 cm. Courtesy Rafael Bueno. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W —— David Wojanrowicz, Untitled, Para Serjio [sic], muchas gracias, café, lápiz y óleo pastel sobre papel, 21.6 x 15,24 cm. Cortesía Rafael Bueno. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W. David Wojanrowicz, Untitled, 1984, coffee and water markers on paper, 26,5 x 35 cm. Courtesy Luis Niveiro. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W —— David Wojanrowicz, Sin título, 1984, café y marcador sobre papel, 26,5 x 35 cm. Cortesía Luis Niveiro. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

40


David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1984, acrylic on paper, 85 x 90 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Sin título, 1984, acrílico sobre papel, 85 x 90 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

41


David Wojnarowicz and Luis Frangella, David Wojnarowicz’s travel contact (detail). Courtesy of the David Wojnarowicz Papers and the Fales Library Collections —— David Wojnarowicz y Luis Frangella, planchas de contactos de David Wojnarowicz (detalle). Cortesía de David Wojnarowicz Papers and Library & Special Collections.

42

sheets & Special de viaje the Fales


David Wojnarowicz, Postcard to Hal Bromm from Buenos Aires, 1984, Courtesy Hal Bromm. —— David Wojnarowicz, Postal a Hal Bromm desde Buenos Aires, 1984, Cortesía Hal Bromm.

43


David Wojnarowicz, S.A.: Wojnarowicz Argentina, 1984, watercolor, graphite and marker on paper, 23 pages, 41 x 33 cm. Courtesy of the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, S.A.: Wojnarowicz Argentina, 1984, acuarela, grafito y marcador sobre papel, 23 páginas, 41 x 33 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

44


Luis Frangella, A Souvenir of our travels..., 1984, watercolor on paper, 20 pages, 39 x 28 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. ©Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, A Souvenir of our travels..., [Un recuerdo de nuestros viajes...], 1984, acuarela sobre papel, 20 páginas, 39 x 28 cm. ©Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

45


David Wojnarowicz, 1984, watercolor and graphite on papers, 41 x 33 cm (each). Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, 1984, acuarela y grafito sobre papel, 41 x 33 cm. (cada una). Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

46


Luis Frangella, 1984, watercolor on paper, 39 x 28 cm. (each). Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. ©Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, 1984, acuarela sobre papel, 39 x 28 cm. (cada una). Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W. ©Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

47


David Wojnarowicz, 1984, watercolor and graphite on paper, 41 x 33 cm. (each). Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, 1984, acuarela y grafito sobre papel, 41 x 33 cm. (cada una). Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

48


Luis Frangella, 1984, watercolor on paper, 39 x 28 cm.(each) Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. ©Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. —— Luis Frangella, 1984, acuarela sobre papel, 39 x 28 cm. (cada una). Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W. ©Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa.

49


David Wojnarowicz, Happy Birthday Luis, 1984, watercolor and graphite on paper, 41 x 33 cm. Courtesy Estate of Luis Frangella, Cosmocosa. ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Happy Birthday Luis [Feliz cumpleaños Luis], 1984, acuarela y grafito sobre papel, 41 x 33 cm. Cortesía Legado de Luis Frangella y Cosmocosa. ©Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

50


David Wojnarowicz, 1984, watercolor and graphite on paper, 41 x 33 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, 1984, acuarela y grafito sobre papel, 41 x 33 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

51


52


David Wojnarowicz and Luis Frangella, David Wojnarowicz’s travel contact sheets. Courtesy of the David Wojnarowicz Papers and the Fales Library & Special Collections —— David Wojnarowicz y Luis Frangella, planchas de contactos de viaje de David Wojnarowicz, Cortesía de David Wojnarowicz Papers and the Fales Library & Special Collections.

53


David Wojnarowicz, Fire, 1987, acrylic and mixed media on wood, 183 x 244 cm. Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), New York, Collection. Gift of Agnes Gund and Barbara Jakobson Fund. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Fire, [Incendio], 1987, acrílico y técnica mixta sobre madera, 183 x 244 cm. Colección Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Nueva York. Donación Agnes Gund y Barbara Jakobson Fund. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

54


David Wojnarowicz, Cal (Factory Face), 1984, acrylic on masonite, 121.92 x 121.92 cm. Courtesy Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W. —— David Wojnarowicz, Cal (Factory Face) [Cal (Cara de fábrica)], 1984, acrílico sobre masonita, 121.92 x 121.92 cm. Cortesía Legado de David Wojnarowicz y P.P.O.W.

55


David Wojnarowicz y Luis Frangella en Argentina Ian Erickson-Kery y Verónica Flom

Introducción En junio de 1984, el artista argentino Luis Frangella viajó a Buenos Aires desde Nueva York junto con el artista norteamericano David Wojnarowicz. Los dos eran miembros fundamentales de la entusiasta escena del East Village en la década del ‘80, y partieron hacia el sur llevando en sus valijas varias obras de sus colegas para una muestra en el CAyC (Centro de Arte y Comunicación), un foco de arte experimental en Buenos Aires. Mientras que para Luis el viaje también implicaba una visita a su familia y una manera de reconectarse con su país de origen, para David significó la inmersión en un entorno nuevo, que tuvo un impacto perdurable en su obra. Luis nació en Buenos Aires en 1944, en una familia de clase media alta. Estudió arquitectura y recibió una beca del Massachusetts Institute of Technology entre 1973 y 1976, tras la cual se mudó a Nueva York.1 Durante su estadía en el MIT trabajó en colaboración con el emblemático y multidisciplinario artista John Cage. Una vez en Nueva York Luis empezó a mostrar sus dibujos y pinturas con más frecuencia.2 David nació en las afueras de Nueva Jersey en 1954. Su infancia estuvo marcada por incidentes de violencia doméstica. Se mudó solo a Nueva York a los dieciséis años. Un tiempo más tarde surgió su interés por la música y la escritura, y poco después empezó a pintar, expandiéndose compulsivamente hacia otros medios.3 La participación de David y Luis en la escena de los ‘80 del East Village estuvo definida por su constante presencia en muestras de galerías, la vida nocturna y crucialmente la comunidad queer que

1. Elena Oliveras, “La pittura è cosa mentale” en Luis Frangella (exh. cat.), ed. Elena Oliveras (Buenos Aires: Centro Cultural Borges), 4 2. Oliveras, Luis Frangella, 21. 3. Dan Cameron, “Passion in the Wilderness,” en Fever: The Art of David Wojnarowicz (exh. cat.), ed. Dan Cameron (New York: New Museum of Contemporary Art, 1999), 1.

57


frecuentaba los muelles abandonados del bajo Manhattan durante ese período. Los piers 45 a 52 eran lugares de encuentros sexuales, como detalla David en sus diarios. Para David y Luis, sin embargo, los muelles del río Hudson resultaron ser el lugar perfecto para experimentar con la pintura. I En 1983, los muelles del Hudson adquirieron un papel más significativo entre los artistas del East Village cuando David y su amigo Mike Bidlo decidieron ocupar el Pier 34 y llenarlo de obras de arte. Usar ese lugar para producir arte era, en cierto modo, un acto de rebelión contra un sistema de galerías que se había vuelto demasiado comercial. David y Mike distribuyeron un comunicado de prensa en el que el pier era declarado espacio de libre expresión; allí los artistas podrían “explorar cualquier imagen con cualquier material sobre cualquier superficie que elijan”, lo que, en sus palabras, era “algo que ninguna galería toleraría”.4 Más de treinta artistas respondieron a la convocatoria y, durante un breve período, antes de que el pier fuera demolido en 1984, el espacio se convirtió en un hervidero de actividad artística en Nueva York.5 Mientras que los trabajos tempranos de David consisitieron principalmente en fotografías y stencils sobre papel, en los muelles empezó a trabajar murales impromptu y a gran escala. Comenzó, a su vez, a experimentar con una estética de historieta que pasaría a desempeñar un importante papel dentro de su obra. En uno de esos murales, David pintó una vaca perturbada con ojos poseídos y lengua afuera: en sus propias palabras, “estallando de miedo” camino al matadero. La imagen ha pasado a ser una de sus más emblemáticas.6 David y Luis se hicieron amigos en esa época. Los aportes de Luis al Pier 34 fueron impactantes. Era la persona justa para responder a la propuesta de David y Mike: su habilidad pictórica le

4. Mike Bidlo y David Wojnarowicz, “Statement,” David Wojnarowicz Papers at the Fales Library and Special Collections, New York University. Publicado originalmente en Benzene (Otoño-Invierno 1983-84). 5. Jonathan Weinberg, Pier 34: Something Possible Everywhere (New York: Hunter College Art Galleries, 2016). 6. Cynthia Carr, Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz. (New York: Fire in the Belly, Bloomsbury USA, 2012), 206.

58


permitía cubrir grandes superficies con formas expresivas e intensas, y hacerlo, además, con aparente facilidad. Para sus obras más grandes utilizaba una brocha o un rodillo en la punta de un palo largo.7 Los murales de Luis fueron inmortalizados en fotos por Andreas Sterzing. En uno de esos murales, un desfile de imponentes torsos masculinos y femeninos cubría dos paredes, irguiéndose sobre todo el que entrara al recinto. Otro consistía de una cabeza serena y andrógina a una escala igualmente impresionante. Sterzing registró a David y Mike recostados en el pasto en el muelle, y detrás la cabeza pintada por Luis, dominando elegantemente el espacio. La habilidad de Luis para pintar sobre grandes superficies sin duda tuvo influencia sobre David. Carlo McCormick, un crítico de arte que cubrió extensamente la escena del East Village, escribe: “Eran tan diferentes entre sí, y sin embargo adquirieron, a través de su amistad y sus trabajos en colaboración, un estilo de simbiosis creativa que le agregó enormes y nuevas dimensiones al trabajo de ambos artistas. Claramente David arrastró las refinadas sensibilidades de Luis hacia una especie de espontaneidad, crudeza y energía primaria y urgente que no se correspondía con la gracia y la majestuosidad del clasicismo de Luis. Pero de Luis aprendió a pintar de verdad”.8 La fotógrafa Marisela La Grave, que también registró los piers, señaló que David admiraba a Luis “por el control que tenía de la línea y por cómo manejaba la proporción y la perspectiva”. También consideró que la cabeza de vaca de David era una respuesta directa a Luis: “Como si le dijera Ok, mirá cómo pinto a mayor escala”.9 II Entre 1976 y 1983 Argentina atravesó la dictadura militar más violenta de su historia. El 24 de marzo de 1976, un golpe militar derrocó al gobierno democrático de Isabel Martínez de Perón para dar comienzo a un período que el régimen denominó como Proceso de Reorganización Nacional. Los militares clausuraron la Legislatura,

7. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 205. 8. Carlo McCormick en David Wojnarowicz: Brush Fires in the Social Landscape, ed. Melissa Harris (New York: Aperture, 2015), 117. 9. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 206.

59


prohibieron los partidos políticos y reprimieron toda oposición. Con la premisa de restaurar el orden y eliminar el “movimiento subversivo guerrillero”, la dictadura cometió incontables crímenes de lesa humanidad, entre ellos el secuestro y asesinato de miles de personas, conocidas como “desaparecidos”. En medio de una creciente oposición interna, resultante de la represión y las políticas económicas fallidas, el régimen militar intentó recomponer su legitimidad reclamándole las Islas Malvinas a Inglaterra. La derrota militar en la guerra subsiguiente lesionó el régimen y aceleró la transición a la democracia. En octubre de 1983, el país eligió a Raúl Alfonsín, candidato de la Unión Cívica Radical, como presidente democrático. Alfonsín empezó un juicio contra la junta militar y encarnó el optimismo por el retorno a la democracia, que se manifestó también en la escena del arte. Durante este período de redemocratización, surgió en Buenos Aires una corriente under. Este momento se caracterizó por el intercambio y la colaboración entre disciplinas, y el borramiento de los límites entre pintura, música, teatro y poesía. Los espacios no tradicionales, como el Café Einstein y el Parakultural, fueron las principales incubadoras de estas nuevas tendencias. La pintura desempeñó un papel central para los artistas argentinos, como quedó demostrado en la muestra curada por Ana María Battistozzi para Fundación Proa en 2003, Escenas de los ‘80.10 Sus relaciones con la Transvanguardia italiana y los Nuevos Salvajes alemanes necesitan ser revisadas. Luis tenía una fuerte sensibilidad hacia la figura humana en la pintura, en particular hacia el torso y la cabeza que ejecutaba de manera tanto clásica como expresionista. Su práctica incorporaba elementos de estructura y de azar. Por un lado, utilizaba grillas, resabios de su entrenamiento como arquitecto. Por el otro, “recurría al I-Ching para determinar el tamaño y la forma de sus pinturas”, como rememoró el artista Walter Robinson en un discurso después de la muerte de Luis.11 Un experto en el claroscuro y el uso del negro, Luis frecuentemente incorporaba ratas, esqueletos, calaveras,

10. Ana María Battistozzi, Escenas de los ‘80, Buenos Aires: Fundación Proa, 2003. 11. Walter Robinson, discurso inédito presentado en la ocasión de World Aids Day 1993 (Día Mundial del Sida, 1993). Archivo Hal Bromm.

60


velas, puñales y vanitas. Si bien su obra no se refería directamente al contexto sociocultural de Argentina, sin duda se vinculaba con el predominante retorno a la figuración entre los artistas plásticos argentinos tras la caída de la dictadura. Como explica la historiadora del arte Viviana Usubiaga, en ese entonces, los artistas argentinos estaban preocupados por la representación del cuerpo, lo cual era una manera de confrontar “los procesos traumáticos que atraviesa la sociedad en tiempos de transición”.12 Por su parte, David demostró interés por el contexto argentino en el trabajo que empezó a hacer en 1983, un año antes de su visita. Aludió de forma directa a la represión en dos collages, Chicken Legs y Sirloin Steak. En ambos casos, los carteles de supermercado con ofertas de carne sirven de fondo para un par de imágenes perturbadoras: primero, una serigrafía en blanco y negro de un batallón policial; segundo, el dibujo de una cabeza con la boca cosida con hilo rojo, que pasa por unos agujeritos hechos en el papel alrededor de los labios. La forma de la cabeza está superpuesta al cartel de supermercado y exhibe recortes de un mapa en el que se ve claramente el territorio argentino. Antes del viaje de 1984, David hizo un collage más grande, que desarrollaba los motivos ya presentados en Chicken Legs y Sirloin Steak. El título de la obra destacaba la materialidad y el virtuosismo: I Use Maps Because I Don’t Know How to Paint (Uso mapas porque no sé pintar). Es, entonces, con ironía que el cuerpo decapitado y desmembrado de una res aparece pintado en la parte inferior del collage. Aunque realizado por David, tiene la marca estilística de uno de los torsos carnales de Luis, dado vuelta, hecho bovino y cortado al medio. El humilde título de la obra puede interpretarse como un comentario mordaz: David parece estar comparando su destreza a la de Luis. Durante su estadía en Buenos Aires David produjo varias obras notables. Quienes lo conocieron durante esta visita señalaron la voracidad con la que trabajaba, constantemente dibujando, pintando, sacando fotos. Para él no había mucha distancia entre la observación del nuevo entorno y la producción de arte. La información sobre la

12. Viviana Usubiaga, “Imágenes argentinas en la postdictadura: el poder memorizar,” Ramona 23 (2001): 19.

61


historia reciente de la dictadura, en particular, lo incentivó no sólo a practicar su modalidad de comentario político sino también a una mayor experimentación con los materiales. En una entrevista con Sylvère Lotringer, dice: “En dos semanas pinté doce cuadros e hice varias esculturas. Muy en bruto porque tenía poco tiempo. Tenían que ver con gente secuestrada y asesinada, con la nueva planta nuclear que inauguraba en Cordova [sic] y cosas de economía”.13 Hizo pequeños dibujos coloridos de cabezas con los labios cocidos con hilo rojo. La influencia para esta técnica de costura se encuentra en la obra de la artista chilena Catalina Parra, cuyo trabajo David conoció en 1978. En ese momento bocetó, en su cuaderno, una imagen de Diariamente, una obra de la artista.14 El trabajo consiste de páginas de diario—obituarios y una publicidad de pan—que habían sido cortados y rearmados con costuras. La propaganda de pan es atravesada por una foto de alguien siendo capturado, una alusión a las desapariciones políticas en Chile después de la toma de poder del golpe de estado del General Pinochet. La técnica de costura de Parra claramente impactó a David, quien utilizó un recurso similar en sus obras a partir de 1983, generalmente utilizándola para cocer los labios de figuras dibujadas o pintadas. Además, pidió presupuesto para una obra en neón que jamás ejecutó, y armó la escultura An Altar for the People of the Villa Miseria, una observación de la extrema pobreza de los habitantes de los barrios carenciados que incluye un pan cortado por la mitad y unido por una costura de hilo rojo. También hizo una escultura con el cráneo de un caballo amordazado con alambre de púas. En el hocico tiene pegados mapas de países del hemisferio sur, y en la quijada billetes de pesos argentinos. Los billetes son de dos valores: de $1 y $10.000, en referencia a la drástica revaluación de la moneda de 1983, en la que 10.000 de los antiguos “pesos ley” equivalían a 1 nuevo “peso argentino”.15 Este recurso, sin embargo, resultó insostenible, y marcó el comienzo de un período de hiperinflación y permanente

13. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz” en David Wojnarowicz: A Definitive History of Five or Six Years on the Lower East Side, ed. Giancarlo Ambrosino (New York: Semiotext(e), 2006), 190. 14. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 96.

62


ajuste monetario que se prolongó hasta 1991. El comentario de David –su representación de la moneda como una especie de trampa alambrada– demostró ser tremendamente profético si se tiene en cuenta la experiencia económica de la década del ‘80 en Argentina. Además, su inclinación a la crítica adquirió una dimensión más global a través de su trabajo en y sobre Argentina, apuntando no sólo a la violencia y la economía, sino también a la historia del colonialismo en trabajos como A Painting to Replace the British Monument in Buenos Aires, en la que David pinta con delicadas pinceladas en acrílico sobre la propaganda de un popular licor argentino. Un gigante en llamas con banderas norteamericanas y británicas como ojos observa detenidamente una carrera de caballos prendida fuego. El trabajo captura una mezcla de imaginación, intensidad emocional y un agudo comentario político por el que David sería luego reconocido. III El CAyC, fundado en 1968 y dirigido por Jorge Glusberg, fue el principal foco de actividad artística conceptual internacional en Argentina durante la década de 1970; organizaba muestras tanto a nivel local como en el extranjero. Glusberg estaba particularmente interesado en integrar a los artistas y al público argentino en un contexto internacional. Luis había expuesto en el CAyC en 1979 como parte de la muestra “Dibujo argentino”.16 Ya en los 80 era uno de muchos artistas locales que estaban trabajando en el extranjero y surgió como un nexo entre la escena del East Village y las actividades del Centro. Mientras que, en la década del ‘70, el CAyC había sido el espacio fundamental para las prácticas de desmaterialización, a principios de la década del ‘80 empezaba a exhibir pinturas neoexpresionistas, a tono con las tendencias emergentes en Nueva York y en Europa. Para cuando viajaron a Buenos Aires, David y Luis ya habían obtenido cierto reconocimiento como artistas en Estados Unidos. A Glusberg la visita le proporcionó la ocasión perfecta para presentar

15. Banco Central de la República Argentina., Boletín Estadístico, No. 234.921, 1984. Impreso, www.bcra.gob.ar/Pdfs/PublicacionesEstadisticas/BoletinEstadistico/boldat198409.pdf (consultado en noviembre de 2016). 16. Oliveras, Luis Frangella, 21.

63


a artistas jóvenes de afuera. Un poster promocional de David parecía el de un recital. En letra grande y entre dos estrellas, el encabezamiento del cartel decía: “Desde New York...”, poniendo en primer plano la fama y el origen del artista en un importante centro cosmopolita. Se incluían también varias imágenes pequeñas, características de su obra: una cabeza que estallaba, una casa partida en dos, un hombre prendido fuego y la vaca que el artista pintó por primera vez en los muelles. La muestra en el CAyC se llamó “Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village” e incluyó obras de David, de Luis y de muchos de sus amigos y vecinos, como Bidlo, Sterzing, Keiko Bonk, Judith Glantzman, Russell Sharon, y Kiki Smith. En medio de una instalación caótica, llevada a cabo por David y Luis, Glusberg mandó algunos asistentes no profesionales que reprobaron enfáticamente el deseo de ambos artistas de pintar las paredes de la galería, y que estuvieron a punto de abandonar la tarea.17 Finalmente la muestra se inauguró y fue bien recibida por el público local, según comentó David en un entrevista con Sylvère Lotringer en 1989.18 Sin embargo, debido a la escasez de cobertura de prensa en la época en Buenos Aires, ha quedado muy poca documentación del evento además de los carteles publicitarios y una lista del CAyC con los nombres de los artistas que participaron. Las fotos instantáneas que Rafael Giménez –un amigo de Luis– sacó la noche de la inauguración sirven como registro y documentación del evento. Alejandro de Ilzarbe, un artista que visitó la muestra, traza una comparación entre lo que vio y lo que se estaba haciendo en Buenos Aires en ese momento: “No es que acá estuviéramos pintando naturalezas muertas y de pronto apareciera una nueva forma de pintar. Acá ese espíritu ya existía. Nosotros, o al menos cierto grupo de personas, estábamos trabajando en ese registro: las discotecas, el arte efímero, instalaciones que se desarmaban en la misma noche, ese tipo de cosas...”.19 Ambas escenas tenían un ethos alternativo y colaborativo muy similar.

17. Rafael Giménez en conversación con los autores, noviembre de 2015. 18. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 190. 19. Alejandro de Ilzarbe en conversación con los autores, febrero de 2015.

64


En la muestra del CAyC, Luis pintó un gran mural expresionista de un cuerpo humano en una de las paredes; iba desde el piso hasta el segundo nivel de la galería. El mural de Luis en el CAyC se parecía mucho a su mural del torso humano en el Pier 34, por el enfático uso del espacio vertical, que sobrepasaba la escala del espectador. Sin embargo, el mural hecho en Buenos Aires quedaba desmembrado por los distintos pisos. David expuso tres esculturas que consistían en la modificación de la superficie de unos muñecos: a uno lo pintó casi todo de blanco, a otro le pintó un diseño de nubes y al tercero lo cubrió con recortes de mapas, como había hecho en varios otros trabajos. En Buenos Aires, David tuvo la oportunidad de presentar su trabajo ante un público nuevo. En la misma entrevista con Lotringer, señaló que la recepción fue muy diferente a la que solía tener en Nueva York: “Mostrar mi trabajo ahí fue un tipo de comunicación totalmente distinto. No tenía nada que ver con lo económico. Quiero decir: hubo gente que lloró delante de las cosas que hice en Argentina... Creo que la amenaza de muerte en la vida cotidiana, el ciclo de muerte de los desaparecidos, la amenaza de muerte expresada son lo mismo que yo experimenté de chico: el miedo a que me mataran o me traumatizaran. Para mí fue una experiencia muy emotiva mostrar mi trabajo afuera, en un contexto completamente diferente, sin relación con el dinero, y darme cuenta de que las imágenes pueden afectar a la gente”.20 David volvió a Nueva York en julio de 1984.21 Sin embargo, el 20 de agosto, en Buenos Aires, se inauguró una muestra grupal en el antiguo Café Einstein, que había reabierto bajo el nombre de Babilonia, una galería de arte clandestina perteneciente a Sergio Aisenstein.22 Se expusieron obras de David y Luis, junto con otras de artistas argentinos: Guillermo Kuitca, Alfredo Prior, Juan José Cambre, Rafael Bueno, Alejandro de Ilzarbe, Ana Ekell, Gustavo Marrone y el hermano de Luis, Roberto Frangella.

20. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 190. 21. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 264. 22. Sergio Aisenstein era una figura clave de la escena contra cultural de Buenos Aires en los 80, Fue el fundador de los espacios culturales alternativos Café Einstein, Babilonia and Nave Jungla.

65


IV Durante su visita a Buenos Aires, ambos artistas pasaron tiempo con la familia y los amigos de Luis. Una tarde, en el departamento de sus padres, Luis hizo unos retratos de su madre y de su padre en un cartón doblado al medio en forma de V. A esas pinturas las llamaba máscaras. David capturó el momento íntimo en fotos blanco y negro. Con la misma técninca Luis hizo un retrato similar de David. También frecuentaron a artistas argentinos, como Sergio Avello y su compañero de piso Alejandro de Ilzarbe. Como recuerda Rafael Giménez, pasaron muchas noches caminando por Buenos Aires. Una vez caminaron desde el barrio céntrico de Recoleta hasta El Tigre, una distancia de más de treinta kilómetros.23 Además, David y Luis viajaron en auto al interior de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Entre Ríos y a la provincia de Misiones, al noreste del país, donde visitaron las Cataratas del Iguazú. A lo largo de esos viajes, ambos llenaron sus cuadernos de acuarelas, registrando lo que veían. Los cuadernos ofrecen algunos vistazos de los momentos que ambos compartieron: observaban lo que los rodeaba, pintaban el entorno natural y se hacían retratos. Estas obras revelan ciertas similitudes estilísticas y una sensación de experiencia compartida, pero al mismo tiempo muestran puntos de vista y enfoques diferentes. Tomadas en conjunto constituyen una producción íntima y abundante. Los artistas nunca presentaron los cuadernos al público, convirtiéndolos en un documento muy personal de lo que sin duda fue un momento intenso e intrépido para los dos.24 David también registró el viaje en varias fotos que ahora forman parte del Fales Archive, en la Universidad de Nueva York. Las escenas representadas en los cuadernos de acuarelas reaparecen con frecuencia en las fotos. También en otras obras de David pueden encontrarse varias imágenes llamativas: cráneos de vacas, caminos perdidos y animales atropellados. Algunas de las fotos tienen un contenido explícitamente social y político; se muestran, por ejemplo, las villas miseria y la ex Escuela Superior de Mecánica de la Armada, que funcionó como centro de detención y tortura durante la dictadura.

23. Rafael Giménez en conversación con los autores, noviembre de 2015. 24. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 264.

66


En conjunto, las imágenes ofrecen un panorama conmovedor de la relación entre estos artistas. En una carta a su amigo y fotógrafo Peter Hujar, David relata un momento increíble en el que se colgaron de unas lianas al borde de las Cataratas del Iguazú, y estuvieron a punto de caer fatídicamente a los rápidos que corrían debajo.25 Esta escena, claramente exagerada, está registrada más mansamente en fotos que sacó Luis con la cámara de David. Los recuerdos de viaje de David, relatados a Hujar y a otros amigos, como por ejemplo el galerista Hal Bromm, son siempre afectuosos. A Hujar le expresó su deseo de volver al país y aprender castellano. En una postal a Bromm le cuenta cuánto lo entusiasmó entrar a pie a la selva tropical y cómo le habían gustado los hombres argentinos, una vez más mostrando su habilidad para la exageración. Del lado de la foto, dibujó su habitual cabeza de vaca sobre dos imágenes emblemáticas de Buenos Aires: el Congreso y el planetario. En el reverso escribió: Saludos desde un país increíble; no tanto Buenos Aires como las rutas argentinas. Atravesamos selvas humeantes, combatimos serpientes mamba y tarántulas enardecidas, escapamos de la crecida que casi nos arrastra hasta las cataratas de ciento ochenta metros, escalamos acantilados y nadamos en los rápidos. Acá los hombres son hermosos, ya tuve como trescientos miniataques cardíacos. Pero salvo eso, fue todo genial. Visitamos la famosa piedra movediza de Tandil, aunque aparentemente perdió el equilibrio en 1920 y ahora sólo quedan señales de que alguna vez estuvo ahí arriba a noventa metros de altura. Espero que todo vaya bien. Hice una muestra individual tremenda acá en Buenos Aires. Es excelente viajar con Luis. Chau – David Woj.26

El departamento de los padres de Luis en Buenos Aires estaba ubicado en una de las calles principales del barrio de Recoleta. Tenía una amplia vista a la estación de trenes de Retiro y al Italpark, paseo favorito para niños y familias en la década del ‘80. En su cuaderno, debajo de un dibujo de la vista desde la ventana, David escribió:

25. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 263. 26. David Wojnarowicz, postal enviada a Hal Broom, 1984.

67


“Algo del parque de diversiones al atardecer cuando me levanté, su cielo invernal amarillento con luces de neón y el amarillo que se volvía verde mar y las luces que brillaban, me hizo ponerme a llorar. Volví a tener cinco años o algo así”. Después del viaje, Luis le regaló su cuaderno a David, y se lo dedicó: “Un recuerdo de nuestros viajes por el noreste de Argentina. Para David: el primer artista estadounidense que amó esta tierra. Para su sensación de tener cinco años. Hacia Iguazú. Junio de 1984”. David y Luis claramente tenían una fuerte conexión personal y artística, que se manifestó en su decisión de viajar juntos a Argentina. Sin embargo, tras regresar a Nueva York se fueron alejando. Carlo McCormick, amigo cercano de los dos, explica que “aunque siguieron siendo amigos, nunca volvieron a ser tan unidos como antes”. Un motivo, tuvo que ver con el estómago de David: “David tenía un metabolismo hiperactivo. Hacía muchas comidas por día y siempre estaba flaquísimo y desnutrido... necesitaba comer cada pocas horas, pero lo necesitaba de verdad, se ponía famélico. Y si no comía lo suficiente a veces se malhumoraba. Se rompía el increíble equilibrio que se esforzaba por mantener entre su lado extremadamente oscuro y su lado profundamente esperanzado. Parece ser que David y Luis estaban en las profundidades de la selva y a David le dio hambre”.27 La voracidad de David condujo su trabajo artístico en varias direcciones. Asimismo los rastros de su viaje siguieron apareciendo regularmente en los años posteriores. En Argentina, David recopiló material impreso que luego incorpora en varias de sus obras. Afiches de un evento en la Casa de Salta sirven como fondo de un collage, Untitled, de 1984, con dos de las cabezas características de David. Fire, un collage muy detallista de 1987, incluye en el vértice inferior derecho una publicidad de batería de autos del Automóvil Club Argentino, junto con otros materiales impresos como listas de personas buscadas por el FBI. Los recuerdos del viaje se desparramaban por su entorno cotidiano. En una foto que le sacó Nan Goldin en su departamento, en 1990, se ve un collage hecho en parte con un afiche de la Unión Cívica Radical, el partido elegido para el regreso a la democracia después de la dictadura.28

27. McCormick en Brush Fires, 188.

68


V La crisis del SIDA tuvo un fuerte impacto en la década del ‘80, en particular en la comunidad neoyorquina de la que David y Luis formaban parte. En julio de 1981, una breve columna en el New York Times describía la misteriosa aparición de un “extraño cancer” detectado en 41 hombres homosexuales, primordialmente de Nueva York y San Francisco.29 El cancer era el Sarcoma de Kaposi, lo que luego se descubrió era uno de las letales infecciones encontradas en los pacientes con SIDA. Los Centros de Control y Prevencion de Enfermedades usaron el término SIDA por primera vez en septiembre de 1982, haciendo hincapié en su predominio entre hombres homosexuales y bisexuales al igual que consumidores de drogas intravenosas.30 El creciente número de casos en Nueva York se dio a conocer en 1983 en The Village Eye, una de las publicaciones de arte clave de la ciudad.31 Cuando viajaron a Argentina en junio de 1984, el SIDA todavía no era una amenaza generalizada en la vida cotidiana. Las causas de la enfermedad no eran del todo claras y no había información sobre cómo controlarla. En pocos años, sin embargo, la efervescente escena del East Village había pasado a ser una comunidad marcada por la enfermedad, que se llevó prematuramente la vida de muchos de sus miembros. En 1988 y 1989, respectivamente, David y Luis confirmaron su diagnóstico.32 Con sólo treinta y tres años, David enfrentó el SIDA y el abandono absoluto en que el gobierno estadounidense dejó a sus víctimas. Se volvió un activista comprometido, en particular a través de la organización ACT UP, y siguió enfocado en su producción artística. Pasó sus últimos años escribiendo y trabajando incansablemente.

28. “Sylvère Lotringer / David Wojnarowicz,” 211. 29 Lawrence K. Altman, “Rare Cancer Seen in 48 Homosexuals,” The New York Times, 3 de julio, 1981, http://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/03/us/rare-cancer-seen-in-41-homosexuals.html, (consultado el 10 de diciembre de 2016). 30. Centers for Disease Control Prevention, ”Update on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)--United States,” Atlanta: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 1984. Impreso, https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00001163. htm, (consultado el 10 de diciembre de 2016). 31. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 228. 32. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 391 y 439.

69


La enfermedad fue especialmente devastadora para Luis. Lo debilitó muy rápido, al punto de que tenía dificultad para hablar. Su hermana Lía Frangella cuenta que se esforzaba por recordar el castellano cuando estaba enfermo.33 Russell Sharon, un artista del East Village, quien fuera su pareja, lo cuidó en su departamento de Manhattan. Según una de las amigas más cercanas de Luis, Keiko Bonk, él quería morir en su país, pero no fue posible porque Argentina no contaba con los servicios médicos necesarios.34 Luis murió el 7 de diciembre de 1990. Posteriormente murió David el 22 de julio de 1992. Al momento de sus muertes, Luis tenía 46 años y David 37. En 1999, el New Museum de Nueva York presentó una muestra retrospectiva póstuma de la obra de David, curada por Dan Cameron. En 2003 y 2008, Elena Oliveras curó dos muestras de Luis en Buenos Aires. Si bien su obra no recibió tanto reconocimiento académico o institucional como la de David, sin duda Luis tuvo un rol relevante para la historia del arte en la rica escena del East Village, tanto en terminos de influencia como de camaradería. La amistad y el viaje a Argentina de estos artistas tuvieron lugar antes de que se estableciera el circuito del arte altamente globalizado que impera en la actualidad. Para un artista nacido en Estados Unidos y establecido en Nueva York, lograr un contacto tan íntimo con un contexto latinoamericano era poco habitual en esa época, y el hecho, indudablemente, marcó a todos los involucrados. Vistos en retrospectiva, el trabajo y la colaboración entre ellos conjuga una vulnerabilidad y una fugacidad especialmente conmovedoras. Sin embargo, también nos recuerda la indisoluble marca de la amistad y el sentido de comunidad en la creación del arte, aun frente a la incertidumbre y la dificultad.

33. Lía Frangella en conversación con los autores, julio de 2015. 34. Carr, Fire in the Belly, 439.

70


David Wojnarowicz and Luis Frangella, David Wojnarowicz’s travel contact sheets (detail). Courtesy of the David Wojnarowicz Papers and the Fales Library & Special Collections —— David Wojnarowicz y Luis Frangella, planchas de contactos de viaje de David Wojnarowicz, (detalle). Cortesía de David Wojnarowicz Papers and the Fales Library & Special Collections.

71


David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina Printed in Buenos Aires, February 2017 / Impreso en Buenos Aires, febrero de 2017 Authors / Autores: Ian Erickson-Kery & Verónica Flom Project / Proyecto: Amparo Díscoli, Ian Erickson-Kery, & Verónica Flom Design / Diseño: Cecilia Szalkowicz & Gastón Pérsico Image post-production / Posproducción de imágenes: Martín Sichetti Spanish Translation / Traducción al español: Laura Wittner

Special thanks to / Agradecemos especialmente a Sergio Aisenstein, Ana María Battistozzi, Anneliis Beadnell, Hal Bromm, Rafael Bueno, Cosmocosa Gallery, Alejandro de Ilzarbe, Fales Library and Special Collections at New York University, Estate of Luis Frangella, Lía Frangella, Roberto Frangella, Diego Fontanet, Rafael Giménez, Ignacio Iasparra, Inés Katzenstein, Marisela La Grave, Carlo McCormick, Elena Oliveras, Adriana Pérez Bayo, María Paula Piaggio, Duilio Pierri, P.P.O.W Gallery N.Y.C., Gabriela Rangel, Andreas Sterzing, Susanna Temkin, Juan Tessi, Jonathan Wienberg, and the Estate of David Wojnarowicz.

© 2017, Cosmocosa © 2017, Ian Erickson-Kery and Verónica Flom, for the text / Ian Erickson-Kery y Verónica Flom, por el texto All of David Wojnarowicz’s artwork images are ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz. Courtesy P.P.O.W Gallery, New York. Todas las imágenes de las obras de David Wojnarowicz son ©Estate of David Wojnarowicz. Cortesía P.P.O.W Gallery, New York. All of Luis Frangella’s artwork images are ©Estate of Luis Frangella. Courtesy Cosmocosa, Buenos Aires. Todas las imágenes de las obras de Luis Frangella son ©Estate of Luis Frangella. Cortesía Cosmocosa, Buenos Aires. All rights reserved / Todos los derechos reservados. Back-cover image: David and Luis at the opening of Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village [From New York: 37 East Village Painters], CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984. Courtesy Rafael Giménez / David y Luis en la inauguración de Desde New York: 37 pintores del East Village, CAyC, Buenos Aires, 1984. Cortesía Rafael Giménez. ISBN: 978-987-46487-0-9 Erickson-Kery , Ian David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina / Ian Erickson-Kery ; Verónica Flom ; coordinación general de Amparo Díscoli. - 1a ed. - Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires : COSMOCOSA, 2017. 72 p. ; 22 x 16 cm. Edición bilingüe: español, inglés. ISBN 978-987-46487-0-9 1. Arte Contemporáneo. 2. Pintura. I. Flom, Verónica II. Díscoli, Amparo, coord. III. Título. CDD 700.92


Profile for Cosmocosa

David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina  

David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina”, 1a ed. - Buenos Aires, COSMOCOSA, Authors: IAN ERICKSON-KERY, & VERONICA FLOM. Edited b...

David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina  

David Wojnarowicz & Luis Frangella in/en Argentina”, 1a ed. - Buenos Aires, COSMOCOSA, Authors: IAN ERICKSON-KERY, & VERONICA FLOM. Edited b...

Profile for cosmocosa
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded