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Anniston Star

THE CRIME BULLETIN Northeast Alabama's Law Enforcement Community Billboard

PIEDMONT POLICE DEPARTMENT

WANTED

www.piedmontcity.org

Jeffery David Huey Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 11-Sept-74 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 6'1" Weight : 280 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Assault 3rd

David Alfred Landers Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 10-Oct-71 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 6'2 Weight : 210 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Harassing Communications

Willie Roger Johnson Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 10-Jan-79 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 5'9" Weight : 200 Hair Color: Borwn Eye Color: Hazel Charges: Theft of Property 2nd

Ronald F. Stephens, II Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 17-Jun-79 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 6'1" Weight : 210 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: FTA Domestic Violence 3rd

Nicole Lee Whitmore Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 16-Sept-77 Race: White Sex: Female Height : 5'7" Weight : 115 Hair Color: Blonde Eye Color: Green Charges: Rec. Stolen Property 3rd

Marilyn Wright Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 8-Aug-62 Race: Black Sex: Female Height : 5'7 Weight : 115 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Marijuana 2nd

Contact the Piedmont Police Department at 256-447-9091

ANNISTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

WANTED www.annistonal.gov

Louis Fenton Brown III Walter Daniel Grier Race: White Race: White Sex: Male Sex: Male Height: 5'10" Height: 5'8" Weight: 195 lbs. Weight: 185 lbs. Charges: Charges: Breaking & Entering Auto Domestic Violence 3rd Degree

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Dominac M. Hutchinson Altonio Deon Douthit Melvin D. Harris Race: B;ack Race: Black Race: Black Sex: male Sex: Male Sex: Male Height: 5’ 10” Height: 6’ 2” Height: 5'8" Weight: 195 lbs. Weight: 170 LBS. Weight: 160 lbs. Possession of Charges: Charges: drug paraphernalia Domestic Violence 3RD Failure to Appear Possession of marihuana Domestic Violence 3rd Degree 1st degree

The Anniston Police Department needs help in locating Anniston resident Darryl Welcome. If you have information on his whereabouts, please call 256-238-1800.

Detrick Jajuan Elston Stephen Douglas Gunn Quinton Lamar Davis Race: Black Race: Black 6’02” 140 lbs. Sex: Male Probation Violation Sex: Male (alias) Failure to Appear Height: 5'7" Height: 5'11" Reckless Endangerment Weight: 150 lbs. Weight: 175 lbs. Driving while License Revoked Domestic Violence 3rd Degree Probation Violation Fleeing or Attempting to Elude Failure to Appear Failure to Signal Turn

Darryl Welcome

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Contact the Anniston Police Department at 256-238-1800


THE CRIME BULLETIN

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

OXFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT

WANTED

www.oxfordpd.org ed r u t ap

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Amber M. Dupree 5’00” 125 lbs. DOB: 1990-05-30 CONTEMPT TOP 3RD

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Justin Bruce Burgdoerfer

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Shawn Donta Cross Date of Birth: 01-Jan-73 Charges: Possession of Forged Instrument

Billy G. Elder 6’02” 170 lbs. DOB: 1949-06-25 Burglary 2nd

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Jessica L Grizzard 5’01” 95 lbs DOB: 1984-08-06 CONTEMPT OF COURT

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Jerred L Smith 5’10” 185 lbs. DOB: 1984-07-28 PUR OF EPH X 3

Matthew L. Snelling 6’03” 163 lbs. DOB: 1982-12-30 PUR OF EPH X3

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Anita Michelle Henegar Date of Birth : 31-Jul-67 Charges: Purchase of Ephedrine

Claudia Elizabeth Mallery Date of Birth : 6-May-63 Charges: Contempt of Court (DUI)

Anthony Lavonn Crook Indecent Exposure

Noretta R. Lipscomb Distribution of Controlled Substance

Meshele Edgeworth Theft of Property 1st

Christina Flowers Theft of Property 3rd 7 Counts

Robert Reece Theft of Property 3rd, FTA

Eric Walker 6’ 145 lbs. DOB: 1983-09-11 Contempt of Court DUI.

Keith Mason Edwards Drug Charges, FTA

Eric Clay 6’02” 318 lbs. DOB: 1965-05-28 Contempt of Court, Faliure to Appear

Allen Ray Long 5'11" 190 lbs DOB 1957-12-03 Contempt of Court Theft of Property

Heather Reed 5’03” 130 lbs DOB: 1973-06-11 Contempt of Court Public Intoxication

Keith Mason Edwards

DRUG CHARGES -F.T.A-

If you have information concerning these individuals, please contact the Oxford Police Department at (256) 831-3121. You can leave your information on the Tip Line at (256) 241-4556. You do not have to leave your name. Calhoun County’s Most Wanted Hosted by

Anniston Police Department seeks information in investigations

Look for the

Calhoun County Sheriff Larry Amerson & Chris Wright

1537 Arrests Tune in Tuesday Nights at 7:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 2:30 p.m., only on TV24

On the morning of Saturday, July 18, 2009, Lecretia French’s body was found in the middle of the road on 20th St. between Walnut Ave. and McCoy Ave. She had apparently been assaulted and was bleeding and injured. Frech died on Saturday, August 1 due to injuries sustained during the attack. The Anniston Police Department is speaking to people who had contact with French in the twenty-four hour period leading up to the discovery of her body. On June 11, 2009, Charles Andre Jennings was shot and killed as he walked west bound on 15th street, near Cobb Ave. This case is still underinvestigate. On Wednesday, June 17 at approx. 10:00pm in the 1300 block of W 15th St., a resident was approached by two to three unknown black males while he was standing on his porch. One of the unknown black males pointed a gun at the resident. When the resident attempted to defend himself he was shot three times. The resident was treated at the hospital for his injuries. All of the black males fled on foot in an unknown direction after the shooting had occurred. At this time there is no information about any of the suspects involved. The resident was home alone at the time the incident occurred. If you have any information on these cases, contact APD Investigations at 256-240-4000.

THE CRIME BULLETIN

on Tuesdays in

The Anniston Star To advertise in The Crime Bulletin call 256-235-9222

CRIME STOPPERS TIP LINE (256) 238-1414


THE CRIME BULLETIN

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

CALHOUN COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE

WANTED

www.calhouncountysheriff.org

Carol Ann McNair Date of Birth : 26-Jul-70 Race: White Sex: Female Height : 5’4 Weight : 125 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Assault II (Prob Revoc)

Williams Ray Staggs Date of Birth : 16-Dec-83 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 5’11 Weight : 180 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Mult Worthless Checks

Michael Ray Nelson Date of Birth : 09-Feb-78 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 5’7” Weight : 210 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Green Charges: Viol Protection Order

Ronald Lee Wynn Date of Birth : 19-Sep-85 Race: Black Sex: Male Height : 5’9 Weight : 195 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Burg I (Arrest Order)

Bryan Dusty Pickett Date of Birth : 15-Feb-68 Race: Black Sex: Male Height : 5’9 Weight : 110 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Escape I

Robbie Jerome Collins Race: Black Sex: Male Height: 5’9” Weight : 150 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Att Burg III (Prob Rev)

Shannon Gene Willingham Date of Birth : 19-Jan-77 Race: White Sex: Male Height : 5’11” Weight : 170 Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Charges: Burg III (Prob Revoc)

Anthony Terrell Flentroy Date of Birth : 26-Jan-90 Race: Black Sex: Male Height : 6’4 Weight : 155 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Rob III

Michael Anthony Young Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 09-Jun-76 Race: Black Sex: Male Height : 5'11" Weight : 150 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Thft Prop II (Prob Revoc)

Timothy Crook Status: Wanted Date of Birth : 12-Nov-85 Race: Black Sex: Male Height : 5'11" Weight : 180 Hair Color: Black Eye Color: Brown Charges: Viol Comm Notification

CRIME STOPPERS TIP LINE (256) 238-1414

Family Links' HIPPY program has openings Goal of parent program strives to keep youth safe By Sherry Kughn The Star Marketing Department What does helping pre-schoolers have to do with providing safe, wholesome activities for youths? Plenty, according to Robin Mackey, Executive Director of Calhoun County’s Family Links program, the parent agency of Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY). The best way to keep youths in school and to steer them away from crime is to start them off when they are preschoolers by helping each of their families. “HIPPY is a national program which has a long history of helping parents successfully prepare their children for school,” said Mackey. “Children who complete HIPPY have been shown to perform better on kindergarten readiness assessments than children who do not.” The gains she refers to in academic readiness and achievement have been tracked for reading and math scores up to 9th grade in some communities. HIPPY has openings for about 40 three- and four-year-old Anniston children. Parents should call 820-5911 to register. Registration is open until September 25, 2009, with slots available on a first-come, first-served basis. Call as soon as possible to get a slot in the program. HIPPY helps parents learn how to teach their youngsters to be confident, to prepare for kindergarten and to develop the tools they need for growing toward independence. Parents will

learn how they can help their children learn the ABCs, shapes, colors, and motor skills. Educators from the HIPPY program will visit the home once a week and present a packet of lessons to the students. The program is free for parents. Call Meghan Alves-Thayer at 820-5911 to learn more about HIPPY and to see whether your child is eligible. HIPPY is part of Calhoun County’s larger program called Family Links, formed to help youths succeed in school, to make wholesome choices and to stay away from criminal activities. Family Links, began in 1999 and was called LINC Program. It is involved a task force of community leaders, such as the family court judge, juvenile probation officers, the district attorney’s office, local law enforcement officials, local school officials, and social service agencies. In mid 2007, the LINC program became Family Links and updated its mission. It is funded by a variety of state and local entities, and some private monies. Visit www.familylinksonline.org to learn more. Other ways Family Links helps youths include: Parents Empowering All Kids The PEAK program offers parenting classes that teach a step-by-step process to deal with issues that youths face. The classes are held throughout the community in a variety of times and locations. Parents can stay involved in the program for four years to ensure that their youths receive the attention and assistance they need to get a good start toward being respon-

sible adults. The AmeriCorps program works in the city schools to “catch” and photograph youths studying and doing good works. LINC ID The LINC ID program takes pledges from youths to be drug-free and violence-free. It also recognizes these youths and gives them peer support for the positive health decisions. Youths who sign up volunteer to take confidential, random drug screenings. Project Parent The Project Parent program helps families of strong-willed youths and/or those considered to be “out of control” with their behavior. It meets once per week for 10 weeks and is led by leaders in the community. Parents are taught prevention, identification, and intervention strategies for students who resist attending school, who do poorly in school, who use alcohol or drugs, and who are tempted to be a part of a gang, to run away, or to become violent. While parents are in their classes, the youths, too, attend classes on anger management, conflict resolution, and responsibility. They learn about many other issues related to teens. Childcare is available while classes are in session. Volunteers are needed in various programs. To learn about any and/or all of these classes, go to www.familylinksonline.org or call 8205911. Sherry Kughn is a freelance writer in Anniston.

$

3,000 Reward

for information leading to the arrest, conviction & incarceration of person or persons responsible for the murder of David Randall (Boone) Smith January 16, 2006 at 1125 County Road 93 Cleburne County, Alabama Call Detective Dennis Green at (256) 463-2277 or (256) 463-7336


THE CRIME BULLETIN Northeast Alabama's Law Enforcement Community Billboard

Calhoun Calhoun inmates grow produce, reap benefits of hard work Vegetable garden helps offset food costs and provides work for inmates By Danny McCarty The Star Marketing Department Calhoun County jail inmates are learning lessons in reaping what you sow, and in eating what you sow courtesy of a vegetable garden. The Calhoun County Jail Garden program is supported by the Calhoun County Commision, with J. D. Hess currently serving as chairman, according to Calhoun County Sheriff Larry Amerson. Even though inmates growing their own vegetables for use in the jail kitchen is not really a new idea, it is not a common occurance. Some state prisons have their own farms, as do some county and city jails. The county jail is only allocated $1.75 a day per inmate for three meals a day, Sheriff Amerson said. In years past the county managed to stretch resources to the limit. With food prices rising daily, it was time to try something new. The number of prisoners in the Calhoun County jail varies from one day to the next, but it hovers around 485 on an average day. A tremendous amount of food is needed to feed them all, Amerson said. Aside from the budget concerns, Amerson said It makes sense that the inmates should work to help offset the cost of their confinement. However this is not the only program the county has for the jail inmates to help the tax payers. They also help keep the animal shelter clean and work at area parks doing various jobs. The farm itself is located in the city of Anniston, near Weaver, and is called Holly Farm. "Former Anniston mayor, Chip Howell, was very supportive when the farming program was started, and current Anniston mayor, Gene Robinson, continues to support the program,�

Stephen Gross/The Anniston Star

Calhoun County jail inmate Michael Clark with a basket of squash and cucumbers that he picked at the old Holly Farm near Weaver.

Stephen Gross/The Anniston Star

Calhoun County jail inmate James Edgeworth hands fellow inmate Michael Clark a squash that he picked at the old Holly Farm near Weaver.

Amerson said. To ensure public safety, only minimum security inmates work the garden and they are guarded to prevent any escapes. The inmates volunteer to work on the farm, and so far getting enough workers has not been a problem. However, there are more and more prisoners being jailed that are considered high risk, or violent, and are therefore not allowed to serve on the work detail. Now in its third year, the garden is beginning to show results. After two seasons plagued by drought, this year it is becoming profitable and the inmates at the Calhoun County jail are reaping the benefits of their hard work. One reason for the new success is the technique, plasticulture, which involves the use of long sheets of plastic placed on the ground with holes cut ever so often to allow the plants to be inserted. A “soaker� hose is placed under the plastic that allows the plants to be watered and fertilized with regularity and eliminates the need to water the whole garden, thus saving on water and fertilizer. The plastic all but elimates competiton from weeds. There is a little more to it than that, but that is plasticulture in a nutshell. The advantages of the plasticulture system is early harvest, cleaner vegetables (since the vegetables never touch the ground), less maintenance, high yields, and ease of harvest. “Since the first two years of the gardening program encountered some problems, a new system was implemented this spring. Plasticulture is a fairly new technique in farming,� said Dan Spector, a master gardener who volunteers his time and services to the Calhoun County jail garden program. The garden itself is about an acre for now, but hopefully it can be expanded in the future. The plasticulture concept can produce a large amount of vegetables on a very small amount of land. “Due to the unusal amount of rain we had in late spring, the actual planting at Holly Farm had to be delayed until June 18th. However,

the land is now producing a bountiful supply of squash that the inmates harvest several times a week," Spector said. He said the produce is cooked and served to the prisoners at the jail, thus saving the county money. "In the not to distant future, beans, okra and other summer vegetables will hopefully be ready for harvest, since they are coming along nicely at the present time." As cooler weather approaches, there are plans in the works to plant such things as broccoli and cauliflower after the summer plants have stopped bearing. This will keep the garden going, and make it more cost efficient. There is an overgrown apple orchard and numerous pecan trees on the Holly Farm property, Spector said. "There have been discussions about the possibility of trying to clear unwanted brush away and getting the fruit trees back in good shape for production. That is a project for the future.� Over the course of time, Spector has gotten to know some of the inmates personally, and most of them really enjoy working on the farm. “Some inmates want to stay on the land past their alloted hours of work. One inmate who will be released from jail soon is thinking of returning to the farm as a volunteer to help with the project.� Spector believes that because of little things like this, the program is well worth continuing. Sheriff Amerson added, “The garden is an impressive sight to see, it is the right thing to do, and I am well pleased with the results this summer.� Maybe other counties and cities in Alabama will follow Amerson’s lead in implimenting a farming program for prisoners. It could help the morale of the inmates and give them the incentive to become law-abiding citizens after their release. Not only is this program good for the inmates, but it is good for the community as well. Danny McCarty is a freelance writer in Anniston.

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