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Indiana Travel & Culture

SUMMER 2015


Candace S. Shaw PUBLISHER/CEO

When I was a little girl growing up just outside Buffalo, IN I grew up appreciating the simpler things in life. Like Strawberries, fresh picked and still warm from vine ripening in the hot Indiana sun, right in the patch. Long evenings listening to crickets while fishing on the banks of the Tippecanoe and the beautiful Lakes in Monticello. Weeks spent at the 4-H Fair, drinking homemade lemon shakeups, eating elephant ears, and living on stolen time before school started in the fall. Spending each night in a swing with friends and family, watching the sun slowly drop below the Western horizon while I waited for the lightning bug show to start. These are memories that can’t be recreated in the hustle and bustle of busy city life and that is why you chose to take a break from it all: to make these kind of memories for you and your family. There is no other place in the Midwest that can offer such an infusion of agritourism, lake living, and simple pleasures as you will see featured in this premier issue of Magazine. Whether you are staying for a weekend or a few weeks in the area, there are so many wonderful opportunities to enjoy the full flavor of the simple life. I hope you enjoy reading our premier issue as much as you enjoy your time touring the area. So turn the page and plan your next ! adventure at Best Regards,

Candace 2


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IN Beach & Beyond is owned and published

Publisher/CEO

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by Contour Media, LLC. Copyright 2015.

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for further purchase locations.

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Guided Trail rides • TraininG services • lessons and demos

Y FAMIL! FUN ear!

ll Y Open A o 6pm 9am t

574-643-9395 Toll Free: 1-800-317-5016 Phone:

Just a short driving distance from Logansport, Monticello, Delphi, Knox, Rochester, Peru, Kokomo, Frankfort, Lafayette, Rensselaer, Plymouth, Wabash, Tipton, Frankfort, Huntington, Marion, Noblesville, Carmel, Fishers, Indianapolis, Merrillville, South Bend, Fort Wayne, and many more!

7187 W Co Rd 250 N, Royal CeNteR, IN 46978 WWW.CRookedCReekhoRsebaCkRIdINg.Com INfo@CRookedCReekhoRsebaCkRIdINg.Com


contents

Features

20 Towns of White County By Kean MacOwan Take a tour of the towns of White County and relish in the history of how these many small towns came to be.

24 An Historic Pleasure All Can Enjoy Logansport, Indiana’s

Cass County Dentzel Carousel By R.V. Jones

36 France Park An Oasis of Adventure 6

By R.V. Jones


Activity & Event Profiles

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White County Historical Society & Museum By Kean MacOwan

White County Indiana is more than just corn — it is a treasure trove rich in history.

18

Tippecanoe Country Club By Morgan Wichlinski

The Tippecanoe Country Club has plans to transform; including more family friendly tees.

Main Street Taste & Tour of White County

41

The quad county festival has quickly grown to nearly 5,000. Come an taste the best locally owned resaurants and enjoy live entertainment.

Departments County Fairs 11 AgriTourism Indiana  12 Wine Tours  28 Calendar of Events 32

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WHITE COUNTY H I S T OR IC A L S O C I E T Y & M U S E U M Foot st e p s In Hi s t o r y

By Kean MacOwan President White County Historical Society

I

f you think there is a lot of corn in Indiana—there is even more history tucked away in every corner of the county. White County is a treasure trove of history and the White County Historical Society and Museum is the area’s collection point.

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Artifacts and historical records found within the restored 1905 Carnegie Library Museum pre-date the formation of the State of Indiana, the United States and even before Columbus crossed the Atlantic Ocean. Early American Indian artifacts dating back to 10,000 BC are displayed at the museum. Uniform military accruements of the namesake of White County, Colonel Isaac White are encased in a temperature and humidity controlled cabinet. These items are the most coveted articles held dear by area residents and historians. Colonel Isaac White was killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe on November 7, 1811. The colonel’s chapeau, epaulettes, sword, scabbard and personal papers are housed in the museum. For those that recall the famed gangster John Dillinger, you will want to hear the story of the gang’s foiled robbery of the Thread Mill payroll that occurred not far from the museum. The myth of John Dillinger’s precise and calculated execution of robberies will be dispelled. Some of the earliest examples of life in the 1830’s and 1840’s can be found at the


complex and brought the center of industry to Monticello. For the railroad buff the county historical record began in 1853 when the New Albany and Salem Railway was built through the county. In 1859 the east-west rail line was constructed making White County the crossroad of rail traffic. White County’s participation in the Civil War was unparalleled in the State of Indiana. White County was the only county in the state that had no need to implement the draft. More volunteers joined the ranks of the Union on a per capita basis than any other county. Civil War artifacts of the period are housed in the military section of the museum.

museum. The museum houses an early walnut secretary hand-made in Round Grove Township, and the first ballot box that was used in 1834 when the county was formed. Those familiar with Indiana know how rare hydraulic dams are today in the state.White County had five dams in various locations

along the Tippecanoe River and even a dam on the Big Monon. Utilizing the power of the river transformed the area from one of farming to that of manufacturing. The earliest dam builder was Hans Erasmus Hiorth. This Norwegian settler purchased about a thousand acres in what we know as Norway. The Hiorth dam built in 1831 created a building and manufacturing boom to the area. Soon a saw mill, grist mill, woolen mill, blacksmith shops, filling mill, and general store were built making Norway the focal point of the county. You can learn how Empire Alexander Magee obsoleted the Norway Dam

Admission to the museum is free and the hours are Wednesday–Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Donations are always welcome.


JULY 5 - 11 CASS COUNTY 4-H FAIR Cass County Fairgrounds 2281 E 125 N Logansport, IN 46947 574-753-7750 4HCASSCOUNTY.ORG

JULY 9 – 17 CARROLL COUNTY 4-H FAIR Carroll County Fairgrounds 4th and Main St Flora, IN 46929 574-967-3538 EXTENSION.PURDUE.EDU/CARROLL

JULY 18 - 25 TIPPECANOE COUNTY 4-H FAIR Tippecanoe County Fairgrounds 1010 Teal Rd Lafayette, IN 47905 765-474-0793 EXTENSION.PURDUE.EDU/TIPPECANOE

JULY 25 - 30 WHITE COUNTY 4-H FAIR White County Fairgrounds 5100 Fairground Street Reynolds, IN 47980 219-984-5115 EXTENSION.PURDUE.EDU/WHITE

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CARROLL COUNTY DELPHI FARMERS MARKET

IN Beach & Beyond offers our readers the most available information for the freshest and tastiest fruits, vegetables and meat found in our target area: the counties of Carroll, Cass, Tippecanoe, White and a few others “beyond.” Proud farmers from Northern Indiana’s agricultural families painstakingly condition their crops and livestock to offer only the choicest selections to traveling tourists and customers in the area.

101 W. Main Street | Delphi, 46923 765-564-6692 cityofdelphi.org Fresh produce, cut flowers, herbs, bedding plants, juried crafts. Hours: Wednesday 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

LOGANSPORT FARMERS’ MARKET 

U-PICK

Downtown between 5th & 6th St. | Logansport, 46947 318-697-1584 Hours: June 9 through October 27; Tuesday and Thursday 3 p.m.-7 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.-Noon

THISTLE BYRE FARM INC. 

U-PICK

1857 W 900 N | Delphi, 46923 574-652-3909 www.thistlebyrefarm.com Flowers, processed meat, cornucopia, tours. They do batches of chickens from May to September, and take orders for turkeys at home or the farmers’ market. Parties, tours, camping and seminars by appointment only.

CASS COUNTY ADA’S SWEET CORN 9340 E County Road 800 N | Twelve Mile, 46988 574-664-3861 Email: ddlperry@mcremc.net

Use our AgriTourism Indiana listing to find and visit as many as you can while here! 12

Sweet corn and green beans available from late June through September. From US 31 go west on State Road 16 for 3 miles to County Road 1000E. Turn right (north) on 1000E for 1 mile and turn left (west) on County Road 800N. Go 3/4 mile to first house on left. From Twelve Mile, go 1 mile east on State Road 16 to County Road 900 E. Turn left (north) for 1 mile to County Road 800N and turn right (East) for 1/4 mile to 1st house on right. Hours: Monday through Saturday by appointment only. Closed on Sunday


CASS COUNTY FARMERS’ MARKET 

U-PICK

CLINTON COUNTY

2903 S 475 E | Logansport, 46947 219-739-1211

CARTER’S STRAWBERRIES AND MUMS 

farmersmarketonline.com

8428 N 300 E | Frankfort, 46041 765-258-3047

Hours: June through October; Tuesday and Thursday 3 p.m.-8 p.m.; Saturday 7:30 a.m.-Noon.

DEER CREEK ORCHARD 

U-PICK

11250 S. U.S. Highway 35 | Galveston, 46932

U-PICK

Farmer’s Market - enjoy strawberries in the spring and Flowers in the fall! Located ½ mile south of SR 26 on 300 E. Hours: June through October Weekly 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.

574-699-7685

ENGLISH FARMER’S MARKET 

www.deercreekorchard.com

Parking lot of Sun Oak Trading Post | English, 47118

Email: greenapple@deercreekorchard.com

Hours: June 23 through October 20 Saturday 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.

Hours: Labor Day through Mid-November Sunday 1 p.m.-5 p.m., Tuesday – Friday 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Monday

U-PICK

THE OLD MILL GENERAL STORE 6512 East St Rd 16 | Twelve Mile, 46988 574-644-2000 www.theoldmillgeneralstore.com Farmer’s Market. Locally raised meats, Bison, pork, chicken, beef, lamb, brown eggs, produce, apples, eggs, apple cider, bakery or baked goods, beans, corn, cucumber, jams, jellies, maple syrup, strawberries, tomatoes. Tours, trees/shrubs. North of Logansport Indiana on St Rd 25 to St Rd 16, east 3 miles on the left. Hours: May 1 to July 1; Monday-Friday 3 - 9 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.- 9 p.m.

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HOWARD COUNTY

TIPPECANOE COUNTY

FARLOW’S ORCHARD 

ANNIE’S ORCHARD 

U-PICK

6850 W. 250 S | Russianville, 46979 765-883-7028

9625 W 75 S | West Lafayette, 47906 765-583-2425

Farmer’s Market; apples, pumpkins, honey, strawberries; U-pick strawberries are available in June. And U-pick apples are available in October until the first freeze. Our regular season is Sept. 1 through January.

Email: abrummet@msn.com

They also participate in the Kokomo Farmers’ Market at the corner of Sycamore and Union Streets in Kokomo, that Farmers’ Market runs May through Mid-October. Hours: June through January. Call for hours.

KOKOMO DOWNTOWN FARMERS’ MARKET 

U-PICK

Farmer’s Market; Flowers, blueberries, cherries, grapes, jams, jellies, peaches, plums, strawberries, sweet cherries Jun 5 - 22; blueberries June 25 through July 20, Peaches July 27- through August 20. Open seasonally for U-pick or “we” pick fruit. Take South River Road to the Ravines Golf Course. Turn left and follow the signs. One quarter mile past the Ross Camp. From Lafayette, Ind. Take S. River Rd. 10 mi. to the Ravines Golf Course. Turn left and follow signs. Orchard is 1/4 mi. past the Ross Camp.

Downtown Kokomo Sycamore and Union Streets | Kokomo, 46901 765-210-8235

Hours: Varied with each season, June through August; Call 583-2425 for hours and availability.

www.kokomofarmersmarket.com

COOLEY FAMILY FARM 

Email: kokomofarmersmarket@yahoo.com

AGRITOURISM, FARMER’S MARKET

24 N 900 E | Lafayette, 47905 765-296-8834

Hours: April through October from 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.

www.cooleyfamilyfarm.com

TOP BANANA FARM MARKET

Cornucopia. The Cooley’s grow vegetables to sell on the farm and at area farmers’ markets.

932 South Berkley | Kokomo, 46901 765-459-4738

EXPLORATION ACRES 

Apples, potatoes, apple cider, flowers, gift items, pumpkins, gourds, raspberries, beans, bedding plants, blueberries, cherries, corn, cucumber, grapes, honey, jams, jellies, melons, peaches, peppers, plums, refreshments, squash, strawberries, tomatoes. Whether its produce, flowers, or jams/jellies that you’re looking for, they have a wide variety of each. They also have different varieties of soil and mulch for gardening needs. During the end of their season they carry fall decorations, corn stalks, straw (carried all season), and pumpkins.

U-PICK

U-PICK

6042 Newcastle Rd. | Lafayette, 47905 765-296-2863 Email: mary@explorationacres.com

www.explorationsacres.com

Located just 2.25 miles west from US-31 on Markland Ave - on the corner of Markland and Berkley, across from the Howard County Jail.

Picnic area and refreshments; the grounds are filled with picturesque barns, wooded trails, play areas and picnic areas with fire rings. Enjoy hay rides, a pedal car truck, ducky water races, corn cannons, a straw bale maze, sandboxes, a shelled corn bin and straw mound. For the shopper, there is a pumpkin patch, mums, hand-made crafts and food.

Hours: Open from April (when the weather permits) through October 31 from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

For admission prices and discounts and a complete listing of special events, visit website www.explorationacres.com.

MIAMI COUNTY DOUD ORCHARD 

U-PICK

Route 1, State Road 19 | Denver, 46926 765-985-3937 Apples, apple butter, berries, no-sugar preserves, peaches, other fruit and market products. Located 10 mi. north of Peru on SR 19. 14

U-PICK

Hours: Monday – Saturday 10:00 a.m., 5:00 p.m Call for Sunday hours.

From Indianapolis (south): take I-65 north to Lebanon, Exit US 52 North to Wyandotte Road. Turn right to the first intersection. Turn right on Newcastle Road. Follow the signs to the parking lots for Exploration Acres. From Lafayette (north): take U.S. 52 south to Wyandotte Road. Turn left. Go to first intersection. Turn right on Newcastle Road. Follow the signs to the parking lots for Exploration Acres. Hours: Open weekends August through October 31 Friday 6 p.m.- 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sunday 12 p.m.- 7 p.m. Closed Monday. Group reservations and field trips available Tuesday - Thursday. Call for reservations.


HISTORIC PROPHETSTOWN 

U-PICK

3549 Prophetstown Trail | Battle Ground, 47920 765-567-4700 Email: agmanager@prophetstown.org

www.prophetstown.org/farmproduce.html Ornamental ironwork also available. Located within Prophetstown State Park where a playground, bike trails, hiking and camping are available. Refreshments, Tours. Hours: Open year round Daily 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

LAFAYETTE FARMERS’ MARKET 5th St. between Main and Columbia St.  |  Lafayette, 47901 765-742-4044 Email: information@GreaterLafayetteCommerce.com

www.lafayettefarmersmarket.com Fresh garden flowers, baked goods, vegetables, fruits, plus honey, jams and jellies Hours: Tuesday & Saturday 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Thursday 3 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

PURDUE CAMPUS FARMERS’ MARKET Purdue University, Office of University Sustainability Ernest C. Young Hall/155 S. Grant St. | West Lafayette, 47907 765-494-2481 www.purdue.edu/sustainability Assorted produce and fruit in season. Vendors also offer fruit, cheese, beef and lamb. Due to anticipated construction, the market will be located on Oval Drive in West Lafayette (Purdue University). Hours: Open May 7 through July 30 on Thursdays from 11:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m.; August 6 through October 29 from 11:00 a.m.3:00 p.m.

MARTIN ACRES LLC 

U-PICK

4840 Hawthorne Ridge Dr.  | West Lafayette, 47906 765-463-4215

SAGAMORE WEST FARMERS MARKET 

U-PICK

Cumberland Park | West Lafayette, 47906 765-775-5110 Email: marshallmartin@onemain.com

Email: marshallmartin@onemain.com

www.city.west-lafayette.in.us

Blueberries! Buckets to pick in and special plastic bags to take the fruit home in are provided. Call the farm to verify availability. Please drive slowly and park carefully at the farm for safety reasons since there are often many families with small children.

Apples, Eggs, Potatoes, Apple Cider, Flowers, Processed Meat, Asparagus, Gift Items, Pumpkins, Bakery Or Baked Goods, Gourds, Raspberries, Beans, Bedding Plants, Blueberries, Broccoli, Cheese, Corn, Cucumber, Grapes, Honey, Jams, Jellies, Maple Syrup, Melons, Peaches, Peppers, Picnic Area, Plums, Refreshments, Squash, Strawberries, Tomatoes, Wine.

Go north on Salisbury St. in West Lafayette, IN to the city limits and then ½ mile north or about ½ mile south of Harrison High School on County Farm Rd (50W). Follow the white blueberry signs to the farm and the parking area. Hours: June 30 through August 25 Monday - Friday 5:30 p.m.- 9 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.- Noon.

PRELOCK BLUEBERRY FARM 

U-PICK

9632 E 350 S  |  Lafayette, 47905 www.prelockblueberryfarm.com Farmer’s Market; Blueberries. If you are coming from Lafayette, take 38E through Dayton, cross the bridge and go 1 ½ mi. to E 350 S. Turn left on E 350 S and watch for the Prelock Blueberry arm sign on the left. Hours: July; Monday-Wednesday & Saturday 7 a.m.- noon; Thursday and Friday 4 p.m.- 8 p.m.; Closed Sunday

The weekly fresh-air market opens Wednesday, May 4, and continues on Wednesdays through October 26, with an additional market the week of Thanksgiving. Goods range from fresh produce and meat to herbs and flowers, baked goods and food crafts, original art, crafts and jewelry. Goods sold at the market must be primarily grown, made or produced in Indiana by the vendor. West Lafayette’s Cumberland Park off the corner of Salisbury Street and Kalberer Road Hours: Wednesdays, 3 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

WEA CREEK ORCHARD 

U-PICK

5618 South 200 East | Lafayette, 47909 765-807-6142 Email: abrummet@msn.com

www.weacreekorchard.com Lots of Apples, Pumpkins, Gourds, Peaches. Plus a great picnic area. Call for hours.

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WEST LAFAYETTE FARMERS MARKET 3065 N. Salisbury | West Lafayette, 47906 765-775-5110 Email: wlaf.farmersmarket@gmail.com Hours: June, July, and August; Wednesdays 4 p.m.-8 p.m.

WHITE COUNTY HEARTLAND GROWERS FARMERS’ MARKET C/O Prairie Moon Orchard & Market; P.O. Box 627 | Monon, 47959 219-253-638

WINKLER FARMS 4428 South Freeman Road | Monticello, 47960 765-479-2819 / 765-543-2086 Email: jules.cat35@gmail.com Melons, summer squash, strawberries, tomatoes, other fruit and vegetables. Picnic area (bring your own food). Discounts offered for larger quantities to encourage customers to stock up for the winter. Also offer potatoes seasonally. South of Monticello 4.2 miles on the west side of Freeman Road. Hours: Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Indian Trail Wines is a family owned farm winery that opened in April of 2010 as the first winery in Cass County which sits on approximately 4 acres of land including, 1.4 acres of growing vines. Most of the wines are “Estate” wines, ranging from Dry to Semi-Sweet to Sweet.

MORE SOURCES OF INFORMATION FOR YOU TO CHECK OUT!  WWW.AGRILICIOUS.ORG  WWW.CARROLLCOUNTYFARMERSMARKET.COM/PAGE/ PAGE/7165896.HTM  WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/CARROLLCOUNTYFARMERS MARKET  FARMERSMARKETONLINE.COM/FM/CASSCOUNLTYFARMERSMARKETIN.HTML

We have music events almost every Saturday evening during the summer and early fall. Open Friday from 2 pm - 6 pm Saturday and Sunday from 11 am - 6 pm

www.IndianTrailWines.com

 WWW.FOODMARKET.COM/ BUSINESS/420060-DELPHI-FARMERS-MARKET  WWW.IN.GOV/APPS/ISDA_FARMERSMARKET/DESTINATION.ASP  WWW.PICKYOUROWN.ORG/INNORTHURSDAYHTM  WWW.PURDUE.EDU/SUSTAINABILITY  WWW.LAFAYETTEFARMERSMARKET.COM

7540 N CR 350 W • Royal Center, IN 46978 • tel (574) 889-2509

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 WWW.WESTLAFAYETTE.IN.GOV/DEPARTMENT/DIVISION.PHP?FDD=8-164


Quad County —AREA MAP—

Lee Monon

Buffalo

16

Metea

16

Royal Center

17 39

25

Burnettsville

Norway

Wolcott

Reynolds

24

24

Onward

CARROLL COUNT Y

43

Yeoman Chalmers

231

25

421

35

218

Delphi

29

Flora 25

Americus

Buck Creek 52

West Lafayette

Lafayette

Galveston

18

421

75

Burlington

26

38

52

25

Odell

18

Dayton

Shadeland West Point

Young America

Colburn

Battle Ground

26

Walton

218

Camden

65

43

Montmorenci

Burrows

Rockfield

Brookston

18

Logansport

Idaville

Monticello

WH ITE COUNT Y

CASS COUNT Y

35

421

231

65

TIP P ECANOE COUNT Y 28

Clarks Hill 17


The

TIPPECANOE COUNTRY CLUB HAS SOMETHING FUN FOR EVERYONE The new era of Tippecanoe Country Club can be summed up in just one word: REINVENTION! At one time or another, any successful venture faces a fork in the road. The choice must be made to remain the same or branch out and do something different. 18

By Morgan Wichlinski


Monticello’s beloved country club opted for the latter, undergoing a fantastic transformation. The club started with plans for updating their course, and adding family tees to make it more family and beginner friendly.

J

ason Walke, PGA Club Professional, came on board as the club pro and general manager with his invaluable expertise in the industry, spearheading the updates. As the cherry on top of the sundae, with Walke’s lead, the club upended their calendar of events, adding family-friendly fun to their roster of standard country club activities. Most country clubs, especially more established ones, come with the stuffy stigma of exclusivity. Tippecanoe Country Club is looking to alter that mentality by making the course more family friendly while maintaining member benefit exclusivity. Founded in 1920 and located on Lake Shafer, the country club offers stunning views both on the course and on the back deck of the Clubhouse. With the summer weather in full-swing, you will not want to miss the opportunity to relax on the deck or in the bar while enjoying a cool cocktail with a tasty meal artfully prepared by Sandy Saltsman of Celebrations in Francesville. In addition to their 18-hole course modified and expanded by Pete Dye in the 1960s, the Country Club boasts excellent practice facilities for both putting and chipping.

Its scenic 6,850 yards are meticulously groomed and is considered one of the finest in the state.

If you need to improve your game, they also have professionals (including Walke, along with Assistant Pro, John Weidner) on hand for lessons. Like any professional course, the Club has a well-stocked Pro Shop on the off chance that you happen to bend your 9 iron in frustration, or you just need to freshen up your golfing wardrobe with a new shirt.

While you do not need to be a member to golf the course or attend a special event, there are awesome incentives and perks to becoming one. Exclusive tee times, discounts on golf and social events, and member-only events are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the benefits of membership. As promised, Tippecanoe Country Club revamped their entire calendar for the summer. Walke helped to add activities and golfing for all ages and skill level. There are weekly events for junior golfers, couple’s golf nights (complete with activities at the clubhouse for the kids!), Ladies’ League, “Chip ‘n Sip” clinics for the ladies to sip wine while improving their game, removing the “Gentlemen Only, Ladies Forbidden” acronym stigma (GOLF), and, of course, plenty of stuff for the guys, such as the ABCD Scramble and the Club Championship. Throughout the summer, the club management has plans for a craft beer tasting, wine outings, outdoor live music, and other fun and exciting events. Man, woman, or child: there is truly something for everyone at the Tippecanoe Country Club!

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The Towns of

White

County By

Kean MacOwan President of the White County Historical Society

V

isitors to the area have to be overwhelmed by the number of small little towns that dot the map in White County. As a point of reference and a historical perspective perhaps it might be appropriate to identify these towns and spotlight how each came into being, and how the names were chosen. Many of the towns over the years have been renamed.

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The town of

Monticello When White County was formed in 1834 the county seat was to be named Monticello per instructions from state government in honor of the home of Thomas Jefferson. The amazing issue was that there was absolutely no development or settlers that lived in the area. The location for Monticello was chosen only because a few early settlers came together and purchased the land close to the Tippecanoe River. They offered this land to the newly formed county to be the center of justice and government. As the proverbial saying goes, “Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.� The newly elected commissioners jumped on the offer and the town of Monticello was platted. Attempts were made later to move the county seat to a more central location in the county, however part of the legal documentation on the gift was that Monticello would forever be the county seat. As time progressed it was indeed a wise decision. Monticello, because of the proximity to the Tippecanoe River flourished after dams were erected that provided water power that transformed Monticello into the industrial manufacturing area that it is today.

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Downtown Monticello, Indiana

The town of

Norway

Hans Erasmus Hiorth. Mr. Hiorth, an early settler just north of Monticello, owned the lands in and around what we now call the town of Norway. Hans was a sailor by trade and immigrated to America very early. His country of birth was Norway. Mr. Hiorth came to the area in 1831. This preceded the founding of the county and its name. Hiorth purchased one thousand acres encompassing lands on both the east and the west banks of the Tippecanoe River. On this land he constructed a dam across the river that provided water power that would run the first grist mill in the county. Later he built a saw mill, carding and filling mill. Hiorth never platted a town in the area. It was his long held contention that a town should not be built in the area. However, the land became quite valuable since this was the center of industrialization within the county. Hiorth passed away in 1845. His will decreed that his “executors lay out a village to be called Mount Walleston, in honor of the first ship that landed me (Hiorth) in America, and one street to be called Francis Street in honor of Capt. Francis, the captain of the ship Walleston.” Hiorth’s wife Bergetta indeed fulfilled the decree of her husband and the town of Mount Walleston was born. Later the name was changed from Mount Walleston to the town of Norway in honor of the birthplace of Mr. Hiorth. Towns of White County | Continued on page 42…

VACATIONS - REUNIONS - PARTIES - OPEN YEAR ROUND www.thelighthouselodge.com 23


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A Historic Pleasure All Can Enjoy

CASS COUNTY Logansport, Indiana

B

usloads of about 200 excited children pull in front of the McHale Community Complex in Logansport, Indiana eager to take their turn on one of the rarest carousels in the country. The Dentzel Carousel is a masterpiece of happiness that first arrived in Robison Park, Fort Wayne, Indiana circa 1902. In 1919, new owner, Frank Franz brought the carousel to Spenser Park in Logansport. From 1928 to 1969 it had various owners and moved locations within Logansport. The deteriorating Dentzel Carousel captured the hearts of Logansport’s residents. By

R.V. Jones

25


The Carousel is available year round for private parties and special events.

T

26

he Dentzel Carousel was put-up for sale, in 1972. A possible purchase meant that it could be moved outside of Logansport, and even the state Indiana. Frank Callipo a member of the Jaycees solicited their assistance to keep the beloved community artifact. A radiothon dedicated to saving the carousel exhibited the community’s devotion to save it. Twenty one thousand dollars was collected; the carousel was saved and the nonprofit organization, Cass County Carousel, Inc., was born. The Cass County Carousel, Inc., is operated by a volunteer board consisting of eleven members. The efforts of the Board of Directors in cooperation with the National Historic Landmarks Association made the Cass County Dentzel Carousel a National Historic Landmark in 1987. The community’s continued support enabled the 1993 restoration of the treasured Dentzel


FUN FACTS • The carousel is traced back to the Middle East and earlier to India and Pre-Columbian Mexican culture. • It was also used as a way to practice cavalry riding skills in the 15th century. • In the Middle East it became a cavalry combat trainer. • A human powered carousel ride was considered top-secret military equipment, after it was first brought to Europe by the early Crusaders.

The Factoid Finger of Facts* The National Park Service is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all U.S. national parks, many American national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.

Carousel. The renovation required that it be dismantled and taken to the Carousel Works in Mansfield, Ohio. About six months later it was returned in time for the 4th of July celebration. According to “Masterpiece in Progress” the animals are a part of a menagerie that represent the third oldest carousel in America, a set of irreplaceable wooden masterpieces” (April 25, 1993). Here is a bit of trivia, the Cass County Dentzel Carousel is the only National Historic Landmark in Cass County. In 1995, the McHale Community Complex was constructed as a permanent enclosure for the carousel. Within the enclosure the carousel continues to be enhanced. In 1999, a Stinson Electric Band Organ was built for the carousel. To the delight of onlookers the organ plays rolled music, while a conductor moves his wand as drums drum and the bells ring. (www.casscountycarousel.com)

At the apex of amusement one can still reach for the brass ring. During each ride a chute is filled with over sixty rings but only one is brass. A brass ring is good for a free ride whenever it is redeemed. A reference to ‘reaching for a brass ring’ goes back to the 1890s, but the history of Dentzel carousel extends beyond that. Michael Dentzel began carving carousels in Kreuznach, Germany, 1839. Dentzel’s son, Gustav immigrated to Philadelphia in 1860. In 1867, he carved the country’s first merry-go-round. Dentzel’s menagerie of lifelike wooden animals—horses, reindeer, goats, lion and tigers—display his attention to detail. A Dentzel Carousel and specifically one of his rare carved animals, are prized collectibles. (www.dentzel.com) If looking for an historic fun one-day trip that uses about half a tank of gas, if you are traveling from Northwest Indiana, and one that children, parents and grandparents will absolutely love, plan a visit to the historic Cass County Dentzel Carousel in Logansport. The carousel includes a handicapped accessible chariot. Allow your family an opportunity to capture the brass ring. Carousels have long history. Your family can be part of history and making memories at Cass County’s Dentzel Carousel, an actual creation by Gustav Dentzel that is still operational, over one-hundred years later. This is an artifact that continues to unite a community, an amusement that honors the past and a choice activity that gives joy to all.

(www.dentzel.com) Cass County Dentzel Carousel 1208 Riverside Drive, Logansport, IN 46947 Cass County, Inc. McHale Community Complex Email: dentzelcarousel@frontier.com Phone: 1-574-753-8725 Office: M-F 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Memorial Day Weekend thru Mid-August M-F 6 a.m.-9 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 1 p.m.-9 p.m.

Mid-August thru Labor Day Sat. & Sun.1 p.m.-5 p.m.

Labor Day Weekend Sat.-Sun. 1 p.m.-9 p.m.

Labor Day 1 p.m.-5 p.m.

www.casscountycarousel.com

27


Western Wabash Wine Tour by Epic Limo  |  855-461-5466

1

Carpenters Creek

2

Wildcat Creek

3

Fruitshine Wine

4

Whyte Horse

5

The People’s Winery

6

11144 Jordan Rd Remington, IN 47977

Lee

65

Buffalo Monon

3233 E 200 N Lafayette, IN 47905

1

16

421 39

11752 W 1100 N Monticello, IN 47960

Wolcott 24

1510 S Airport Rd Monticello, IN 47960

Monticello

Reynolds

WHITE COUNT Y

414 s 3rd st Logansport, IN

Norway

4 3

43

Ye Chalmers

Indian Trail

421

65

7540 N CR 350 W Royal Center, IN 46978

Brookston

18 231

25

43

Americus Battle Ground Colburn Buck Creek 52

Montmorenci

26

2 West Lafayette

Lafayette Dayton

Shadeland

52

25

West Point

231

28

TIP P EC ANOE COUNT Y

38

65 28

Odell

26

Clarks Hill


Indian Trail Wines is a family owned farm winery that opened in April of 2010 as the first winery in Cass County which sits on approximately 4 acres of land including, 1.4 acres of growing vines. Most of the wines are “Estate” wines, ranging from Dry to Semi-Sweet to Sweet. 16

6

Metea

Royal Center 17

CA SS CO U N T Y

35 25

Burnettsville

5

Idaville

Logansport 24

www.IndianTrailWines.com Onward

eoman

25

Burrows Walton

218

Rockfield

35

7540 N CR 350 W • Royal Center, IN 46978 • tel (574) 889-2509

Camden 218

Delphi

29

Flora CAR ROLL CO UNT Y 421

Young America

18

Galveston

18

75

Burlington

29


30


Explore

Open Season: May 1 - November 30

Wolf Park

Guided Tours

Howl Night

Fox Talks

After Hours

Group Tours

Wolf Park is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization dedicated to behavioral research, education and conservation, with the objective of improving the public's understanding of wolves and the value they provide to our environment.

WWW.WOLFPARK.ORG

4004 E 800 N

BATTLE GROUND, IN 47920

(765) 567-2265 31


FESTIVALS & EVENTS MAY-AUGUST MOSEY DOWN MAIN STREET Lafayette, IN Second Saturdays from May-August and Sept 5 765-714-4844 WWW.MOSEYDOWNMAIN.COM

MAY 23 ROUND THE FOUNTAIN ART FAIR Lafayette, IN

765-491-6298 WWW.ROUNDTHEFOUNTAIN.ORG

JUNE 5 PADDLE FOR PAWS CANOE RACE Canoes launch from Adamsboro

574-721-6560

JUNE 15 DINO MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE France Park, IN

574-753-2928

JUNE 20 TASTE OF TIPPECANOE Downtown Lafayette, IN

765-432-2787 32

WWW.TASTEOFTIPPECANOE.ORG

JUNE 26-27 SPIRIT OF MONTICELLO & CAR SHOW Downtown Monticello, IN

574-870-4888

JUNE 26-28 TIPPECANOE BATTLEFIELD 200 Battle Ground Ave. 765-742-1419 WWW.INDIANAFIDDLERSGATHERING.COM

JULY 4 CELEBRATION IN THE PARK LAKE FREEMAN BOAT PARADE Monticello, IN 574-583-9784 WWW.BOATS4VETS.COM

JULY 4 WOLCOTT SUMMER FESTIVAL Wolcott, IN 219-279-2946

JULY 10 CHRISTMAS IN JULY GOLF OUTING Monticello, IN 574-583-7220 WWW.MONTICELLOIN.COM


JULY 11

AUGUST 7-12

WABASH RIVERFEST

COLT WORLD SERIES

Tapawingo Park 100 Tapawingo Dr. West Lafayette IN 765-420-8505

Bert E. Loeb Stadium at Columbian Park 1915 Scott St. Lafayette IN 765-477-6694 COLTWORLDSERIES.COM

JULY 18 DANCING & CRUISING IN THE STREETS

AUGUST 8

Downtown Lafayette, IN 765-742-4044 LAFAYETTECHAMBER.COM

IDAVILLE TRUCK & TRACTOR PULL Idaville, IN 574-870-0879

JULY 18-19

AUGUST 15

THE MAXC AMA MOTORCROSS EVENT

TIPPECANOE COUNTY AMPHITHEATER

France Park 574-753-2928

Tippecanoe, IN 219-984-5936 TSGPAI.ORG

JULY 18-25 TIPPECANOE COUNTY 4-H FAIR TIPPECANOE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS 1010 Teal Rd Lafayette IN 765-474-0793 WWW.PURDUE.EDU/EXTENSION

JULY 24 TASTE OF WHITE COUNTY

& MAIN STREET TOUR

Downtown Monticello, IN 574-583-3668

JULY 25-27 BROADWAY ART SHOW 574-583-2665

JUNE 26-27 SPIRIT OF MONTICELLO FESTIVAL Monticello, IN 574-870-4888 SPIRITOFMONTICELLO.ORG

AUGUST 1 OUTFEST Downtown Lafayette, IN 765-423-7579 OUTFEST.PRIDELAFAYETTE.ORG

AUGUST 22 BEERS ACROSS THE WABASH Lafayette, IN 765-714-4844 BEERSACROSSTHEWABASH.COM

AUGUST 22 WHITE COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY 26TH ANNUAL CHICKEN DINNER Buffalo Fire Department Buffalo, IN 4:00PM-7:30PM 574-583-3998

AUGUST 22 UPTOWN JAZZ & BLUES FEST Buffalo Fire Department Lafayette, IN 765-742-4044 UJBF.COM

AUGUST 29 INDIANA BACON FESTIVAL OF CARROLL COUNTY Downtown Delphi, IN 866-374-6813 INDIANABACONFESTIVAL.COM

33


SEPTEMBER 5

OCTOBER 31

GLOBAL FEST

MONTICELLO HALLOWEEN PARADE

Morton Community Center 222 N. Chauncey Ave. West Lafayette, IN 765-775-5113 WESTLAFAYETTE.IN.GOV

Downtown Monticello, IN 3:00PM

SEPTEMBER 12

Downtown Lafayette, IN 765-742-4044 DICKENSOFACHRISTMAS.COM

ST. BONIFACE GERMANFEST

DECEMBER 5 DICKENS OF A CHRISTMAS

St. Boniface, 318 N. 9th St. Lafayette, IN 765-404-4717 LAFAYETTEGERMANFEST.ORG

DECEMBER 5 – 6

SEPTEMBER 19

PURDUE UNIVERSITY, ELLIOTT HALL OF MUSIC WEST LAFAYETTE, IN 765-494-3941 PURDUE.EDU/PMO

37TH ANNUAL BROOKSTON

PURDUE CHRISTMAS SHOW

Apple Popcorn Festival Downtown Brookston IN 764-563-3770

SEPTEMBER 19 BURNETTSVILLE COMMUNITY DAY & 15th Annual BeeBumble Run/Walk Burnettsville, IN HTTP://WWW.BEEBUMBLE5K.ORG/

SEPTEMBER 20 ART ON THE WABASH Tapawingo Park West Lafayette, IN 800-721-2787

SEPTEMBER 20 ART ON THE WABASH Tapawingo Park West Lafayette, IN 800-721-2787 ARTONTHEWABASH.COM

OCTOBER 3 - 4, 2015 FEAST OF THE HUNTERS’ MOON Fort Ouiatenon, 3129 S. River Rd. West Lafayette, IN 765-476-8411 HTTP://TIPPECANOEHISTORY.ORG/FEAST.HTM

OCTOBER 4 ART ON THE VINE MEETS CLASSIC CAR SHOW

34

Whyte Horse Winery Monticello, IN 574-870-4888 WHYTEHORSEWINERY.COM

engaged®


35


An Oasis of Adventure

36

By R.V. Jones


wimming, camping and fishing are favorite calming summer activities. Some prefer the peace and serenity of a waterfall, or the bucolic harmony of a seven to ten mile hike could provide the composure one needs after a week of gridlock and stress. Many active families treasure being close to nature and, specifically, the water. France Park, in Logansport, Indiana is the perfect place to spend the beautiful days of spring and summer. The Park is a great location for a day or weekend get-away. It is almost guaranteed that one will discover a healthy recreational activity, conceivably, while separating from the never-ending daily hi-tech connections.

37


France Park has a seemingly never-ending natural resource of activities. As mentioned previously there are scenic trails but also the excitement of ziplining—which spans 1,400 feet from cliff to a platform on the edge of the water below­­—camping sites are available on a first come first serve basis.

38

The Recreational Building is an ideal location to rent for birthdays, family reunions, and large events. It includes a fully equipped kitchen complete with sink, cabinets, refrigerator freezer, electric stove, tables, a bathroom, heat and air-conditioning. When one thinks of scuba diving it is often at a Caribbean island. France Park, a jewel in the Midwest United States, offers Scuba Diving; it is operated by the Indy Dive Center of Indianapolis. According to www. francepark.com “the old Kenneth Stone quarry . . . makes scuba diving accessible . . .” For those who prefer to cool off on the beach with a swim, beach lifeguards are on-duty from 12-8 p.m. There is also a ramp accessible to those with disabilities, and although bathhouses are available


France Park also boasts “the premier dive site in Indiana” according to William Baker who manages the Indy Dive Center. “It’s a great location and most of the time the water is clear.” For more information about the Indy Dive Center at France Park, just call (317) 210-2822. there are no showers. available there are no showers. Shelters/pavilions can be reserved. A boat ramp is accessible to the Wabash River at the south end of the park. The catch of the day, for those who fish is usually bass, crappie or bluegill. Fishing, by the way, is only permitted in designated areas, like Lake Trimer. Observing wildlife is an activity that folk can enjoy year-round. What could be more tranquil than a clear swimming lake and the France Park Falls. As falls go—the France Park Falls is relatively small with a height of 15 feet. While some folk enjoy the beauty of the Falls, for a small fee and a speedier pace, those who love the distinctive rush of mountain biking can also enjoy nature’s essence.

39


The genteel and aspiring golfer can experience the sportiness of the Park’s offerings. One can putter around with nine holes of miniature golf or frolic around with Frisbee or Disc golf. In June, the France Park Open 2015, Disc Golf Singles Tournament takes place. Golfers play through a scenic area described as “very hilly” and “heavily wooded” 24/24 holes and baskets, using a mix of Mach III and Spider Web III baskets. Seven holes are open and nearly flat, while the other 17 holes are hilly and in the forest. Participants should expect to see picturesque cliffs and quiet fishing areas. France Park is an ultra-convenient Cass County attraction. The amusements of the Park are available year-round.

For those who can handle Midwest winters, France Park offers: Cross Country Skiing (ski rental available); ice fishing, ice-skating, sledding, and snowmobiling: only on park service roads—not on trails. For a safe and enjoyable time visitors are asked to please observe the Park’s Rules and Regulations. Many activities require specific compliance. The Park’s directives can be found on their website: www. francepark.com, by calling the office (574) 753-2928, or by visiting the Recreation Building. Love the out-of-doors, and need an ideal spot to enjoy nature with family or friends? Prepare for a great get-away at Logansport, Indiana’s France Park. Consider the naturalist/recreation programs that are available on the weekends from Memorial Day until Labor Day. Take a few hours away from cell phones, pads, laptops, and video-games. A healthy exertion for mind, body and spirit is needed. France Park is an attraction that incorporates the unique majesty of nature to activities that many love, which enables all to enjoy the beauty and authenticity of life. France Park www.francepark.com 4505 US 24 West Logansport, IN 46947 phone: (574) 753-2928 The Park is Open All Year

On the shores of the

beautiful Lake Freeman

in Monticello . . .

Indiana’s most unique venue for all special occasions: Weddings, Anniversaries & Corporate Events Featuring Every Saturday Night The region’s hottest bands Dinner Cruises Catered by the famous Sportsman Inn* *Select Friday Nights Only

40

FOR A COMPLETE SCHEDULE AND CRUISE TIMES VISIT US AT:

www.MadamCarroll.com Call us at: 574-583-3545 PLEASE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT facebook.com/MadamCarroll


The Gary Jeffries Band will be headlining Friday July 31st

T

he Main Street Tour and Taste of White County is quickly becoming an institution in the QuadCounty area, with last year’s attendance hovering around 5,000. Held at the end of July every year in downtown Monticello, the bustling street festival highlights all the best locally owned restaurants while featuring live entertainment and plays. A relatively new fest, the Main Street Tour began five years ago and is sponsored by the Monticello Business Alliance. It was organized by Ingrid Landis of the very fashion-forward boutique, Necessities located in Monticello.

This year, he festival will be held on Friday, July 31, 2015 on the downtown strip of Monticello. The street opens at 5:00 p.m. and will boast 13 restaurants cooking up their signature fare. The Gary Jeffries Band will headline the show with Forever Floyd, a Pink Floyd tribute band, and Otis, playing southern blues and rock. Brass Doorknobs will also be reuniting for the festival. Award-winning winery, Whyte Horse will host a wine garden along with newcomer and fast-favorite, Fruitshine Wine, a local fruit wine producer. There will also be a beer garden.

Another competitive edge of the festival is that you can rent tables and chairs or space at the Do-It-Or-Dye Bar, built by Dye Lumber. That way, you can visit with friends, listen to the music, and sample the food, all while knowing you have a home base to return to with no risk of “moving your feet and losing your seat.”

There are many festivals throughout the White, Carroll, Cass, and Tippecanoe counties, but the Main Street Tour really sets itself apart from the rest. The festival, of course serves as a way to highlight small businesses in White County, and it is covered by Channel 18 News. It also serves as a reunion venue for Twin Lakes High School.

If you have plans to be in the Monticello area in late July, swing by the Main Street Tour and sample everything that town has to offer! The 2015 Main Street Tour benefits the town’s Black Wednesday event, the town’s other event promoting small business shopping held every year on the Wednesday the week before Thanksgiving.

41


The town of

Buffalo

A short journey northeast of Monticello is the town of Buffalo. The town of Buffalo was named by Jonathon W. Sluyter (pronounced Slighter). Mr. Sluyter and his wife, Elizabeth Hall were both born in the Empire State of New York. It is recorded that Mr. Sluyter, wife Elizabeth and sons Hiram and Abraham packed up their belongings in a wagon in the early spring of 1836 and headed west to their chosen destination of Illinois where they would start a new life. After traveling during the remaining spring and all summer through road-less forests and swamps, under chilling rains and hot humid days they finally reached the village of Rochester, Indiana and then journeyed to Logansport. Several weeks later the family reached the Tippecanoe River. Due to high water levels the travelers were forced to stop to wait for the waters of the Tippecanoe to subside. In the meantime, they found an early abandoned log cabin in which to reside and as winter was fast approaching they decided to spend the winter in this location. The decision to permanently make this their home was the result of Mr. Sluyter building a forge whereby he could produce iron and make crude steel products. Sluyter was a blacksmith by trade and recognized the need for such a skill in this wilderness setting. A growing business soon boomed with the 300 native Pottawattamie Indians encamped along

the banks of the Tippecanoe. Mr. Sluyter soon learned the native Indian language and bartered his way into business. His number one fabricated item… steel arrowheads. Sluyter sold these steel arrowheads for a penny a piece. The first post office in Liberty Township founded in 1857 was located at Jonathon Sluyter’s farmhouse making him the first postmaster in the township. It was Mr. Sluyter’s wish that the post office be called Buffalo… and so it was and the town that formed around this area became known as Buffalo. Many theories abound as to why the town was named Buffalo. Perhaps it was from the original dialogue Mr. Sluyter had with the early Indian population… i.e. a Buffalo trace or the stories of buffalo hunting perhaps. The most accepted theory is that Sluyter was partial to the city of Buffalo, New York. In honor of that city he named the post office Buffalo.

The town of

Idaville

Heading east we encounter the town of Idaville. Idaville was originally called Hannah. Hannah was platted on March 20, 1860 by Andrew and Margaret Hannah, John B. and Rebecca (Spencer) Townsley and John and Mura McCully. In 1860 the Hannah Post Office was opened. Problem! It seems that another town outside of Ft. Wayne settled on the name of Hannah earlier. This necessitated changing the name. The quest for the community was to come up with a new name for the town. The townspeople could not agree on a name and the decision was left to Rev. Thomas Callahan of the United Presbyterian Church. After pondering the solution for a name it was the recommendation of Rev. Callahan that they name the town after his daughter Ida. The naming of Idaville and approval of the community apparently won the hearts of its citizens.

The town of

Burnettsville

FANTASTIC FASHION FINDS Necessities carries all styles of en trend, unique jewelry, clothing & handbags. We are especially known for our great scarves! Stop by to see us. Mon-Fri 10 am - 7 pm; Sat. 10 am - 5 pm

109 N Main St. • Monticello, Indiana 47960 • (574) 583-3668

www.necessitiesboutique109.com 42

Moving further east we enter the town of Burnettsville, or perhaps more correctly the village of Burnett’s Creek. The village of Burnett’s Creek was located just south of what we now know as the town of Burnettsville. The village was located along the bank of Burnett’s Creek and had a post office as early as 1836. The area was also known as Farmington after the famous Farmington Seminary located in the area. Burnettsville was platted in the year 1854 by the founder of Burnettsville, Franklin J Herman. With the expansion of the east-west railroad line, (Logansport, Peoria and Burlington) the rail line was to pass just north of the town of Burnettsville. In 1860 the town of Sharon was platted at the northern boundary of the town of Burnettsville where it would border the new railroad line. Soon thereafter the two towns merged and a depot was built at the downtown site of what we now know as the town of Burnettsville.


The town of

Headlee

Heading north from Burnettsville we visit the town of Headlee. Here we encounter a hamlet that was platted in 1888 and is named after the Headlee family. The town was platted by Harvey and Silas Headlee in honor of their father Charles Headlee. Charles was born in 1797 and died in 1877 in Headlee.

The town of

Bell Center

Leaving Headlee we journey a short distance to Bell Center. It might surprise some that the town was originally called Kensal or Kensalville. The Kensal name was pinned to the community by store owner Christopher Kensal. On August 1, 1902 the town was renamed Bell Center after Mr. Kensal closed his general store.

The town of

Monon

What about Monon? It certainly wasn’t always called Monon. Most people think that Monon was named after the Monong River or the Monon Railroad. On January 5, 1836 White County created Monon Township from part of Union Township. Monon Township was named after the Indian name of the Monong River that ran through the township. However at this early date there existed no town by the name of Monon. Cornelius Sutton was the first settler to this area as he plied his skill as a trapper and fur trader. His cabin was located in what would become the village of West Bedford, which was located at the confluence of the Big and Little Monon Creeks. When the north-south rail line, (Louisville, New Albany and Chicago) was built a new town was created called New Bradford. Several of the newer homes in West Bedford were deconstructed and moved to New Bradford which was in close proximity to the new rail line. The man that platted the town was James Brooks who was president of the New Albany and Salem Railway. It wasn’t until 1879 that the town was officially named Monon which coincided the new rail line that connected Indianapolis, Delphi, Monticello and Monon. Today we remember the town after the famous Monon Railroad.

Continued on next page...

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The town of

Reynolds

Heading south from Monon we enter the town of Reynolds. In January 10, 1854 the town was named in honor of Benjamin Reynolds the early pioneer settler. The town was platted by Benjamin Reynolds and others. It was Benjamin Reynolds who owned significant stock in the L.N.A.C. railroad and used his influence to locate the rail line through many of the towns that would spring up along the rail line. Reynolds has been and will probably always remain the town of Reynolds.

The town of

Smithson

Heading south we enter the village of what today is called Smithson. This was a flag station along the L.N.A.C. and was originally called Wheeler. This village was named after the property owner Hiram Wheeler. The post office was however named Smithson in honor of civil war veteran Lieut. Bernard G. Smith. After the death of Mr. Wheeler the village became known to all as Smithson.

The town of

The town of

Wolcott

We end our excursion around White County today with a stop in Wolcott in Princeton Twp. Here we encounter one Anson Wolcott. Much like Benjamin Reynolds he was a man of great wealth and influence. It was Benjamin Reynolds as a shareholder in the East-West rail line who laid out the path of the railroad through White County. As the railroad track was laid, the towns started to pop up. And so it was with Wolcott. Between the years 1858 and 1860 Anson Wolcott snapped up 2,000 acres of ground in and around what would become the town of Wolcott. In May, 1861 the town was laid out by Anson Wolcott and his brother E. G. Wolcott. Soon however, a rivalry began as to what town would be the western collection site for grain and livestock shipments to market. It seems that two other rival towns were to vie for this profitable title. One was Seafield and the other Clermont. Clermont for a short time was winning the battle. However, Anson Wolcott with his unlimited capital resources built storage buildings for hay and grains as well as a huge elevator that was unequaled in the county. He even purchased two presses to bail hay for shipment on the rail line. Once again technology wins the day and it was Anson Wolcott who made all this possible and propelled the town of Wolcott into prominence in this area.

Chalmers

A short distance south appears the town of Chalmers. In 1853 the L.N.A.C was completed through the town of Chalmers. Originally, the town was heralded as Mudge’s Station. The name was identified by the landowner Gardner Mudge. Now this is interesting. In 1873 the town of Chalmers was officially platted. It seems that the majority shareholder and founder of the L.N.A.C had a son whose first name was Chalmers. A deal was struck that the founder James Brooks of the L.N.A.C would build a passenger and freight depot if the town were to be named after his son Chalmers. The deal was agreed upon and Chalmers now had a new nameplate.

The town of

Brookston

Likewise another deal was struck by James Brooks on the new town just south called Brookston. Brookston is officially named after the business railroad tycoon James Brooks. Once again Mr. Brooks agreed that he would build a depot and additional rail spurs if the town would be named after him. Apparently the deal was struck and Brookston became one of the thriving communities along the rail line. 44

Well now‌ there you have it. By now you have either grabbed a map or Googled these towns to determine their exact locations. As you leisurely drive around the county, take time to enjoy the quaint villages, shops eateries and good old Hoosier hospitality in these various communities.


Metea 16

Lee

nter Royal Ce

Buffalo

Monon

35

25

16

port Logans

39

421

24

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Yeoman

43

Chalmers

25

421

n

Bro

218

Flora

25

s

Americu

43

Colburn

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29

erica

Young Am

18

18

18

65

35

Galvesto

Camden

Delphi

Walton

218

Burrows

Rockfield

okston

TWIN LAKES CINEMA

Onward

Idaville

ello Montic

s Reynold

231

24

ille

Burnettsv Norway

Wolcott

CA SS TY CO UN

17

75

n

Burlingto

421

NS O I T C A R T T A A ARE 52

nci

Montmore

Lafayette

ayette

West Laf

26

26

Dayton

nd

Shadela

25

38

52

65

231

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Odell

AN OE TI PP EC T Y CO UN

28

107 S. Main Street, Monticello Nightly: 7pm, Saturday/Sunday: 3 pm matinee 574-583-9466 tlcinema.net

VISITOR RESOURCES INDIANA WINES West Lafayette Open year-round 800-832-9463 indianawines.org

l Clarks Hil

WABASH & ERIE CANAL PARK 1030 N Washington St., Delphi Open year round, closed holidays Mon-Fri 1pm-4pm, Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 1pm-4pm 765-564-2870 wabashanderiecanal.org

FAIR OAKS FARMS 856 N 600 E, Fair Oaks Open year round Mon-Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 10am-5pm 877-536-1194 bentoncountyin.gov

BENTON COUNTY WIND FARM TOURS 706 E 5th St., Fowler Tours by Appointment only April-Oct, closed for holidays 765-884-2080 bentoncountyin.gov

ART MUSEUM OF GREATER LAFAYETTE 102 S 10th St., Lafayette Open year round; closed holidays 11am-4pm artlafayette.org

COLUMBIA PARK ZOO 1915 Scott St. Lafayette Open April-October; closed holidays 765-897-1540 Lafayette.in.gov/zoo

DOWNTOWN LAFAYETTE- WEST LAFAYETTE

CARROLL COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 119 W Franklin St., Delphi Open year round; closed holidays 866-374-6813 Mon-Fri 8:30am-4:30 pm carrollcountychamber.com

VISIT LAFAYETTE-WEST LAFAYETTE 301 Frontage Rd, Lafayette Open year round; closed holidays Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 10am-4pm, Sun noon-4pm 765-447-9999 homeofpurdue.com

GREATER MONTICELLO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Downtown Monticello Open year round; closed holidays 574-583-7220 monticelloin.com

LAFAYETTE LIMO 2525 Klondike Rd. Open year round 765-497-3828 lafayettelimo.com

CASS COUNTY VISITORS BUREAU 311 S 5th Street Logansport 866-753-4856 visit-casscounty.com

DELPHI PARKS Open Year round cityofdelphi.org

LAKE SHAFER MARINE & BOAT RENTALS

West Lafayette Open year round 800-872-6648 readysetgodowntown.com

4019 N. West Shafer Dr. Carroll Depends on season and weather 574-583-5238 lakeshaferboatrentals.com

LAKE SHORE DRIVE IN

TIPPECANOE COUNTRY CLUB

100 Rickey Rd. Monticello 8pm-10pm 574-583-0311 lakeshoredrivein.com

3267 NW Shafer Dr. Monicello 574-583-9977 tippecanoecc.com

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Profile for Contour Media

IN Beach & Beyond  

A magazine dedicated to people who know what it is like to enjoy the simple pleasures in life, to bask in the glow of the sun on the beach s...

IN Beach & Beyond  

A magazine dedicated to people who know what it is like to enjoy the simple pleasures in life, to bask in the glow of the sun on the beach s...

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