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FAL L 2011/ WINTE R   2012

Studio

The

the corning museum of glass


Come and experience glass at The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass. Whether you are new to glass or are a seasoned professional, we offer classes at all levels by the talented instructors who teach at our state-of-the-art facility. In the fall, we offer classes on weekends and in the evenings, perfect for those who want to explore glassmaking without making an intense commitment. Techniques range from glassblowing, flameworking, fusing, and stained glass to mosaics, photosandblasting, and even Precious Metal Clay with glass. If you are looking for a more in-depth experience, please join us for one of our one-week intensive classes in the winter with famous instructors who come from around the world. This year, we are offering classes in a variety of techniques, including glassblowing, sculpting, kiln working, casting, flameworking, engraving, cold working, and glass painting. We are also bringing back the popular Glassworking through the Ages, a special class focusing on important glass objects and the techniques that were used to create them. While you’re here, we invite you to spend some time experiencing the Museum’s Rakow Research Library. The Rakow Research Library houses the world’s most comprehensive collection of materials on the art and history of glass and glassmaking. Research glass formulae, view contemporary artist videos, and more.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

As you work to create objects of beauty, enjoy free Museum admission to explore the world’s best collection of glass. This fall, special exhibitions include a focus show on Toots Zynsky’s work, and exhibits on Harvey K. Littleton and Dominick Labino to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the American Studio Glass movement. Let us help you develop your passion for glass. Join us at The Studio this fall or winter…or both!

Amy Schwartz Director, The Studio

William Gudenrath Resident Adviser, The Studio

The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass • One Museum Way • Corning, NY 14830-2253 Phone 607.438.5100 • Fax 607.438.5150 • E-mail thestudio@cmog.org


THE STUDIO OF THE CORNING MUSEUM OF GLASS

FALL 2011/WINTER 2012 PROGRAMS

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Fall Programs 2011

Ten-Week Sessions 2

Weekend Workshops 3 One-Day Workshops

7

Instructor Biographies 8

Registration Information 9

Winter Programs 2012

Intensive Classes 10

Registration Information 30

Additional Information

Student and Artist Resources 33

Residency Programs 34

Other Glassmaking Experiences 35

Travel Information 35

The Studio’s Scholarship Funds 36

Application Form 37


FALL

FALL 2011 PROGRAM TEN-WEEK SESSIONS These 10-week courses allow students of all levels to explore glassmaking. Classes meet once each week for three hours. Each class begins the week of September 25 and ends the week of November 27. Tuition is $440 for the entire 10 weeks, which covers basic supplies for the class. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis, as class sizes are limited. Full payment must be received before September 13 to ensure a spot in the class. See page 9 for registration information.

CONTINUING GLASSBLOWING

GLASSBLOWING

Mondays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Josh Powers

BEGINNING GLASSBLOWING

Through demonstration and hands-on practice, students will develop a strong foundation for flameworking borosilicate glass. Topics will include properties of the material, color usage, the techniques used in creating solid sculpture, and how to construct objects. No glassworking experience is required.

Mondays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Allison Duncan

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Intended for beginners, this course will emphasize learning the basic skills necessary to complete simple blown vessels. Class time will be divided between demonstrations and supervised work time, with individual attention for each student. No glassworking experience is required. INTRODUCTION TO CANEWORKING Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Jeremy Unterman This course will introduce students to the processes of making a variety of glass cane styles and then incorporating them into solid and blown forms. Students will begin by creating the simplest single-color core cane, and then move on to more complex cane styles. Students may bring drawings to class. Some glassblowing experience is required.

Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Lorin Silverman In this course, students will build their glassblowing confidence by improving their gathering, marvering, blowing, and punty skills. Some glassblowing experience is required.

FLAMEWORKING BEGINNING FLAMEWORKING

BEADMAKING & JEWELRY DESIGN Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Linda McCollumn Students will develop a foundation for creating flameworked beads using Moretti soft glass. They will learn to shape beads with confidence and consistency, and explore jewelry design, material usage (including advanced techniques), and color blending. Students should bring notebooks to class. No glassworking experience is required.


F L AT G L A S S FUNCTIONAL FUSING Tuesdays, 7:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m. Instructor: Janet Dalecki Students will learn how to cut flat glass, arrange the pieces into patterns, and apply fusing techniques to create functional dishes and other pieces of fused dinnerware. Students will fuse their own designs into various shaped molds. No glassworking experience is required.

Weekend workshops, held Saturdays and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., offer students the opportunity to study glassworking without making a long-term commitment. Tuition for each weekend workshop is $220. See page 9 for registration information.

FALL

WEEKEND WORKSHOPS

Participants in need of accommodations may contact the nearby Days Inn of Corning at 607.936.9370. Please identify yourself as a student at The Studio. All hot-glass work requires overnight cooling in an annealer. Work created on Sunday may be picked up Monday or shipped at an additional fee.

GLASSBLOWING BEGINNING GLASSBLOWING October 1 – 2 October 8 – 9 November 12 – 13

Quinn Doyle Brenna Baker Brenna Baker

Students will learn the basics of blowing and manipulating glass. They will then create simple glass objects, such as colorful paperweights, flowers, free-form sculptures, and vessels. No glassworking experience is required. NEXT STEPS IN GLASSBLOWING October 15 – 16 November 19 – 20

Lorin Silverman Lorin Silverman

Students who have completed a beginning glassblowing workshop are invited to build on their basic skills. Using both colorless and colored glass, they will create objects such as cups, vessels, and sculptures. Basic glassblowing experience is required.

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FALL

WEEKEND WORKSHOPS Cont’d

GLASSBLOWING

BEGINNING FLAMEWORKING

VESSELS

October 8 – 9 Instructor: Jim Byrnes

October 22 – 23 Instructor: Lorin Silverman In this class, students will learn multiple approaches to creating blown glass vessels (e.g., cylindrical, conical, hourglass, and amphora shapes). Basic glassblowing experience is required. INTRODUCTION TO GOBLET CONSTRUCTION November 5 – 6 Instructor: Jeremy Unterman

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This furnace glassblowing workshop will focus on the many ways to create a goblet using hot glass. Students will begin by making clear goblets with simple stems pulled from the bubble. More complicated techniques will be introduced as well. Basic glassblowing experience is required.

FLAMEWORKING BEAD BASICS: INTRODUCTION TO FLAMEWORKED BEADS October 1 – 2 Instructor: Linda McCollumn Students will learn the basics of forming round beads, then move on to shaping and surface decoration. This workshop will concentrate on helping students develop a high level of competence in basic beadmaking and on providing solid technical groundwork for further development. No glassworking experience is required.

Through demonstration and ample hands-on practice, students will develop a strong foundation for many aspects of flameworking borosilicate glass, including creating solid sculpture and an introduction to hollow work. Color usage will be covered. No glassworking experience is required. INTRODUCTION TO FLAMEWORKING: BEADS AND MARBLES October 22 – 23 Instructor: Josh Powers By gaining hands-on experience, students can expect to achieve a strong understanding of techniques used in creating solid sculpture in soda lime and borosilicate glass, including beads, pendants, marbles, and small sculpture. Color usage will be included. No glassworking experience is required. SEASONAL BEADS AND SCULPTURES IN SOFT GLASS October 29 – 30 Instructor: Elijah Schwartz This class will build on basic soft glass techniques, including shaping, pattern application, precision sculpting and proper heating. Students will create seasonal-themed beads, small sculptures, and ornaments. Demonstration options include pumpkins, black cats, snowmen, candy canes, and much more! Some flameworking experience is preferred, but not required.


F L AT G L A S S

November 5 – 6 Instructor: Lee Silveri

PHOTOSANDBLASTING

This workshop features perfume bottles, various drinking vessels, and larger scale vases. Students will create functional objects and apply surface decoration. Some flameworking experience is required. Advanced students are welcome. FA N C Y I C I C L E S November 12 – 13 Instructor: Caitlin Hyde

FALL

FLAMEWORKING BOTTLES AND GOBLETS

October 8 – 9 Instructor: Denise Stillwaggon Leone Halftones and black-and-white images will be used in this workshop, which will explore the fundamentals of photosandblasting on glass. Stencils will be created and used as resists in sandblasting projects. Students should bring halftone positives or high-contrast black-andwhite images to class. No glassworking experience is required.

This class will show students how to make fancy, vividly colored glass icicles from soda lime glass at the torch. These icicles introduce students to Venetian-style, off-mandrel flameworking techniques—and they make lovely window or holiday ornaments! Basic flameworking experience is helpful, but not required.

MOSAICS

OCEAN LIFE

B E G I N N I N G S TA I N E D G L A S S

November 19 – 20 Instructors: Elijah Schwartz

October 22 – 23 Instructor: Tony Serviente

Students will learn how to make small oceanic sculptures and beads, and will bring home a veritable aquarium of glass animals! Demonstration options include sea turtles, octopi, blown seashells, and tropical fish. Bring pictures to work from and a sketchbook for notes. All techniques cross over to borosilicate, but soft glass will be used in class. No glassworking experience is required.

This workshop offers a spontaneous and playful way to become acquainted with stained glass. Students will learn basic techniques (cutting and shaping glass, foil wrapping the pieces, and soldering them together) and complete a small window. No glassworking experience is required. Accompanied by parents, children over the age of 12 are welcome. (Please note that parents must contact the instructor before they register children for the workshop. The Studio will provide contact information.)

October 15 – 16 Instructor: Janet Dalecki Students will learn to cut flat glass and assemble the pieces into imagery or patterns on a prepared substrate. Students will have time to complete a project and learn about the grouting and finishing process. No glassworking experience is required.

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FALL

WEEKEND WORKSHOPS Cont’d

F L AT G L A S S FUSED JEWELRY October 29 – 30 Instructor: Gayla Lee Students will learn to fuse glass on a small scale to create jewelry. A variety of techniques for designing and finishing pieces will be covered. This class will focus on the development of a solid foundation in glass fusing and the realization of the students’ ideas in glass. No glassworking experience is required. INTRODUCTION TO FUSING November 5 – 6 Instructor: Glady West

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Students will learn how to cut flat glass, arrange it into patterns, and fuse the completed pieces in a kiln. Both flat plates and trays will be created with colorful enamel powders. No glassworking experience is required. P R E C I O U S M E TA L C L AY AND GLASS USING COPPER AND BRONZE* November 12 – 13 Instructor: Ed and Martha Biggar Students will learn basic techniques of fusing glass and incorporating silver metal clay around glass for finished pendants and earrings. Additionally, students will be introduced to the new copper and bronze metal clays. Some experience working with PMC and glass is preferred, but not required. * Due to the cost of precious metal materials, an additional fee of $100 will be charged for this PMC class.

NEXT STEPS IN FUSING November 19 – 20 Instructor: Glady West Students who have taken Beginning Fusing, or have basic cutting and fusing skills, are invited to learn more advanced decorative techniques. Hot pieces will be slumped or draped into shape using molds. Basic cutting and fusing experience is required. PRACTICE OPPORTUNITIES The Studio will remain open (by request) after class on Saturdays so that students in glassblowing and flameworking workshops may rent practice time at reduced rates. Please contact us for details.


One-day workshops are fun for the entire family! No glassworking experience is required, but participants must be at least 10 years of age for beadmaking and 14 for furnace working. Parents are encouraged to register with their children. The classes will meet from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., with one-hour lunch breaks on your own. Tuition for each workshop is $110 per person, which covers basic supplies for the class. See page 9 for registration information. All hot-glass work requires overnight cooling in an annealer. Pieces may be picked up the following day or shipped for an additional fee. JEWELRY DESIGN WITH P R E C I O U S M E TA L C L AY AND SEA GLASS* October 1 Instructor: Beth Hylen Students will learn to mount pieces of sea glass on a pendant and create a clasp from silver metal clay. Basic techniques for working with Precious Metal Clay (PMC) will be covered. Chips of sea glass and PMC are supplied. No experience is required. One pendant per student. *Due to the cost of materials, an additional fee of $50 will be charged for this PMC class. F A S T A N D F U N : A L I V E LY I N T R O D U C T I O N T O S TA I N E D GLASS AND ETCHING

BEADMAKING October 15 Instructor: Allison Duncan

FALL

O N E - D AY W O R K S H O P S

Students will learn the art of creating colorful glass mandrel-wrapped beads at the torch. The class will cover basic shaping and decorating techniques using rods, stringers, and various hand tools. No glassworking experience is required. MARBLE MAKING October 16 Instructor: Quinn Doyle While learning color application and design, students will create glass marbles using primarily borosilicate glass at the torch. No glassworking experience is required. PA P E R W E I G H T S AT T H E F U R N A C E October 29 Instructor: Eli Smith This workshop will explore how to make paperweights that contain a broad variety of colorful and interesting glass inclusions, which will be encased in crystal. No glassworking experience is required. PUMPKINS AND GOURDS AT T H E F U R N A C E

October 2 Instructor: Tony Serviente

October 30 Instructor: Janet Dalecki

This class will allow students to explore the basics of two glass techniques to create decorative mirrors or small stained glass windows, and have a great time in the process. While the pace will be brisk, there will be ample opportunity for one-on-one guidance. No glassworking experience is required.

Students can celebrate the harvest season by learning to form pumpkin and gourd shapes from molten glass! Those who have taken Beginning Glassblowing or have some experience with furnace working will build upon their basic skills and learn shaping techniques. Some furnace-working experience is required.

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FALL

INSTRUCTORS Brenna Baker first studied glassmaking at The Studio through a local high school arts program. Since then, she has gone on to study and work with some of glassmaking’s finest artists, including Pino Signoretto, for whom she has head assistant in Murano, Italy. Ed and Martha Biggar have more than 50 years collective glassworking experience, as well as more than 15 years working with metal clay. Mrs. Biggar is a juried member of the Southern Highland Craft Guild and the Artisan Center of Virginia. Mr. Biggar has created illuminated neon mixed-media works since the early 1990s. They maintain a studio in the mountains of Virginia. Jim Byrnes spent 30 years as a scientific glassblower while making decorative items on the side. He is now devoted full time to teaching his craft and selling his decorative work at quality craft retailers across the United States.

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Linda McCollumn has worked with glass for 18 years, exploring many techniques, including fusing, sandblasting, diamond-etched and kiln-fired enamels, stained glass, and Precious Metal Clay. Josh Powers has been flameworking glass for several years. He has worked as a flameworker for The Studio and currently owns World Glass, a glass supply shop in Corning, NY. Elijah Schwartz is from a family of glassblowers and artisans. He has displayed and published his work since he was 15, and has mastered a variety of techniques during the past 20 years. Tony Serviente has been working with glass for more than 20 years. He maintains a studio in Ithaca, NY, where he teaches, makes stained glass panels and lamps, and markets a line of giftware nationally.

Janet Dalecki was first introduced to art glass in 1989 through her family’s glass business. She received a B.F.A. from Alfred University in 2002 and has worked in many privately owned glass studios.

Lee Silveri began working with glass in 1998. He teaches flameworking regularly, and enjoys sharing his love of the art. Mr. Silveri’s work can be found in galleries, museum shops, and private collections throughout the United States.

Quinn Doyle has been working with glass since 2004, when she began taking classes in Philadelphia at a public-access glassblowing studio. Ms. Doyle is currently a member of the technical team at The Studio.

Lorin Silverman works at a private studio near Ithaca, NY, and demonstrates/exhibits his work in studios and galleries in New York City, Philadelphia, and Corning, NY. He received a B.F.A. in glass from Alfred University.

Allison Duncan began pursuing glass as an artistic medium in 2003. She received a B.F.A. in glass and a B.A. in art history from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in 2006. She creates sculptural and functional pieces. Ms. Duncan is currently the team leader for the Fun with Glass program at The Studio.

Eli Smith began working in glass through classes at The Studio in 2003. In 2007, he began blowing glass full time at the Hot Glass Show and teaching at The Studio.

Caitlin Hyde has been working with glass and mixedmedia sculpture and jewelry since 1996. She teaches flameworking and beadmaking workshops across the United States and demonstrates at the Museum. Beth Hylen uses glass and Precious Metal Clay (PMC) to create wearable art and artwork that has been exhibited in galleries and shops, and featured in several publications. She is PMC certified. Gayla Lee has been working in glass for 10 years. She is a frequent visitor to The Studio, as a student, an instructor, and a resident artist. She currently works at a glassblowing studio in Baltimore.

Denise Stillwaggon Leone began working with glass in 1970 as a student at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She has completed many commissions, and her work has been shown nationally. Jeremy Unterman began working with glass in 1999. He received a B.F.A. in 2003 from the Tyler School of Art, and is currently a member of the technical team at The Studio. Glady West is a graduate of SUNY at Alfred and Tusculum College. She has worked with glass since 1982, and enjoys the challenges of combining flat, kiln-formed, and flameworked glass.


R E G I S T R AT I O N A N D PAY M E N T

FA L L P R O G R A M S C H O L A R S H I P S

Fall

FA L L 2 0 1 1 P R O G R A M R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N

The Christopher John Kammerer Memorial Scholarship Fund was founded by the family and friends of the late Christopher John Kammerer, who attended classes and rented To register: space at The Studio in the 1990s. It supports > Call 607.438.5100 promising young artists from the Northeast, > Fax the application form on page 37 and is available for courses that meet during (with payment info) to 607.438.5150 > Visit The Studio during regular business hours the spring and fall sessions. (Monday – Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.) To apply for these scholarship funds, please submit five digital images of recent work and We accept checks or money orders (payable an essay explaining why you wish to take a to The Corning Museum of Glass), and Masterparticular class. Include any appropriate Card, Visa, American Express, or Discover. information describing your financial need. You also may include one or two letters of No confirmation letter will be sent. Participants recommendation. will be notified only if the requested workshop Registrations are taken on a first-come, firstserved basis.

is full. R E F U N D / C A N C E L L AT I O N POLICY A 50-percent refund will be given for cancellations made at least seven days before the start of class. No refund will be given after that time. If it is necessary for us to cancel a class for any reason, a full refund will be given.

All scholarship applications will be reviewed by a committee. Applications should be sent to Christopher John Kammerer Memorial Scholarship Fund, The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830-2253.

H O L I D AY O P E N H O U S E AND GLASS SALE The Studio will hold its annual Open House and Studio Glass Sale in conjunction with the Museum’s Open House, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on December 3 and 4. Visitors may make a variety of projects at a reduced cost. Guests also can buy original glass pieces made by artists who use and support The Studio. All proceeds of the sale go to the scholarship fund and residency program.

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WINTER

WINTER 2012 PROGRAM Immerse yourself in glass during an intensive course. We provide excellent instruction by top artists and proximity to the world’s largest collection of glass. .

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2 0 1 2

S E S S I O N

O N E

1

P R O G R A M

O N E W E E K

JANUARY

2–7

A G R E AT B A L A N C I N G A C T: THE ON-CENTER/OFF-CENTER FORM

WINTER

W I N T E R

JORDANA KORSEN AND JOHN MILLER Glassblowing The focus of this course will be learning to create the on-center/off-center forms that are both sculptural and functional. This class will offer the opportunity for creative expression through a skillful approach in the hot shop. We will discuss collaborative works and encourage students to explore this type of work. Two years of glassblowing experience are required.

11 JORDANA KORSEN has been working with hot glass for more than 20 years, focusing on functional work with a sculptural touch. As a glassblower, she creates clean forms with a sense of humor. She has been running the glass program at Franklin Pierce University since 1995. Her architectural commissions Photo by Charley Freiburg. for restaurants and hotels Jordana Korsen can be seen throughout Get Hammered the United States.

John Miller The Perfect Hamburger

JOHN MILLER has been working in glass for more than 20 years and focuses on blown sculpture. He earned his M.F.A. at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and has worked at Pilchuck Glass School for 15 years. He exhibits internationally, lectures and demonstrates nationally, and is an assistant professor and head of the glass department at Illinois State University.


S E S S I O N

WINTER

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C o n t ’ d

W E E K

FLAMEWORKING FOR EVERYBODY

JANUARY

2 -– 7

A N E X P L O R AT I O N O F KILN FORMED GLASS

EMILIO SANTINI

MARK SALSBURY

Flameworking

Kiln Working

Realizing personal creativity through torch work will be the focal point of this course. Students will be introduced to various sculpting and glassblowing techniques, using borosilicate and soft glass. They will use colored rods and tubing to create objects, such as blown beads, ornaments, goblets, and human figures. Venetian techniques for making figures with soft glass also will be demonstrated. No glassworking experience is required; advanced students also are welcome.

This class is designed to establish a strong foundation in kiln-formed glass. Students will learn a wide range of techniques, including kiln casting, enamel stenciling, basic fusing, and pattern bar. The class will also cover cold working and developing firing schedules. This class is an opportunity to start learning about kiln-formed glass, or to advance current knowledge. No glassworking experience is required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

12 EMILIO SANTINI, originally from Murano, resides with his family in Williamsburg, VA, where he works glass full time in his studio. He also is a faculty member of the Virginia Commonwealth University glass department. His work is featured in private and museum collections Photo by Ann Cady. around the world and he Emilio Santini has extensive teaching Untitled experience.

Photo by Amber Marshall.

Mark Salsbury Exponential Growth

MARK SALSBURY is currently the director of the kiln working department at Third Degree Glass Factory in St. Louis, MO. While earning his M.F.A. at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, he became interested in kiln-formed glass. His work was featured in the New Glass Review (29 and 32) and has been recognized in the Illinois Emerging Artist exhibit.


AN IN-DEPTH INTRODUCTION TO VENETIAN TECHNIQUES

VENETIAN TECHNIQUES I N G L A S S PA I N T I N G

WILLIAM GUDENRATH

LUCIA SANTINI

Glassblowing

Painting on Glass

This course will provide a firm foundation in the basic movements of Venetian-style glassblowing. It will include the making of well-formed and thinly blown vessel bodies, excellent necks, delicate mereses, and blown feet and stems. When students have mastered these techniques, they will proceed to making canes and studying caneworking processes. Objects from The Corning Museum of Glass collection will be closely studied, initially to frustrate, and then to inspire students. One year of glassblowing experience is required.

This course will focus on the traditional Venetian techniques for painting enamels on glass. Students will learn how to mix and apply colors, and how to apply gold leaf. Technical and artistic aspects of glass painting will be covered, and plenty of time will be allowed for practice. No glassworking experience is required.

WINTERR

1

13 WILLIAM GUDENRATH, resident adviser at The Studio, is a glassblower, scholar, lecturer, and teacher. An authority on historical hot glassworking techniques from ancient Egypt through the Renaissance, he has presented many lectures and demonstrations. Mr. Gudenrath also is the president of the Fellows William Gudenrath of The Corning Museum Sea Green Trio of Glass.

LUCIA SANTINI was born in Murano to a family with a 600-year glassmaking history. She learned from Muranese masters of painting on glass. She works at her own studio in Murano and frequently collaborates with Lucio Bubacco and her brother Emilio Santini. She teaches and exhibits her work internationally.

Photo by Ann Cady.

Lucia Santini Untitled


S E S S I O N

WINTER

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JANUARY

W E E K

A D VA N C E D S O L I D S C U L P T U R E

A D VA N C E D F L O R A L M U R R I N E

PINO SIGNORETTO

LOREN STUMP

Hot Sculpting

Flameworking

This course is designed for advanced students who are interested in sculpting hot glass off the pipe. Daily demonstrations and extensive individual instruction will enable students to develop the manual dexterity necessary to make figural and abstract work using hot glass. This is a juried course and significant hot glassworking experience is required. Please submit three digital images of your work with your application.

Students will make a variety of complex murrine components to achieve high detail in miniature floral design. The course will cover the construction of plant components that are shaded, veined, and speckled, and then used for flat surface decoration and three-dimensional surface application. These components will be combined into picture murrine for later use. Paperweight vacuum encasement also will be covered. Students should bring images of their three favorite flowers. Intermediate flameworking experience and some murrine experience is required. A prior class with Mr. Stump is recommended.

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9–14

PINO SIGNORETTO is a sculptor who manipulates glass with rare strength and skill. He was trained by the glass master Alfredo Barbini, and he is now considered to be a master himself. A Pino Signoretto portraitist and a nature Pantalone e Colombina lover, Mr. Signoretto also is a popular instructor.

LOREN STUMP, a Sacramento, CA, native, began his career more than 35 years ago as a stained glass artist. He is now a self-taught flameworker, tool and technique developer and teacher, known for such innovative techniques as the manipulation of two-dimensional Photo by Rich Images. murrine slices into threeLoren Stump dimensional forms. Mr. Last Stand Stump has exhibited, demonstrated, and lectured around the world.


LARGE-SCALE KILN CASTING

WINTER

2

MILON TOWNSEND Kiln Working Working with student sketches, the class will emphasize teamwork. Students will work together to create lost-wax kiln castings on a much larger scale than is typically possible in a classroom or home studio. Students will mix large batches, make large silicone molds using a “mother mold,� pour and finish large waxes, build multiple-part molds, create large-scale reverse relief castings, and steam out largescale molds. Students will not be producing work to take home. Some glass-casting experience is helpful, but not required. 15 MILON TOWNSEND has been working with glass for more than 35 years, in flameworking, cold working, and kiln casting. He is the author of numerous books, videos, and articles on glass, art, and marketing, and frequently presents at workshops, classes, and conferences. His work is Photo by Milon Townsend. represented in many fine Milon Townsend galleries, museums, and Koi Panel private collections around the world.


S E S S I O N

WINTER

T W O

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2

C o n t ’ d

W E E K

COLD CONSTRUCTION

JANUARY

9– 14

MARTIN ROSOL AND PAVEL NOVAK Cold Working Using solid blocks of glass, students will experiment with aspects of advanced cold working: grinding, polishing, the use of horizontal mill wheels and vertical lathes, and cutting with stone and diamond to create constructions from glass. Students also will learn the HXTAL gluing process to join glass elements. No glassworking experience is required.

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Photo by Debra Adelson.

Martin Rosol Galactica

MARTIN ROSOL attended the School for Arts and Crafts in Prague and received further training in his native Czechoslovakia as a cold worker. He came to the United States in 1988 to further his career as a sculptor. He lives in Massachusetts, where he maintains a glass studio. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe.

Pavel Novak Swing Pendant

PAVEL NOVAK was born in the Czech Republic. There, he was trained as a cold worker and employed as a teacher at the Glass School in Novy Bor, where he taught cold working techniques. Mr. Novak immigrated to the United States in 2000, and currently lives and works in New Jersey where he makes his line of jewelry and sculpture.


T H R E E

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W E E K

I F Y O U C A N ’ T TA K E T H E H E A T, G E T O U T O F T H E KITCHEN

3

JANUARY

16– 21

WINTER

S E S S I O N

ERICA ROSENFELD AND JESSICA JANE JULIUS Glassblowing During this course, the hot shop will turn into a kitchen! Students will create new recipes of glassmaking techniques and approaches to their work, and traditional techniques will be explored in new ways, through blowing, sculpting, and cane pulling. Students will create kiln components that can be hot-worked. Carving, polishing, and drilling along with gluing, will be addressed. Students should have bodies of work or concepts that they wish to evolve or explore. Some glassworking experience is required.

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Photo by Ken Yanoviak.

Photo by James Dee.

Erica Rosenfeld Family Tree Necklace

ERICA ROSENFELD combines glass and beading techniques to create kinetic jewelry and sculpture. She is a founding member of “The Burnt Asphalt Family,” a performance art group who combines glassmaking and cooking in their work. Her pieces are included in the collection of the Museum of Arts and Design and featured in several publications.

Jessica Jane Julius Labor of Craft

JESSICA JANE JULIUS is an adjunct professor at the Tyler School of Art, Rochester Institute of Technology, with a private studio in South Philadelphia. She is the co-founder and active member of “The Burnt Asphalt Family.” Ms. Julius’ work has been featured in the New Glass Review in 2001, 2008, 2009, and 2010.


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S E S S I O N T H R E E C o n t ’ d J A N U A R Y

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W E E K

FIORI E ANGELI (FLOWERS AND ANGELS)

16– 21

PAUL STANKARD AND LUCIO BUBACCO Flameworking Two master glass artists will share their signature flameworking styles and techniques in a celebration of flowers and angels. Students will create small-scale inclusions for encapsulation in clear glass paperweights. The inclusions will be cast into panels in the hot shop. Two years of flameworking experience are required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

18 PAUL STANKARD’S flameworked naturethemed objects are included in more than 50 museum collections worldwide. In addition to authoring the book No Green Berries or Leaves: The Creative Journey of an Artist in Glass, his detailed glass interpretations of the plant kingdom Paul Stankard have set the standards Lotus Orb with Honeybee in the field.

LUCIO BUBACCO’S works combine the anatomic perfection of Greek sculpture with the Byzantine gothic architecture of his native Venice. He is known for his unique human and fantasy figures, which are entirely hand-formed and incorporated in blown vases or in casting. His work has been published Lucio Bubacco and exhibited around the Ulisse le Sirene world.


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P R O B L E M S O LV I N G FOR GLASS CASTING

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DANIEL CLAYMAN Glass Casting Drawing on Mr. Clayman’s 30 years of experience casting glass into investment molds, this fast-paced class will help students develop a language for solving problems encountered in creating their own work. Using the students’ work as a platform for demonstrations, the course will cover a range of topics, including mold recipes, wax-working techniques, rubber mold making, glass sources, and kiln requirements. No glassworking experience is required; a foundation in basic sculptural materials is recommended. 19 DANIEL CLAYMAN has been working with glass since 1979. He is the recipient of numerous grants and is represented in major museum collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, The Corning Museum of Glass, and the Milwaukee Art Museum. Photo by Mark Johnston. He lives and works in Daniel Clayman East Providence, RI. Clear Volume


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S E S S I O N F O U R JANUARY O N E W E E K

ABOUT CRAFT MATTHEW URBAN Glassblowing

This class will focus on taking the basics of glassblowing (cone, sphere, cylinder, amphora, handles, and color), and making them quick and easy. The overall objective will be to make as many forms as possible while maintaining consistency. The principals of glassblowing become clear and comprehensible when students understand the traditional vessel-making framework. Vessel making, as a form of exercise, will strengthen the way students approach projects at the bench. One year of glassblowing experience is required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

20 MATTHEW URBAN has been working with glass since 1997, when he took a course at The Studio with maestro Gianni Toso. Since that time, he has studied and worked with numerous Italian glass maestros. Mr. Urban currently owns and operates a hot shop in Normal, Il. Matthew Urban Blue Group

2 3 – 28


SPECIAL PROJECTS IN FUSED GLASS MARK DITZLER

ERIC GOLDSCHMIDT

Kiln Working

Flameworking

This class is designed for students who wish to learn new skills, or who need help troubleshooting current projects in fused glass. In addition, students will learn to make unique design elements including color bars and wafers, canes and murrini, vitreous enamels and lusters, silkscreened images, dichroics, and mica powders. Some flameworking and hot shop techniques also will be demonstrated. Discussions will also include kiln operation, annealing, and cold working techniques. Some glass fusing experience is required.

This class will cover all aspects of flameworked goblet making. Students will receive step-by-step instructions on how to make many cup shapes, and insight into how to create shapes students may dream up later. Many stems, feet, lids, color applications, and constructions will be considered. Through detailed demonstrations, hands-on practice, and visits through the Museum’s collection, students will gain keen insight into the goblet as a functional and sculptural form. Some flameworking experience is required. Students should be able to control hollow forms on the torch.

Photo by Christina Zawadecki.

Eric Goldschmidt Autumn Evening Cage Cup

ERIC GOLDSCHMIDT has studied with, and assisted, several of the world’s most renowned flameworking artists through the course of his 15-year career. He has taught and demonstrated at several studios, including UrbanGlass, The Penland School of Craft, and The Studio. Mr. Goldschmidt also is the Museum’s Flameworking and Glass Demonstrations Supervisor.

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EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT FLAMEWORKED GOBLETS

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21

Photo by Mark Ditzler.

Mark Ditzler Wall Panel Series

MARK DITZLER, a Seattle-based artist specializing in kiln-fired glass for art and architecture, has been working in glass for more than 20 years. He has taught at The Studio for more than 10 years, and at Pratt Fine Art Center and The Glass Furnace in Istanbul. Mr. Ditzler’s work is exhibited nationwide.


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S E S S I O N F O U R C o n t ’ d O N E W E E K JANUARY

E N G R AV I N G A N D COLD WORKING TECHNIQUES MAX ERLACHER Engraving and Cold Working

A master engraver for more than 40 years, Mr. Erlacher will share his knowledge of copper, stone, and diamond engraving, and cold working techniques in this class. Students will learn by instructor demonstration and ample hands-on engraving time, achieving their own engraved designs. This is a rare opportunity to work with this master! No glassworking experience is required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

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MAX ERLACHER has more than 40 years of experience with copper, stone, diamond engraving, and cold working techniques. He received a Master Engraver Certification from Lobmeyr in Austria. He then worked for Steuben Glass and owned his own business. Mr. Erlacher has worked Photo by Harry Seaman. on numerous art glass Max Erlacher projects for museums, as Wine Harvest Goblet well as private collectors.

2 3 – 28


GLASSWORKING THROUGH THE AGES

WINTER

4

This course is a unique opportunity to engage with the curators of The Corning Museum of Glass to explore glassworking from antiquity to the present day. The class will divide its time between the Museum’s Glass Collection Galleries, the Rakow Research Library, and The Studio. Students will explore the galleries with the curators, learn research techniques at the Library, and experiment with glassmaking techniques used around the world, including casting, fusing and slumping, making cane, and blowing glass into molds. This course is ideal for students and artists who want to learn about the history of glassmaking. No glassworking experience is required. WILLIAM GUDENRATH, resident adviser of The Studio, is a glassblower, scholar, lecturer, and teacher. An authority on historical glassworking techniques from ancient Egypt to Renaissance Europe, he has lectured and demonstrated in North America and Europe.

JANE SHADEL SPILLMAN joined The Corning Museum of Glass in 1965 and has been the curator of American glass since 1978. She writes and lectures extensively on the history of American glass. She has published numerous books and curated many of the Museum’s exhibitions.

TINA OLDKNOW is the curator of modern glass at The Corning Museum of Glass, and she is responsible for the Museum’s collection of glass made between 1900 and the present. Her many publications include Contemporary Glass Sculptures and Panels (2008) and Voices of Contemporary Glass (2009).

DAVID WHITEHOUSE, senior scholar at The Corning Museum of Glass, joined the Museum as curator of ancient and Islamic glass in 1984, and was the executive director from 1992 to 2011. He is currently preparing volumes two and three of a catalog of the Museum’s Islamic collection.

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S E S S I O N F I V E JANUARY 30–F EBRUARY 4 O N E W E E K

GLASSBLOWING, DESIGN, PRODUCTION DAN MIRER Glassblowing

Students will explore the interdependence of concept and technique as they realize personal designs. The class will cover plaster model and mold making, various types of mold blowing, crack-off, bit work, use of special tools, and teamwork. Students are encouraged to bring ideas, problems, and objects to cast. One year of glassblowing experience is required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

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Dan Mirer Snowman Jars

DAN MIRER has been working in glass since the age of 16. He attended the Rochester Institute of Technology, Alfred University, and Pukeberg School of Design, Sweden. Mr. Mirer lives in Corning, NY, as an independent artist.


COLOR, FORM, AND D E C O R AT I V E M O T I F S I N B O R O S I L I C AT E G L A S S

LANDSCAPES IN KILN-FORMED GLASS (DI FIORE’S TECHNIQUE)

SUELLEN FOWLER

MIRIAM DI FIORE

Flameworking

Kiln Working

This class will introduce students to John Burton’s “off-hand” flameworking, characterized by building successive layers of clear and colored glass on the end of a blowpipe, and forming the result into a finished vessel. Students also will experiment with solid sculptural techniques. They will learn how to hand-mix and pull borosilicate cane, and will explore new ideas and techniques for more effective use of commercially available borosilicate color rods. Some flameworking experience is helpful, but not required.

Starting with an image of a winter forest landscape, students will be led through a step-by-step process of realizing that image in kiln-formed glass with a very realistic sense of depth. Lessons will have a theoretical component so students will understand the complexity of the process. Some glass fusing experience is required.

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5

25 SUELLEN FOWLER has blown and sculpted glass for more than 35 years. She is the foremost practitioner of “offhand” flameworking and considers herself to be a colorist. She has devoted much time and energy to developing and Photo by Ann Cady. refining various oxide Suellen Fowler formulas to color Untitled borosilicate glass.

Photo by Miriam Di Fiore.

Miriam Di Fiore Ticino River

MIRIAM DI FIORE has been working with fused glass since 1985. Her landscaped fused works are in many public and private collections, and have been displayed in numerous exhibitions around the world. Ms. Di Fiore cofounded the Vetroricerca Glass School in Italy and has been teaching for more than 15 years.


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S E S S I O N F I V E C o n t ’ d J A N U A R Y 3 0 – F E B R U A R Y 4 O N E W E E K

REFINING AND SOLIDIFYING YOUR TECHNIQUES WILLIAM GUDENRATH Glassblowing

During this course, students who have previously studied with Mr. Gudenrath are invited to review and refresh their Venetian techniques: well-formed and thinly blown vessel bodies, excellent necks, delicate mereses, and blown feet and stems. Students will move to the next level in their glassblowing through intensive explanation and repetition of processes. Students must have previously taken a course with, or studied under, Mr. Gudenrath.

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William Gudenrath Vibrant Plaid

WILLIAM GUDENRATH, resident adviser at The Studio, is a glassblower, scholar, lecturer, and teacher. An authority on historical hot glassworking techniques from ancient Egypt through the Renaissance, he has presented many lectures and demonstrations. Mr. Gudenrath also is the president of the Fellows of The Corning Museum of Glass.


S I X

O N E

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FEBRUARY 6–1 1

W E E K

INTRODUCTION TO GLASS SCULPTING

WINTER

S E S S I O N

BRENNA BAKER Glassblowing This class will consist of bit working and glass forming, as well as using additive glass bits of different shapes, sizes, colors, and temperatures. Starting off with whimsical fish, sea shells, and flowers, students will progress into their own designs and achieve projects together as a class. Students have the option of bringing unique tools, colors, and creative designs to share. One year of glassblowing experience is required.

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Photo by Harry Seaman.

Brenna Baker Tropical Crab

BRENNA BAKER has been working with glass for 10 years. She has studied under many great artists in the United States and spent one year working with Pino Signoretto in Murano, Italy. She now resides in Corning, NY, where she rents the facilities of The Studio to create her work as an independent artist.


S E S S I O N

WINTER

O N E

S I X

6

C o n t ’ d

W E E K

BEADMAKING: E X PA N D I N G Y O U R S K I L L S KRISTINA LOGAN Flameworking

This course is designed for people who would like to expand their flameworking and beadmaking skills. Students who have questions or difficulties with any beadmaking techniques will especially benefit. A broad spectrum of techniques will be explained and demonstrated: various surface decorations, dots galore, clear casing, working large beads, and troubleshooting common mistakes and difficulties. Some beadmaking experience is required.

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

28 KRISTINA LOGAN is recognized internationally for her precisely patterned and delicate glass beads. She travels throughout the world teaching workshops and lecturing on glass beads and jewelry. Her work is in the collections of many museums, including The Smithsonian, Photo by Dean Powell. The Corning Museum Kristina Logan of Glass, and the Musée Constellation Necklace du Verre de Sars-Poteries in France.

FEBRUARY 6–1 1


DENISE STILLWAGGON LEONE Sandblasting and Painting This class offers a foundation in image making inspired by intaglio printmaking. Students will develop fluency in the production of hand-cut sandblast stencils and photo-resists. They also will explore methods of stage-blasting, carving, and shading in order to gain a working knowledge of how light and shade are developed in sandblasted imagery. Basic methods of vitreous painting on glass will be established. Students also will exploit the complexity of overlapping imagery using different types of layered glass. No glassworking experience is required.

BEGINNING GLASSBLOWING

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PA I N T I N G T H E V O I D : SANDBLASTING AND V I T R E O U S PA I N T I N G

6

AMANDA GUNDY Glassblowing This course is designed to create a relaxed, safe, and fun environment for students who have little to no hot glassworking experience. In order to learn the basic skills of glassblowing, students will participate in a series of exercises to build confidence and coordination at the bench. The class will then move on to explore different forms and techniques that will give students a better understanding of molten glass and its properties. No glassworking experience is required.

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Photo by Rich Grant.

Denise Stillwaggon Leone Jumping into the World (detail)

DENISE STILLWAGGON LEONE designs and fabricates architectural art glass commissions, and has participated in numerous art competitions. Her work can be found in the public spaces of universities, hospitals, libraries, and places of worship. Ms. Stillwaggon Leone’s autonomous glass sculptures have been published in New Glass Review and 25 Years of New Glass Review.

AMANDA GUNDY earned a B.F.A. in photography before a growing interest in glass art led her to UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, NY. There, she studied glassblowing, worked as a technician and glassblowing assistant, and gave private lessons to beginners. Today Ms. Gundy lives in upstate New York, where Amanda Gundy she teaches and works as Untitled a freelance glass artist.


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WINTER 2012 PROGRAM R E G I S T R AT I O N I N F O R M AT I O N TUITION AND ROOM AND BOARD Tuition is $750 for a one-week course. The cost for room and board is $520 per week, plus an eight-percent sales tax. Accommodations are provided by Days Inn of Corning, with standard, air-conditioned rooms containing two double beds. The Days Inn is conveniently located just a short walk (about 800 feet) from The Studio. Each room will be shared by two students.

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A few single rooms are available for an additional $320 per week, plus an eight-percent sales tax. Room availability is subject to change, and there is no guarantee that you will get a single room. If you prefer not to share a room, we suggest that you make separate housing arrangements. A few non-smoking rooms also are available on a firstcome, first-served basis and may be requested upon arrival. Please note: guests of the Days Inn must be 21 years of age or accompanied by a guardian. If you are not 21, please call us to discuss alternative housing options. Meals are provided by local restaurants, which can accommodate vegetarian diets. All room and meal costs are included, except for dinner on Saturday night following a one-week course. COLLEGE CREDIT College credit is available through Corning Community College. In certain cases, an additional fee is required. Please inquire for further details.

CLASS SIZE Each course is limited to a maximum of nine students. R E F U N D A N D C A N C E L L AT I O N POLICY PROCESS A refund, less a $200 cancellation fee and your application fee, is available if cancellations are made at least 30 days before the first day of class. Thereafter, if refunds are requested at least seven days before the start of class, a 50-percent refund will be given for tuition only, not for room and board. No refunds will be given after that time. If, for any reason, it is necessary for us to cancel a class, a full refund will be given for tuition and for room and board.


To apply for a course, please complete the application form on page 37. A $20 non-refundable application fee must accompany each completed application form. This fee may be used to apply for one or two courses. If you wish to apply for more than two courses, please use a separate application form and enclose a $20 application fee for each two additional courses. Mail your application forms and fees to The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830-2253. Applications also may be faxed to 607.438.5150 if payment is to be made by credit card. Applications received before October 15 will not be processed until that date, and they will be selected in random order. Those received on or after October 15 will be processed next, in the order that they are received, until all spaces are filled. Confirmation letters will be mailed soon thereafter, as classes are filled. Once you are notified of acceptance into a course, full payment must be received by December 1. We will not hold spaces in a course after that time without full payment. Acceptable forms of payment are check (made payable to The Corning Museum of Glass), money order, and credit card (MasterCard, Visa, American Express, and Discover).

P R O G R A M F O R M AT Each course begins with an informal (not mandatory) dinner at 7:00 p.m. on Sunday night and then an orientation at 8:30 a.m. on Monday at The Studio.

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A P P L I C AT I O N P R O C E S S A N D PAY M E N T

Classes generally run from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. with a one-hour lunch break. Instructors may alter the schedule if necessary. The Studio is open until 11:00 p.m. for practice. Most days there are special events. One-week courses end at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday. A full schedule of events will be given to each student on the first day of class. Students should plan to check in at the Days Inn no earlier than 3:00 p.m. the day before their courses begin, and to leave either the evening the courses end or early the next day. Following a one-week course, students are on their own for dinner Saturday evening, and they must check out of the hotel by 11:00 a.m. on Sunday.

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A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N STUDENT AND ARTIST RESOURCES DVDS FROM THE STUDIO The Studio produces several DVD series which may be purchased at the GlassMarket of The Corning Museum of Glass or online at http://glassmarket.cmog.org. MASTER CLASS DVD SERIES These 30-minute videos present a portrait of an artist and teaches the viewer a glassworking technique. • Cane Working with Lino Tagliapietra • An Introduction to Venetian Techniques with William Gudenrath • Engraving on Glass with Jirí Harcuba • Pâte de Verre with Shin-ichi and Kimiake Higuchi • Flameworking with Cesare Toffolo • Kiln-Worked Glass with Rudy Gritsch • Beadmaking with Kristina Logan • Working with Murrine with Davide Salvadore v

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

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FOUNDATIONS DVD VIDEO SERIES This series is designed to give beginners a foundation in various glassworking techniques. • An Introduction to Furnace Glassblowing with William Gudenrath • An Introduction to Flameworking with Emilio Santini

GLASSWORKING: PROCESSES AND PROPERTIES This DVD features 43 segments with renowned artists teaching a variety of techniques employed in glassworking: blowing, flameworking, cold working, and casting. Other topics include the composition of glass, glass coloring, and annealing. Some segments are available for download at www.cmog.org. GLASS MASTERS AT WORK DVD SERIES Award-winning documentary filmmaker Robin Lehman catches the drama and intensity of master glassmakers at work. • Glass Masters at Work: Pino Signoretto • Glass Masters at Work: Lino Tagliapietra • Glass Masters at Work: Mark Matthews • Glass Masters at Work: Vittorio Costantini • Glass Masters at Work: Mark Matthews • Glass Masters at Work: William Gudenrath


STUDENT AND ARTIST RESOURCES S T U D I O R E N TA L S

Cont’d

Many of The Studio’s spaces are open for rental when there are no classes or other events in progress. We have a state-of-theart dedicated rental hot shop with a 1,000pound furnace and two glory-hole stations. Studio time must be booked in advance. Please call for rates and schedules or check the Museum’s website. PHOTOGRAPHY ROOM Our photography room is equipped with a professional lighting setup, a high-end digital camera and tripod, a slide scanner, photo printer and Photoshop. At no charge during their course enrollment, students and teachers may take images of their work. The room is available for hourly rental to nonstudents. During summer and winter intensive classes, a photographer is available during certain hours.

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STUDENT AND ARTIST RESOURCES RESIDENCY PROGRAMS RESIDENCY PROGRAMS AT T H E S T U D I O The Studio offers Artist-and Researcher-inResidence programs. Transportation, room and board, and basic supplies are provided, as well as access to facilities. Residencies for 2012 will be held in March, April, May, October, November, and December. There is no formal application process. If you are interested in being considered, please send the following materials to Residency Programs, The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830-2253. • Ten digital images of your work (300 dpi, 4 x 6, JPEGs) with captions • Two letters of recommendation

607.438.5100 • www.cmog.org

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J O I N T A R T I S T- I N - R E S I D E N C E PROGRAM WITH KOHLER ARTS CENTER The Studio partners with the John Michael Kohler Arts Center for a joint Artist-in-Residence program to provide multi-media residencies. Artists spend one month at The Studio and two to six months in Kohler Co.’s foundry (casting iron or brass) or pottery (slip casting clay) in Sheboygan, WI. Artists are required to have experience working with glass, but do not need experience working with clay or metal. Travel, accommodation, supplies, equipment, technical assistance, and a food stipend are provided. To apply, please include two copies of the following materials:

• Written proposal (including detailed information on your Residency plans; necessary supplies, equipment, and assistants; and the best months for you to participate)

• Completed application form (download from www.cmog.org)

• Current résumé

• Current résumé

Applications for all 2012 residencies must be received by October 31, 2011.

• Brief (200-word) cover letter explaining relevant experience and qualifications

• Brief (200-word) proposal for a unified project incorporating the resources available from both institutions

• Twenty digital images (300 dpi, 4 x 5, JPEGs) with captions Applications for the 2013 Corning/Kohler Joint residency must be received by April 1, 2012.


OTHER GLASSMAKING EXPERIENCES

T R AV E L I N F O R M AT I O N

MAKE YOUR OWN GLASS

T R AV E L B Y A I R P L A N E / T R A N S P O R TAT I O N T O A N D FROM THE AIRPORT

For a small fee, all ages can experience glassworking in 40-minute sessions, offered daily, year-round. Projects include blowing holiday ornaments, shaping glass flowers, fusing colorful creations, or sandblasting designs on glass (age limits apply to certain activities). Visit www.cmog.org for Make Your Own Glass hours, and to book an experience. FUN WITH GLASS FOR GROUPS In a hands-on glassworking adventure, your group of 10 or more can blow hot glass ornaments, fuse colorful pieces of glass into suncatchers, or sandblast drinking glasses with original designs. Adults and children can participate in these hands-on activities, and sample a variety of glassworking techniques. Events range between one and three hours in length depending on the size of the group and the number of activities planned. The cost is $32.00 per person. Contact Erin Wing at 607.438.5800 or funwithglass@cmog.org to register your group.

The Elmira/Corning Regional Airport is a 15-minute car ride from The Studio. Transportation from the airport to the hotel is available at a cost of $24.00 each way. To make arrangements, call Bill’s Taxi at 607.731.8801 at least 24 hours before you plan to arrive in Corning. Please mention that you are a student of The Studio.

T R AV E L B Y C A R Corning is easy to reach by car. Take I-86/NY Route 17 to exit 46 and follow the signs for The Corning Museum of Glass. Corning is 255 miles from New York City; 280 miles from Washington, D.C.; 235 miles from Toronto; and 210 miles from Albany.

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SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS AND GIVING OPPORTUNITIES Through our scholarship programs, we support developing glass artists and students. You may donate to any of the funds listed here to give an emerging artist working in glass the opportunity to study with the best at The Studio. By contributing to one of our scholarship programs, you are not only supporting promising artists who may not otherwise be able to afford to develop their skills, but you are also investing in the future of the glass community. The Studio Scholarship and Residency Fund is supported by the sale of glass works donated by instructors, staff, and students over the course of the year; by the Celebrity Cruises Glassmaking Scholarship Fund; and by private grants and other contributions. The fund provides general summer scholarships and also is used to support our Artist-in-Residence program.

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The Paul and Patricia Stankard Flameworking Scholarship Fund, created with the support of friends of Paul and Patricia Stankard and collectors of Paul’s work, is earmarked for the support of one developing flameworking artist each summer.

The Christopher John Kammerer Memorial Scholarship Fund was founded by the friends and family of the late Christopher John Kammerer. It aims to support promising, young, regional artists and is available for courses that meet over our spring and fall semesters. The Silver Trout Fund was founded by Sue Schwartz in memory of her husband Tom, who worked at Corning Incorporated for many years. It supports the Artist-in-Residence program. The Elio Quarisa Scholarship Fund has been established to support furnace glassworkers who shared Mr. Quarisa’s passion for Venetian glassblowing. The Celebrity Cruises Glassmaking Scholarship Fund is made possible by the collaboration between Celebrity Cruises and The Corning Museum of Glass. The Museum is demonstrating glassblowing at sea on Celebrity Cruises. At the end of selected cruises, some of the best pieces made during hot glass demonstrations are auctioned. The proceeds benefit a scholarship fund to help developing artists and students who want to work in glass, allowing them to take classes or work as resident artists.

Cover Image Fabrication des bouteilles, from Les Grandes usines de France: etudes industrielles en France et à l’étranger, Volume 7, pg. 232–233. Collection of the Rakow Research Library, The Corning Museum of Glass.


FA L L 2 0 1 1 / W I N T E R 2 0 1 2 A P P L I C AT I O N PAY M E N T C H A R T F O R W I N T E R C O U R S E S : Course Length

Tuition

Room & Board

Additional charges for single room

Application fee (non-refundable)

(subject to availability)

One week

$750.00

$520.00 + sales tax

$320.00 + sales tax

= $561.60

= $345.60

$20.00

Please complete this application form and mail it to The Studio of The Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830-2253. Applications made by credit card may be faxed to 607.438.5150. There is no application fee for fall classes. Please include a $20 non-refundable application fee for one or two winter courses. Use a separate application form and enclose a $20 non-refundable application fee for each two additional winter courses. Name ________________________________________________________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________   State ___________   ZIP Code ____________________   Country ____________________________ Email ___________________________________________________ Home # ________________________   Work # _______________________   Fax # _______________________  COURSE SELECTION First Choice (include session #) _________________________________________________________________

Fall  

  Winter 

   Date __________________   Instructor ______________________________________

Second Choice (include session #) ______________________________________________________________ Fall     Winter     Date __________________   Instructor ______________________________________ I would like to take both courses. If a course(s) is (are) filled, please place me on a waiting list.

W I N T E R P R O G R A M O N LY I would like housing.            I am     Male    Female    Age: ___________. I am attending with _______________________________________ and we wish to room together. I would like a single room ($320 + sales tax = $345.60 extra per week. Availability not guaranteed.) M E T H O D O F PAY M E N T Enclosed is a money order in the amount of $___________________. Enclosed is a check payable to The Corning Museum of Glass in the amount of $ ___________________. Please charge to:    MasterCard

Visa

Discover

American Express

Name as it appears on card _____________________________________________________________________ Card number _____________________________________________    Expiration date ____________________ If you check this box, we will charge your tuition and room and board to your credit card upon acceptance into a course. I’d like to contribute $___________ to the _______________________________________ Scholarship Fund.

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One Museum Way

Corning, NY 14830-2253

See page 9 for details.

December 3 and 4, 2011 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

H O L I D AY O P E N H O U S E AND GLASS SALE

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