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Conservation Legacy 2017 ANNUAL REPORT


2017: OUR 20TH YEAR OF OPERATION Founded in 1998 to continue the legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps and now in our 20th year of operation, Conservation Legacy is a national organization dedicated to supporting a cooperative of locally based conservation service programs. We provide service and work opportunities for a diverse group of individuals to complete important conservation and community projects for public benefit. This year, our program participants surpassed the 1,000,000 service hour mark for the second time. We placed over 2,000 people in positions serving their communities and the environment across the United States. Our programs continue to evolve and grow— Conservation Corps New Mexico and the Hopi Ancestral Lands program completed successful inaugural seasons. The growth of the Stewards

Individual Placement Program represents a progressing commitment to providing individual opportunities through service that build career-based experience. We had our largest disaster response deployment to date. Our Veterans Fire Corps program continues to provide exceptional on-theground training and experience, leading to entry level fire employment for a majority of our recent-era veteran participants. Energized by the momentum of the past 20 years, we uphold our dedication to building strong and healthy communities and ecosystems, fostering personal growth and life-long service and providing leadership and support to deepen the impact of conservation and national service.


2017 Annual Report

ARIZONA CONSERVATION CORPS

SOUTHEAST CONSERVATION CORPS

CONTENTS

Arizona Conservation Corps (AZCC) provides young adults with challenging service and educational opportunities throughout the full calendar year from the White Mountains, Flagstaff and Tucson, AZ.

PROGRAM INFO 1

www.azcorps.org

Southeast Conservation Corps (SECC) operates conservation service programs throughout the Southeast that focus on empowering young people to cultivate compassion, responsibility and grit through community service, hard work and environmental stewardship. Based in Chattanooga,TN.

2017 IMPACT 2

CONSERVATION CORPS NEW MEXICO

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS ARIZONA CONSERVATION CORPS 3 CONSERVATION CORPS NEW MEXICO 3 SOUTHEAST CONSERVATION CORPS 4 GREAT APPALACHIAN VALLEY CC 4 SOUTHWEST CONSERVATION CORPS 5 STEWARDS INDIVIDUAL PLACEMENTS 6 ANCESTRAL LANDS 7 VETERANS FIRE CORPS 8 DISASTER RELIEF 9 PRESERVE AMERICA YOUTH SUMMITS 10

Since April of 2017, Conservation Corps New Mexico (CCNM) has been operating conservation service programs across southern New Mexico and western Texas that engage individuals and strengthen communities through service and conservation. www.corpsnm.org

GREAT APPALACHIAN VALLEY CONSERVATION CORPS

RECOGNITION 11

The Great Appalachian Valley Conservation Corps (GAVCC) moves forward from the tradition of the Civilian Conservation Corps to engage young people in conservation service projects, based in New Market, Virginia.

CONTACT INFORMATION 12

www.gavcc.org

www.southeastconservationcorps.org

SOUTHWEST CONSERVATION CORPS Southwest Conservation Corps (SCC) operates conservation service programs across Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico with offices in Durango and Salida, CO, Gallup, Acoma, and Zuni, NM. www.sccorps.org

STEWARDS INDIVIDUAL PLACEMENT PROGRAM Stewards Individual Placement Program places AmeriCorps and VISTA Members in communities across America for a year of volunteer service by facilitating partnerships between federal agencies and communitybased nonprofit groups. Based in Beckley, WV and Durango, CO. www.stewardslegacy.org

PRESERVE AMERICA YOUTH SUMMIT The Preserve America Youth Summit (PAYS) Program began in 2007 with the goal of creating an opportunity for young people aged 13 to 18 to get out of the classroom and into the field to learn about history, archaeology, heritage tourism, and preservation. www.preservationyouthsummit.org

Programs

OF CONSERVATION LEGACY


TOTAL SERVICE HOURS:

ACRES OF LAND IMPROVED:

MILES OF RIVERS & TRAIL IMPROVED:

TOTAL PARTICIPANTS:

2,128

UNIQUE PARTICIPANTS: Crew Leaders: 176 Crew Members: 854 Individual Placements: 662 AmeriCorps VISTAs: 185 Preserve America Youth Summit Participants: 212 Ancestral Lands Hiking Club participants: 39

FINANCIALS TOTAL REVENUE: $22,108,012 PROJECTS: 84% GRANTS: 15% OTHER: 1%

TOTAL EXPENSES: $20,899,611 PERSONNEL & PARTICIPANTS: 78% PROGRAM OPERATIONS: 22%

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PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Arizona Conservation Corps PATHWAYS TO A LAND MANAGEMENT CAREER: ERIC DUARTE “I grew up in Bakersfield and come from a family who immigrated from Central America. My upbringing was different from many people—I’m first generation here, I had to learn a lot on my own. I went to college, I knew I wanted to go to college. I decided to earn a degree in forestry.As I learned about our history, I decided I wanted to focus on conservation efforts. I was able to get an internship as a soil scientist in Illinois after interning with the BLM and the US Forest Service. I also interned with the US Fish and Wildlife Service and then took this position here in Yuma with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), through Arizona Conservation Corps. I work as a Biotechnician on restoration projects and environmental assessments. I’ve been working on a ten acre restoration project here, and I’ve basically been given the lead on this project. Years of college and internships have paid off—I’ve been given the trust to take on these projects and I have earned a full time position with the BLM at Lake Havasu. I just love working outdoors, with nature around me. AmeriCorps has been part of my career growth, they have been here along the way and I have seen it growing up, in my schools. AmeriCorps is here to help young people make something of themselves, here for those young people growing into their careers wanting to make a difference. It’s a privilege to be a part of this, I was honored that I was able to participate.”

LOCAL PROGRAMMING IN LOS CRUCES Launching its inaugural season in 2017, Conservation Corps New Mexico operates conservation service programs across southern New Mexico and western Texas that engaging individuals and strengthen communities through conservation service projects. LINCOLN NATIONAL FOREST Crews engaged in efforts to clear wilderness trails of fire-damaged and other downed trees in the Capitan Wilderness and the White Mountain Wilderness of the Lincoln National Forest. Over the course of 2,925 volunteer service hours, 16 young adults on two crews cleared 614 trees over 49 miles of trail. GUADALUPE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK Crews have spent a large part of their summer season hard at work on the Indian Meadows Nature Trail. This trail is a central and accessible interpretive 0.6 mile loop that provides insights on the natural and cultural history of the meadow and the surrounding area. Having suffered from years of erosion, the trail is now receiving a major face lift as the crews apply new gravel.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

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Conservation Corps New Mexico


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PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Southeast Conservation Corps 5 YEARS OF GRIT, SERVICE & STEWARDSHIP Southeast Conservation Corps (SECC) hit the trail in 2013 with a crew of six local teens for one month. In 2017, SECC operated year round, running youth crews, adult crews, veteran fire crews, individual placements and a youth biking program, becoming a foundation for youth and young adult development and conservation stewardship in Chattanooga and the greater Southeast region.

A FORCE IN THE FOREST In 2017, The Great Appalachian Valley Conservation Corps (GAVCC) worked on multiple projects with The George Washington and Jefferson National Forest, including historical restoration of civil war trenches, fishing area cleanup and maintenance and trail construction, ensuring the safety of the people who enjoy these public lands.

“THE SOUTHEAST CONSERVATION CORPS HAVE WORKED ON THE BLUE BLAZES TRAIL FOR THREE CONSECUTIVE SUMMERS, MAKING SURE VISITORS ARE ABLE TO SAFELY TAKE IN THE NATURAL SURROUNDINGS. WITHOUT THEIR HARD WORK AND DEDICATION, THIS TRAIL WOULD HAVE FALLEN INTO GREAT DISREPAIR.” -Chris Young, Chickamauga & Chattanooga NMP

“GAVCC has unlimited potential! Especially considering they are such a new, yet powerful force in the Appalachian areas,” said Steve Beri, Recreation Program Manager.“They completed some amazing work.The strong crew leaders and outstanding leadership ensured folks were ready to tackle all sorts of projects. It was extremely rewarding to watch these youth develop sound skills, an appreciation for hard work and a care for public lands!” In all, GAVCC created and improved 34 miles of trails and 210 acres of public lands, working 3,871 total project hours and creating 36 jobs for local young people.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Great Appalachian Valley Conservation Corps


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Southwest Conservation Corps “THIS IS ABLE TO BRING WOMEN FROM ALL OVER THE COUNTRY TOGETHER TO SEE THAT THIS IS AN OPPORTUNITY.” -Women’s Fire Corps Member

“THE CREW DID A GREAT JOB OF COMPLETING QUALITY WORK THAT WILL ENABLE THE TRAIL TO BE SAFE AND SUSTAINABLE WHEN OPENED TO THE PUBLIC.” -Carith Kamermans, San Juan National Forest

2018 THE CORPS NETWORK PROJECT OF THE YEAR: WOMEN’S FIRE CORPS The Wyoming Women’s Fire Corps Program was launched in 2017 as a unique opportunity to develop a collaborative solution to the need for more women in wildland fire. This effort was a partnership between the Southwest Conservation Corps, Montana Conservation Corps and the Bureau of Land Management. The program model is incredibly replicable and relevant—it can be easily be adapted in many communities across the country, with various land management agencies. Applications for the crew came at three for every open position, with the crew filled in two weeks. Most of their work has been fire fuels reduction in Wyoming, as well as some prescribed burning, however the crew was able to be deployed on a 14-day fire assignment in California on the Orleans Complex. The crew has increased capacity to respond to wildland fire, completed prescribed burns and tackled a backlog of habitat improvement while training a new cadre of women for careers in wildland firefighting and land management agency jobs.

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SOUTHWEST CONSERVATION CORPS AND THE SAN JUAN NATIONAL FOREST: THE MCPHEE OVERLOOK TRAIL The McPhee Overlook Trail has been a strong example of realizing the benefits of collaborative conservation work. This project resulted in a huge return on investment for the Recreational Trails Program (RTP). For an initial investment of $73,312 by the RTP, the San Juan National Forest’s Dolores Ranger District, in partnership with Southwest Conservation Corps (SCC) was able to leverage an additional $189,688 in cash and $182,777 in volunteer labor for a grand total investment of $445,377. The construction of a new trail promised local residents unparalleled local access to the San Juan National Forest directly from the Town of Dolores and it offered those same residents the promise of added economic development. Nearly one third of those living in the area represent the Hispanic and Native American cultures and users of this and other Forest trails truly represent those demographics. The identity of many residents revolves around a rural connection to nature and having access to the outdoors. As a result, the McPhee Overlook Trail is widely seen as an asset that has become integral to that identity and is a source of community pride. Over the four year construction phase of this project, SCC served 64 young people and put in a total of 9,479 person hours on this project alone. SCC did most of the heavy lifting in terms of the construction of this trail, serving eight different crews.


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Alyssa Fortune: HPTC AmeriCorps Member Alyssa Fortune was a 2017 member of the Traditional Trades Youth Initiative. The program exposed Alyssa and seven other AmeriCorps members to preservation techniques and philosophy. Alyssa received training in masonry, woodcrafting, and carpentry, and gained excellent exposure to the National Park Service and the preservation career field. Throughout her term, Alyssa gained hands-on experience in preservation trades from experienced NPS craftspeople. She worked on projects refinishing and restoring historic structures at three national monuments: Gettysburg National Military Park, Antietam National Battlefield, and Fort McHenry National Monument. She developed skills in professional communication, worksite safety, and machinery use. Her favorite project was working at the Poffenberger Farm House at Antietam National Battlefield: “I learned a lot about painting, carpentry repairs, and building a deck from the ground up. I learned that is important to have a solid foundation and roof before spending time on the exterior.”

DEVELOPING A FUTURE WORKFORCE, PRESERVING AMERICAN CULTURAL RESOURCES The National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Training Center is unique in that it provides training and work experience for people interested in the stewardship and conservation of our cultural resources. For those interested in pursuing historic preservation as a career, there are very few programs in the United States that provide these opportunities. Because of the collaborative nature of this program, it is an effective avenue for developing a future workforce. Participants of the Traditional Trades Youth Initiative come from a diverse background of work experience and education levels. These young people are able to work directly with experienced staff on projects in National Park Service units across the country.

“I AM MOST PROUD ABOUT LEARNING ENOUGH TO CORRECT THE MISTAKES I MADE IN THE BEGINNING. I AM PROUD TO LEARN HOW TO DO SOMETHING PROPERLY.” -Alyssa Fortune, HPTC AmeriCorps Member

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Stewards Individual Placement Program


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Ancestral Lands

NATIVE YOUTH LEADING OUR NATIONS BACK TO ECOLOGICAL AND CULTURAL WELL-BEING Since 2008, the Ancestral Lands programs have grown from the Acoma Pueblo into a collaborative and community based program model embedded in several Conservation Legacy programs as well as other corps programs and national initiatives across the country. Crew programs, youth programs individual placements and AmeriCorps VISTAs are supported by a dedicated staff, including a national program coordinator. Ancestral Lands celebrates its 10th year of operation in 2017, serving Acoma, Hopi, Navajo, White Mountain Apache and Zuni communities.

ECONOMIC IMPACT:

$1.7 MILLION In wages, salaries, & living allowances alone, the Ancestral lands program has provided over 1.7 million dollars in economic development throughout Indian Country in FY2017 $275,000 in AmeriCorps Education Awards awarded

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“MY STORY HAS NOT BEEN A GLAMOROUS ONE. FIVE YEARS AGO

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I WAS A HOMELESS HEROIN ADDICT, WITH A DAUGHTER, GOING THROUGH A DIVORCE. I WAS FORTUNATE TO HAVE KNOWN A VETERAN WHO HAD BEEN PART OF THIS PROGRAM AND DESPERATELY INQUIRED TO SEE WHAT IT WAS ABOUT. I SOON FOUND MYSELF A GRATEFUL MEMBER OF AMERICORPS! OVER THE LAST DECADE I HAVE NOT FELT AS INSPIRED OR MOTIVATED AS I HAVE IN THE LAST SIX MONTHS.” -2017 Veterans Fire Corps member

THE NEXT GENERATION OF WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS The Veterans Fire Corps (VFC) is a collaborative initiative of Conservation Legacy, run in partnership with state and federal agencies. The VFC aims to engage recent era veterans on priority hazardous fuels projects while developing the next generation of wildland firefighters. Since 2011, Conservation Legacy has engaged over 400 veterans in the Veterans Fire Corps. In 2017, the Southwest Conservation Corps and Arizona Conservation Corps Veterans Fire Corps crews worked with the US Forest Service in seven National Forests in Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. Looking forward, Southeast Conservation Corps and Conservation Corps New Mexico will also be supporting Veterans Fire Corps programs in 2018.

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Veterans Fire Corps


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Disaster Relief

ALL HANDS ON DECK: OVER A DECADE OF SUPPORTING COMMUNITIES IN NEED Conservation Legacy programs are active members of the AmeriCorps Disaster Response Team (A-DRT), supported by the Corporation for National and Community Service, leveraging program resources to assist communities in disaster relief and recovery. A-DRT programs have a heightened focus and commitment to disaster response, engage in activities and trainings year round, are a nationally deployable resource and are recognized as leaders in the emergency management community. Conservation Legacy has been offering crews for deployment on federal disaster relief projects since 2006 and is an integral part of national disaster relief and recovery efforts. Since the first disaster deployments, Conservation Legacy programs continue to be called into service, working on many more assignments, from hurricane and flood relief to wildland fire response. In 2017, Conservation Legacy programs deployed a total of nine crews on Disaster Response assignments. This included 55 members and 19 staff, with 537 individuals receiving CNCS supported services. In 2018, we’ve already had staff and crews deployed to Florida and Puerto Rico from Arizona Conservation Corps, Conservation Corps New Mexico, Great Appalachian Conservation Corps and Southeast Conservation Corps.

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THE FUTURE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION The Preserve America Youth Summit Program began in 2007 with the goal of creating an opportunity for young people aged 13 to 18 to get out of the classroom and into the field to learn about history, archaeology, heritage tourism, and preservation. Interacting directly with community partners such as federal, state and local governments and agencies as well as non-profit historic preservation, tourism, community, and education organizations, each Youth Summit provides interactive, outcome-driven learning experiences and service opportunities.

I LEARNED MANY THINGS I DID NOT KNOW ABOUT OUR TEXAS HISTORY. I ALSO GAINED A WORKING KNOWLEDGE I CAN APPLY TO MY NEIGHBORHOOD, MY CITY AND OUR GREAT STATE OF TEXAS.

2017 SUMMIT LOCATIONS:

Washington, DC: Preserve America Youth Summits meeting with the Director of the National Park Service and others at the Department of the Interior Texas: Padre Island National Seashore and Palo Alto National Historic Park Denver, Colorado: Next Decade Leaders, Saving Colorado’s Special Places New Mexico: Cultural Confluences Albuquerque Area Historic Landscapes Colorado: The Gold Belt Tour National Scenic Byway and Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument

-Grant Hernandez, 2017 Summit Participant

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT:

Preserve America Youth Summits


Recognition

CELEBRATING PROGRAMS AND PARTNERSHIPS National New Deal Preservation Association Kathy Flynn Preservation Awards Stewards Individual Placement Program Western Division American Fisheries Society Riparian Challenge Award Southwest Conservation Corps The Dolores River Restoration Partnership (DRRP) Project Mark E. Mack Community Engagement Award Southwest Conservation Corps Ancestral Lands ArcheoBlitz Team Tamarisk Coalition President’s Award Southwest Conservation Corps Mike Wight, Regional Director for the Ancestral Lands

The Corps Network 2018 Corpsmember of the Year Lance Tubinaghtewa, Arizona Conservation Corps • Ancestral Lands The Corps Network 2018 Project of the Year Southwest Conservation Corps & Montana Conservation Corps BLM Women’s Fire Corps SH/FT Emerging Leaders Andrea Stanley • Ancestral Lands Navajo Staff Alumni Marshall Masayesva • Ancestral Lands Hopi Program SH/FT Youth Engagement Award Conservation Legacy • Ancestral Lands Programs Arizona Conservation Corps • ‘Mogollon Monsters’ Crew 389 Coalition for Recreational Trails Award Arizona Conservation Corps White Mountains Ancestral Lands Crew 389

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PARTNER HIGHLIGHTS: CHAMPION OF THE YEAR AWARDS Led by The Corps Network and Conservation Legacy, the Partnership for the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps recognizes individuals from partner organizations who have gone above and beyond to engage Corps and help train the next generation of conservation and preservation professionals with the Champion of the Year Award. The following recipients are partners nominated by Conservation Legacy programs in 2018:

Lonnie Pilkington, 21CSC Champion of the Year Natural Resource Manager, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, National Park Service Jen Murphy, 21CSC Champion of the Year Operations Manager, Disaster Services Unit, Corporation for National & Community Service “Jen is an amazing person who cares about our country in the times of great need. She has realized the tremendous asset Corps serve and the abilities our members and staff have to make a difference to people impacted during these incredibly trying times.” -Rob Spath, Executive Director, Stewards Individual Placement Program Ben Baldwin, 21CSC Champion of the Year Youth & Volunteer Programs Manager, Intermountain Region, National Park Service


CONSERVATION LEGACY 701 Camino Del Rio Suite 101 Durango, CO 81301 (970) 403-1149 ARIZONA CONSERVATION CORPS TUCSON OFFICE 1443 W Prince Rd Tucson, AZ 85705 (520) 884-5550 FLAGSTAFF OFFICE 2500 North Rose Street, Suite 101 Flagstaff, AZ 86004 (928) 526-3280

BOOTS ON THE GROUND The hard work, sacrifice and grit of our members inspires us every day. Special gratitude goes out to our crew members, leaders and individual placements. We owe every bit of accomplishment f rom the past year to YOU!

WE ARE DEEPLY THANKFUL FOR THE SUPPORT AND DEDICATION OF OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Andrew Moore, Chair Enrique Figueroa, Vice-Chair Loretta Pineda, Secretary Karen Rudolph, Treasurer Ann Baker-Easley, Immediate Past Chair Robert Burkhardt • Nelson Cronyn • Larry Hand • Cornell Torivio Philan Tree • Dawnafe Whitesinger • Stephanie Wu • Elwood York

WHITE MOUNTAINS OFFICE 1892 Pine Lake Road Pinetop, AZ 85935 (505) 593-1001 CONSERVATION CORPS NEW MEXICO 512 North Valley Las Cruces, NM 88005 (520) 884-5550 GREAT APPALACHIAN VALLEY CONSERVATION CORPS 9386 S. Congress St. New Market, VA 22844 (540) 246-9224 SOUTHEAST CONSERVATION CORPS 2001 N. Chamberlain Ave. Chattanooga, TN 37406 (423) 664-2344

SOUTHWEST CONSERVATION CORPS DURANGO: FOUR CORNERS 701 Cam. del Rio #101 Durango, CO (970) 259-8607

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GALLUP: ANCESTRAL LANDS 506 W. Hwy 66 #12 Gallup, NM 87301 (505) 870-4810 SALIDA: LOS VALLES 701 E. Hwy 50 Salida, CO 81201 (719) 539-2438 PUEBLO OF ACOMA: ANCESTRAL LANDS PO Box 208 San Fidel, NM 87049 (505) 552-4084 PUEBLO OF ZUNI: ANCESTRAL LANDS 67 Rte 301 N. P.O. Box 203 Zuni, NM 87327 (505) 870-0101 STEWARDS INDIVIDUAL PLACEMENT PROGRAM 115 S. Kanawha St Beckley, WV 25801 (304) 252-4848

Contact Information OFFICE LOCATIONS


WWW.CONSERVATIONLEGACY.ORG

Profile for Conservation Legacy

2017 Annual Report  

2017 Annual Report