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JACKSON HOLE’S ALTERNATIVE VOICE | PLANETJH.COM | JULY 11-17, 2018

(IT IS NOT YET)

TE) A L O (TO

Open Land, Closed Spaces As anti-immigrant sentiment rises in the U.S., will the door close completely for refugees in Wyoming?


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JACKSON HOLE'S ALTERNATIVE VOICE

VOLUME 16 | ISSUE 26 | JULY 11-17, 2018

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7 COVER STORY OPEN LAND, CLOSED SPACES

As anti-immigrant sentiment rises in the U.S., will the door close completely for refugees in Wyoming? Cover photo by Robyn Vincent

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OPINION

16 LOCAL SYNDROME 17 DINING

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BY METEOROLOGIST JIM WOODMENCEY

This past Friday, July 6th, 2018 the temperature in Jackson Hole was the hottest of the year, so far. At the Jackson Climate Station the official high temperature was 87-degrees. In Grand Teton National Park, at the Moose Climate Station, the afternoon high was also 87-degrees. You may recall, or you may not, that last July we had our hottest day of the summer on July 5th, 2017, with an afternoon high of 89-degrees.

The average low temperature this week is 41-degrees. The record low temperature this week is 25-degrees, which was set back on July 14th, 1977. The warmest overnight low temperature we have ever had during this week in July is 59-degrees, set back on July 15th, 1943. For comparison, low temperatures in Jackson this past week have been in the low to mid 40’s. This week we may be running a little warmer than that each morning.

HIGHS

The average high temperature this week is 82-degrees. The record high temperature during this week in July is 101-degrees. That is also our all-time record high temperature, and that was set way back on July 17th, 1934. A record that has stood the test of time, for the past 84 years. That 101-degree reading was repeated on July 20th, 1934. As a matter of fact, July of 1934 still holds eight out of nine daily high temperature records between July 12th and July 20th. Amazing!

NORMAL HIGH NORMAL LOW RECORD HIGH IN 1934 RECORD LOW IN 1977

82 41 101 25

THIS MONTH AVERAGE PRECIPITATION: .94 inches RECORD PRECIPITATION: 3.26 inches (1933) AVERAGE SNOWFALL: .02 inches RECORD SNOWFALL: 2 inches

Jim has been forecasting the weather here for more than 20 years. You can find more Jackson Hole Weather information at www.mountainweather.com

JULY 11, 2018 | 3

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THIS WEEK

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

JH ALMANAC LOWS

JULY 11- 17, 2018

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6 THE NEW WEST


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4 | JULY 11, 2018

ENJOY YOUR FLOAT, BUT DON’T ROCK THE BOAT. Respect our community!

Per Town of Jackson municipal code: No trespassing on private lands Open alcohol containers are strictly prohibited on Flat Creek. Dogs are prohibited in public parks. No dogs at large. Public urination is prohibited.

• • • • •

Please respect private property at all times. Utilize designated public access locations when accessing Flat Creek. Be considerate of neighbors and environment by limiting noise and disturbance to riparian habitat. Respect wildlife. Glass containers are prohibited. Please dispose of garbage in designated receptacles. Float at your own risk – no safety personnel present. Dangerous and swift flowing cold water, low clearance bridges and shallow water occur in some locations. For additional information and maps of public access points the Town of Jackson or the Parks and Recreation Department: www.townofjackson.com or www.tetonparksandrec.org

SINGLETRACK MIND

Welcome to summer! It’s now officially hot and smoky. So it seems like a good time to talk about coping with heat since we’ve been spoiled so far. I just came back from a race in Sturgis, South Dakota, which happens to have some great riding if you’re traveling that way. The race took almost eight hours and for the last four the temperature on my computer never dipped below 90. Needless to say, I was monitoring my body closely for signs of heat exhaustion/stroke. What are those signs? According to Mayo Clinic, heat exhaustion is identifiable by heavy sweating, rapid pulse, dizziness, fatigue, cool, moist skin with goosebumps when in the heat, muscle cramps, nausea and headache. If you don’t take steps to cool down, heat stroke may ensue. It is often associated with dry skin and no more sweating as well as an altered mental state. It

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can become fatal at this stage. If you’re heading out for a ride in the heat there are a couple precautions you can take. Be well hydrated before setting out and plan on drinking 1.5-2 times as much as you normally drink during the ride. Electrolyte replacement drinks are vital, but having straight water tastes good and you can dump it on your body. Plan a route with plenty of shade and, if possible, water along the way. Using water or a soaked bandana to cool your head, neck and groin will drastically reduce your core temperature. You will adapt to riding in the heat if you build up to it in a similar manner to alpinists acclimatizing to altitude. But you still need to be cautious. And don’t take your dog—she won’t adapt or tell you she’s getting hot. – Cary Smith

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tetoncountywy.gov TetonWyo.org The public meeting agendas and minutes for the Board of County Commissioners and Planning Commission can also be found in the Public Notices section of the JH News and Guide.

JULY 11, 2018 | 5

riving into ranged from ecoJackson nomic pragmalast week, tism, the golden my companions rule and heartfelt and I stopped for a declarations from quick dip into the both an Episcopal Hoback River. The and a Lutheran sun was burning priest that their bright and it gave Christian discipleus false hope that ship guided their the river might support. There was have absorbed a call to make laws some of the heat, that recognize the offering us a value and worth Lauren Ames and Anne Marie Wells found themselves on the June 27 cover of Planet Jackson Hole. of LGBTQ teens in refreshing lark as They were among the subjects of ‘Queen for More than a Day,’ a story about LGBTQ people we headed into demanding an out life in Jackson. the hopes it would town for Jackson slow the suicide Town Council’s rate, comparisons second reading to laws that protect of the LGBTQ our LGBTQ armed non-discriminaservice members tion ordinance. as long as they The sun may have stay on military Tense and encouraging moments defined the second been blazing but bases—because the Hoback was, reading of Jackson’s LGBTQ non-discrimination ordinance, the current laws of to put it mildly, Wyoming do not now citizens must see the process to the finish line bracing. It sent a offer these soldiers shock up our travthe same protecBY SARA BURLINGAME el-weary legs and tion—and a handsupport of the ordinance just the week we skedaddled for the car, laughing at our ful of stories from the Jackson community before. What incredibly poor form to disnaivete. about those who have long faced discrimregard the local party’s sovereignty, and a Three of us had driven from Cheyenne ination and subsequent inner turmoil. bizarre twist from the GOP to insist that that afternoon with mixed expectations I looked around town chambers and state interests should supercede local. Et for the evening. I am the executive direcsaw a group of citizens on the eve of tu, Frank Eathorne? tor of Wyoming Equality, a statewide American Independence Day, doing the In all, more than a dozen folks, about LGBTQ advocacy organization and I was thing our Founders set out to do: create a half from Jackson and half from other accompanied by my colleagues Adrienne democracy that demanded participation parts of the state, spoke against the ordiVetter, a Laramie artist, and Shayna and passion. nance. The thrust of their argument was Lonoaea Alexander, Wyoming Equality’s Mayor Pete Muldoon quoted Dr, that their religious rights were being treasurer and chair of the Young Dems. Martin Luther King Jr. and Frederick infringed on, and they made their case by We’ve been in communication with the Douglass, two men who knew something comparing members of the LGBTQ comlocal PFLAG chapter headed by the tireabout loving a country profoundly while munity to dogs who “urinate wherever less Mark Houser and local advocates like knowing it needed to change. When the they please, they have sex wherever they Matt Stech and Michael Yin. vote was called, Jackson Town Council please.” Some compared us to pedophiles. Outside Jackson Town Hall stood voted unanimously in favor of moving Local Pastor Don Landis of the Jackson Rev. Jonathan Lange, a Lutheran pastor Ordinance M to a third reading. Hole Bible College questioned whether from Evanston who had made the trip It did not feel like a small moment. lesbian members of the Jackson commuto denounce the ordinance. Lange and I Like the pure mountain water rushnity who had taken their own lives did frequently spar in Cheyenne during leging through the Hoback, it felt bracing. so “because they were unfilled in their islative sessions. We’ve done our best, I And for someone who has been waiting lifestyle,” and the list goes on. believe, to find some common ground a long time to see public officials recogFor the most part, opponents made with very little success. I struggle to find nize the humanity and rights of LGBTQ their cases with a disturbing level of sinany kindness in the positions he takes Wyomingites, it was a long overdue action cerity. Many preceded or followed their and he likely feels the same about me. and a sweet relief. arguments with some attestation that Nevertheless, outside Town Hall we greetOn New Year’s Day many of us they loved us and considered their words ed one another and extended the friendly make goals for the coming year. Maybe both patriotic and guided by a love for the courtesies that adversaries are forced to we should start a new tradition: on Constitution or their love for Christ. make in such civil settings. Independence Day we should commit I didn’t feel loved. It may very well have When the meeting started I was surto participating in our democracy. The been their intent to offer love, but what I prised to hear from Kathy Russell, the third reading of the non-discrimination felt was contempt. executive assistant to the Wyoming ordinance—scheduled for Jackson Town Their messages of intolerance were Republican Party, who spoke in oppoCouncil’s July 16 meeting—would be a contrasted by more than a dozen memsition to the ordinance, despite the fact great place to start. PJH bers of the Jackson community and us that the Teton County GOP Executive three visitors who spoke in favor of the Committee had issued a statement in ordinance. The arguments made in favor

HALF OFF BLAST OFF!


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THE NEW WEST

DOTTIE

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The Draper, however, has cultivated a special forte with studying raptors (birds of prey). A permanent display called The Raptor Experience has live eagles, falcons, owls and even a turkey vulture with daily public programs that have become favorites of families on their way to Yellowstone. This summer, the exhibit “Monarch of the Skies” opened A map of Greater Yellowstone is at the center of the Draper’s universe. and offers a fascinating glimpse into the lifeways of golden eagles, one of the Draper is another crown jewel of greatest avians of the West and a species the Yellowstone region deeply embedded in BY TODD WILKINSON | @BigArtNature indigenous culture. Still another treagrizzlies, wolves, bison, and some of the most amazing wildlife migrations sure is the Draper’s collection of more than 1,200 bird and mammal speciremaining on earth. In fact, the acclaimed exhibition, mens, including 170 wolf skulls now “Invisible Boundaries” (now on display being studied by researchers with a at the National Museum of Wildlife Art forthcoming scientific paper on the in Jackson), made its official debut at wolves of Greater Yellowstone. Preston is hailed as one of the leadthe Draper, led by Dr. Charles Preston, ing thinkers on the Greater Yellowstone an extraordinary staff and board of Ecosystem, stolen away in 1998 from directors. the Denver Museum of Natural History All of whom carry on the intrepid to oversee the Draper’s construction. spirt of the late philanthropist Nancy To engage visitors, he notes, all Draper whose determination won over her community and defied skep- of the exhibits are intended to be, in tics who claimed there was no way a some way, interactive. One of the subtle new natural history museum could be delights is the floor map of the Greater built—let alone in tiny Cody and in a Yellowstone Ecosystem that you can way that would attract global attention. stroll across. When you visit the Draper, it’s a Yet it happened. five-for-one proposition. Next door, “Nancy ranks as one of the great charof course, is the renowned Whitney acters I’ve ever known. Rambunctious, Western Art Museum (featuring historas she was, she became much beloved in our little town and held truth to her ical fine art masterworks), the Plains course,” former U.S. Sen. Alan Simpson, Indian Museum featuring indigenous art and artifacts, the Cody Firearms one of Draper’s good friends, told me. The Draper doesn’t merely dis- Museum featuring the Winchester play things passively. Part of its mis- Arms Collection, and the Buffalo Bill sion is fostering original research and Museum exploring the myth and reality unearthing new insights. It has collab- of West through the life of William F. orated with the Wyoming Migration “Buffalo Bill” Cody. Of all the towns in the West, there’s Initiative, for example, to highlight something about the mix of provinwildlife corridors. It also champions the cial pride and cosmopolitan museums ethics of living and traveling responsibly in bear country, something that that sets Cody apart. The Draper helps is on the minds of the huge crowds of explain why. PJH DRAPER MUSEUM

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mong all the wondrous logistical coordinates in the Yellowstone region, there is just one flat spot on a map where a person can stand literally at the very center of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem without having to physically enter the wild backcountry. In every direction are visions of wildlife and the stories of their survival. That place resides inside an institution dubbed “the The Smithsonian of the West.” By its very design, it is the only edifice of its kind devoted to celebrating the living temporal and spatial essence of Greater Yellowstone. The Draper Museum of Natural History in Cody, Wyoming, part of the Buffalo Bill Center of the West complex (comprising five amazing interconnected museums), is a true diamond in the rough. If you haven’t been there, you ought to consider it a landmark as important in many ways as the vistas fronting the Tetons, the boardwalk of Old Faithful Geyser, the wolf watching turnouts in Lamar Valley and the overlooks that rise above the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. In a region defined by its crown jewel national parks, forests and wildlife refuges, the Draper shines as a touchstone that reminds us why the ecosystem matters. Until 2002, when it opened its doors, there was, almost unbelievably, no real natural history museum in the northern Rockies devoted to the very thing that makes Greater Yellowstone world-renowned. Our backyard is the only landscape in the Lower 48 where all the major animals that existed here when Europeans arrived in North America 500 years ago are still present. Think about that for a second. It’s no accident; in fact, it’s involved conscious human decisions, held together by a common ethic of conservation spanning generations, that has enabled Greater Yellowstone to still be home to

Smithsonian of the West

locals and tourists that pass through the museum.


(IT IS NOT YET)

As anti-immigrant sentiment rises in the U.S., will the door close completely for refugees in the state? BY NATALIE HARRISON

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

E) T A L O O (T

JULY 11, 2018 | 7

RAMALLAH, PALESTINE – The morning is silent as the sun creeps over the water tanks positioned precariously on the rooftops of al-Am’ari Refugee Camp. The stillness is suddenly broken by a series of gunshots ricocheting through the tightly-clustered cinder block homes. The morning’s early pink is stained by a child crying amid the confusion. After an hour of gunshots, another moment of silence is punctuated again, this time by the Islamic call to prayer. It fills the air, just like it has for hundreds of years, and then circulates through the broken-down cars and oncesleepy faces of those roused by the commotion. The violence resulted in an unconfirmed number of people from the refugee camp being arrested and detained by the Israeli Defense Force (IDF) in connection with the death of a soldier two weeks prior. Gunshots and raiding soldiers are a common part of camp life here. Every year a few of the children “are sponsored to go to France, and they come back and ask me, ‘Why are the children not afraid there?’” said Iyad Shadid*, director of the Palestinian Society for Care and Development (PCSD). In digestible terms, he tried to explain how difficult life can be in this impoverished section of the West Bank.

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Open Land, Closed Spaces


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8 | JULY 11, 2018

The UN Refugee Agency counts 68.5 million forcibly-displaced persons throughout the world. Humanitarian aid, then, has never been more crucial for sustaining the lives of vulnerable populations. The world’s largest economy and most affluent nation, the U.S., has resettled more than 3 million refugees since 1975, but Wyoming has remained unmoved. It is the only state in the Union without a refugee resettlement program. While the U.S. has historically resettled more refugees than all other countries combined, its contribution is nearly mute against the countries now hosting huge numbers of unsettled refugees. Turkey hosts approximately three million refugees, Lebanon has around one million, and Jordan has taken in nearly 700,000, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). The situation in Palestine has left mu lt i-gener at ion a l refugees in poverty and in need of external assistance. But, as President Donald Trump and his administration continue push Americafirst isolationism, the plight of refugees fades deeper into the background. In Wyoming, a refugee resettlement program has faced great resistance. As the Trump administration’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and hard-line immigration policies continue, is the potential for a resettlement program in the state fading away?

totaling approximately $300 million worth of U.S. contributions to the U.N. Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA). According to the report, total contributions to date have only reached $65 million. Historically, those contributions have aided approximately 5.4 million Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank. The full repercussions of this decision will not be fully known until later this year. Now the UN is scrambling to gather “emergency funding” from other countries and donors. Through foreign-based funding, the UNRWA attempts to provide services for Palestinian refugees, including medical and dental services, education in the form of UN-schools, community mental health initiatives and environmental health through quality drinking water and sanitation projects. Domestic affairs are also shaky for refugees, especially those from Muslim backgrounds. On June 26, the Supreme Court voted to uphold Trump’s travel ban on several majority-Muslim countries. The so-called “Muslim ban” took a backseat to the chaos of the President’s “zero-tolerance” policy that separated more than 2,300 migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border. America once led the world in refugee resettlement. According to the Migration Policy Institute, “The United States has historically accepted more refugees for resettlement than all other countries combined.” But “this gap has all but disappeared in recent years.” This year, Trump set the target for refugee resettlement in the U.S. s at only 45,000 refugees, and the country is unlikely to reach even that goal. That number is roughly half of what it was under President Obama and qualifies as the lowest target post-9/11. In fact, the United States will have admitted fewer than 100 Syrian refugees this year. From 2006 to 2016, the U.S. shouldered roughly 70 percent of all global resettlement efforts (at just under half a million people); however, less than one percent of all refugees are ever resettled. The State Department noted that in Obama’s final year as president, he approved a resettlement project that would provide refuge for 110,000 refugees and asylum-seekers, of which 15,479 were from Syria. According to the UNHCR, this year, under Trump, refugee resettlement in the United States will fall to 41 percent of global totals. That is the lowest it has ever been on UNHCR record. The refugee crisis is more real than ever for many civilians in the south of Syria along the country’s

The United States has historically accepted more refugees for resettlement than all other countries combined. But this gap has all but disappeared in recent years. - Migration Policy Institute

From East to West Wyoming spans nearly 98,000 square miles and is the 10th largest state in the Union. With a population of around 579,000 people, it is also the least populous state. For a perspective on population density, the West Bank is home to more than 775,000 registered refugees. Al-Am’ari Refugee Camp hosts nearly 11,000 of them on nearly one third of a square mile of earth on the outskirts of Palestine’s de facto capital, Ramallah. Education is limited in the camp, and social services are nearly non-existent. Despite the growing demand for humanitarian aid, relations between the Palestinian Territories and the United States continue to deteriorate. Trump’s decision to move the United States embassy to Jerusalem was a definitive move in favor of Israeli dominance in a volatile region. The tense relationship has hit Palestine hard. Permanent refugees, like those in al-Am’ari Camp, have had their funding from the United States cut by nearly 83 percent. The Congressional Research Service released a report recording the Trump administration’s withholding of monetary support

border with Israel and Jordan in the rebel-held city of Daraa. Daily airstrikes have made the city nearly uninhabitable. According to the United Nations, some 320,000 Syrians have been displaced (approximately 120,000 of which are children) since June 19, making it the largest migration in the civil war’s long and brutal history. Trump admitted the situation is untenable and that civilians in Syria are suffering, but this has not informed his policies concerning resettlement. In fact, in many cases, Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric has been aimed specifically at provoking public backlash about refugees from majority-Muslim countries. At a rally in Rhode Island in April 2016, Trump repeatedly announced that Syrian refugees being resettled there could potentially be members of ISIS. “We don’t know who these people are,” the President said. “We don’t know where they’re from. They have no documentation. But you know what? We can’t let this happen. But you have a lot of them resettling in Rhode Island. Just enjoy your… lock your doors, folks.” He later continued, “We have our incompetent government people letting ‘em in by the thousands, and who knows, who knows, maybe it’s ISIS.” Trump has employed dozens of quotes just like this one. Of course, America’s rigorous vetting system means that Syrian refugees statistically pose a non-existent threat to American citizens. In fact, Alex Nowrasteh, an immigration expert with the Cato Institute, found that of the more than 3 million refugees resettled in the U.S. between 1975 and 2015, none from countries on the travel-ban list have killed U.S. citizens.

Cowboy Intolerance

Statistical anomalies aside, the Equality State maintains a fairly homogenous population. It is 92 percent white and the most conservative state in the Union edging out Alabama, according to Gallup. That state’s perennial conservatism hasn’t stopped it from resettling refugees. According to Refugee Council USA, in 2015 Alabama resettled 105 refugees, largely from Iran, Iraq and Cuba. In addition to that they also settled 808 unaccompanied minors predominately from Latin America with sponsor families. In Wyoming, the American Immigration Council (AIC) estimates roughly 4 percent of the state’s population is comprised of recent immigrants, contributing some half a billion dollars to the state’s economy every year. The AIC contends that, “As workers, business owners, taxpayers, and neighbors, immigrants are an integral part of Wyoming’s diverse and thriving communities and make extensive contributions that benefit all.” Despite immigrants’ positive impact, refugees have been met with everything from varying levels of indifference to outright animosity in the Cowboy State. Governor Matt Mead has held varying positions on refugees in Wyoming. He suggested that the establishment of a refugee resettlement program would be in the state’s best interest and then oscillated to strong statements calling for a halt toall new refugee


COURTESY PHOTO

Chelsea Roan, one of the orchestrators of the protest, said she was hoping to “raise awareness about some of the legit reasons so many people have concerns about Islam and mass Muslim immigration.” She considers herself publicly anti-Islam, saying that she hates Islam “with the heat of a thousand suns.” That sentiment is rooted in the belief that Islam and the American way of life are incompatible, which is an ideology shared by the President of the United States. “Well, I would hate to [shut down mosques],” Trump said in a campaign speech in November 2016, “but it’s something you’re going to have to strongly consider. Some of the absolute hatred is coming from these areas. The hatred is incredible. It’s embedded. The hatred is beyond belief. The hatred is greater than anybody understands.” This isn’t the first time Wyoming has seen anti-Islam hostility. Duncan Philp also publicly announced his intent to burn a Quran in front of the state’s capital on September 11, 2010, with the Wyoming Tyranny Response Team, an unofficial political organization that advocates for gun rights, but backed down after what he called, simply, “an exercise in freedom of expression.” Nearly every refugee resettlement program in the country is predominantly federally-funded. This absolves states of financial burden for the integration of refugees into their communities, said Suzan Pritchett, former University of Wyoming co-director of the Center for International Human Rights Law Advocacy. Pritchett said Americans are obligated to help integrate refugees into society. “Notwithstanding the legal and economic aspects of refugee resettlement, our nation has a moral duty to provide the chance to begin again for some of the world’s 60 million individuals who have been displaced by persecution and conflict,” Pritchett wrote in a letter to Mead in 2015. “Wyoming’s moral duty to participate in this program is no less. People have been finding safety from persecution inside our borders since the time of our nation’s founding.” Another important aspect of state refugee resettlement programs is independence and integration of those resettled in the area, said Jim Barclay of Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains. That organization specializes in refugee services from New Mexico to Montana (with the exception of Wyoming). Barclay clarifies that the objective of refugee resettlement is not about amassing people on welfare. Refugee resettlement programs work with the intention to equip refugees with the skills and aid they need to find jobs and integrate into society as quickly as possible. “It’s about self-sufficiency,” he said. Because Wyoming is the only state without a refugee resettlement program, it is almost impossible for refugees to obtain the aid they need to integrate into the state. This is prohibitive because after fleeing war and governmental abuse, many refugees cannot get

“I hope they can give me a second chance. That’s all I needed. This country and this state and this city provided me a second chance.” - Mayor Wilmot Collins

People have been finding safety from persecution inside our borders since the time of our nation’s founding. - Attorney Suzan Pritchett

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

JULY 11, 2018 | 9

to be built in their city. That protest was called “Ban Islam in Wyoming” and was predicated on the fear that the mosque would encourage more Muslims to move there. Ironically, the targets of the protest are a combination of legal immigrants and American-born citizens, the Khan family. They originally hail from what is now Pakistan. However, their family has roots in Wyoming that date back more than 100 years to a time before Wyoming was even recognized as a state, making them more Wyoming than many of the people protesting their right to religious freedom. Even though the family has been in the area for more than a century, they did not have a place of worship until recently. In 2015, the family established a mosque inside a Gillette home. Many members of the community reacted positively to their decision, but a small, very outspoken faction did not approve. Threats aimed at the family became severe enough to eventually attract the attention of the local police and the FBI.

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resettlement in the U.S.. Specifically, after the 2015 Paris terrorist attacks carried out by DAESH. Mead wrote a letter to then-President Obama. In no uncertain terms, Wyoming would not become a haven for refugees until they could be certain none of them were terrorists, he wrote. Lately Mead has been more ambiguous. His spokesperson, Chris Mickey, danced around questions concerning the Governor’s stance on refugees. The closest answer Planet Jackson Hole received came from Mead himself: “The refugee discussion has been ongoing for many years in Wyoming. Currently, Wyoming doesn’t have a plan or program for accepting refugees. Because of this, Wyoming relies on the federal government and other states to properly vet people who were legally granted refugee status.” This is the language that Mead used when he was petitioning the legislature for a refugee resettlement program. It is the great unknown of not having an official resettlement program that bothers him. “Other states that have refugee programs that get quarterly reports of who’s coming in, how many are coming in. We just are—we get secondary refugees. I don’t know that number. I don’t know what services they have. I certainly don’t know where they’re from,” Mead said. Whatever the impetus for creating the program might have been, Wyoming’s small, vocal population has historically had a large effect on the Governor’s policies. Such was the case when Mead initially moved to form a refugee resettlement office in 2014. But it was close to election season and the incumbent governor faced serious backlash for the suggestion in the form of protests in Cheyenne and heated online criticism. It takes approximately two years of vetting before a refugee can be resettled in the United States and involves more than 20 steps, each of which can be a point of rejection. The U.S. is very selective about which refugees it takes, even after refugees are approved by the United Nations. Citizens’ fears that a low-populous, homogenous state like Wyoming might not be able to accommodate the religious and cultural practices of certain refugees is something the legislature has clearly noted. Wyomingites have openly displayed their intolerance for religious pluralism. On August 27, 2016, the Gillette group, Americans for a Secure Wyoming, held a Quran burning to protest plans for a mosque


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

10 | JULY 11, 2018

REILEY WOOTEN, GILLETTE NEWS RECORD

by without government assistance for the first few years as they try to cobble together a new life. Wyoming, then, is an unpalatable option for many. That doesn’t mean states with poor, or non-existent, refugee resettlement programs do not host refugees, but it does make the likelihood of their success dismal. Wyoming’s conservative neighbor to the north, Montana, also has not resettled any refugees in the last two years. However, to the shock of many, a former Liberian refugee was elected mayor of Montana’s capital city, Helena. Wilmot Collins started out as an impoverished man fleeing war-torn Liberia in 1994. He told NPR that he and his wife were once so poor they had nothing to survive on but toothpaste. He is now the first black mayor of any city in Montana, and is a huge advocate for refugee rights and resettlement in the area. He believes that it is well within Wyoming’s power to adopt a policy that would resettle refugees here. However, without the political drive, he doesn’t see it happening in the near future. Collins’s story is significant because it exemplifies the drive of refugees and the contributions they are making in the American West. They often feel such a deep sense of gratitude in their new country that they dedicate their lives to giving back. Collins told The Guardian, “My only thing was, I hope they can give me a second chance. That’s all I needed. This country and this state and this city provided me a second chance.” Collins beat out a four-time incumbent mayor and now continues to advocate for refugee rights. Although the stories are few, Collins isn’t the only one in the region. In Gillette, Wyoming, the 20152016 Teacher of the Year is former refugee from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Bertine Bahige. He received his citizenship in Wyoming in 2011 and has since become a valuable member of the Gillette community, alongside his wife and two daughters. Initially settled in the Washington, D.C. area, Bahige moved to Wyoming 13 years ago after receiving a scholarship to the University of Wyoming. He has not looked back since. According to Bahige, planting roots in Wyoming secured his future. “When you come from nothing, it’s not easy to find your way in a big community,” Bahige told the Casper Star Tribune in 2014. “That’s the beauty of Wyoming: small and family-oriented communities. If you fall, people will pick you up.” His story wasn’t always so happy. When Bahige was 15 years old, he was captured and used as a child soldier for two years before he escaped and fled to a refugee camp in Mozambique. He was one of the lucky few allowed to resettle in the U.S. in 2003. His family was not quite as fortunate; Bahige has not seen his mother or nine siblings since he was taken. Now, Bahige uses his charisma and compassion to inspire

“That’s the beauty of Wyoming: small and family-oriented communities. If you fall, people will pick you up.” - Bertine Bahige students in Gillette, and advocate for refugees. He also represents Wyoming as the state’s delegate to the United Nations Refugee Congress. Despite the increasing barriers refugees who hope to move to the United States face, many members of the refugee communities scattered across the globe do the best they can with what they have. In the al-Am’ari Ref ugee Camp, its annual summer camp is set to begin next week. The summer camp specializes in providing medical and social services for children with disabilities. It is here that Shadid sits in his office, eyes wincing. “I have had this pain since I was 13,” said the 33-year-old of his leg. Shadid was shot by the IDF and imprisoned for three years without cause, along with two of his cousins. Since then, he has been on pain medication every

day. “We do this for the children,” he said, referencing the long days people at the camp work to secure medical and mental health services for attendees. Most days of the week, Shadid arrives at the PSCD facility early in the morning and stays well into the night. Ramadan is the Muslim holy month of performing intentional acts of charity; this year, it lasted from mid-May to mid-June. In one of the poorest areas of the West Bank, this man, and many refugees like him, live Ramadan 12 months a year. With anti-Muslim sentiment on the rise in the U.S. and Wyoming, people like Shadid continue to be viewed as a threat, “to the American way of life,” as Trump put it. Meanwhile, Shadid, his wife and two daughters, live their lives in the tiny, bleak microcosm of humanity that is al-Am’ari Camp. PJH

As workers, business owners, taxpayers, and neighbors, immigrants are an integral part of Wyoming’s diverse and thriving communities and make extensive contributions that benefit all. - American Immigration Council

*This person’s name has been changed to protect his identity, as the al-Am’ari Camp is under direct Israeli Administrative control, where public and political activities in the West Bank are suspect.


Through Sunday, July 15 Continued on page 13 Extended listings at www.planetjh.com/calendar

TUESDAY, JULY 10

n Intermediate Tai Chi classes 10 a.m. n PUBLIC HISTORIC PRESERVATION WALKING TOURS 10:30 a.m. Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum, n Teton Valley Food Pantry drop-off 12 p.m. n A Brush with Nature 12 p.m. Turner Fine Art, Free, 307.734.4444 n Senior Lunch 12 p.m. Seniors of the West Community Center, Free, (208) 354-6973

n ALIVE@5 5 p.m. Village Commons, n St. Francis of the Tetons Eat & Meet Dinner 5:30 p.m. St Francis of the Tetons Episcopal Church, Free, (307) 353-8100 n Zero Waste Living workshop 6 p.m. Valley of the Tetons Library, Free, (206) 484-7354 n Bluegrass Tuesdays with One Ton Pig 7:30 p.m. Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n Ballad of Cat Ballou 8 p.m. Jackson Hole Playhouse, $26.75 - $82.25, n Inside the Music:

Scheherazade - Her Story, Our Music 8 p.m. Walk Festival Hall, n Dean Ween Group 9 p.m. Pink Garter Theatre, $35.00,

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11 n A Brush with Nature 12 p.m. Turner Fine Art, Free, 307.734.4444 n Senior Lunch 12 p.m. Seniors of the West Community Center, Free, (208) 354-6973 n Vertical Harvest Tours 1 p.m. Vertical Harvest, Free,

n Raptor Encounters 2 p.m. Teton Raptor Center, $15.00 - $18.00, n Historic Ranch Tour 2:30 p.m. Murie Ranch of Teton Science Schools, Free, n Jr. Oula 3:30 p.m. Teton Dance Academy, $5.00, n Slow Food in the TetonsSummer People’s Market 4 p.m. Base of Snow King, Free, n “Hump Day” Music Series at Warbirds Cafe 4 p.m. Warbirds Cafe, Free, (208) 354-2550 n Down in the Roots 4 p.m. Moe’s Original BBQ, Free,

n ALIVE@5 5 p.m. Village Commons, n Lauren Conrad & Pat Chadwick 5 p.m. Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n Community Potluck and Free Family workshop 5 p.m. Teton Arts Center, n Gallery Concert at Diehl Gallery 5:30 p.m. Diehl Gallery, n DISC GOLF DOUBLES 5:30 p.m. Teton Village, n Nature Mapping Certification Training 5:30 p.m. Teton County Library, Free, 307-739-0968

n Front Porch Conversations: Cultivating a Lifelong Connection to Nature 5:45 p.m. The Murie Ranch, Free, n The HOF BAND plays POLKA! 6 p.m. The Alpenhof Lodge, Free, n THE CENTER BENEFIT WITH BELA FLECK AND THE FLECKTONES 8 p.m. Center Theater, n GTMF Presents: Jazz Pianist Aaron Diehl 8 p.m. Walk Festival Hall, n Jackson Hole Rodeo 8 p.m. Teton County Fairgrounds, $15.00 - $35.00,

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

JULY 11, 2018 | 11


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

12 | JULY 11, 2018

ART Tuesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday - 7:30pm Wednesday - 5pm • Sunday - 7pm

WEDNESDAY, JULY 11

LAUREN CONRAD + PAT CHADWICK

FOLK DUET THURSDAY, JULY 12 TYLER & THE TRAIN ROBBERS GRITTY AMERICANA FRI & SAT, JULY 13 & 14 HOGAN & MOSS & OLD WEIRD AMERICA SCORCH FOLK TUESDAY, JULY 17 BLUEGRASS TUESDAY Full music schedule at worthotel.com 50 N. Glenwood St. • 307-732-3939

Taryn Boals’s work hearkens back to a childhood spent among animals and nature.

In Wild Company Local artist bucks her trend of charcoal broncs in new exhibition, but not entirely BY KELSEY DAYTON |

A

s a child, when Taryn Boals felt stressed, she often turned to her horses, soothing herself in the rhythm of the brush as she groomed them. Today, Boals finds peace with charcoal, which she moves across paper in the same direction she used when grooming her animals. Often with each mark, one of the horses she loves begins to take shape under her hand. The edges fade like a memory—and in many ways Boals’s work is part of a memory of her childhood and her horses, she said. The charcoal horses have been her trademark as an artist and what she is known for, but her new show at Cowboy Coffee is about debuting new subject matter and medium she’s been experimenting with the last few years. “Menagerie,” is a mix of Boals’s classic charcoal horse drawings, but also acrylic paintings, pen and ink drawings, and moose, elk, bison, rabbits and ravens. The show’s title fits what Boals hopes people see when they walk into the coffee shop, a collection of animals and works in all shapes, sizes and mediums. The 44 pieces in the exhibition are already hanging, but Boals is hosting a reception for the show 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday. Boals grew up in rural northwest Illinois in a town with only a few hundred people. Her parents owned a dairy farm and had other animals. She also owned and showed horses. Working with animals was part of her life and often required chores, but she was “obsessed with them,” wanting to know each one and learn its personality.

@Kelsey_Dayton

She was also a child who was always drawing. Her kindergarten teacher told her parents at a conference that Boals would become an artist. Boals never thought about doing anything else and animals made an obvious subject matter choice, until she attended graduate school at Northern Illinois University. Boals tried to move beyond horses, which some people said were cliché. She experimented with figure drawing and contemporary and conceptual art for two years before realizing none of it really fit and she returning to animals. Originally an oil painter, she realized in school she wanted to focus on the animal itself, showing its personality and quirks. Painting, though, was detracting from her effort. “What I was trying to say in my work wasn’t about the paint—it was about getting the essence of the horse and the subject matter I was trying to portray,” she said. So she turned to charcoal. She loved how working with it—both laying it on paper and erasing it—added to her work a sense of mass and weight. “I love that charcoal is super physical,” she said. “It’s the closest I can get to the paper.” Boals continues to use it to draw horses, but she’s also branching out. In this show, alongside horses, are works depicting animals from the area. Some pieces depict the charismatic megafauna of the Greater Yellowstone like moose, wolves and bears. But there are also the ravens that hang out near the garbage cans around her studio and the

resident rabbit she sees every day. “There’s definitely some new characters in my life,” she said. They may not be the most famous wildlife in the area, but they are the ones she sees and studies daily. Boals also has returned to painting. There are several small works with acrylic paints in the show. Painting allowed her to capture scenes like horses in pasture in the winter. She wanted a softer look than the angular marks of charcoal. Painting allowed her to capture the stillness and the light of winter scenes. She works in pen and ink, too. While the effect is similar to charcoal, the process is not. It requires more planning. It’s more adrenaline-filled with a sense of daring permanence. “I love the thrill of putting down a mark and there’s no going back,” she said. Pen and ink forces her to observe a line and think hard about how she could capture an animal in a single motion. Both charcoal and pen and ink allow her to share her process with viewers. “I like to work on paper because I like to show my initial lines,” she said. “Once it’s on there—that’s history. It’s there no matter how hard I erase.” Like the variety of mediums, Boals’s new work is in a variety of sizes and shapes. The smallest are 3 by 3 inches, the largest are up to four-feet long. Prices range from $25 to $850. “Menagerie” hangs until August 1. PJH “Menagerie,” an exhibition of work by Taryn Boals, openes with a reception 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday at Cowboy Coffee.


DANCE

BEERFEST ●

XXXXX

JULY 21st 2018

CODY WY.

2 - 8:00PM

FEATURING 60+ BREWERIES AND 200+ BEERS

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago pushes its boundaries by performing works from a panoply of choreographers.

Physical Finesse and Resilience Dancers’ Workshop hosts eminent, diverse dancers from the Windy City @Kelsey_Dayton

cultural connoisseur Dancers’ Workshop is also offering $50 balcony tickets that include the performance and after-party. “We feel it’s important that everything we present is affordable and accessible to the community,” Case said. She grew up in small-town Iowa and didn’t realize until she was much older the different forms dance could take and what it could look like beyond what she had seen at home. Dancers’ Workshop, she said, tries to expose the community to different types of dance and give students the opportunities to see and learn from world-class professionals. Case’s efforts have paid off. Dancers’ Workshop students go on to study and dance internationally. But it’s also about showcasing to visiting artists what Jackson is all about. During these shows, young, burgeoning dancers in Jackson see what’s possible, what they can aspire to. But Ohad Naharin in Israel also sees “what’s possible here,” Case said. Bringing in companies like Hubbard Street Dance gives people in a small Western town the chance to see internationally known artists in an intimate venue. It is also a way to support the art form, Case said. PJH Hubbard Street Dance Chicago performs 8 p.m., July 18 at the Center for the Arts, $50-$350. Check www.dwjh.org for tickets and info on additional events.

THE PETTY BREAKERS TRIBUTE TO TOM PETTY

& THE HEARTBREAKERS

BUT NO SEGER & +CLOSE TRIBUTE TO BOB SEGER THE SILVER BULLET BAND

TICKETS:

$35

AVAILABLE AT:

www.yellowstonebeerfest.com

CODY CHAMBER

& PINNACLE BANK FOR MORE INFO

acebook.com/yellowstonebeerfest

THURSDAY, JULY 12

n Green River Rendezvous - 83rd Annual 9 a.m. Sublette County Chamber of Commerce, n Grand Teton Community Trails Day 9 a.m. GTNP, Free, (307) 739-3379 n Farmer’s Market 9 a.m. Driggs City Center Plaza, Free, n Oula 9 a.m. Teton Dance Academy, $5.00, n Gentle Yoga 9:30 a.m. Seniors of the West Community Center, $5.00, (208) 354-6973 n Yoga on the Trail 10 a.m. National Museum of Wildlife Art, Free, n Free Family Concert: Jazz Pianist Aaron Diehl 11 a.m. Teton County Library, Jackson Branch, n Chamber Music with Leila Josefowicz 11 a.m. Walk Festival Hall,

SEE CALENDAR PAGE 14

JULY 11, 2018 | 13

work with a variety of choreographers. Several years ago Hubbard Street 2, which features younger apprentice dancers, performed in Jackson. This performance will feature the 16 professional dancers in the company. It will be another level, Case said. The company is in residence at Dancers’ Workshop July 13 to 20 during which they will teach a weekend intensive workshop. They will also open a rehearsal to the public allowing people to see the behind the scenes of how a performance comes together. For the July 18 performance, Contemporary Dance Wyoming will open the program with a piece Case choreographed called “A work dedicated to those who are incapable of love.” It is the closing section of “Stealing Inward,” which the company recently performed. The piece is sarcastic, Case said. It’s a love story, but its dedicated to those who think they are incapable of love in hopes that it will make them feel something they thought they couldn’t, she said. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago will perform immediately after Contemporary Dance Wyoming. The single night performance is a fundraiser for Dancers’ Workshop. Gala tickets cost $350, or tables of eight cost $7,500. The event includes a cocktail reception, dinner, a live auction, the performance and an after-party with New York City-based DJ Antonio Brown, desserts, dancing and a chance to meet the dancers. For the wallet-conscious

LIVE MUSIC BY

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

rystal Pite happens to be one of Babs Case’s favorite choreographers. Case, head of Dancers’ Workshop, has good taste—the Canadian choreographer is renowned in the contemporary dance world. Now spin the globe. Ohad Naharin, artistic director of Israel-based Batsheva Dance Company, is also one of the foremost contemporary choreographers in the world. And on Wednesday, people in Jackson can see work from both choreographers in one show performed by the acclaimed Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago will perform for Dancers’ Workshop’s annual fundraising gala at 8 p.m. July 18 at the Center for the Arts. The company is known for its cutting-edge contemporary dance, and unlike many companies that rely on a single choreographer, Hubbard Street Dance performs new and eclectic works created by a diverse array of the world’s leading choreographers. Pite’s piece, “Solo Echo,” is described by the choreographer as the best of everything she’s done, put together in a single piece, Case said. Her work “is so beautiful it brings me to tears sometimes,” Case said. “It’s very emotional and physical, stunning, innovative and there’s a long list of adjectives I would use to describe her work.” Meanwhile, Nahrain’s work with the Batsheva Dance Company is strong and powerful, Case said. Hubbard Street Dance Chicago is versatile. It is able to

BY KELSEY DAYTON |

UNLIMITED 7oz SAMPLES

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C

YELLOWSTONE


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

14 | JULY 11, 2018

n A Brush with Nature 12 p.m. Turner Fine Art, Free, 307.734.4444 n STEAM camp, Victor 1 p.m. Valley of the Tetons Library, n Parks & Recreation Advisory Board Meeting 5 p.m. n ALIVE@5 5 p.m. Village Commons, n OPENING EXHIBITION: A Brush with Nature 5 p.m. Turner Fine Art, Free, 307.734.4444, n WINE AND DESIGN 5:30 p.m. Top of the Bridger Gondola,

n Jonesys’ Poolside Players w Karee Miller & Susan Jones 5:30 p.m. Springhill Suites Marriott, Free, 307 690-8859 n Thursday Live Painting Demonstration with Shannon Marie Schacht 6 p.m. Huntsman Springs, n Papa Chan and Johnny C Note 6 p.m. Teton Pines Country Club, Free, 307 733 1005 n Music on Main: Within w/ Calle Mamboi 6 p.m. Victor City Park, Free, n Jackson Hole Shootout 6 p.m. Jackson Town Square, Free,

CINEMA

n Writers Salon 7 p.m. Whole Grocer Community Room, Free, 3076900808 n Tyler & the Train Robbers 7:30 p.m. Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307-732-3939 n Ballad of Cat Ballou 8 p.m. Jackson Hole Playhouse, $26.75 - $82.25, n Elevated Yoga on the Deck 9 p.m. Top of Bridger Gondola, n B-Side Players 10 p.m. Knotty Pine, $12.00,

SEE CALENDAR PAGE 16

Fred Rogers in ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’

Look for the Helpers ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’ and the simple heroism of Fred Rogers

F

BY SCOTT RENSHAW |

red Rogers isn’t going to break your heart in Won’t You Be My Neighbor? That was the fear surrounding a feature documentary about the mild-mannered creator of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, especially in this age when celebrated men are identified almost daily as abusers, harassers and predators. Sure, it’s the 50th anniversary of the show, but would that be a sufficient reason for exploring the world of its creator? We couldn’t take it if scandal took Mr. Rogers, but why else spend 90 minutes profiling him, if not to dig up skeletons keeping company with the cardigans in his closet? Director Morgan Neville, blessedly, has no such agenda. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? offers a narrow focus on Rogers’ life as a public figure, bypassing cradle-to-grave biography—Rogers died in 2003—to begin with the 1950s precursor to Neighborhood and follow his broadcasting efforts from the premiere of Neighborhood in 1968 on Pittsburgh PBS station WQED, through

@scottrenshaw

his initial retirement to later TV appearances including a post-9/11 special. While Rogers’s widow and two sons are interview subjects, Neville generally doesn’t dig into the man’s personal life, beyond anecdotes about his disciplined physical fitness regimen and personal pride at maintaining the same body weight. When there are attempts to draw connections between Rogers’s work and his childhood, they’re accompanied by animation that imagines him as his puppet alter-ego, Daniel Striped Tiger. What Neville seems most interested in, however, is the legacy of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, and its improbable success given that one former crew member describes the show as “you consider all of the elements that make good television, and you do the exact opposite.” There’s a clever montage devoted to the way Rogers “used time differently,” not just by taking precious air time to change his shoes, but


child’s primal level, they knew that this man listened to them and cared about them. This is why you might spend the majority of Won’t You Be My Neighbor? on the verge of tears, and not just because we get obviously heartstring-tugging moments like an episode in which Rogers had a wheelchair-bound young boy named Jeff Erlanger as a guest. As perhaps obvious-in-hindsight as it might be to note that conservative commentators attempted to turn Rogers’ “you are special” message into a cause for the wimpification of America’s children, it’s always clear from Neville’s documentary how this ordained Presbyterian minister interpreted his Christian faith as a call to exalt individual dignity. Maybe Rogers wasn’t ready in the late 1960s to allow a member of his cast like the openly gay Clemmons to be seen in a gay bar, but he was an example of the idea that, as one interview subject here puts it, there was “another way of being a man.” The kindly gentleman who told us in times of difficulty to “look for the helpers” would never have had the ego to acknowledge that he was talking about himself. PJH

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR? BBB.5 Documentary Rated G

TRY THESE

Troubadours (2011) Lou Adler Peter Asher NR

The Music of Strangers (2015) Yo-Yo Ma Kinan Azmeh PG-13

SERIES

Downtown Lander, WY Planet Jackson Hole is looking for a few new writers to uncover the valley’s must-know stories. email inquiries to editor@planetjh.com

July 19 - Susto July 26 - The Main Squeeze August 9 - Shovels and Rope August 23 - Futurebirds Gates open at 5:00 Donation-supported

Landerlivemusic.com

JULY 11, 2018 | 15

20 Feet from Stardom (2013) Darlene Love Merry Clayton PG-13

CONCERT

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood (1968-2001) Fred Rogers NR

OUTDOOR

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

feeding fish, peeling an apple or changing a lightbulb. And there’s a recognition of the way Rogers could subtly impact the perception of his audience, as in a scene from a 1969 show in which he and the Neighborhood’s resident police officer, African-American actor François Clemmons, cool their feet together in the same wading pool. Plus, we see that he spoke to children about things even modern adults have trouble understanding, since the very first episode of Neighborhood involved King Friday building a wall around his kingdom out of fear of change. Beyond all that, there’s the kind of hagiography that feels both weirdly out-of-place in cynical 2018 America, and completely earned. Neville paints Rogers as an American hero, one who built that heroism on something as simple as decency, and believing in the fundamental value of a child’s feelings. At the same time, the Neighborhood clips that Neville includes provide a reminder that Rogers’ show itself was often incredibly complex in its respect for the psychology of children. It borders on heartbreaking as we watch Daniel Tiger sing a song about wondering whether he’s a mistake, a self-talk that doesn’t disappear entirely even when someone reassures him of his worth. In archival footage of Rogers’s personal recollections of conversations with children, as well as filmed interactions between Rogers and live audiences of children, we see the genuine love that he inspired because on a young

MAKE REAL NEWS


FRIDAY, JULY 13

n Yoga@the History Museum 8 a.m. Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum, Free, 307-733-2414 n Green River Rendezvous - 83rd Annual 9 a.m. Sublette County Chamber of Commerce, n Farmer’s Market 9 a.m. Driggs City Center Plaza, Free, n Tetonia Breakfast Meet and Greet 9:15 a.m. Badger Creek Cafe, n Breakfasts in Tetonia 9:15 a.m. Badger Creek Cafe, n MC Presents Art and Antique Show 10 a.m. Teton Village, Free, 8013675560 n Festival Orchestra Open Rehearsal: Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony 10 a.m. Walk Festival Hall, n 52nd Annual Art Fair Jackson Hole 10 a.m. Miller Park, $5.00, 307-733-6379

2018

SATURDAY, JULY 14

| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

16 | JULY 11, 2018

n A Brush with Nature 12 p.m. Turner Fine Art, Free, 307.734.4444 n Grand Targhee Festival 3 p.m. Grand Targhee Resort, n Game Night 4 p.m. Valley of the Tetons Library, n CHANMAN - SOLO 5:30 p.m. Springfield Suites by Marriot, Free, 307 201 5320 n Macbeth! Thin Air Shakespeare in the Park 6:30 p.m. Center for the Arts Amphitheater, Free, 307-733-3021 n Oula 7 p.m. Teton Dance Academy, $5.00, n Hogan & Moss & Old Weird America 7:30 p.m. Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307732-3939 n Festival Orchestra: Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony 8 p.m. Walk Festival Hall, n FREE Friday Night Public Stargazing 9 p.m. Center for the Arts, n Late Night at the Trap: The Canyon Kids 10 p.m. Grand Targhee Resort, , n 14th Annual Targhee Fest

LIVE MUSIC, FOOD TRUCKS, ART DEMOS, AND ACTIVITIES ARTURO GARCIA

JULY 13-15 MILLER

PARK

ADMISSION : free fOr Members $5 : NOn Members Kids Under 1 0 free

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 10AM-6PM SUNDAY 10AM-4PM

n Farmers Market 8 a.m. Jackson Town Square, Free, n Green River Rendezvous - 83rd Annual 9 a.m. Sublette County Chamber of Commerce, n Volunteer for a Wildlife Friendlier Fencing Project 9 a.m. South of Wilson, Free, 307-739-0968 n MC Presents Art and Antique Show 10 a.m. Teton Village, Free, 8013675560 n 52nd Annual Art Fair Jackson Hole presented by the Art Association and Center of Wonder 10 a.m. Miller Park, $5.00, 307-733-6379 n Grand Targhee Festival 11 a.m. Grand Targhee Resort, n Prodigious Prodigy II: Kyle Ma 3 p.m. Wilcox Gallery, Free, 3076905360 n Festival Orchestra: Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony 6 p.m. Walk Festival Hall, n Macbeth! Thin Air Shakespeare in the Park 6:30 p.m. Center for the Arts Amphitheater, Free, 307-733-3021 n Hogan & Moss & Old Weird America 7:30 p.m. Silver Dollar Showroom, Free, 307732-3939 n Late Night at the Trap: Sneaky Pete & the Secret Weapons 10 p.m. Grand Targhee Resort,

SUNDAY, JULY 15

n Green River Rendezvous - 83rd Annual 9 a.m. Sublette County Chamber of Commerce, n MC Presents Art and Antique Show 10 a.m. Teton Village, Free, 8013675560 n 52nd Annual Art Fair Jackson Hole 10 a.m. Miller Park, $5.00, 307-733-6379 n Grand Targhee Festival 11 a.m. Grand Targhee Resort, n Concert on the commons - HoneyHoney 5 p.m. Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, n Macbeth! Thin Air Shakespeare in the Park 6:30 p.m. Center for the Arts Amphitheater, Free,

LOCAL SYNDROME An Imminent Eruption Exposing our frustrations can challenge Jackson’s status quo BY ANDREW MUNZ |

T

here are weeks when I feel like I write this column for only myself. A journal of sorts where I can consolidate my thoughts for the week. Perhaps that comes from people who say they’re not reading the paper, as if local journalism was a Yoplait flavor one grows weary of and writes off. I, of course, try to remind my friends, family and coworkers that each issue is different, but God forbid you ask Jackson locals to change their minds once they’ve been made. Recognizing that stubbornness, I can’t help but wonder if I throw these words down a well every week. But recently I’ve received ample and unexpected feedback from one column in particular. In my May 16 article, “Parsing our Sensitivities,” I expressed my frustration with Jackson’s inability to champion honest opinions, especially when they are unpopular. I’ve probably had somewhere around 20 locals offer up a compliment (or, ironically, subtle, passive aggressive critiques) about the column. Most thanked me for articulating a perspective that they too possess but have yet to publicly state. That gratitude came in several forms: offerings of coffee and beer; a gift card to Persephone Bakery. Others sent me Facebook messages or whispered thanks in public, as if we were plotting revolution and could only criticize Jackson Hole in the shadows. (I’ve been obsessed with Robin Hood ever since I was a kid and appreciated the roguish romanticism in it all.) Such secretive support only emphasized the point of my column further, and it made me wonder: What is Jackson’s collective voice? Understandably, we are a transient town comprised of seasonal workers, people coming in and out, yadda yadda yadda… we’ve heard the excuses. A lot of us do live here full-time, though, so surely the local perspective on political issues and community happenings is more cohesive than divisive. The response to that column is a clear example that most locals will have your back if you express your honest opinions. Here’s an example of unsaid things you just might agree with: The Snow King Ave. bike lane pylons were a poorly executed idea. Pastor

@AndrewMunz

Don Landis’s public comments against the non-discrimination ordinance are ungrounded. There’s something fishy about McPhail’s Burgers listed as the No. 2 Best Jackson Restaurant on TripAdvisor. Also, and akin to years past, there are too many white dudes running for local office. Oh, and how is Ocean City still a thing? Why does our Kmart suck so much? See? Easy. Are we just so numbed by our incessant joy of all things Jackson that we’re fine to ignore the ways it can improve? We’re so freakin’ hyped up on farmers’ markets and hiking and “We were on the river today!” and outdoor concerts and not picking up dog shit and everything else, that it’s a wonder we even have time to complain about anything. My voice is indeed not an anomaly. We all have an opportunity to speak out and make Jackson the town we want it to be. I’m not saying that Jackson will be my home forever, but it is my home for now, and it will always be the place I grew up and came from. Despite Jackson stereotypes of homegrown locals, my circumstances are not that of excessive wealth or lofty privilege. Perhaps that’s where my open dissatisfaction comes from—a constant drive to prove myself in a town that values money and fame over ambition. And I think for us to stop being so complacent and, instead, adopt a healthy appetite for change, we should upend the table. That requires not only my loudmouth voice, but everyone’s. In Howard Pyle’s The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, there’s a line I love about Robin Hood’s forest cohort, Little John. “Now there was no sign of any foul weather, but when one wishes to do a thing, as Little John did, one finds no lack of reasons for the doing.” As it stands, Jackson finds no lack of reasons for the not doing. Much like the caldera that threatens to incinerate us at any minute, our frustrations boil like magma. Unless we start to relieve the pressure—whether in Town Council public comment or letters to the editor or public Facebook posts—it will only be a matter of time before our mountain paradise is stolen because someone else spoke up when we didn’t. PJH


DINING

THE LOCALS

FAVORITE PIZZA 2012-2016 •••••••••

$7

$5 Shot & Tall Boy

LUNCH

SPECIAL Slice, salad & soda

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

TV Sports Packages and 7 Screens

Southern darlings be warned, this Western pie from Roots Kitchen and Cannery is perfection.

Praise be to Pie Tis the season for flakey, buttery, fruity indulgence BY HELEN GOELET

F

Reservations at (307) 733-4913 3295 Village Drive • Teton Village, WY

www.mangymoose.com

Open nightly 5:30pm

733-3912 160 N. Millward • Reservations recommended Reserve online at bluelionrestaurant.com

AT TH

AT THE

307.733.3242

JULY 11, 2018 | 17

Mangy Moose Restaurant, with locally sourced, seasonally FRESH FOOD at reasonable prices, is a always a FUN PLACE to go with family or friends for a unique dining experience. The personable staff will make you feel RIGHT AT HOME and the funky western decor will keep you entertained throughout your entire visit.

pies. Then there are the berry lovers, the strawberry-rhubarb fanatics, the key-lime die-hards, the chocolate pudding sweethearts. And I’m just talking fillings here. True pie lovers know that the basis of any good pie is the crust. That debate really boils down to preference, which often begins with one’s very first pie memory. The No. 1 criteria is flake.

INNERGE D I UNCHETON VILLA L I T IN T FAS BREAKE ALPENHOF

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

ourth of July has come and gone and that means summer in Jackson Hole has officially arrived. The long days of the season are perfect for spending time with friends and family, hiking, biking, barbecuing, and, making pie. Everyone has a favorite pie. Regardless of the time of year, there are those who prefer the fall-inspired cinnamony apple, pecan or pumpkin

F O H ‘ E H T

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

ROOTS KITCHEN AND CANNERY

Under the Pink Garter Theatre (307) 734-PINK • www.pinkygs.com

ELY UNIQUPEAN EURO


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

18 | JULY 11, 2018

PIZZAS, PASTAS & MORE HOUSEMADE BREAD & DESSERTS FRESH, LOCALLY SOURCED OFFERINGS TAKE OUT AVAILABLE Dining room and bar open nightly at 5:00pm (307) 733-2460 • 2560 Moose Wilson Road • Wilson, WY

A Jackson Hole favorite since 1965

There’s really no point in eating a pie if the crust isn’t deliciously flakey. A dense, hard layer of dough is a no-no. To achieve flake, you must have copious amounts of fat in your crust as it melts while baking, creating layers of air pockets within the dough. To get it extra flakey, however, the “secret” ingredient bakers have been using for years is vodka or distilled white vinegar. Due to the lower evaporation temperature, a tablespoon of either into your dough will help create an even, nicer flake. There are two schools of thought here: butter or shortening? The result of both, when done properly, should be similar in consistency, but the final flavor is different. While using shortening often results in a “lighter” flavor and crust, a butter-based dough lends a deliciously nutty, buttery taste that is the perfect accompaniment to jammy summer fillings. Local pie-makers Orion Bellorado and Willi Brooks, owners and bakers of Roots Kitchen and Cannery, agreed. At 5 a.m. on Saturday mornings, Brooks rises with the birds to get his pies in order for the Farmers’ Market on Jackson’s Town Square. Bellorado, a math teacher at Jackson Hole High School, launched Roots Kitchen and Cannery in 2004 with Ian McGregor, now the president of Teton Slow Foods. Brooks, who was born and raised in Jackson, joined the team in 2013 to bake pies, a practice that is cooked into his childhood. “My mom baked a lot when I was growing up,” Brooks said. “Her strawberry rhubarb pie will forever be my favorite.” While their berries are sourced from Strums, an Oregon-based farm, they try to stay regional with their other ingredients. Their flour, peaches, plums and cherries come from Bozeman and Paradise Valley, Montana. The company spans beyond pies, too. They churn out delicious jams, BBQ sauces and pickles in their Bozemanbased cannery. Pick up their goods 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays at the Farmers’ Market or 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays at the People’s Market. To be sure, preparing pie can be daunting. What if the crust is soggy? What if it burns? Not to mention the hours required to make the perfect pie. Never fear—adapted from Smitten Kitchen’s Butter Dough recipe, here is my take on the perfect pie. It’s an easy one. PJH

HELEN GOELET

FAMILY FRIENDLY ENVIRONMENT

Helen’s Triple Berry Post-Fourth of July Pie For the Crust 2 1/2 cups all purpose flour 2 sticks (8 ounces) unsalted butter 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar 1 tsp salt 1 tsp cinnamon (if desired) 1 C Iced water 1 tsp white wine vinegar or vodka

The trick is to keep the butter as cold as possible. Start by filling a cup with water and ice and put it in the freezer to keep it cold. Next, cut the butter into small cubes, about 1/2 inch in size. Put them into a bowl and place the bowl in the freezer. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and cinnamon (if using) in a large mixing bowl. Remove butter from the freezer and sprinkle into the flour mixture. Cut with a pie cutter until the butter comes together with the flour into small pea-sized pieces. Add 1/2 cup of ice cold water into the mixture and the vinegar or vodka and stir in with a rubber spatula. Add more water, 1 Tbsp at a time, until it begins to come together into larger clumps. Begin mixing with your hands and add more water until it comes together enough to hold a shape without being too wet. You’ll be able to see the dough flaking together at this point. The trick here is not to let the dryness of the dough intimidate you. Separate into two portions and press into discs. Wrap and cool in the fridge for at least 5 hours and up to two days. For the Filling 2 C raspberries 2 C blueberries 3 C blackberries 1 C granulated sugar 1 Tbsp corn starch 1 orange, zest and juice 1 lemon, zest and juice 2 Tbsp Grand Marnier Liquor (optional) Combine all ingredients except for corn starch and allow to sit for at least 1 hour.

Set the oven to 400 degrees. Grease a 9-inch pie pan, then flour a clean surface and rolling pin. Roll out one disc of dough until it is approximately 12 inches in diameter. Fold the dough in half, then in half again (you should have a quarter of a circle of folded dough at this point). Place the dough in the top corresponding corner of your dish (the bottom of the folded quarter should be in the middle of the pie dish). Unfold until the dough fills the pie dish. Trim off the remaining dough. Pour the filling into the dish. If you’re going for a fully covered pie, remove the second disc of dough from the fridge and roll it out to 12 inches and drape over your pie, pinching it together with the bottom dough. If you’d rather lattice the dough, cut it into ribbons and weave one over the other, pinching together at both ends. Brush the top dough with 1 egg beaten with 1 tsp water and sprinkle with sugar. Bake in the oven for approximately 20 minutes, until the top begins to turn golden, then reduce the temperature to 350 degrees and bake for another 25 minutes, until the filling begins to resemble jam. Remove from the oven and allow to cool before serving. Serve with ice cream or freshly whipped cream.


3 BU

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Featuring dining destinations from breweries to bakeries, and continental fare to foreign flavor, this is a sampling of our dining critic’s local favorites.

ASIAN

TETON THAI Serving the world’s most exciting cuisine. Teton Thai offers a splendid array of flavors: sweet, hot, sour, salt and bitter. All balanced and blended perfectly, satisfying the most discriminating palate. Open daily. Located at 7432 Granite Loop Road in Teton Village, (307) 733-0022 and in Driggs, (208) 787-8424, tetonthai.com.

THAI ME UP Home of Melvin Brewing Co. Freshly remodeled offering modern Thai cuisine in a relaxed setting. New tap system with 20 craft beers. New $8 wine list and extensive bottled beer menu. View our tap list at thaijh.com/brews. Open daily for dinner at 5 p.m. Located downtown at 75 East Pearl Street, (307) 733-0005, melvinbrewing.com.

CONTINENTAL ALPENHOF

THE BLUE LION A Jackson Hole favorite for 39 years. Join us in the charming atmosphere of a historic home. Serving fresh fish, elk, poultry, steaks, and vegetarian entrées. Ask a local about our rack of lamb. Live acoustic guitar music most nights. Open nightly at 5:30 p.m. Reservations recommended, walk-ins welcome. 160 N. Millward, (307) 733-3912, bluelionrestaurant.com

LOTUS ORGANIC RESTAURANT

MANGY MOOSE Mangy Moose Restaurant, with locally sourced, seasonally fresh food at reasonable prices, is a always a fun place to go with family or friends for a unique dining experience. The personable staff will make you feel right at home and the funky western decor will keep you entertained throughout your entire visit. Teton Village, (307) 733-4913, mangymoose.com. Opened in Jackson Hole by Tom Fay and David Fogg, Moe’s Original Bar B Que features a Southern Soul Food Revival through its awardwinning Alabama-style pulled pork, ribs, wings, turkey and chicken smoked over hardwood

SNAKE RIVER BREWERY & RESTAURANT America’s most award-winning microbrewery is serving lunch and dinner. Take in the atmosphere while enjoying wood-fired pizzas, pastas, burgers, sandwiches, soups, salads and desserts. $9 lunch menu. Happy hour runs from 4 - 6 p.m., including tasty hot wings. The freshest beer in the valley, right from the source! Free WiFi. Open 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Loacted at 265 S. Millward. (307) 739-2337, snakeriverbrewing.com.

JOIN US ON THE ‘HOF DECK THIS SUMMER DAILY BEER & APP SPECIALS BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER DAILY

HALF OFF BLAST OFF!

ITALIAN CALICO

A Jackson Hole favorite since 1965, the Calico continues to be one of the most popular restaurants in the Valley. The Calico offers the right combination of really good food, (much of which is grown in our own gardens in the summer), friendly staff; a reasonably priced menu and a large selection of wine. Our bar scene is eclectic with a welcoming vibe. Open nightly at 5 p.m. Located at 2560 Moose Wilson Rd., (307) 733-2460.

MEXICAN

EL ABUELITO

Serving authentic Mexican cuisine and appetizers in a unique Mexican atmosphere. Home of the original Jumbo Margarita. Featuring a full bar with a large selection of authentic Mexican beers. Lunch served weekdays 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nightly dinner specials. Open seven days, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Located at 385 W. Broadway, (307) 733-1207.

PIZZA

PINKY G’S

The locals favorite! Voted Best Pizza in Jackson Hole 2012-2016. Seek out this hidden gem under the Pink Garter Theatre for NY pizza by the slice, salads, strombolis, calzones and many appetizers to choose from. Try the $7 ‘Triple S’ lunch special. Happy hours 10 p.m. - 12 a.m. Sun.Thu. Text PINK to 71441 for discounts. Delivery and take-out. Open daily 11a.m. - 2 a.m. Located at 50 W. Broadway, (307) 734-PINK.

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60-MINUTE INTRODUCTORY BIODYNAMIC CRANIOSACRAL THERAPY SESSION $120 VALUE FOR $60

DOMINO’S PIZZA

$25 VOUCHER FOR $12.50

REDEEM THESE OFFERS AT HALFOFFJH.COM

JULY 11, 2018 | 19

MOE’S BBQ

Come down to the historic Virginian Saloon and check out our grill menu! Everything from 1/2 pound burgers to wings at a great price! The grill is open in the Saloon from 4 p.m.-10p.m. daily. Located at 750 West Broadway, (307) 739-9891.

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

Serving organic, freshly-made world cuisine while catering to all eating styles. Endless organic and natural meat, vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free choices. Offering super smoothies, fresh extracted juices, espresso and tea. Full bar and house-infused botanical spirits. Serving breakfast, lunch & dinner starting at 8am daily. Located at 140 N. Cache, (307) 734-0882, theorganiclotus.com.

VIRGINIAN SALOON

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

Serving authentic Swiss cuisine, the Alpenhof features European style breakfast entrées and alpine lunch fare. Dine in the Bistro for a casual meal or join us in the Alpenrose dining room for a relaxed dinner experience. Breakfast 7:30 a.m.-10 a.m. Coffee & pastry 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Lunch 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Aprés 3 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Dinner 6 p.m.-9 p.m. For reservations at the Bistro or Alpenrose, call (307) 733-3242.

served with two unique sauces in addition to Catfish and a Shrimp Moe-Boy sandwich. A daily rotation of traditional Southern sides and tasty desserts are served fresh daily. Moe’s BBQ stays open late and features a menu for any budget. While the setting is family-friendly, a full premium bar offers a lively scene with HDTVs for sports fans, music, shuffle board and other games upstairs. Large party takeout orders and full service catering with delivery is also available.


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

20 | JULY 11, 2018

EARLY RISER? Planet Jackson Hole is looking for a Wednesday morning delivery driver to start immediately! CONTACT PETE@PLANETJH.COM | (307) 732-0299

L.A.TIMES “WATT’S HAPPENING” By JOE KIDD

SUNDAY, JULY 15, 2018

ACROSS

1 Beginning 7 Arnold’s Terminator, e.g. 13 Arboretum feature 18 Some ski lodges 20 Longhorn rivals 22 __ Island 23 Pratt & Whitney helicopter engine with two power sections 24 Unsteady walk while using social media? 26 Fuel for a lorry 28 Leslie Caron title role 29 “Count me in!” 30 Field in acting 32 Detroit labor org. 34 Prefix meaning “billionth” 36 In reserve, with “on” 37 It tops a deuce 38 Lowly short-order cook? 41 24 minutes, in the NBA 44 Tommy’s kid brother on “Rugrats” 45 Marquis __ 46 Enjoy courses 48 1840s Rhode Island rebellion leader Thomas 50 In short order 52 Nasty storm 56 Popeye’s __’Pea 57 Victorious shout 58 Bawdier Bavarian britches? 60 X x XXX 61 Storage compartments 62 Sandburg’s “little cat feet” arrival 63 Mauna __ 64 Trembling 66 Intellectual 70 Deficiencies 73 Words with a gift 74 Lambaste 76 Yield as a return 77 Fannie __: securities 78 Frodo pursuer

79 Beefcake’s breakfast 84 Ilsa __: “Casablanca” heroine 85 “... giant __ for mankind” 87 Like top Michelin ratings 88 Toondom’s Le Pew 89 Flood barrier 90 “Ahem” relative 91 Spoke 93 Maple extract 96 Big top, for one 98 Return from a salamander farm? 102 Work unit: Abbr. 103 __ Bo 105 Stadium reaction 106 PC hookup 107 Thai currency 108 Easily bent 112 Kristen of “Bridesmaids” 114 Nullify 116 Drawback of the best place to watch the fight? 119 Dispute decider 122 En pointe, in ballet 123 Give an oath to 124 Enlarging, as a hole 125 Contradictory word 126 Some Dadaist paintings 127 Brings honor to

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Bit in a horse’s mouth? Agric. labor group Dessert for a large legal firm? In a reasonable manner What “E” may mean Get emotional, with “up” Wisconsin winter hrs. Distressed cry Enola Gay manufacturer Track circuit Eye layer M.A. seeker’s hurdle Ben Nevis, e.g. Easily riled types

15 It’s tossed into a pot 16 Road sign ruminant 17 Thornfield Hall governess 19 Searches carefully 21 Indian term of respect 25 “Didn’t wanna know that!” 27 Bomb big-time 30 Like A/C in most cars 31 Radio host Shapiro 33 Heiress, perhaps 35 Have credit from 38 Marshland 39 Uncool one who lately is sort of cool 40 Scot’s nots 42 Number for the weight-conscious? 43 Like Howdy Doody’s face 45 Crime boss 47 Accord 49 Judge’s announcement 51 Lack of influence 53 Comics scream 54 Warring son of Zeus 55 Bygone Persian title 57 “Don’t change anything!” 58 Actor Chaney 59 Disturbing bank msg. 61 Like some closet doors 62 Last down 65 Exaggerate on stage 67 Crowd around 68 Coastal raptor 69 Overflowing 71 Met regular 72 Dorm VIPs 75 Polite online letters 80 “Two owls and __”: Lear limerick line 81 More twisted 82 Suffix for fabric 83 Pope John Paul II’s given name

84 Went before 86 Big brass container? 88 Favored one 92 Karaoke performer’s problem 94 PC key under Z 95 “Masterpiece” airer 97 Word processing function 99 Humdinger 100 Formosa, now 101 Buttinskies 102 Bluebeard’s last wife 104 Rooter for the Bulldogs 107 Picture book pachyderm 108 Figurehead spot 109 Director Wertmüller 110 QBs’ stats 111 Mag honchos 113 Walk or trot 115 Norman on the links 117 Girl in the pasture 118 Shipping wts. 120 Vegas-to-Denver dir. 121 Some NFL linemen


COSMIC CAFE Words, Thoughts and You

The way we treat and talk to ourselves shapes our future

“I

BY CAROL MANN

f your compassion does not include yourself, it is incomplete.” – Jack Kornfield

“In a society that profits on selfdoubt, liking yourself is a rebellious act.” – Caroline Caldwell

Scientists estimate we have between 50,000 and 70,000 thoughts a day. The sobering fact is 70 to 80 percent of our thoughts are negative ones, and they are toxic. Every time you use the words “I am” you are literally instructing yourself to think, believe, and feel a certain way. You are telling your subconscious mind what to filter out and disallow, and what to let into your awareness.  You are commanding the Universe to form an outer reality that matches your declaration. From now on, practice being mindful of the word you say after “I am” statements. You believe what you tell yourself, and your words instruct the Universe to match your beliefs by bringing more of the same into your experience. Talk to yourself like you are talking to someone you love. And as Dr. Steve Maraboli teaches, “Love yourself enough to take the actions required for your happiness. Love yourself enough to cut yourself loose from the ties of the drama-filled past. Love yourself enough to move on.” PJH

Carol Mann is a longtime Jackson resident, radio personality, former Grand Targhee Resort owner, author, and clairvoyant. Got a Cosmic Question? Email carol@yourcosmiccafe.com

That’s okay, because whatever the reason, you can vote by absentee from July 6th to August 20th, 2018!

Stop in and vote at the absentee polling site located in the basement of the Teton County Administration Building at 200 S. Willow St., Jackson, Wyoming. You can also call or email us to request that a ballot be mailed to you. Email us: elections@tetoncountywy.gov Call: 307.733.4430 All primary absentee ballots must be received by the County County Clerk’s office by 7:00 p.m. on August 21st, 2018.

JULY 11, 2018 | 21

Many people mistakenly think loving oneself is an expression of selfishness. Selfish is the inability to consider anyone else other than oneself. Selfless is the inability to consider your needs or to include oneself. Self-full is a made up word to describe the balance between those two extremes. It is the awareness that taking care of yourself fills your cup, and that is precisely what enables

“Our own worst enemy cannot harm us as much as our unwise thoughts. No one can help us as much as our own compassionate thoughts.” – Buddha

Going hiking, biking, or climbing on Election Day?

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

Selfish, Selfless and Self-full

You Believe What You Tell Yourself

Worried about having to wait in line?

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

Compassion is a state of mind—a state of feeling and a state of being which views life through the lens of the heart and in so doing, removes judgment. Compassion is not about condoning hurtful behavior, nor is it about pity or trying to fix anyone. Compassion is an expression of deep caring that is spacious and allowing. It is an openhearted state of being which allows us to see beyond the surface, to let go of automatic emotional responses and personal bias. This is how we come to know the following greater truth: Everyone is doing the best they can in that moment given who they are and what they are facing. Self-compassion is approaching whatever is going on for you with spaciousness and kindness. This state of being removes the harshness of self-criticism, and only with that out of the way, is the stage set for any appropriate and timely self-improvement. When you extend compassion to yourself, the heart tells the brain to release the biochemistry of well-being. This includes maximum immune support, emotional balance and mental clarity. All these elements reset the body and the mind, promoting healing and the ability to be in the present coming from the expansion for love rather than from the contraction of fear.

you to more authentically and generously extend support to others. Here’s a simple exercise to experience being self-full. Take a few minutes to sit quietly, close your eyes, take a few deep, slow breaths. Now focus your awareness on your own physical heart. Hang out in your heart for a half dozen more breaths. Slowly bring to mind, one at a time, three attributes/qualities about yourself that you love and respect. Pause as you bring each one of these into your awareness. Savor each one and let yourself feel the truth of this self-recognition and appreciation as it flows through your entire body. Then gently open your eyes.

Out of town?


| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

22 | JULY 11, 2018

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To join Planet Jackson Hole’s Wellness Community as an advertiser, contact 307-732-0299 or sales@planetjh.com

WELLNESS COMMUNITY Your one-stop resource for access to Jackson Hole’s premier health and wellness providers.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY CANCER (June 21-July 22) I pay tribute to your dizzying courage, you wise fool. I stage-whisper “Congratulations!” as you slip away from your hypnotic routine and wander out to the edge of mysterious joy. With a crazy grin of encouragement and my fist pressed against my chest, I salute your efforts to transcend your past. I praise and exalt you for demonstrating that freedom is never permanent but must be reclaimed and reinvented on a regular basis. I cheer you on as you avoid every temptation to repeat yourself, demean yourself, and chain yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) I’m feeling a bit helpless as I watch you messing with that bad but good stuff that is so wrong but right for you. I am rendered equally inert as I observe you playing with the strong but weak stuff that’s interesting but probably irrelevant. I fidget and sigh as I monitor the classy but trashy influence that’s angling for your attention; and the supposedly fast-moving process that’s creeping along so slowly; and the seemingly obvious truth that would offer you a much better lesson if only you would see it for the chewy riddle that it is. What should I do about my predicament? Is there any way I can give you a boost? Maybe the best assistance I can offer is to describe to you what I see.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Lucky vibes are coalescing in your vicinity. Scouts and recruiters are hovering. Helpers, fairy godmothers, and future playmates are growing restless waiting for you to ask them for favors. Therefore, I hereby authorize you to be imperious, regal, and overflowing with self-respect. I encourage you to seize exactly what you want, not what you’re “supposed” to want. Or else be considerate, appropriate, modest, and full of harmonious caution. CUT! CUT! Delete that “be considerate” sentence. The Libra part of me tricked me into saying it. And this is one time when people of the Libra persuasion are allowed to be free from the compulsion to balance and moderate. You have a mandate to be the show, not watch the show.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “Reverse psychology” is when you convince people to do what you wish they would do by shrewdly suggesting that they do the opposite of what you wish they would do. “Reverse censorship” is when you write or speak the very words or ideas that you have been forbidden to express. “Reverse cynicism” is acting like it’s chic to express glee, positivity, and enthusiasm. “Reverse egotism” is bragging about what you don’t have and can’t do. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to carry out all these reversals, as well as any other constructive or amusing reversals you can dream up. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Poet Emily Dickinson once revealed to a friend that there was only one Commandment she ever obeyed: “Consider the Lilies.” Japanese novelist Natsume Sōseki told his English-speaking students that the proper Japanese translation for “I love you” is Tsuki ga tottemo aoi naa, which literally means “The moon is so blue tonight.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Pisces, I’m advising you to be inspired by Dickinson and Sōseki. More than any other time in 2018, your duty in the coming weeks is to be lyrical, sensual, aesthetic, imaginative, and festively non-literal.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You can’t sing with someone else’s mouth, Taurus. You can’t sit down and settle into a commanding new power spot with someone else’s butt. Capiche? I also want to tell you that it’s best if you don’t try to dream with someone else’s heart, nor should you imagine you can fine-tune your relationship with yourself by pushing someone else to change. But here’s an odd fact: You can enhance your possibility for success by harnessing or borrowing or basking in other people’s luck. Especially in the coming weeks.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) You wouldn’t attempt to cure a case of hiccups by repeatedly smacking your head against a wall, right? You wouldn’t use an anti-tank rocket launcher to eliminate the mosquito buzzing around your room, and you wouldn’t set your friend’s hair on fire as a punishment for arriving late to your rendezvous at the café. So don’t overreact to minor tweaks of fate, my dear Gemini. Don’t over-medicate tiny disturbances. Instead, regard the glitches as learning opportunities. Use them to cultivate more patience, expand your tolerance, and strengthen your character. Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

JULY 11, 2018 | 23

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your key theme right now is growth. Let’s dig in and analyze its nuances. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It may stretch you too far too fast—beyond your capacity to integrate and use it. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn’t feel good to you. It might force you to transcend comforts that are making you stagnant, and that can be painful. 3. Some growth that’s good for you may meet resistance from people close to you; they might prefer you to remain just as you are, and may even experience your growth as a problem. 4. Some growth that isn’t particularly good for you may feel pretty good. For instance, you could enjoy working to improve a capacity or skill that is irrelevant to your long-term goals. 5. Some growth is good for you in some ways, and not so good in other ways. You have to decide if the trade-off is worth it. 6. Some growth is utterly healthy for you, feels pleasurable, and inspires other people.

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Emily Dickinson wrote 1,775 poems—an average of one every week for 34 years. I’d love to see you launch an enduring, deep-rooted project that will require similar amounts of stamina, persistence, and dedication. Are you ready to expand your vision of what’s possible for you to accomplish? The current astrological omens suggest that the next two months will be an excellent time to commit yourself to a Great Work that you will give your best to for the rest of your long life!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Now and then you go through phases when you don’t know what you need until you stumble upon it. At times like those, you’re wise not to harbor fixed ideas about what you need or where to hunt for what you need. Metaphorically speaking, a holy grail might show up in a thrift store. An eccentric stranger may provide you with an accidental epiphany at a bus stop or a convenience store. Who knows? A crucial clue may even jump out at you from a spam email or a reality TV show. I suspect that the next two weeks might be one of those odd grace periods for you.

| WELLNESS | DINING | A & E | NEWS | OPINION |

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Psychologist Paul Ekman has compiled an extensive atlas of how emotions are revealed in our faces. “Smiles are probably the most underrated facial expressions,” he has written, “much more complicated than most people realize. There are dozens of smiles, each differing in appearance and in the message expressed.” I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because your assignment in the coming weeks—should you choose to accept it—is to explore and experiment with your entire repertoire of smiles. I’m confident that life will conspire to help you carry out this task. More than at any time since your birthday in 2015, this is the season for unleashing your smiles.

BY ROB BREZSNY

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) What’s the biggest lie in my life? There are several candidates. Here’s one: I pretend I’m nonchalant about one of my greatest failures; I act as if I’m not distressed by the fact that the music I’ve created has never received the listenership it should it have. How about you, Sagittarius? What’s the biggest lie in your life? What’s most false or dishonest or evasive about you? Whatever it is, the immediate future will be a favorable time to transform your relationship with it. You now have extraordinary power to tell yourself liberating truths. Three weeks from now, you could be a more authentic version of yourself than you’ve ever been.


L E IL A J OS E FOWICZ

“Her virtuosity is extraordinary, but even more extraordinary is her expressive power. She is the Wonder Woman of violinists.”

24 | JULY 11, 2018

| PLANET JACKSON HOLE |

| OPINION | NEWS | A & E | DINING | WELLNESS |

- LOS ANGELES TIMES

A TO P CL ASSI CA L M U SI C FESTI VA L - TH E N EW YO R K T IMES T HIS W E E K Wednesday, July 11 at 8PM

Thursday, July 12 at 11AM

Thursday, July 12 at 8PM

GTMF Presents: Jazz Pianist Aaron Diehl

Free Family Concert with Jazz Pianist Aaron Diehl

Chamber Music with Violinist Leila Josefowicz

Free, but ticketed Teton County Library, Jackson

$25

$25

Friday, July 13 at 8PM & Saturday, July 14 at 6PM

Festival Orchestra: Beethoven’s Pastoral Symphony

Tickets

$25–$55

Monday, July 16 at 7PM

Movies on the Mountain: City Slickers Free, but ticketed

Planet Jackson Hole July 12, 2018  

Open Land, Closed Spaces

Planet Jackson Hole July 12, 2018  

Open Land, Closed Spaces

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