Portfolio 2016

Page 1

CORY BODEN AIA

NCARB

CPHC

LEED AP

P o r t f o li o 2 016


Burnham/Tower relationship

Existing site condition

Location map

WSJ February 13, 2012


Millennium Tower Boston, MA Under construction

2012 - Present Handel Architects Millennium Partners 57 Floors 1,050,000 SF $404.5M Project Designer / Co-job Captain

Millennium Tower is located in the heart of Boston’s midtown cultural district, sharing a block with Daniel Burnham’s 1912 Filene’s department store, which went bankrupt in 2006. Shortly thereafter, the site was purchased and a 36 story office and hotel tower began construction on the north side of the lot. This project was abandoned in 2008 during the recession, leaving a 40 foot deep excavation idle in the center of the city. After several years of waiting for the initial developer to fulfill their plans, the site (including the Burnham building) was purchased by Millennium Partners for the construction of a larger residential tower. The Burnham building restoration was coordinated alongside the new tower design. In fact, the 3 basement levels and first 3 above grade levels are even with the Burnham floors in order to allow parking (in the case of the lower 2 basement levels) and retail to span across both structures, creating the opportunity for large retail tenants. The residential tower form and floorplate were driven by the desire to direct views southeast towards Boston Commons, as well as pulling away from the north facade of the Burnham building, which would now provide a glazed facade for the office space on its upper floors. The faceted nature of tower skin served both to provide a feature for unit living rooms as well as to accentuate the verticality of the tower form. Furthermore, each plane of the tower is rotated slightly away from the planes adjacent, creating variations in reflections across the facade. The termination of the tower is defined by inset penthouse terraces, banded together by nonreflective glazing, and set-back creating a magnificent terrace for the full-floor penthouse at the top floor. The tower extends all the way to grade at the corner of Franklin and Washington streets, and is wrapped by a podium facade that shares the same faceted, crystalline language. The Washington facade kinks just slightly, reflecting contextual queues from adjacent buildings, while the Franklin facade ripples with sever breaks in order to create vertical expressions sympathetic with the existing building fabric along Charles Bullfinch’s adjacent Tontine Crescent. Large canopies are more or less continuous along the ground floor due to results of a wind tunnel analysis. The site is benefitted from a small plaza on its front door, Shoppers Park, which is also being renovated as part of this development, creating a revitalized urban space for the city. View from Charles River


Massing studies M I L L E N N I U M P A R T N E R S | H A N D E L A R C H I T E C T S LLP

ONE FRANKLIN STREET

M I L L E N N I U M P A R T N E R S | H A N D E L A R C H I T E C T S LLP

ONE FRANKLIN STREET

M I L L E N N I U M P A R T N E R S | H A N D E L A R C H I T E C T S LLP

ONE FRANKLIN STREET

M I L L E N N I U M P A R T N E R S | H A N D E L A R C H I T E C T S LLP

ONE FRANKLIN STREET

Core & floorplate studies 1/16" = 1'

1/16" = 1'

1/16" = 1'

5'

10'

15'

5'

5'

5'

15'

15'

10'

15'

18 JUNE 2012

18 JUNE 2012

PROFILE STUDY D

10'

PROFILE STUDY C

10'

18 JUNE 2012

18 JUNE 2012

CORE STUDY N - CONDO

1/16" = 1'

CORE STUDY N - RENTAL


Millennium Tower Tower termination studies

Rendered perspective


Typical plan - lower tier

Typical plan - upper tier

Master building section


Millennium Tower Rendered perspective - lower tier master bath

Rendered perspective - upper tier kitchen

Rendered perspective - lower tier kitchen

Rendered perspective - upper tier kitchen

Rendered perspective - upper tier master bath


OPTION 2: FULL EXTRUSION ON BOTH SIDES

1D: INSET ON BOTH SIDES , PH 5 TERRACE OPTION ON NORTH 6B: TERRACE CUTOUTS NORTHWEST CORNER

SOUTHWEST CORNER NORTHWEST CORNER

NORTHEAST CORNER

CORNER NORTHEAST SOUTHEAST CORNER

Penthouse exterior studies

NORTHWEST CORNER

OUSE STUDIES

NORTHEAST CORNER

CORNER NORTHWESTSOUTHWEST CORNER

BOS TO N, M A PENTHOUSE STUDIES

MILLENNIUM TOWER / BURNHAM BUIL DING

CORNER NORTHEASTSOUTHEAST CORNER

OPTION 2C: FULL EXTRUSION ON BOTH SIDES

OPTION 5C: HORIZONTAL STRIDES NORTHWESTSOUTHWEST CORNER CORNER

NORTHEASTSOUTHEAST CORNER CORNER 2013.01.29 NORTHWEST SOUTHWEST CORNER CORNER

BOS TO N, M A PENTHOUSE STUDIES

MILLENNIUM TOWER / BURNHAM BUIL DING

NORTHEAST CORNER SOUTHEAST CORNER

Penthouse typical core and shell plan

HOUSE STUDIES

Rendered perspective - penthouse terrace

MILLENNIUM TOWER /

2013.02.11 BOS TO N, M A PENTHOUSE STUDIES

MILLENNIUM TOWER / BURNHAM BUIL DING

BOS TO N, M A PENTHOUSE STUDIES

MILLENNIUM TOWER / BURNHAM BUIL DING

Rendered perspective - Grand penthouse terrace

MILLENNIUM TOWER /


Millennium Tower North tower facade displaying variation of reflection due to faceted surface

Rendered perspective - adjacency of tower to Boston Commons

View from Charles River in late afternoon


STREET WALL CONTINUITY

RELATIONSHIP TO HISTORIC FACADE

INFILL CONNECTOR

Tower podium contextual relationships

BASE DIAGRAM

Rendered elevation - Washington Street podium facade

MILLENNIUM TOWER / BURNHAM BUILDING

BOS TON, MA

Tower podium north facade contextual relationship

Rendered elevation - Franklin Street podium facade

OFFICE RESIDENTIAL

OFFICE OFFICE

AMENITY OFFICE

SUMMER STREET

OFFICE

RETAIL

OFFICE/RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

OFFICE LOBBY RETAIL

MBTA

MECH. LOADING

ELEC.

PARKING

PARKING

PARKING

PARKING

RES. LOBBY

FRANKLIN STREET

BOH

BOH Burnham building & tower podium section

2013.04.16


Millennium Tower Rendered perspective - Shoppers Park

Section detail - Typical ‘fly-by’ curtainwall detail at podium slab edges

RFI 495 Pool/Spa Fin Tube

Site plan

Rendered perspective - Shoppers Park and tower


Residential lobby facade fin porosity studies

4

PLAN DETAIL - VESTIBULE A GLASS WALL Scale: 3"=1'-0"

3

PLAN DETAIL - VESTIBULE A DOOR FRAME Scale: 3"=1'-0"

Residential lobby facade design rendering

Plan detail - Residential lobby facade typical bronze fin

Section detail - Residential lobby facade typical head & canopy gutter


Millennium Tower Shoppers Park landscape & paving plan

SITE PLAN RICHARD BURCK ASSOCIATES / HÖWELER + YOON ARCHITECTURE

Rendered perspective - Residential lobby port cochere & entry

BOSTON CIVIC DESIGN COMMISSION MAY 07 20 MILLENNIUM PARTNER


Lobby B

Lobby A

Residential lobby plan

Residential lobby rendered elevation & perspective

Residential elevator cab interior study

Residential elevator cab interior - installed


10

30

Scale: 1'-0"=1'-0"

NEW YORK, NY 10018 617.445.3500 T: 212.532.9600 ARCHITECT STRUCTURAL ENGINEER HANDEL ARCHITECTS LLP DESIMONE ENGINEERS 150 VARICK CONSULTING STREET, 8TH FLOOR 18 WEST18TH 10TH FLOOR NEW YORK, NYST. 10013 NEW YORK, NY 10011 T: 212.595.4112 T: 212.532.2211 MEP ENGINEER CODE/LEED CONSULTANT WSP - FLACK + KURTZ COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION 512 7TH AVENUE CONSULTING, NEW YORK, NYINC. 10018 313 CONGRESS STREET T: 212.532.9600 BOSTON, MA 02210 STRUCTURAL ENGINEER T: 617.330.9390 DESIMONEARCHITECT CONSULTING ENGINEERS LANDSCAPE 18 WEST18TH ST. 10TH FLOOR RICHARD BURCK ASSOCIATES, INC. NEW YORK, NY 10011 7 SQUARE T:DAVIS 212.532.2211 SOMERVILLE, MA 02144 CODE/LEED CONSULTANT T: 617.623.2300 COMMERCIAL CIVIL ENGINEER CONSTRUCTION CONSULTING, INC. NITSCH ENGINEERING 313 CONGRESS STREET 2 CENTERMA PLAZA SUITE 430 BOSTON, 02210 BOSTON, MA 02108 T: 617.330.9390 T: 617.338.0063 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT PLAZA DESIGN RICHARD BURCK ASSOCIATES, INC. HOWELER + YOON ARCHITECTURE LLP 7 DAVIS SQUARE 150 LINCOLN STREET, #3A SOMERVILLE, MA 02144 BOSTON, MA 02111 T: 617.623.2300 T: 617.517.4101 CIVIL ENGINEER LIGHTING DESIGN NITSCH ENGINEERING LAM PARTNERS 2 CENTER PLAZAINC SUITE 430 84 SHERMAN ST BOSTON, MA 02108 CAMBRIDGE, MA 02140 T: 617.338.0063 T: 617.354.4502 PLAZA DESIGN EXTERIOR WALL CONSULTANT HOWELER + YOON ARCHITECTURE LLP ISRAEL BERGER & ASSOCIATES 150 LINCOLN STREET, #3A 360 PARK MA AVENUE BOSTON, 02111SOUTH, 15TH FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10010 T: 617.517.4101 T: 212.689.5389 LIGHTING DESIGN POOL CONSULTANT LAM PARTNERS INC AQUATICS GROUP 84 SHERMAN ST 5CAMBRIDGE, CENTENNIALMA DRIVE 02140 PEABODY, MA 01960 T: 617.354.4502 T: 978.532.1900 EXTERIOR WALL CONSULTANT ACOUSTICAL CONSULTANT ISRAEL BERGER & ASSOCIATES SHEN MILSOM WILKE, LLC 15TH FLOOR 360 PARK AVENUE SOUTH, 417 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10010 NEW YORK, NY 10016 T: 212.689.5389 T: 212.725.6800 POOL CONSULTANT ELEVATOR CONSULTANT AQUATICS GROUP VAN DEUSEN &DRIVE ASSOCIATES Scale: 6"=1'-0" 5 CENTENNIAL 470 ATLANTIC AVENUE 4TH FLOOR PEABODY,MA MA02210 01960 BOSTON, T: 978.532.1900 T:617.273.8016 ACOUSTICAL CONSULTANT FACADE ACCESS CONSULTANT SHEN MILSOM WILKE, LLC ENTEK ENGINEERING, LLC 417 AMES FIFTH AVENUE 166 STREET NEW YORK, NY NJ 10016 HACKENSACK, 07601 T: 201.820.2801 212.725.6800 T: ELEVATOR CONSULTANT VAN DEUSEN & ASSOCIATES NO. ATLANTIC ISSUANCE DATE 470 AVENUE 4TH FLOOR BOSTON, MA 02210 CD ADD#26 AUG 28, 2014 26 T:617.273.8016 CD ADD#30 OCT 30, 2014 30 FACADE ACCESS CONSULTANT ASI 083 ASK 302 LOBBY REVISIONS JAN 14, 2015 ENTEK ENGINEERING, LLC 166 AMES STREET 30 HACKENSACK, NJ 07601 T: 201.820.2801

SECTION - PANEL TYPE B BASE CONDITION

Scale: 1'-0"=1'-0"

30

30 RE: ASI 083 30

30 30

RE: ASI 083 30

30 30

30

TYPE.

YA

YA

30

30

30 30 30

30

NO.

ISSUANCE CD ADD#26 CD ADD#30 ASI 083 ASK 302 LOBBY REVISIONS

30

26 30

30

6

30

FACADE ACCESS CO ENTEK ENGINEERIN 166 AMES STREET HACKENSACK, NJ 0 T: 201.820.2801

30

NO.

ISSUAN CD ADD CD ADD 30 ASI 083 ASK 302 LOBB 26

30

SECTION - BRONZE PANELS LOBBY Residential B SECTION - TRANSPARENT BRONZE PANELS LOBBY A lobby backlit bronze panel plan installed 7 Scale: 6"=1'-0"

8

LAM PARTNERS INC 84 SHERMAN ST CAMBRIDGE, MA 02 T: 617.354.4502 EXTERIOR WALL CON ISRAEL BERGER & 360 PARK AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 100 T: 212.689.5389 POOL CONSULTANT AQUATICS GROUP 5 CENTENNIAL DRI PEABODY, MA 0196 T: 978.532.1900 ACOUSTICAL CONSU SHEN MILSOM WILK 417 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 100 T: 212.725.6800 ELEVATOR CONSULT VAN DEUSEN & ASS 470 ATLANTIC AVEN BOSTON, MA 02210 T:617.273.8016

30

Millennium Tower

10

6

SECTION - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS LOBBY A Scale: 6"=1'-0"

KEY PLAN

DATE AUG 28, 2014 OCT 30, 2014 JAN 14, 2015

30

30

SECTION - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS LOBBY A Scale: 6"=1'-0"

SCALE: PROJECT NO:

Residential lobby backlit bronze panel section detail

6

SEAL & SIGNATURE

Residential lobby backlit bronze panel plan detail

SECTION - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS LOBBY A Scale: 6"=1'-0"

KEY PLAN

4

PLAN DETAIL - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS - LOBBY A Scale: 6"=1'-0"

30

30

KEY PLAN

30

30

30 30

30

30

DRAWING TITLE:

LOBBY BRONZE

30 30

30

30

2

SCALE: PROJECT NO: 30 SEAL & SIGNATURE

DRAWING NO:

30

818

ENLARGED PLAN - TRANSPARENT BRONZE PANELS - PANEL TYPE B Scale: 1-1/2"=1'-0"

SCALE: PROJECT NO: SEAL & SIGNATURE

818

30 30

30

30

AN - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS - PANEL TYPE A Rendered perspective - Residential lobby

LOBBY BRONZE PANEL DETAILS

DRAWING NO:

30

30

DRAWING TITLE:

ID02.34

DRAWING TITLE:

26

LOBBY BRONZE PANEL DETAILS

DRAWING NO:

ID02.34

26

1

ENLARGED PLAN - BACKLIT BRONZE PANELS - PANEL TYPE A Scale: 1-1/2"=1'-0"

ID


Plan - Lower amenity floor

Rendered perspective - Amenity club and lounge exterior


Millennium Tower Rendered perspective - Amenity lobby

Rendered perspective - Amenity pool

Rendered perspective - Amenity lounge


12’-0” PLANING MODULE AT TOWER

13’-9-1/2” PLANING MODULE AT PODIUM

13’-9-1/2” PLANING MODULE AT PODIUM

river

river

river

70’-8” 10’0” x 5’3”

70’-8”

57’-8”

10’0” x 5’3”

683 sq ft

520 sq ft

683 sq ft

4,054 sq ft

12’-0” PLANING MODULE AT TOWER

13’-9-1/2” PLANING MODULE AT PODIUM

13’-9-1/2” PLANING MODULE AT PODIUM

river

river

river

4,054 sq ft

VERY LARGE COLUMNS ON BEST FRONTAGE VERY LARGE COLUMNS ON BEST FRONTAGE TRIPLE HEIGHT SPACES TENG TOWER TENG TOWER OVERLAY OVERLAY

river

river

70’-8” 10’0” x 5’3”

10’0” x 5’3”

river

520 sq ft

DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACES

river

VERY LARGE CORE

TRIPLE HEIGHT SPACES

DOUBLE EXTENDING CORE ELEMENTS VERY UP SETS HEIGHT TOWER BACK FROM RIVER EDGE LARGE SPACES CORE

river

70’-8”

STRUCTURE CORE AND VOIDS

TOWER OVERLAY CORE AND VOIDS

683 sq ft

520 sq ft

683 sq ft

4,054 sq ft

84’

57’-8”

84’

57’-8”

80’

STRUCTURE

80’

12’-0” PLANING MODULE AT TOWER

TEN OVE

river

84’

river

57’-8”

12’-0” PLANING MODULE AT TOWER

520 sq ft

4,054 sq ft

EXISTING BUILDING CHALLENGES EXISTING AND BUILDING PROPOSED CHALLENGES MODIFICATIONS AND PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS VERY LARGE COLUMNS ON BEST FRONTAGE VERY LARGE COLUMNS ON BEST FRONTAGE TRIPLE HEIGHT SPACES

Existing concrete structure

EXISTING NORTHEAST RIVERFRONT

STRUCTURE

DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACES

111 W. WACKER DRIVE

VERY TRIPLE LARGE HEIGHT CORE SPACES CHIC AGO, IL

DOUBLE EXTENDING COREVERY ELEMENTS UP SETS EXTENDING CORE ELEMENTS RELOCATE UP SETS CORE ELEMENT HEIGHT BACK FROM TOWER RIVER EDGE TO FRONT TOWER AS TOWER BACK FROM RIVER EDGE LARGE SPACES CLOSE TO RIVER AS POSSIBLE CORE

Adaptation diagrams

May 1st, 2012

STRUCTURE CORE AND VOIDS

CORE AND VOIDS TOWER OVERLAY

EXISTING BUILDING CHALLENGES EXISTING BUILDING AND PROPOSED CHALLENGES MODIFICATIONS AND PROPOSED MODIFICATIONS

Location map

RELOCATE CORE ELEMENT TO FRONT TOWER AS CLOSE TO RIVER AS POSSIBLE

TOWER OVERLAYTOWER AND CORE SHIFTS TOWER AND CORE SHIFTS PROPOSED PROPOSED

111 W. WACKER DRIVE May 1st, 2012

CHIC111 AGO,W. IL May 1st, 2012

WACKER DRIVE

CHIC AGO, IL


111 Wacker Chicago, IL Completed 2014

2011 - 2012 Handel Architects Related Midwest 60 Floors 930,500 SF $180M Team Designer

The project is situated at the southwest corner of Wacker Drive and Clark Street, in the heart of Chicago’s central business district and directly overlooking the iconic main branch of the Chicago River. The site consisted of an existing 25 story concrete shell with 4 levels of below grade structure, remnants of a previously unrealized hotel project abandoned in 2008. The challenge was how to marry a new program laid onto a new tower footprint with its own unique structural needs, superimposed onto a shell with entirely different elements. After studying the structure, the best solution involved moving the tower out towards the front of the site in order to capitalize on the best river views; keeping those core elements that cannot move (e.g. elevators) and moving those that can (e.g. stairs); laying out a normative column structure that works with residential planning; and creating a transition between the two that works structurally (columns, shear walls, core), mechanically (transformer location, mep systems), and architecturally (unit planning, cladding, and overall aesthetic consistency). Architecturally, it was important for the design team to create a unified building form, one that would encompass the entire structure as one complete and cogent idea, unencumbered by the change in design necessitated by the break in construction, program, and ownership. Many material palettes were investigated, including stone, terra cotta, and metal panel. An all-glass scheme was chosen as the overall cladding system. With a taut glass skin as a base, an incised element was introduced - a “ribbon� of non-reflective glass, darker in appearance, wending its way up and around the structure in a continuous move around all four elevations. This ribbon helped create project specific moves on the entirety of the mass of the building in a manner that reinforced the vision of the building as a whole. As an architectural element, the ribbon offered an opportunity to create breaks at major elements of the building. Aesthetically this helped create the highlight zones where programs like the amenity floor would be located. Urbanistically, these breaks would tie into the street wall, registering the continuity of buildings along the River and cornice lines from our immediate neighbors, respecting the inplace rhythm along this highly visible frontage.

View from Chicago River


12’ MODULE

ICONIC TOP

327’ tower TOWER RESIDENTIAL

630’ AMENITY PODIUM RESIDENTIAL

HOTEL

303’ podium

13’-9-1/2” MODULE

PARKING

HOTEL B.O.H., BALLROOM, PARKING

(to top of transfer)

LOW-LEVEL PLANTING TERRACE

PARKING

BELOW GRADE

PARKING RETAIL RESIDENTIAL RETAIL

EXISTING STRUCTURE Massing diagram & section

“RIVER” IDEA

Facade progression

BUILDING STACK

HIGHLIGHT ZONES

“RIVER” LINKING BASE AND TOWER

SECTION

111 W. WACKER DRIVE May 1st, 2012

CHIC AGO,


111 Wacker Typical floor plans - podium (left) & tower (right) N

111 W. WACKER DRIVE

ROPOSED CORE SHIFT

Wacker elevation & context

May 1st, 2012

Wacker elevation & context diagram

CHIC AGO, IL


8'-1"

ST-1 STONE ANCHORS, WITH STEEL FRAMING SUPPORT

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

March 27th, 2012

|

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 |

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

March 27th, 2012

1

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

March 27th, 2012

2'-6"

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 |

|

LLP

7'-6"

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

Ground floor exterior studies

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 March 27th, 2012

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

LLP

|

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 |

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

HANDEL ARCHITECTS

5

LLP

|

SECTION AT COLUMN

R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

GROUND STUDIES OPTION 1 HANDEL ARCHITECTS

Scale: 3/8"=1'-0"

LLP

4

|

SECTION AT LOBBY ENT R E L AT E D M I D W E S T

|

111 WEST WACKER DRIVE

March 27th, 2012

Scale: 3/8"=1'-0"

ST-1 STONE ANCHORS

7" 2'-31 2"

7"

Residential lobby brise soleil installed

4"

VARIES

째 60

ST-1 STONE ANCHORS, WITH STEEL FRAMING SUPPORT

3'-43 4"

3'-10"

3'-10" 7'-8"

Plan detail at residential lobby entrance piers

2

Residential lobby brise soleil studies

2'-15 8"

2"

METAL FILAGREE PANEL, TYP

1

4"

1

2'-0 8"

4'-81 8"

1'-91 8"

2'-6"

3'-93 4"

EXISTING CONCRETE COLUMN

2'-15 8"

PROVIDE STEEL SUPPORT AT COLUMNS THRU STONE PANELS MTL. SCREEN PANELS, TYP WATERPROOFING AT FACE OF COLUMN 9'-111 2"

PARTIAL PLAN AT RETAIL (LEVEL 4) Scale: 3/8"=1'-0"


111 Wacker

WEST WACKER DRIVE

RESIDENT LOBBY PUBLIC PARKING LOBBY

RETAIL

RETAIL

NORTH CLARK STREET

MAIL ROOM

GARAGE ENTRANCE

N WEST HADDOCK PLACE

Plan - ground floor

Residential lobby entrance

111 W. WACKER DRIVE May 1st, 2012

Rendered perspective - retail storefronts and residential entry

CHIC AGO, IL


Section - Amenity terrace

Plan - Amenity level

Amenity deck

Plan - Amenity deck


111 Wacker North facade

View from Chicago River

North facade


Tower massing diagrams

O LL C U N T R

Y

CAMPUS

HI

SITE

CAMPUS PE

DESTRIAN

THE CASTILLIAN

CONNECTIO

N

N SU

CITY

T PA

H

Site diagram

W O O L D R I D G E H A L L T R A C T D E V E LO P M E N T U N I V E R I S T Y R F P

A L L E N

THE TOWER

PREVAILING WINDS

&

Building section (N/S)

N O .

O ’ H A R A

O F

W O H 2 0 0 9

|

W I N S T O N

T E X A S |

C A P I T A L

1 |

A T

S I T E

A U S T I N

D E C E M B E R

P A G E S O U T H E R L A N D P A G E

2 0 0 9 |

East elevation

H E N S E L

P H E L P S

A N A LY S I S


2400 Nueces Austin, TX Completed 2013

2009 -2011 PageSoutherlandPage EDR Trust 16 Floors 588,000 SF $63.9M Project Designer

An important new trend in university residence halls centers on creating active urban neighborhoods adjacent to campuses that blur the boundary between “town” and “gown”. The goal is to establish pedestrian-friendly mixed-use environments that are a compact, safe and friendly extension of the campus. City councils and planning commissions are working closely with university officials and planners to make urban campuses, in particular, a seamless part of the larger city. University residence halls are a key element in this transformation. The 2400 Nueces Student Housing Project will be a major landmark in the developing West Campus neighborhood adjacent to the University of Texas at Austin. It puts physical form to the vision created in the University Neighborhood Overlay (UNO) rezoning initiative in 2004. Conceived to increase density in central Austin, reduce commuting traffic to the university and enhance a strong sense of community in the campus area, the UNO initiative is transforming a neighborhood that was once dominated by single family houses interspersed with fraternity and sorority houses into a pedestrian oriented urban neighborhood. The new housing will accommodate 622 students in 306 units with almost 10,000 sf of academic/retail space on the ground level. The building is broken into 8 “bars” of units—each of which is marked by a distinctive material and color. The bars are organized into an S-shaped configuration that creates two great outdoor rooms—an active court with a pool that has views to the hills of west Austin and a quiet court that is oriented east toward views of the campus. The architectural treatment of the building is designed to create a pedestrian and neighborhood scale while creating the higher density that is essential to achieve the sustainability and community building goals of UNO.

Ground floor townhomes & garage above


Plan - Ground level

Southeast perspective

Plan - Deck level

Plan - Typical tower level


2400 Nueces Southwest perspective

Stair tower, corridor fenestration & corner residential unit

Southwest corner facade


Southwest street perspective

Resident entry & lobby


2400 Nueces Amenity deck

Resident private terraces

Amenity deck


Section at pool deck

Pool deck courtyard looking West

Pool deck courtyard looking East through breezeway


2400 Nueces Section detail at planter

Terrace unit

Townhomes below garage along west facade


Site plan

Rendered perspective

Rendered perspective - Interstitial circulatory halls


Performing Arts Center The University of Texas - Pan America Completed 2015 2010 PageSoutherlandPage University of Texas

67,000 SF $26M Team Designer

The new Fine Arts Performance and Academic Complex at UT Pan American replaces two existing 40 year old buildings, which will be demolished, in the existing Fine Arts complex on campus. This new 70,000 square foot building will complete the Fine Arts Quad, and greatly enhance the performance and rehearsal capabilities of the Music Department. There are seven primary spaces in the building – a grand porch and lobby, the main 1,000 seat theatre which will accommodate a variety of music, dance and theatrical performances, a 180-seat recital hall, and dedicated rehearsal spaces for Band, Orchestra, Choir and Mariachi/ Jazz. The building is located near the southeast corner of campus - a grand porch and lobby are oriented toward University Boulevard and Downtown Edinburg to the south and east to make this building a unique gateway onto campus from the City. A series of structural brick arches soar along this porch and lobby as a welcoming gesture, and as an introduction to the unique architectural context of both the campus and the Rio Grande Valley. The building is carefully knit into the existing campus – it completes the Fine Arts Courtyard to the west, and aligns its main circulation spine with the principal north-south axis of campus – reinforcing its role as a key entry point onto the University.


Main auditorium

Section - Main auditorium

Main auditorium


UTPA Performing Arts Center Front porch

Interstitial circulatory hall

Front porch & auditorium facade


Concave lens band

Lens array diagrammatic section

Lens array exterior

Lens array interior

Lens array exterior

Lens array when internally lit


Lens Pavilion

TOGS 3 International Design Competition Finalist 2010 Personal work

The TOGS (temporary outdoor gallery space) competition asks its participants to design a modular art pavilion that can be easily assembled and disassembled, shipped, and stored. These small galleries are intended to be utilized during Art Week Austin - clustered along 1st Street, providing spaces for local artists and craftspeople to display their work. Among the stated purposes of the TOGS is to showcase the ‘synergy between art and architecture.’ The exterior architecture of museums and gallery spaces often respond to the built and cultural environments in which they find themselves, but often that connection dies in a glow of white walls, wood floors, and diffuse lighting as soon as we enter. The pieces, at this point, may hold some fragile bond to their residence, but very little to the world outside those walls, and much less to those visitors who wander the halls. Lens attempts to explore this disparity through integration of context, both live and environmental, by pulling the outside into the gallery space while, at the same time, pushing the art out. This is done, primarily, through a system of modular panels, infilled with lenses. Convex lenses make up the majority of the panel. This lens shape has the effect of blurring and magnifying what’s viewed through it. While one is within the TOGS, they perceive an array of magnifications of the environment surrounding them; at the same time, these images are blurred. So, while the viewer is at once having environmental context thrust upon them, it is also abstracted to the point of nonrecognition, leaving them with the ability to absorb the art without intense distraction. For those passers-by of the TOGS, the reverse occurs, and the interior is arrayed and magnified; projecting itself into the world. This is true for all but an eye-level (from the exterior) band of concave lenses, which condense what is viewed through them, allowing a wider field of vision. Through these, the TOGS draws people close to peer through its surface, and receive a new perspective on what’s within. While the lens panels acknowledge the more static context (placement and product), a dynamic panel system addresses the impact of the audience; the more transient force at play. These panels make up a second layer within the lens shell, and may consist of varying materials to serve a variety of uses, dependent on the needs of the exhibitor. Able to slide, they encourage interaction between the viewers and the space, and therefore the art. Light and shade can be manipulated, as can views from the outside be affected. A visitor is allowed to more directly explore their relationship with the work by adjusting its environment, as can they affect the perceptions of others simultaneously. Lens array exterior perspective


Site section

North curtainwall facade

Port cochere and East facade

Port cochere and main entrance


Lakeway Regional Medical Center Completed 2012

2008 - 2009 PageSoutherlandPage

274,000 SF $86M Project Designer This 274,000 square foot facility was planned within a new medical and mixed-use development located in Lakeway, Texas; a short distance west of Austin. Lakeway Regional Medical Center serves as the primary acute care hospital for that community and provides a full continuum of both inpatient and outpatient services including cardiology, obstetrics, oncology, and orthopedics. Upon opening, the facility included 108 licensed beds with shell space to accommodate an additional 40 beds as demand requires. Lakeway Regional also provides a full array of diagnostic and treatment services, including an emergency department/ urgent care clinic planned for up to 40,000 visits per year. The site for this facility is spectacular and will afford patients, staff and visitors exceptional views to the Central Texas hill country, valleys, and lakes beyond. Though scenic, the site creates design challenges as contours drop over 80 feet from one end of the site to the other. Because of this, as well as limited acreage available for the hospital, the building massing takes advantage of this slope by placing the main entry three floors above the lowest level with each of those lower levels having access to landscaped courtyards and views to a manmade water feature that abuts the site. A hurried project schedule led to extensive use of integrally colored pre-cast concrete panels as the principal exterior cladding material. Near the public entrances, the material dialogue is dominated by Texas Leuders limestone, expansive glazing, and wood sunscreens. This conversation continues as one enters the lobby and waiting areas, where stone wraps into the interior from outside, wood sunscreens become slatted walls, and Ipe clad columns break the rhythm of curtainwall along the perimeter, turning horizontally at the ceiling plane to add a touch of plasticity at the waiting areas and concourses. Key to the building program is the ability for the facility to expand, because the Lakeway community has experienced a steady growth pattern for over a decade that is expected to continue. The building plan has been designed to permit lateral expansion at each level as well as vertical expansion for additional inpatient beds.

Sunken garden at outpatient lobby & waiting


Plan - Ground floor

Rendered perspective - Entrance lobby


Lakeway Regional Medical Center Entrance lobby

Entrance lobby & waiting

Section at entrance vestibule

Section at entrance lobby stairs

Section detail at entrance vestibule

Section detail - Exterior horizontal louvers


Plan detail - Entrance lobby pier

Ground floor corridor

Rendered perspective - Ground floor corridor


Lakeway Regional Medical Center Section details - Interior wood soffits

Typical patient floor waiting

Outpatient waiting

Rendered perspective - Typical patient corridor


Phase I aerial perspective


Conoco Phillips Campus

CAMPUS ROAD

S 88TH STREET

Louisville, CO Unbuilt SECURITY FENCE

JUMPING MOUSE HABITAT:

PICNIC MEADOW

COTTONWOODS, GAMBEL OAK PEACHLEAF WILLOW PONDEROSA PINE ALDER

1.2M SF (phase I) 5M SF (full phase)

WETLANDS

PRAIRIE

2008 PageSoutherlandPage

NW PKWY

HIGH PLAINS GRASSLAND

GRAMA-BUFFALO GRASS

HOTEL

CONTEMPLATIVE GARDENS

Team Designer RETAIL SECURITY BOOTH

NF

OO THI

LLS

VISITORS’ CENTER

HW

Y

EXPERIMENTAL LANDSCAPE/ POWER GENERATION S 96TH STREET

EXISTING POWER PLANT

DEN

VER

PICNIC / PASSIVE RECREATION

BOU

LDE

RT

URN

PIKE

WETLANDS/ RESERVOIR

Full phase campus masterplan

PHASE 4

PH 2 BUILDINGS COTTONWOODS, GAMBEL OAK PEACHLEAF WILLOW PONDEROSA PINE ALDER

SECURITY FENCE

WETLANDS

PRAIRIE

EXPERIMENTAL LANDSCAPE/ POWER GENERATION

DENV

PICNIC / PASSIVE RECREATION

CONFERENCE

TUR

NPIKE

WETLANDS/ RESERVOIR

N

ER

BOULD

ER

CAFE

IRRIGATED LAWN

VISITORS’ CENTER

HW

Y

EXPERIMENTAL LANDSCAPE/ POWER GENERATION EXISTING POWER PLANT

PICNIC / PASSIVE RECREATION

TUR

NPIKE

PRAIRIE

DENV

ER

BOULD

ER

TUR

NPIKE

WETLANDS/ RESERVOIR

1:600 SCALE

PHASE 2

PHASE 1

LLS

WETLANDS/ RESERVOIR

N

1:600 SCALE

OTHI

S 96TH STREET

ER

S 96TH STREET

CONTEMPLATIVE GARDENS

EXISTING POWER PLANT

SECURITY BOOTH

N FO

VISITORS’ CENTER

Y

The majority of the site was left undeveloped, providing generous space for outdoor recreation as well as preservation of natural habitat for several species of plants and wildlife.

PHASE 3

LAB

NATIVE MEADOW GREEN ROOF

INFORMAL LAWN

Phase I site plan

BO

ULD

ER

TUR

NPI

KE

/3

6

As one of the goals of the campus was to drive development of efficiency systems and alternative energy sources, it was imperative that the campus structures themselves embraced contemporary architectural technology systems. Both the laboratory and office facade systems were case studies in somewhat varying approaches to efficient glazing systems. The laboratory skin design consisted of a double, ventilated glass facade with automatic operable lites to assist with AMPHITHEATER interstitial air flow, as well as integral horizontal blinds and rolling solar shades.

OFFICE

VER

The parti for the campus master plan was a series of linear structures that cluster themselves along the high point of property, alongside and above the adjacent highway. Each building would be paired with others, creating a pedestrian avenue between them that linked all parts of the campus, inviting interdisciplinary interaction and creating opportunities for intimate spaces within a large campus. These linear pairs oriented themselves along the natural topography of the site, creating a formal arrangement of built program driven directly by the characteristics of the topography. Parking was designed to be structured beneath the buildings and public plazas, hidden from view.

N

OFFICE

DEN

GRAMA-BUFFALO GRASS

RETAIL

ENTRY PLAZA

HW

HIGH PLAINS GRASSLAND HOTEL

CONTEMPLATIVE GARDENS

EXPERIMENTAL LANDSCAPE/ POWER GENERATION S 96TH STREET

1:600 SCALE

NW PKWY

NW PKWY

NW PKWY

LLS

Y

BOULD

WETLANDS

PRAIRIE

GRAMA-BUFFALO GRASS

SECURITY BOOTH

OTHI

HW

ER

COTTONWOODS, GAMBEL OAK PEACHLEAF WILLOW PONDEROSA PINE ALDER

RETAIL

OTHI

DENV

JUMPING MOUSE HABITAT:

PICNIC MEADOW

HIGH PLAINS GRASSLAND HOTEL

N FO

EXISTING POWER PLANT

SECURITY FENCE

WETLANDS

CONTEMPLATIVE GARDENS

N FO

PICNIC / PASSIVE RECREATION

COTTONWOODS, GAMBEL OAK PEACHLEAF WILLOW PONDEROSA PINE ALDER

PRAIRIE

HIGH PLAINS GRASSLAND

GRAMA-BUFFALO GRASS

ATHLETIC CENTER

CONTEMPLATIVE GARDENS

JUMPING MOUSE HABITAT:

PICNIC MEADOW

S 88TH STREET

JUMPING MOUSE HABITAT:

PICNIC MEADOW

LLS

CAMPUS ROAD

CAMPUS ROAD

SECURITY FENCE

S 88TH STREET

S 88TH STREET

CAMPUS ROAD

PH 3 BUILDINGS

PageSoutherlandPage was asked by ConocoPhillips to participate in a competition to design a large corporate campus between Boulder and Denver Colorado, on a 432 acre plot they had recently purchased. To be constructed in several phases, this development was intended to provide space for their research and development teams, conferences and seminars, hospitality, general offices, and for potential future relocation of their entire headquarters. Partnering with Hargreaves Associates, PSP developed a master plan for full phase buildout, as well as a more detailed design study for phase I construction, which was to include a hotel and conference center, offices, and laboratories.

OFFICE

The office facade system was designed around vertical strips of building integrated photovoltaics. Paired with these were continuous horizontal exterior shades and interior light shelves, as well as a non uniform distribution of porous vertical shades clipped to the curtainwall. Multistory winter gardens punctuated this facade, and were to assist with local natural ventilation. Both systems employed under floor climate delivery systems.


Learning center & hotel

Learning center & hotel entrance

Office lobby

Learning center & hotel lobby

Operable glass vent

Interior light shelf

Building integrated photovoltaic piers

Vertical photovoltaics

Raised floor displacement air system

Ventilation cavity Exterior blinds/shades

Horizontal photovoltaics Lab & office rendered facade system sections


Conoco Phillips Campus Campus pedestrian mall

Campus portal and retail


Entry courtyard perspective


Four Cort Apartments Austin, TX Unbuilt

2005 - 2006 PageSoutherlandPage PRM Realty 7 Floors 245,000 SF $14M Project Designer

Plan - Level 5

Located several blocks from the University of Texas, Four Cort was targeted at an increasingly dense student population west of campus. An arrangement of 156 units, three levels of enclosed garage, and a variety of exterior spaces, the design is informed primarily by the challenge of determining a compromise between the demands of density in this ever more populated neighborhood as well as the desire to create a safe and social living environment that appeals to the widest range possible of student lifestyles. In order to achieve this, the basic plan of the project takes on the character of a human hand, consisting of one four story building mass running the length of the interior property line with five other similar volumes arranged perpendicularly to it. These ‘fingers’ step down along their length in response to the enclosed parking garage beneath them as well as the relatively severe grade of the site, giving the project a more human scale through transitions in height. This arrangement also creates four distinct courtyards in the spaces between the fingers that step in a similar fashion, transitioning from grade level areas to above-garage activity decks, each landscaped with a character unique to itself but clearly related to the composition as a whole and representative of Austin’s natural vegetation. These spaces are open to the street, reducing the feeling of enclosure that is often overshadowing in interior courtyards, as well as creating a more inviting street façade, animated by the comings and goings of the buildings tenants.

Plan - Level 3

As a continuation of this gesture, the standard device of interior, double-loaded corridors is abandoned in favor of a layout that allows for the corridors to instead be exposed to any one of the open spaces created by the building’s massing. This inherently increases the safety of the project’s residents by reducing spaces that are not easily visually accessible, while at the same time enhancing the social interactions of its inhabitants for the same reason. The quality of the circulation spaces is also greatly improved through this visual access to the exterior environment - periodically through textural screens of Ipe hardwood or galvanized steel - as well as an abundance of fresh air. Designed as a single loaded scenario, the accompanying drop in efficiency of such a move is absorbed both through the elimination of the need to mechanically ventilate the shared spaces, as well as the fact that the majority of units are two-bedroom townhomes, requiring corridor access on only one of their two levels. These corridors are laced together through a combination of sculpturally arranged exterior stairs and bridges, connecting each unit with any one of the lower courtyards as well as several rooftop terraces at the buildings fingertips, created by the stepping of those volumes and offering clear views to nearby Pease Park. The building skin is a lightweight rainscreen system composed of painted fiber cement panels and interrupted by battens of Ipe hardwood that lend warmth and scale to the façade, its muted tone balanced by the boldly painted interior stucco surfaces of the residential corridors. Units are a mix of efficiency, one and two bedroom flats, and two bedroom townhomes. All have access to light and air in each primary room through large, operable casement windows.

Plan - Level 1


Exterior courtyard egress stair plans

Section/Elevation - Unfolded typical residential bar

Exterior courtyard egress stair sketch perspective


Four Cort Apartments

Casement Window

1/4” Fiber Cement Board

6” LGMF @ 16” o.c. 5/8” Gyp. Board

4” Conc. Over 1” Galv. Mtl. Deck Ref: Struc.

Ipe Wood Battens

Batt Insulation Sprayed Thermal/Acoustic Insulation - 4” Thick

7/8” Hat Channels Fluid Applied Membrane Air Barrier 1/2” Glass-Mat Gypsum Sheathing Board Continuous Mtl. Soffit Vent

Galvanized Steel Barrier Rail 5/8” Weather Resistant Soffit Board

Section detail at typical wall assembly

Plan - Typical 2 bedroom townhouse unit

Longview street perspective

a b c d e

a b c d e

Plan - Typical 2 bedroom flat


Plan - Ground

Plan - Auditorium level

Elevation - Entrance

Section

Circulation & programming diagrams


Castle Clinton

New York, NY UTSOA - Thomas Phifer Studio

2005

Castle Clinton, in Battery Park, has a long and dynamic history. Constructed in 1811, it served originally as part of the system of battery defenses against a potential British attack. After its tour of duty was complete, it saw time as a promenade, beer garden/restaurant, exhibition hall, opera house, theater, the first immigration station, and the New York Aquarium. Today it is identified as a national monument and houses limited exhibition space and ticketing for the nearby Ellis Island ferry. Our studio program, which was one Thomas Phifer had been actually granted, was to design a conceptual outdoor amphitheater space within the castle walls. When not used as a theater, the project was to be used as a gateway to the Ellis Island ferries, containing ticketing, exhibition space, and a viewing promenade. Given the existing structure’s historical significance, it was important for the structure of the new development to sit lightly within the castle, careful to avoid the existing sandstone walls as well as some basement areas below grade. To that end, the project relied on a woven, diamond structure that brought loads down to finite points. This was applied to a spherical, double hull form that rises from within the castle walls. This is the primary form of the project in addition to a rectangular element at the front of the caste, framed and derived from the inner shape of the masonry walls, that houses ticketing, restrooms, and frames the stage above. The two walls of the lattice sphere create a circulatory ramp from the lower level to the promenade and amphitheater above. It is once the sphere rises above the castle walls that it is affected by several planes, the first of which being a structural glass deck that serves as the promenade and primary upper circulation plane. This extends over the castle walls, sheltering them from rain and providing an excellent viewing platform. The second plane is contained entirely within the inner sphere and is sloped for audience seating, directed towards the stage. The final plane alters the sphere itself, slicing it based on the angle and movement of the sun during the time most evening performances would take place, shielding the stage and its performers from natural direct light. Finally, the lattice structure of the sphere shells also provides and opportunity for additional shading through the inclusion of translucent blades infilling the diamond shaped spaces between structural members. These blades can be swiveled and rotated in order to provide more or less light, opened to increase ventilation of the audience or, conversely, closed in order to better shield the audience if necessary. Interior perspective at ramp


Computer model

Section through entrance

Shell interstitial space


Castle Clinton Perspective composite

Perspective composite


Building section at structural stair

Unit dispersal & circulation diagrams

North elevation

Perspective at boat slip


Boathouse Condos

Austin, TX UTSOA - Dean Almy/ Elizabeth Danze Studio 2004

Plan - Level 3

Provided with a small embankment on Lady Bird Lake, our task was to develop a residential structure with 4 condo units, parking, and a boating/fitness center. The site had many variables acting on it. Contextually, it was bound by an existing multistory housing development to the south, a rather highly traveled road on the east, a public boat slip to the north, and of course the lake to the west. Additionally, the site had roughly 15’ of vertical drop from Lake Austin Boulevard to the lake itself, as well as an artificial cove formed by the boat dock of the adjacent multifamily development and a finger of property alongside the public slip. Given the dramatic difference of amenity on each side of the property, the decision was made to attempt to allow each unit a piece of every site adjacency. Rather than having a mix of units, some better than others, the goal was to have residences that benefitted uniformly from each aspect of the site surroundings. Additionally, it was desirable to have a more private outdoor area for the residents, removed from the lively public space nearby. This, in conjunction with the distribution of site adjacencies, led to a design in which several distinct zones were built around the perimeter of the site, creating a shielded courtyard within.

Plan - Level 2

The entry to the project is through a private garage that is open to the lake on one side, and ringed by residential entries to the east and south. These spaces are primarily small offices or guest bedrooms, lit by clerestory windows off the courtyard above the garage structure. After entering underground, residents then walk up enclosed, but expressed stairways, glazed with frosted glass on the courtyard side, to the loft section of their unit which are ringed by balconies framed with sliding polycarbonate panels for varying degrees of privacy and light. This level provides primarily living spaces that have access to daylight on both two sides, one facing the private courtyard and the other of the large oak trees within the public boat ramp. The stairways connecting the lower portion with the loft spaces become structural elements, supporting the loft volume, as well as defining aesthetic devices; counteracting the mass of the primarily cast in place concrete structure through an expression of lightness. From these loft areas, each unit has a space that faces down river, providing every resident with spectacular views of the lake. Finally, the boathouse is expressed as a glazed volume, directly on the water, from which residents can launch their crafts.

Plan - Level 1


CORY BODEN AIA

NCARB

CPHC

LEED AP

www.coryboden.com coryboden@gmail.com 8 1 7 . 2 0 2 . 5 0 1 0